L'Equipement de l'Alpiniste 1900

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Messages 201 - 220 of total 261 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 21, 2017 - 11:51am PT

Below you see an old piton and a locking carabiner with a swivel. I wonder how the carabiner with swivel has been used. At a farm? In the mountains?

Have you seen a similar item?

Credit: Marlow
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 21, 2017 - 12:40pm PT
I don't think that is an item designed or made for climbing use. I suspect that it was used to secure the end of a chain or cable that might require a twist to engage.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 21, 2017 - 12:45pm PT

Steve

Yes, I think that is more probable than this being a climbing carabiner.

A cool blacksmith work.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 28, 2017 - 10:40am PT

Could this be an early French pre-harness "harness"? Have you seen something similar?

Early French "harness"?
Early French "harness"?
Credit: eBay
Measures: 90 mm x 1,52 m


And then two old crampons:

Credit: eBay

The crampons could be very old or they could be younger and made by someone without a high level of skill. Only a metal analysis made by someone who has the needed skill and knowledge can tell...
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Mar 28, 2017 - 07:53pm PT
That "harness" is for climbing poles I suspect and those instep crampons are for not landing on your ass. No ring closures on the crampons so I would say they are pretty old.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2017 - 12:41pm PT

I think you're right about that, Steve...

Here's another cool old tool:

Old French "carabiner" ...
Old French "carabiner" ...
Credit: eBay
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 5, 2017 - 12:44pm PT

The 16th of September 1926 Francois Simond put a stamp on receipt nr 78.

Francois Simond - receipt nr 78 - 16.09.1926
Francois Simond - receipt nr 78 - 16.09.1926
Credit: Marlow
Francois Simond - receipt nr 78 - 16.09.1926
Francois Simond - receipt nr 78 - 16.09.1926
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2017 - 10:30am PT

Two years later, the 22th of September 1928 Francois Simond put a stamp on receipt nr. 469.

Francois Simond - receipt nr 469 - 22.09.1928
Francois Simond - receipt nr 469 - 22.09.1928
Credit: Marlow
Francois Simond - receipt nr 469 - 22.09.1928
Francois Simond - receipt nr 469 - 22.09.1928
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 13, 2017 - 01:06pm PT

Judging old tools is an uncertain affair.

Look at the ice axe below. The head looks very old and it has possibly been repaired at some time. Then look at the three small regular round "plugs" centrally on the shaft and head - they are very well made and are possibly connected to the "spike" you see on the top of the head. The old and primitively looking ice axe head and the three very well made plugs in the shaft and head, look as if they were made at different times. My best guess is that the ice axe is old and made a long time earlier than 1900, but it could also be a later ice axe made by a not very skilled blacksmith. The three very well made plugs are a mystery.

Credit: eBay
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 13, 2017 - 02:57pm PT
If it doesn't have a spike of some sort at the other end of the handle then it could be a conventional pick made for mineral collecting or plain old digging around. What you are calling plugs are peened round pins that anchor the top spike in place through wood and metal which is an uncommon amount of care in construction which would indicate to me that reliability mattered to the owner.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 14, 2017 - 12:13am PT

It has a spike.

Credit: eBay

What you are calling plugs are peened round pins that anchor the top spike in place through wood and metal


Yes, this would be a good explanation. What still makes me curious is that these pins seem to be very well made and anchored, while the metal of the head is very roughly made. I have seen ice axes from the middle of the 1800s that have a smooth perfectly symmetrical shape. A thought that sends me back to thinking that this is either a very early ice axe or a later ice axe made by a blacksmith without a high level of ice axe making skill.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 15, 2017 - 08:22am PT

Early American mountaineering in the Alps

ANY attempt to present the development of American mountaineering in the Alps must, of very necessity, be fragmentary. Records were inadequately kept, and much material is buried away in inaccessible press notices, diaries and Führerbücher.

We find, however, that American travel in Switzerland began at an early date. A “Native of Pennsylvania”1 wandered from Paris through Switzerland and Italy in 1801-2. A Mr. Carter resided in parts of Switzerland and France during 1813-15. A quarter of a century before this he had been in Geneva, studying under the naturalist Charles Bonnet (Saussure’s uncle) at Genthod. Visiting Chamonix, he walked to Montenvers and registered at M. Desportes “Temple.”

James Fenimore Cooper toured Switzerland in 1828 and 1832, and, while at Lauterbrunnen on the first of these years, saw the flag on the summit of the Jungfrau, planted by Rohrdorf's party.

Dumas describes a large party of Americans on the Faulhorn in 1832, and W. A. B. Coolidge records the visit of his grandmother, Mrs. Brevoort, to the summit in 1835. Forbes mentions that on September 17, 1842, he and Auguste Balmat rescued an American traveller on the Trelaporte precipice above the Mer de Glace, who “had not shown himself generously sensible of the great effort used in his preservation.”

Among the first Americans to write a volume dealing with the Alps was the militant Presbyterian clergyman, George Barrell Cheever (1807-90), of New York, whose Wanderings of a Pilgrim in the Shadow of Mont Blanc and the Jungfrau Alp appeared in 1846.

Schirmer has recently summarized descriptions of Switzerland in American literature up to 1848.

It is natural that the highest peak of the Alps, Mont Blanc, should have attracted Americans as it did travellers of other nationality. Chamonix was a part of the Grand Tour, and Mont Blanc an adventure for a lifetime. Certain it is that many who reached its summit never made any other great ascent or maintained interest in mountaineering.

AAC

http://publications.americanalpineclub.org/articles/12193536000/print
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 21, 2017 - 10:09am PT

Old German all leather mountaineering/trekking boots.

I can't find the name of the maker, but inside the boots have a not very clear number. I think it is 1208. Maybe the maker(s) gave their boots a production number.

Credit: HF
Credit: HF
Credit: HF
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Apr 22, 2017 - 04:55pm PT
http://youtu.be/3E076cjX75Q
jaaan

Trad climber
Chamonix, France
Apr 23, 2017 - 01:53am PT
Marlow, I've seen Swiss farmers still wearing nailed boots like those. Notably the owners of the chalet (complete with plastic gnomes) on the way up to the Salbithütte. One of the guys was wearing a brand new pair, so I guess there are a few cobblers in the area still making them. The phrase 'we are arriving in Göschenen, please put your watch back 50 years', springs to mind...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 23, 2017 - 05:01am PT

Mouse

That's a great video. TFPU!

Jaaan

Interesting. The shoes could then have been made any time between 1930 and 2017. If I remember right they were the shoes after an uncle of the seller. My best guess is that they were made some time between 1950 and 1970.


Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)

Then a story about the beginning of alpinism in Switzerland written in a book from 1913: 1863-1913 Les cinquante premieres annees du Club Alpin Suisse:

Credit: Marlow
The equipment of a climber 1844
The equipment of a climber 1844
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 23, 2017 - 05:06am PT

Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland) continues

Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme &#40;Switzerland&#41;
Les Debuts De L'Alpinisme (Switzerland)
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 12, 2017 - 12:21pm PT

From Mountaincraft (1920) by Geoffrey Winthrop Young:

91 EQUIPMENT FOR THE ALPS

OUTFIT
BY J. P.;FARRAR

Even the beginner had better accustom himself to carry a sack, which may contain his gloves, sweater, etc.

Rucksack: A good size is 21 inches wide and 21 inches deep, the bottom and side walls 4 inches wide, as this gives a flatter sack. Two outside pockets with flap and button the carrying straps of woollen webbing ij inch wide the whole made of waterproof sailcloth with a flap. A good pattern is supplied by Alpine outfitters such as Fritsch & Co. of Zurich, who issue elaborate catalogues of alpine equipment. The Continental dealers supply a very light frame which goes between the back and the sack, thus preventing the back getting hot. The best I know is the "Touristenfreund Rucksackstiitze," No. 20, 3-marks, supplied by Fritsch. The Norwegians make "a novel kind of sack, the weight of which is carried partly by the hips.

The best ice-axes I know are made by Schenk in Grindelwald (difficult to get delivery) . The same pattern Ice-axes are also made by Fritz Jorg, Zweilutschinen, near Interlaken, from whom I have had several
good axes. It is necessary, however, to specify the pattern, as he makes several. Sizes are as follows :

Length of adze-side of head from centre of handle 12 cms
Length of pick-side of head from centre of handle 18 cms
Width of blade of adze 6 cms.
Depth of socket of head (to give weight) 5 cms
Length of side irons of head from lower edge of socket 7" to 8" (about 20 cms.)

Side irons should be fastened to the stock by 3 copper rivets, not screws.

Length of ferrule of axe handle 6 cms.
Length of point of axe handle 5 cms.

The point must not be sharp, and if longer than stated, may tear one's clothes when cutting. The point and ferrule made in one piece are very objectionable, as they allow the point no play if caught.

See article in the Climbers' Club Journal, 1912, p. 147.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 19, 2017 - 12:43pm PT

My new pair of shoes

Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow

They need oil of course...

Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 1, 2017 - 12:50pm PT

PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900

PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
Credit: Marlow
PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
PARIS EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE WORLD FAIR VILLAGE SUISSE VIGNETTE 1900
Credit: Marlow
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