Norwegian Woods (OT)

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 141 - 160 of total 183 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2013 - 09:58am PT

Old tool used by grindermen - slipestein

Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2013 - 02:49pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Till min syster/To My Sister (Dan Andersson)

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2013 - 02:52am PT
A Musician's Last Journey (Dan Andersson)

Thorstein Bergman - the whole poem/song


Malin Foxdal - the first half of the poem/song


Ere the rosy morning brightens over Himmelmora's Crest,
See a dead man faring forth from Berga By:
And silent o'er the hillside they bear him to his rest,
Beneath the dawning grey, the chilly sky.
And their boots go heavy-heeled through the rose-bespattered
field,
And heavy heads are bowed as tho' in prayer.
From the desert spaces' Need comes a Dreamer who is dead,
Through dewy meads that shine with flowers fair.

"He was strange and he was lonely," say the four dark
bearing men,
"And often lacked he resting-place and bread,"-
"Lo, a King!" say the roses - and are trodden down again -
"Lo, a King and a Dreamer that is dead!"-
"We are slow," say the bearers, "and mile on mile it seems,
Ever sultrier brows the day this morning tide." -
"Walk ye warily, speak softly," sigh the willows by the
streams,
"Maybe it is some flow'ret that has died."

But when thro' green Spring woodlands the pitch-black
coffin swings,
Runs a silence through the morn-awakened fields,
And the West Wind stays to listen who it is such escort
brings,
Mid the roses, with such footsteps heavy-heeled.
"Tis but Olle, the musician," sigh the whispering forest
trees,
"For ended is his homeless day." -
"Oh, would I were a hurricane," replies the gentle breeze,
"I would pipe him on his journey all the way!"

Over ling and yellow marshes sway the dead man's stiffening
bones,
Sway wearily the sun's pale rays beneath:
But when evening's lovely coolness falls on bilberries and
stones
Sounds the tramp again on Himmelmora Heath:
Tramp of four tired men, who in grief march home again,
With their heads bowed low as if in prayer.
But deep upon their track see the roses trampled back,
Through the dewy meads that shine with flowers fair.

"He is gone," say the bearers, "and his mother bides forlorn
In Torberga behind the poorhouse bars. -
"We are trampled 'neath your footsteps, with your heavy
shoes are torn,"
Cry the rose-buds, pointing to their scars.
"It is Death that has gone dancing over Himmelmora
Heath,"
Each tistle by the clover pasture moans:
"He has ground you all to garbage his clumsy boots beneath,
While he danced with the Dreamer's bones."

O'er the grass and the grey roof-tops like a whisper comes
the night,
With her few pale stars' wretched fire:
And East across the moorland to the tarn goes down a light,
Goes a song through the lily-sprinkled mire.
Far and wide the black storm thunders, and round the islet
there
Chant the waves of the desert spaces' Need:
O'er the dark and angry waters, lo, the night sounds call to
prayer,
For a Dreamer, a Musician, lies dead.

Translation: C. D. Locock
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 24, 2013 - 01:04pm PT

Tapio

It still exists old photos of Norwegian Forest Finns standing on their knees praying to the forest god Tapio before a hunt. They prayed and asked for permission to hunt - bearers of an old pagan natur-religion as they were.

"Tapio is a forest spirit or god, who figured prominently in the Kalevala. His wife is the goddess of the forest, Mielikki. He was the father of Annikki, Tellervo, Nyyrikki (the god of hunting), and Tuulikki. Tapio is imagined to have a beard of lichen and eyebrows of moss.

He lends his name in the form of Tapiola to:
(a) one of the major urban centres within the city of Espoo, outside of Helsinki; and
(b) an unincorporated community in the USA state of Michigan.

Jean Sibelius's tone-poem Tapiola (1926) is a depiction of the forest Tapio inhabits."


Tapiola (Sibelius) - Neeme Järvi


mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 24, 2013 - 01:31pm PT
Carlow Marlow, is there such a toy as a Norwegian woodie?

FOR SURFING, NOT BANGING!

I looked for one but couldn't find one. This is the best I could do.

http://www.arcticsurfblog.com/2012/09/norwegian-nuggets//

I envision a poodle (Tami-certified and tested) on a board, sacrificing his existence for the greater good by checking for undertow, equipped with transmitters to record currents, temps, etc., the gang gathered to watch the data on the computer set up on the tailgate...

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 24, 2013 - 01:36pm PT
The history of Otter Lake or Tapiola, Michigan

By the Pupils of the Askel School under the direction of Elina Collected and Written Heikkinen School year 1927-1928

Introduction

"Askel, as the eastern shore of Otter Lake is called, is strictly a Finnish settlement. It has a population of only 219 people divided among 34 families, but its history is a remarkable story of wilderness in America. It is this story of How the wild woods were changed into a promising farming community and how the foreign element was Americanized in the short period of 38 years. The Story is here set forth as put together by the Eighth grade civics class of Askel school in 1928.

The First Settlers

The first settlers who lived at Otter Lake were the French and the Indians. There is no accurate information of their existence here as they left before any of the present settlers came. There were however, ruins of log cabins and old pine stumps to show that the Finnish people were not the first to penetrate into this wilderness. With the cutting of the soft wood trees the French left, having no intentions of making their homes here, and settled elsewhere. Later, the Finnish people met some of them occasionally and were told how they had lived in log cabins at Otter Lake when there were yet Indians there. There is said to be in Chassell, a very old French women who claims to have been born at Otter Lake. At the northeastern end of Otter Lake, there is a large beech supposed to have been planted by a women now living in Houghton.

It was early in 1890 that a number of woodcutters at Bootjack near Torch Lake, who had recently come from Finland, heard of a fresh water lake rich in fish somewhere up the Sturgeon, not very far from Chassell. At once, two of these, named Peter Tauriainen and Enock Pyykkonen lured by the tale of fish, set out to investigate. They rowed up Portage lake to Chassell end then up the Sturgeon River. After some time they came to the forks of the Otter and the Sturgeon, and not knowing which branch to take they decided to camp at the fork overnight. They spent a rather lonely night by a bonfire. There was a dark deep forest on all sides and they heard the howling of wolves. In the morning they rowed up the Sturgeon and not finding a lake, they came back and went Otter. Soon they came to the lake they were looking for. It was all they had expected and more. Lying in a deep valley with dense forest around it and high hills and deep ravines on either side they found a very beautiful lake a bout 3 miles long and a mile wide. So pleased were they with its beauty, its abundance of fish, and its resemblance to the lake of Finland that they set back determined to get possession of the land near by. After some time they were pleased to find that the government was giving the land away as free homesteads to those who would make their homes there."

http://www.migenweb.org/baraga/history/otterlake.html

History of Otter Lake or Tapiola
History of Otter Lake or Tapiola


Mouse

Norway has never been a car producing country, but we tried with the car Troll. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll_(automobile)

Troll
Troll

When I was a kid my grandfather made wooden cars for me and my brothers. We used to pull them around with a certain pride because they were large, well built and had wood-wheels that rolled quite well.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2013 - 09:54am PT

Carl Axel Gottlund (February 24, 1796, Ruotsinpyhtää – April 20, 1875, Helsinki) was a Finnish explorer, collector of folklore, historian, cultural politician, linguist, philologist, translator, writer, publisher and lecturer of Finnish language at the University of Helsinki. He was a colorful cultural personality and one of the central Finnish national awakeners and - later - one of the leading dissidents at the same time.

Gottlund pursued the creation on an autonomous Finnish territory from the Finn Forests on both sides of the Swedish-Norwegian border, with great economic and political independence.

Gottlund is commonly attributed with saving the folklore of the Forest Finns.

Carl Axel Gottlund
Carl Axel Gottlund


Finn Forests' autonomy in Central Scandinavia

"In 1817, Gottlund made an exploration trip to the Finnish-inhabited Dalarna area of Central Sweden, to collect Finnish folklore and other ethnographic data as well as genealogical information, the latter partly because he wanted to improve the social circumstances of the Forest Finns and to prevent Sweden from taking ownership of their land. He recorded total of about 50 Finnish language poems, songs and spells during this expedition.

In the summer of 1821, Gotlund launched another expedition to a Finnish-inhabited part of Sweden, this time covering the south-central Swedish area of Värmland. The expedition lasted until January 1822, after which Gottlund began acting as a political advocate on behalf of the Finnish population of Sweden. Among his accomplishments, Gotlund founded three congregations for the Forest Finns.

Furthermore, in 1821 starting Gottlund began pursuing the creation of an autonomous Finnish county called Fennia from the Finn Forests on both sides of the Swedish-Norwegian border, north and northeast from the modern-day Norwegian area of Oslo, with great economic and political independence. The tax border would have been removed and land ownership by Swedes and Norwegians would have been restricted. The Swedish-Norwegian border had not been properly established before 1751.

In attempts to have the Finnish population of Sweden Proper "Swedified" and assimilated into the mainstream Swedish society, the use of the Finnish language had become strictly prohibited in Sweden Proper in the mid-17th-century. However, Gottlund estimated that in the beginning of the 19th century the Central Scandinavian Finn Forests' areas which he had visited alone were still home to approximately 40'000 Finnish-speaking Finns, of whom about 14'000 lived in Värmland - this in addition to other Finns such as the Tornedalians and Kvens and their descendants and the Forest Finns in other parts of Sweden an Norway. It is estimated that "one of each five Swedes has their roots amongst the Forest Finns".

Eventually - however -, due to his political activism, Gottlund nearly became expelled from Sweden. He was banned from operating in Stockholm, and - amidst his lobbying and campaigning - he was finally exiled from Stockholm to Uppsala. In spite of this total political failure in the creation of the Central Scandinavian autonomous Finnish area, Gottlund had positive cultural influence on the Forest Finns and became a legendary, heroic character in the Finn Forests.

While still living in Uppsala and while attending the Uppsala University part-time, Gottlund began preparing an ambitious publication, Otava, aimed to become a Finnish literary monument. Otava was published in three parts between 1828 and 1832. It consisted of articles pertaining to linguistics, history, ethics, religion, folklore and poetry.

However, in Finland, Otava was not met with the type of enthusiasm which Gottlund had hoped for. The work was considered to favor too much the Savonian dialects of Finnish language, and it's mainly enlightenment-spirited contents were overshadowed by the current of romanticism which now had encaptured Finland, producing epics such as The Kalevala in 1835 and The Tales of Ensign Stål in 1848.

In 1831, Gottlund married Charlotta Augusta Brink. Over time, the two gave birth to total of 10 children together.

Some of the folklore poetry collected by Gottlund in the early 19th century was considered sexually too explicit to be published during his lifetime, and even until quite recently. Some poems collected by him stayed archived until 1997, when they became included in the book Suomen Kansan Vanhat Runot ("Old Poems of the Finnish People")."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2013 - 01:51pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Du liv...(Dan Andersson)

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 26, 2013 - 11:24am PT

Dan Andersson
Dan Andersson
Dan Andersson

"Daniel "Dan" Andersson was born April 6, 1888, in the school house in Skattlösberg, Grangärdesgatan parish (in current Ludvika), Dalarna, and died September 16, 1920, in Stockholm by cyanide poisoning. He was a Swedish author and poet. In 1893, five years old, he learned to read. 1896, at the age of eight, he got a violin, and learned to play by himself. He had three brothers. A sister Anna was born in 1892 but died six months later. Next sister who was born in 1899 was also named Anna, and was dedicated the poem "To My Sister" on his 18th birthday. Andersson set to music some of his own poems, including "To My Sister", "Jungman Jansson" and "Per Ols Per Erik." He was married June 19 1918 to småskollärarinnan Olga Turesson, sister of the troubadour Gunnar Turesson. Dan Andersson is in part seen as a proletarian writer, but his poetry is not limited to this genre. He sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Black Jim."

"Dan Andersson's poetry enjoys a broad popularity among the Swedish people because of its naturalist mysticism. In 2005, Sofia Karlsson recorded a new interpretation of Andersson's songs, which received a Grammy award in both Sweden and Denmark, but before this his poems had been sung by a number of artists, including the Hootenanny Singers, Love Explosion and Fred Åkerström. In 1988, at the centenary of Andersson's birth, Posten, the Swedish postal service, published two stamps in his honour. In Ludvika, a Dan Andersson week is celebrated the first week of every August. In Ludvika there is also a Dan Andersson museum, and a statue of him. A bust is also to be found at Järntorget in Gothenburg."

Dan Andersson statue - Jarntorget - Goteborg - Sweden
Dan Andersson statue - Jarntorget - Goteborg - Sweden
Credit: Eli
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2013 - 02:05pm PT

Deep Into The Woods (Langt Innpå Skoga) - Hans Børli

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2013 - 11:25am PT

Flisa at the border of Finnskogen - today

Flisa. The claw...
Flisa. The claw...
Credit: Marlow
Flisa, Aasnes kommune, Hedmark fylke, Norway. Log driving district.
Flisa, Aasnes kommune, Hedmark fylke, Norway. Log driving district.
Credit: Marlow
Flisa. Log driver 1.
Flisa. Log driver 1.
Credit: Marlow
Flisa. Log driver 2.
Flisa. Log driver 2.
Credit: Marlow
Flisa. Log driver 3.
Flisa. Log driver 3.
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Flisa. The eye stone.
Flisa. The eye stone.
Credit: Marlow

Map: Finnskogen with Flisa in the upper left corner (Norway red, Sweden green)
Finnskogen &#40;Norway in red, Sweden in green&#41;
Finnskogen (Norway in red, Sweden in green)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2013 - 12:39pm PT

From log driving history - Log driving director Johs Johannesen, river - Glomma, writes (around 1870):

"Yes, the log drivers are an elite corps, chosen through many hundred years of natural selection. Only the most quick-witted and resilient are attracted to be log drivers, while other men have gone in other directions. Only the most vigorous have wanted this work, because only they have the ability - and this has been the case also with their sons. This way it has been for many generations and because of that we now have log drivers that in fastness, resilience and quick-wittedness are the best ones you can ever hope to find." (Source: Ragnvald Bødtker. Norwegian log driving history. 1860 to 1943)

To repeat the great Canadian video posted by MH2 earlier:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 29, 2013 - 12:51pm PT

The river Rottnan (Swedish)/Rotna (Norwegian)



Rotna is a 110 km long river that flows through Finnskogen from two small lakes at Hof Finnskog (in Aasnes kommune, Norway) to the lake Mellanfryken close to Rottneros (in Sweden). The video shows places down the river: one of the lakes at Hof Finnskog (Norway), Svullrya (Norway), Lekvattnet (Sweden), Gräsmark (Sweden) and Fryksdalen close to Rottneros where the river ends in Mellanfryken.

Most of the pictures are from Sweden.

Music: Mando Diao - Strövtåg i Hembygden (poem/lyrics by Gustaf Fröding)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2013 - 10:56am PT
Thorstein Bergman - Omkring tiggaren från Luossa ('Round the begger from Luossa...) - Poem/lyrics: Dan Andersson



'Round The Begger From Luossa

From Luossa came a beggar singing to the village folk.
Round the watch fire they lingered while he sang
Songs of pilgrims and of beggars, song of wondrous, wondrous things
And of his yearning did he sing the whole night long


"There is something beyond mountains, beyond stars and all the blossoms,
Something, too, behind my song, behind this burning heart of mine
Listen — something goes and whispers, goes and lures me and beseeches
Come to us, for earth below is not the kingdom that is thine!"


I have listened to the lapping of waves upon the shore,
I have dreamed that the wildest seas were calm and still.
And in spirit I have hurried to that contourless land,
Where the dearest we have known we´ll know no more.


To a wild, eternal longing were we born of ash-pale mothers,
And from travail, anxious, painful, rose our first, our wailing cry
Were we tossed on plain and hillside, just to tumble round and frolic,
Then we played at elk and lion, beggar, God and butterfly.


Did I sit beside her, silent, she whose heart was as my own,
Did she tend our home with soft and gentle hands,
Loudly was my own heart shouting, "What you own there is not yours!"
And my spirit drove me onward to find peace.


What I love is lying yonder, lies concealed in dusky distance,
And my rightful way leads high to wonders there.
In this clamor I am tempted to beseech Him, "Lord, O Master,
Take all earth away, for own I will what no one, no one has


Join me, brother, beyond mountains with their still and cooling rivers,
Where the sea is slow to slumber in its peak-encircled bed.
Somewhere far beyond the heavens lies my home, have I my mother
In a gold-besprinkled vapor, in rose-tinted mantle clad.


May the black and brackish waters cool our cheeks with fever reddened,
May we be from life far distant where the morning is awake
Never was I one with this world, and unending tribulation
Suffered, restless, unbelieving, suffered from my burning heart.


On a seashore sown with cockles stands a gate with roses laden,
There in slumber, vagrants perish and all weary souls find peace.
Song is never heard resounding, viols never echo, ringing
Under arches where forever cherubs of salvation dwell.


Translated by Caroline Schleef
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 12:36am PT

Gräsmark - Varmland - in the Swedish part of Finnskogen

Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden
Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden
Grasmark - Sweden - The church
Grasmark - Sweden - The church
Grasmark - Borrsjön &#40;Borr-lake&#41;
Grasmark - Borrsjön (Borr-lake)

Map: Finnskogen with Grasmark in the lower right corner (Norway red, Sweden green)
Finnskogen &#40;Norway in red, Sweden in green&#41;
Finnskogen (Norway in red, Sweden in green)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 12:50am PT

Grasmark in our time

Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden - Hembygdsgarden
Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden - Hembygdsgarden
Grasmark - Hembygdsgarden - New roof
Grasmark - Hembygdsgarden - New roof
Gräsmark - Flötmarkens Lukas and Anders Näsman
Gräsmark - Flötmarkens Lukas and Anders Näsman
Fishing Grasmark
Fishing Grasmark
Jawaklubben at Grasmarks Grillen
Jawaklubben at Grasmarks Grillen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 01:08am PT

Once upon a time in Grasmark

Grasmark - Kolarekoja 1902 - Uddekullen
Grasmark - Kolarekoja 1902 - Uddekullen
Credit: Axel Aurelius
Grasmark - Russian tinkers 1902
Grasmark - Russian tinkers 1902
Grasmark - Log drivers - River Rottnan 1927
Grasmark - Log drivers - River Rottnan 1927
Credit: M Larsson
Grasmark by the river Rottnan - Hunting moose 1920s
Grasmark by the river Rottnan - Hunting moose 1920s
Credit: M Larsson
Grasmark - In the kitchen
Grasmark - In the kitchen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 01:18am PT

Volvo PV 444/544 history


In 1955 the first Volvo PV was exported to USA - on post order.

Grasmark - Volvo PV 444/544 - PV-klubben Varmland
Grasmark - Volvo PV 444/544 - PV-klubben Varmland
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 10:25am PT

Lekvattnet (in the Swedish part of Finnskogen - you find it just below the middle on the map):

Finnskogen &#40;Norway in red, Sweden in green&#41;
Finnskogen (Norway in red, Sweden in green)
Lekvattnet
Lekvattnet
Neverbovagen 22
Neverbovagen 22
Credit: Villmarktouren
Winter road...
Winter road...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 10:46am PT

Old Forest Finns' farms in the Lekvattnet area

Karmenkynna
Karmenkynna 1
Karmenkynna 1
Karmenkynna 2
Karmenkynna 2
Karmenkynna 3
Karmenkynna 3
Credit: John Lysen

Ritamaki
Ritamaki 1
Ritamaki 1
Credit: Mikael Klarstrom
Ritamaki 2
Ritamaki 2
Credit: Mikael Klarstrom
Ritamaki 3
Ritamaki 3
Credit: Mikael Klarstrom

Kvarntorp
Kvarntorp 1
Kvarntorp 1
Kvarntorp 2
Kvarntorp 2
Kvarntorp 3
Kvarntorp 3
Messages 141 - 160 of total 183 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews