Norwegian Woods (OT)

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Messages 1 - 954 of total 954 in this topic
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Original Post - Sep 30, 2012 - 04:33pm PT
Finnskogen in autumn
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 30, 2012 - 04:38pm PT
Yes Ron, there are. Open woods, mostly pine trees, moss, ling, cow- and blueberry..
Cosmic: from Finnskogen? Point taken... Lol...
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Sep 30, 2012 - 06:49pm PT
Pretty Rocks!

Kinda small tho.

Jus Teas'in
BB
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Sep 30, 2012 - 06:53pm PT
Well those are some nice photos, and cccSman, my mind is coming back - I got it right away.



If only we all knew so much.
Prod

Trad climber
Sep 30, 2012 - 07:35pm PT

?
Prod.
turd

climber
Sep 30, 2012 - 08:00pm PT

zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Sep 30, 2012 - 11:45pm PT
Didn't somebody start to laugh?

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2012 - 03:31pm PT
Finnskogen
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 5, 2012 - 03:36pm PT
Hvor ær multebærene?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 5, 2012 - 04:55pm PT
Marlow, tusen takk! So this sweet young thang in Bergen tried to seduce me
with her hellig bible. When it became apparent that wasn't having the desired
effect she brought out her multe jam and my gås was cooked!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2012 - 05:42pm PT
Lolli,

Hehe.. yes some are.. Cosmic is excused. Sitting in the wheelchair with only one hand available, he is pre-occupied with his Norwegian wood. I'm not so sure. I think it's an American. Elg er moose og elk er hjort og hjortron er multe. De'ække greitt... lol...

Thanks for the story Reilly. Klatrer, gammal gubbe, globetrotter og glad i matglade damer... Lol...

Ron: Thanks! The last photos are not my own, but they are telling a lot about Finnskogen and it's story.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Oct 6, 2012 - 12:30am PT
Read and appreciated while nibbling lakerol (salt licorice) donated by Lolli. Thanks!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 7, 2012 - 12:50pm PT
Some relatives of Marlow
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Dec 7, 2012 - 12:57pm PT
Beautiful stuff Marlow- Any chance of removing the dead bear so I can show this thread to my wife? She's always dreamed of visiting Norway.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Dec 7, 2012 - 01:01pm PT
No offense meant Wade, but hunting shouldn't be censored. It's far more respectful than the factory farms most folks get their food from.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 7, 2012 - 01:05pm PT
Wade

If it matters to your wife: Tell her that the bear was killed after killing several sheep inside a high electric fence that was built to safely keep it out and safe from being shot. It's the truth.
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Dec 7, 2012 - 02:37pm PT
Selfish request. I have no desire to censor. but she'll go all PETA on me, if she sees that.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 11, 2012 - 05:47pm PT
nita

Social climber
chica de chico, I don't claim to be a daisy.
Dec 11, 2012 - 06:52pm PT

Marlow , cool pictures...I like the hay drying system.....and

Thanks!.... for turning me on to...Roy Lønhøiden.........Beautiful country...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGfM9eYtD5Q
MikeL

climber
SANTA CLARA, CA
Dec 11, 2012 - 07:52pm PT
Romantic images, Marlow. Partially reminds me of my grandparents and their histories (polish).
jogill

climber
Colorado
Dec 11, 2012 - 08:29pm PT
Nice thread, Marlow. I was in Trondheim at a math meeting in the summer of 1997 and the woods and fiords were beautiful. The olympic team gave us a demonstration of ski jumping that was thrilling to watch. The color was so magnificent that when I flew to Ireland after the meeting was over, the emerald isle seemed a little pale by comparison.


;>)
Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Dec 11, 2012 - 10:52pm PT
Marlow - love your Norsk input. I've always thought - and more so recently - that Norway is the best country on earth in so many ways. Especially politically.

Environmentally it is quite similar to where I live in extreme northern BC.
Maybe I gravitated here because of spending a summer in Norway in '49, just out of high school. Loved it to pieces.

Anyway, keep sharing please. Mange takk.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 12, 2012 - 03:12pm PT
Nita
The hay drying system worked very well... Lol...

MikeL
Romantic images, yes.

jogill
Ski-jumping is a thrill to watch if you see the jumps well. And I'm glad you like the color, there is color even in the b/w photos. Though in my view nothing really compares to Ireland.

Fossil climber
People living in Norway right now are lucky. It's a very good place to live. By the way: picture number 3 above is taken 1949/1950.

For Nita - some other aspects of the hay drying system
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 12, 2012 - 03:25pm PT
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
Dec 13, 2012 - 10:45am PT
Great stuff Marlow. Keep it coming. Even though I don't speak Norge (is that the way to spell it?)
I spent a month in Norway and Svaalbard in summer '85. Have always wanted to return.
le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
Dec 13, 2012 - 12:46pm PT
Great thread, Marlow.

The woods that most blew me away in Norway were of a particular kind of tree out west, often lining the fjords, like these:



Not sure what type of tree, but in copses they seemed to glow. Walking through them was amazing - bright with filtered light, open to wandering, never impenetrable or dour, interesting vertical spaces, full of bird song. Strolling for 15 minutes could easily turn into a few hours. Felt like something from a storybook.


We saw so many awesome things in Norway. Next time I go back I hope to tour by bike - just one of those countries that begs to be taken slowly, and without engines. Will need good rain gear.


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 13, 2012 - 01:31pm PT
le_bruce

Great photos from a mountainous part of Norway. The trees: It's not easy to see from the photos, but I think it's mainly birch trees. http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bj%C3%B8rkeslekten It is not montane birch since this is in the lowlands, but when you get higher you will find the montane birch: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandinavian_Montane_Birch_forest_and_grasslands

Birch is also the tree the "raw material" on the photo above is taken from, and it's only the outer layer that is taken, so the tree lives on very well.


HighTraverse

When you live in the country "Norge" you speak the language "norsk".
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 16, 2012 - 02:02pm PT

A couple of tunes often played in the area:
[Click to View YouTube Video]
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Dancing
[Click to View YouTube Video]
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 17, 2012 - 01:25am PT
Hoo's it hungeeng, Merloo? Bork Bork Bork!--the Chef, MrE's pal

http://www.flickr.com/photos/skotoh/812105909/

The first two photos are from NG, July, 1930, two articles:
Norway--A Land of Stern Reality & Fjords ahd Fjells of Viking Land.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 20, 2012 - 04:42pm PT
Mouse: Great Norwegian pictures.

How work was done in the year 1915 (excellent film, no sound). Filmed in Sweden I think.
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 03:55pm PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 04:01pm PT
I'm glad to hear Ron!

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 04:15pm PT
There's still people working with a horse, but it's unusual.

What's usual today:

In earlier times the best Norwegian skiers were working in the woods. The two persons to the left in the photo below were world champions - Gjermund Eggen and Harald Grønningen.

A picture from the old days
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 04:41pm PT
The work had to be done and it was not without danger. Doing what had to be done and doing it also under danger - that's what it was to be a man. At a later time also a few women participated.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2013 - 04:35pm PT
Svedjebruk Karelen 1920
[Click to View YouTube Video]
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Edited: Cosmic. That's the prayer I prayed every night as a child. I learned it from my mother. Your Norwegian is excellent.
otisdog

Big Wall climber
Sierra Madre & McGee Creek, Ca.
Jan 10, 2013 - 05:20pm PT
Marlow - What kind of big (dead) bird is that?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2013 - 05:36pm PT
Otisdog - The big dead bird in an earlier post is capercailzie - "tiur" in Norwegian.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jan 10, 2013 - 05:40pm PT
Idyllic!
"Ten thousand Swedes, running through the trees, chased by one Norwegian."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2013 - 05:52pm PT
Donini,

Is there a story?

The border didn't exist at Finnskogen - Finnskogen is large woods and many lakes at the "border" between the "two countries".

"These woods are my woods, though I do not own them."

The Swedes are in reality nice people. They gave us this country, but kept Jämtland and Härjedalen. Some Norwegians think we should do our best to buy J & H back with the oil money.

A painting giving us a not so romantic impression of "svedjebruk"
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 11, 2013 - 04:22pm PT
A somewhat relevant article, about the return of wolves to the forests of Norway. Leading to the usual "debate" about it, which we don't need to repeat here. http://www.newsinenglish.no/2013/01/11/wolf-pair-marking-territory-in-oslo/

Marlow's photos are very similar to displays in the Skogsbruksmuseet in Elverum, and also in books of historical photos from Rendalen, where my father's family is from. In Hedmark, in fact, not far from the border with Sweden, which is where most of the wolves (and bears) live.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 11, 2013 - 04:43pm PT
Mighty Hiker

Most of the pictures are from Grue and Finnskogen and some are from Trysil. Grue and Finnskogen are about 230 km from Rendalen and Trysil is closer.

This drawing shows where Hedmark is in Norway.

And this map shows Grue and Finnskogen in the south, Trysil in the middle and Rendalen in the north of Hedmark.
When I was a kid fishing and football were my favourite activites. We lived close to a river, Flisa. We also went to the Rendalen area a couple of times to fish in Sølensjøen.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 11, 2013 - 04:59pm PT
Svullrya - at the heart of Finnskogen

Old pictures from Handelsforeningen, the shop at Svullrya
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 11, 2013 - 07:26pm PT
Thanks, Marlow! Various cousins have hytter in Sølensjøen, and I've been there and of course Rendalen. Lovely spot.

I've never been to Jamtland, just across the border, where there are more distant relatives. It must be quite similar to Rendalen and area.
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Jan 11, 2013 - 08:56pm PT
When I saw the title of this thread I kinda thought what Prod did...

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 12, 2013 - 02:57pm PT
Östmark on the "Swedish side" of Finnskogen

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2013 - 05:22am PT
Resting while picking cloudberries at Fjørhanaberget in Sweden

The self-made cow-berry-sorting machine in use
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2013 - 02:27pm PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Ack Värmeland du sköna - Jussi Björling
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2013 - 03:03pm PT
Modern times: jumping and freerunning
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2013 - 02:08pm PT
Rally Finnskog 2012
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 28, 2013 - 02:40pm PT
Rikesten, a man from Finnskogen, known for his shamanic abilities. He lived the last years of his life in the house of my great-grandparents on my mother's side.

Rikesten means someone living on land owned by someone else.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 30, 2013 - 02:54pm PT
Forest Finns in Scandinavia
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 15, 2013 - 01:57pm PT
Motorcycles at Finnskogen long ago. I don't know what kind of motorcycles. Maybe one of them is an Indian?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 8, 2013 - 11:46am PT
Ack Värmeland, du sköna (Värmlandsvisan) - with explanation in English - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2792-go7i8&feature=player_detailpage

Jussi Björling
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Esther & Abi Ofarim (video with pictures from all over Sweden)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Mauno Kuusisto (1959) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=7ctzhy7r-FI

Göteborgs Symfoniker - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzMLnreaUrg&feature=player_detailpage

Jan Johansson - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s30lq3fseB0&feature=player_detailpage

Stan Getz - http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=0ycw7CAzwSY

Chet Baker & Stan Getz
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Sommarkören 2012 Kulturskolan Lund - http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=DBbonX_knYM

In Flames - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anKqpTBQLuQ&feature=player_detailpage

Victor Kastelein and Yr Kettelhake
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 13, 2013 - 02:49pm PT
Alf Hågedal Trio - Flickan från Finnskogarna (Carl Jularbo)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 16, 2013 - 12:14pm PT
Finnskogen this weekend.

Ed: Thanks Ron. I appreciate your feedback very much.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
Kaisa Vilhuinen (1855-1941)
Kaisa Vilhuinen knew many poems similar to Kalevala, the result of an old oral storytelling tradition carried by rune songs. The tradition of the forest Finns was rooted in shamanism. Kaisa was at her time the best source researchers had at Finnskogen. She was from Röjdåfors in Sweden and is seen as one of the last tietäjä (the one who knows) at Finnskogen. She was known to be able to influence the forces/powers of nature and protect and cure both people and animals. Her teacher had been Puru Juhoin, a man with great shamanic powers. He said: "Never put a sword in the hand of a fool and never teach a person older than yourself. Through your powers you will be able to do both good and bad. Teach someone younger than yourself and do it secretly, if not, the power of the runes will be lost."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
Kalevala

Poems 1-2
Ilmatar (the Virgin of the Air) descends to the waters. A pochard lays its eggs on her knee. The eggs break and the world is formed from their pieces. The mother of the water then gives birth to Väinämöinen. Sampsa Pellervoinen sows the forest trees. One of the trees, an oak, grows so large that it blots out both the sun and the moon. A tiny man rises from the sea and fells the giant oak. The sun and moon can shine once again.
Poems 3-4
Joukahainen challenges Väinämöinen to a contest of wisdom and is defeated. With his singing, Väinämöinen causes Joukahainen to sink into a swamp. In order to save himself, Joukahainen promises his sister' s hand in marriage to Väinämöinen. Upon learning of the bargain, the sister Aino mourns her fate and finally drowns herself.
Poems 5-7
Väinämöinen searches the sea for Aino and catches her (she has been transformed into a fish) on his fishing hook. However, he loses her again and sets out to woo the maiden of Pohjola, the daughter of the North Farm. Meanwhile, eager for revenge, Joukahainen watches out for Väinämöinen on the way to Pohjola and shoots Väinämöinen's horse from underneath him as he rides across a river. Väinämöinen falls into the water and floats out to sea. There an eagle rescues him and carries him to Pohjola's shores. The mistress of Pohjola, Louhi, tends Väinämöinen until he recovers. In order to be able to return home, Väinämöinen promises that Ilmarinen the smith will forge a Sampo for Pohjola. The maiden of Pohjola, Louhi's daughter, is promised to the smith in return for the Sampo.

Poems 8-9
On his way home, Väinämöinen meets the maiden of Pohjola and asks her to marry him. She agrees on the condition that Väinämöinen carry out certain impossible tasks. While Väinämöinen carves a wooden boat, his axe slips and he receives a deep wound in his knee. He searchers for an expert blood-stauncher and finally finds an old man who stops the flow of blood by using magic incantations.

Poem 10
Using magic means, Väinämöinen sends the unwilling Ilmarinen to Pohjola. Ilmarinen forges the Sampo. Louhi shuts it inside a hill of rock. Ilmarinen is forced to return home without his promised bride.
Poems 11-12
Lemminkäinen sets off to woo Kyllikki, a maiden of Saari Island. He makes merry with the other maidens and abducts Kyllikki. He later abandons her and leaves to woo the maiden of Pohjola. With his singing he bewitches the people of Pohjola to leave the farmhouse at North Farm. Only one person, a cowherd, does not fall under his spell.
Poems 13-15
Lemminkäinen asks Louhi for her daughter, but Louhi demands that he first hunt and kill the Demon's moose, then the Demon's fire-breathing gelding, and finally the swan in Tuonela River, which is the boundary between this world and the next. There the vengeful cowherd kills Lemminkäinen and throws his body into the river. Lemminkäinen's mother receives a sign of her son's death and goes out in search of him. She rakes the pieces of her son's body out of Tuonela River, puts them back together and brings her son back to life.
Poems 16-17
Väinämöinen begins to build a boat and visits Tuonela in order to ask for the magic spells need to finish it. He does not find them. He then seeks the missing spells from the stomach of the ancient wise man, Antero Vipunen, who has long been dead. He finds them and finishes his boat.
Poems 18-19
Väinämöinen sets off in his boat to woo the daughter of Pohjola, but she chooses instead Ilmarinen, the forger of the Sampo. Ilmarinen successfully performs the three impossible tasks set before him: he plows a field full of vipers, hunts down the bear of Tuonela and the wolf of Manala and finally fishes the Great Pike out of the Tuonela River. Louhi promises her daughter to Ilmarinen.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
Poems 20-25
In Pohjola, preparations are made for the wedding and invitations are sent to all except Lemminkäinen. The groom and his folk arrive in Pohjola, and there is great feasting. Väinämöinen entertains the wedding guests with his singing. The bride and groom are given advice concerning marriage, and the bride bids farewell to her people and departs with Ilmarinen for Kalevala. There a banquet is also ready for the guests. Väinämöinen sings the praises of the wedding guests.
Poems 26-27
Lemminkäinen shows up at the banquet in Pohjola uninvited, and demands food and drink. He is offered a tankard of beer filled with vipers. Lemminkäinen engages the master of Pohjola in a singing contest and a swordfight and kills him.

Poems 28-30
Lemminkäinen flees the people of Pohjola who are rising up in arms against him and hides on Saari Island, living among the maidens of the island until he is forced to flee once again, this time from the island's jealous menfolk. Lemminkäinen finds his home in ashes and his mother hiding in a cottage in the forest. Lemminkäinen sets out to seek revenge on Pohjola, but is forced to return home because a cold spell cast by the mistress of Pohjola has frozen his ships in the sea.
Poems 31-34
Brothers Untamo and Kalervo quarrel violently, Kalervo's troop is slain, and of his kin only his son Kullervo remains. Because of his superhuman powers, Kullervo fails in every task he is given. Untamo sells the boy to Ilmarinen as a serf. The wife of Ilmarinen send Kullervo out to be a cowherd and out of spite bakes a stone into the bread which is his only provisions. Kullervo breaks his knife on the stone while trying to cut the bread, and in revenge drives the cows into the swamp and brings home a pack of wild animals instead. The mistress, intending to milk the cows, is mauled to death. Kullervo flees. He finds his family in the forest, but hears that his sister has disappeared.
Poems 35-36
Kullervo's father sends him to pay the taxes. On his return trip, Kullervo unwittingly seduces his sister, who then drowns herself in the rapids upon discovering the truth. Kullervo sets out to seek revenge from Untamo. Having killed Untamo and his family, Kullervo returns home to find is own family dead. Kullervo commits suicide.

Poem 37
Ilmarinen mourns the death of his wife and decides to forge a woman of gold. The golden maiden remains, however, lifeless and cold. Väinämöinen warns the young people against worshipping gold.

Poem 38
Ilmarinen is rejected by the youngest daughter of Pohjola and carries her off in his sleigh. The girl reviles Ilmarinen and so offends him that he finally turns her into a seagull with his singing. Ilmarinen tells Väinämöinen of the wealth and prosperity that the Sampo has brought the people of Pohjola.

Poems 39-41
Väinämöinen, Ilmarinen and Lemminkäinen set out to steal the Sampo from Pohjola. In the course of the journey, their boat runs aground on the shoulders of a giant pike. Väinämöinen kills the pike and fashions a kantele from its jawbone. No one else is able to play the instrument, but Väinämöinen holds all living things spellbound with his playing.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
Poems 42-43
Väinämöinen puts the people of Pohjola to sleep with his kantele playing and the Sampo is taken to the travellers' boat and rowed away. The people of Pohjola awaken and Louhi, the mistress of Pohjola, sends obstacles in the path of the raiders to hinder their escape. The seafarers survive, but the kantele falls into the sea. Louhi sets off in pursuit and transforms herself into a giant bird of prey. In the ensuing battle the Sampo is smashed and falls into the sea. Some of the fragments remain in the sea, but others wash ashore and bring Finland good fortune and prosperity. Louhi is left with only the worthless lid of the Sampo and an impoverished land.
Poem 44
In vain, Väinämöinen seeks the kantele which fell into the sea. He makes a new kantele from birchwood and his playing once again delights the whole of creation.
Poem 45-46
Louhi sends diseases to destroy the people of Kalevala, but Väinämöinen cures the sick. Louhi sends a bear to attack the Kalevala cattle, but Väinämöinen slays the bear. The people of Kalevala organize a bear-killing feast.

Poems 47-48
The mistress of Pohjola hides the sun and the moon inside a hill and steals the fire as well. Ukko, the supreme god, makes a new sun and moon by striking fire, but the fire falls to earth, into the belly of a giant fish. Väinämöinen asks Ilmarinen to go fishing with him. They catch the fish and place the fire in the service of humankind.

Poem 49
Ilmarinen forges a new sun and moon, but they do not shine. After battling the people of Pohjola, Väinämöinen returns to ask Ilmarinen to fashion a set of keys with which to release the sun and moon from Pohjola's mountain. While Ilmarinen is forging, Louhi sets the sun and moon free to return to their places in the sky.
Poem 50
Marjatta conceives a child from a whortleberry. Her baby boy is born in the forest, but soon disappears, to be found finally in a swamp. Väinämöinen condemns the fatherless child to death, but the child speaks out against the sentence and is christened King of Karelia. Väinämöinen departs in a copper boat with the prediction that he will be needed again someday to make a new Sampo for the people, to bring new light and play new songs.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2013 - 01:03pm PT
In the forest.
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Music by Gåte.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2013 - 03:35am PT
Fishing trout
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2013 - 01:32pm PT
Celebrating Finnskogen: Finnskogdagene - http://www.finnskogdagene.no/
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2013 - 01:19pm PT

Nitahå-Jussi is said to have been the last wanderer at Finnskogen. He knew the woods well and took a job where he found it, when he needed it. He lived and worked for a while in the US, but returned to Sweden to take over the farm after his father's death. Someone had illegally taken the farm and years of juridical trouble started. In the film "Finnskog and trollskap" we are following Jussi. The film made him "famous", as did the book that was written about him. The book carried his own name. He was still active as an old man - as you see from the picture. I think he's in his 80's. The film "Finnskog and trollskap" has finally reached dvd and is now to be bought. In that film I can also see my great grandfather on my father's side - Laurits - a man worth his own film.

Some of the quotes living after Jussi:
"These woods are my woods, though I do not own them."
"I'm following the bird-paths."
"There's a trick to solve everything." (Det er et knep ved alt)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2013 - 02:06pm PT
Roy Lønhøiden - Finnskogens dronning (Queen of Finnskogen)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 10:52am PT
Finnskogen this weekend
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 11:13am PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 11:21am PT
A couple of tractors at Finnskogen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 12:59pm PT
Finnskogdagene 2013 Gottlundmarsjen 1
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 12:59pm PT
Finnskogdagene 2013 Gottlundmarsjen 2
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 14, 2013 - 01:55pm PT
Roy, tusen takk for alt this! I really enjoyed the Forest Finns video and the music vids.
I never knew anything about Finnskogen. What a hard life. Did you grow up in Hedmark?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 02:00pm PT
Reilly

Yes, I grew up in Hedmark. Mostly Sønsterud close to Flisa, but also Gjesåsen, Løten and Kongsvinger (if you know the local geography).
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 19, 2013 - 03:01pm PT
The history of timber floating in Rotna - written 1983 by Jakob Ryen, an uncle of my mother. The floating in Rotna ended in 1965.


Ed: MH2 - That's sweet - it's the first time I'm exposed to the Canadian log driving bit. lol...
MH2

climber
Jul 19, 2013 - 03:12pm PT
Ha, Ha! Mighty fine.


A possibly relevant albeit over-exposed Canadian log-driving bit:


[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 22, 2013 - 02:25pm PT
Roy Lønhøiden plays "Gjennom Livet" ("Through Life") from his record "Sanger fra skogen" ("Songs from the forest")
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2013 - 12:19pm PT
A poem by Dan Andersson, a poet from the forest, translated in the original metres by C.D. Locock (1929):

Song

My love was born in the sweet of the year,
By the banks of a rippling, hurrying river;
Wild nectar I quaffed in my youth-days there,
In dew-drenced meads where the moonbeams quiver.

My love was born where the salmon leap
In Paiso's river of waters dancing;
And it grew to a melody sung in sleep,
A wild man's revel, a tale entrancing.

It seethed in my blood like a draught divine,
Born anew with each Springs returning,
When the world goes reeling, as drunk with wine,
And Earth and Heaven are burning.

But never more have I loved as then
In the moon of roses by Paiso's river;
My love grows grey, nor findeth again
Sweet nectar in meads where the moonbeams quiver.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2013 - 01:33pm PT
Finnskogen and mountains - a great fantasy. In Norway the closest you get to this painting, this dream, is in Trysil.

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 25, 2013 - 06:01pm PT
Jeg aer i Finnskogen av Nord Amerika - the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. You would feel right at home here, Marlow. I'm visiting the old family farm, now owned by others :-(
They have let it go so maybe I can get it back cheaply.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 26, 2013 - 03:34am PT
Reilly

My best wishes for you and the old family farm. Do you have any photos from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan? Be free to post them on this thread.


Edit.: Here's a picures I found on the web showing a lot of similarities between the two landscapes:


Some differences: The Michigan peninsula has a great "coastal" line that you do not find at Finnskogen, where you have smaller lakes. And I think Finnskogen is generally more dominated by pine and spruce than the Michigan peninsula. The peninsula is as I can see extremely colour-rich in the autumn when the leaves change their ways - as seen from this picture:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2013 - 12:03pm PT
Dan Andersson - Heldagskväll i timmerkojan
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Dan Andersson's first book (1914) - Kolarhistorier. Cost: Swedish kroner 1,-

Joakim Thåström singing his song "Om Black Jim" - a song about Dan Andersson who died 32 years old from cyanid poisoning in a bed at room 11 at Hotel Hellman in Stockholm. Choose your hotel room with care when you get to Stockholm...

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 28, 2013 - 12:39pm PT
Marlow, fotos to come when I reach a computer. Saw wolf tracks a few days ago, big ones.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2013 - 12:45pm PT
Reilly.

That's much appreciated!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 29, 2013 - 04:43pm PT
Sorrow 1894 - A forest Finn and his wife

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 1, 2013 - 01:32am PT
See, Marlow, I told you I would have pics...

Beaver lodge
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 11:27am PT
Reilly.

Norwegian Woods.com. Hehe... that's cool. The similarity between Finnskogen and the picture you posted is striking - it could be anywhere at Finnskogen.

Some lichens from this week:
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 11:27am PT
Some other parts of the nature
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 11:29am PT
And memorablia
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 03:18pm PT
"In his youth Dan Andersson led a wandering life. He worked as woodsman, temperance lecturer, factory worker, and travelling salesman." At the age of 14, Andersson was by his father sent to the United States to explore possibilities for immigration. He worked there at his aunt and uncle's farm, but after eight months, his father asked him to return to Skattlösberg, Sweden.

Dan wrote a book about America - "Chi-Mo-Ka-Ma. Stories from Northern America." (Bonniers 1920).

This is how the book starts:
"I was still young the first time I met Charlie Day, alias Red Shadow, an Indian who had been given this name by the people from Rice Lake, a place near the center of the railway triangel Brainerd - Duluth - Beminji, just like in a big box, with the clear blue sky of Northern Minnesota as roof."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 03:22pm PT
My mother ready to go skiing (in front on the right side) and her mother, my grandmother, with equipment for carrying water on the left.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Aug 2, 2013 - 03:40pm PT
Dette er en fantastisk tråd, Marlow, og du har et godt øye.

As well as a refined sense of place. My pleasure to visit.

I climbed in YV in the eighties with a fellow from Eben Junction, MI. His family, the Laaksos, were Finns. He himself, Kelly, was just as small as a guy gets and looked dwarfed by his rack on El Cap. But he was a strong climber, just not wall-savvy.

"See ya to da U.P., eh?" was the sticker on his bumper. I met him in the C4 parking lot, you can BELIEVE IT OR NOT!

MFM
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 03:46pm PT
Thanks Mouse. Your Norwegian was perfect. Har du hatt hjelp? Can't just be Google?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 2, 2013 - 06:04pm PT
Har du hatt hjelp?

Jeg tror saa men kanskje Musen aer ett Rattus norvegicus?


Who says Devil's Lake is the only climbing in Wisconsin?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 06:26pm PT
From the woods: This is for Bats only...


Mouse - Mus eller Rotte - as a matter of translation:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 11:37am PT
Wolf tracks

Bear tracks

Guns made by the smith at Bortomaaa farm, Orsa Finnmark, Sweden

Bortomaaa farm: Nine different keys needed to open the door

Grue Finnskog: "Den skal tidlig krøkes som god krok skal bli"

Shooting bear, Dalarna, Sweden, January 1877
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 11:50am PT
"Neverkont"

Collecting the raw material "never" from birch

Working with "never"

"Neverkont" in use (my grandmother to the right)

"Nerverkont" - still made today, but never in work-related use
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 3, 2013 - 12:01pm PT
Ekte Finnskog, ikke sant?

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 12:03pm PT
Reilly

Yes, looks exactly like. Is the picture from Finnskogen in Norway, Sweden or Finland?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 3, 2013 - 12:16pm PT
Hahaha, nej, Wisconsin!

Den gammel kahytt...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 12:21pm PT
Great place. Is it the family farm?

And what has happened to the photo? (there's a round spot full of colours on the right side, lower part of the photo)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 4, 2013 - 04:10am PT
The settlement of forest Finns in the central part of Sweden

The settlement of forest Finns in the south-eastern part of Norway

Words: före = before, efter = after
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 4, 2013 - 04:14am PT
Haukugle - Northern Hawk-Owl (Surnia ulula)


Ash and Glow:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 7, 2013 - 04:08pm PT
"The spruce is blooming well this year", people from the forest say.
They stop where their paths cross in the forest
and are there for each other
with a silent glow of joy in their eyes."

Freely after Hans Børli

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 7, 2013 - 04:18pm PT


I'm standing by the river. It's late at night. I've been walking along the river, fishing, for many hours. The last hour I haven't caught a fish. Darkness is approaching. Colours are fading around me. Mist is starting to spread down the river. I can feel a cold breeze softly touching my cheek. The humming sound from the river is growing deeper. I'm standing in some kind of enthrallment. I'm filled with energy, connected, yet calm. I can sense, I can feel, all of this, and still not, since there is no sense of a separate I. The river flows and the river flows in me. I am the river.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 8, 2013 - 04:12pm PT


It is the ephemeral things
that you carry with you:
the shadow of a bird’s wing
crossing the path in front of your foot
the smell of ice and frozen fruit of mountain-ash
an early autumn morning long ago, a word
spoken in the mist and wind
by an open fire
deep inside the moose-fields

It is the ephemeral things
that live inside you
and firmly hold a picture of yourself
and life - shimmering
like beaches reflected
in a flowing river

Freely after Hans Børli

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 16, 2013 - 01:38pm PT
The Forest Finns brought with them many customs from Finland. Sauna, "svedjebruk" (slash-and-burn agriculture), a special kind of rye, the use of "never" from birch as material and so on.

The sauna was often the first building the forest Finns built and the sauna served as a multi purpose house.


The beginning of Urho Kekkonen's book describing the story ot the "Sauna":

"In the beginning was only a heap of rocks. They were heated, they were worshiped. Perhaps they were propitiated, perhaps they were appeased by having water cast upon them.

Rituals have always been an inherent part of the sauna. Once it had become an everyday bathing place, ceremonial uses remained: the bride was bathed in the sauna before the wedding.

The very earliest Finnish woodsmen used the sauna as a multiple purpose building, it was both dwelling and sauna. It could also be used for drying grain.

The first saunas were probably earthen saunas: a pit was dug in the ground and the rocks to be heated were heaped at the bottom. The sides of the pit were reinforced with tree trunks and eventually the entire construction began to rise out of the ground, with walls made of logs.

The functions of the sauna kept increasing: of course the sauna was for washing and bathing and laundring; but it was also a dispensary, where the old cupping women would draw the "evil blood" from the veins with their cupping horns, where painful muscles were massaged, where the children were born and the deceased laid out to be washed. Flax was dried in the sauna, hams and mutton were cured, and malt was dried. The sauna was the source of indispensable hot water. The water was warmed on the hot rocks, or in the hot-water cauldron.

The old saunas were often very large, 25 square meters up to 40 square meters. The door was at the gable end of the sauna and led directly into the sauna-room with it's earthen floor."...


The Helsinki Yacht Club and Bar - Finntown/Butte - Montana - where the annual naming of St. Urho takes place... And: Yes, there are saunas in there :-) Posted by Mojede on the Finland thread.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2013 - 03:13pm PT

Look - the lake's shining with scarlet
from the land of the sunsetting sky.
And bright as a piece of old silver
is the diver's red-throated cry.

Hans Børli


Smaalom (Gavia Stellata - Red-throated Loon )
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Filmed by Gunnar Fernqvist, Sweden.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 04:12pm PT
The Forests' Song

It sounds so sad on the moor at night:
the forests' song.
Its lyrics are written in gold twilight
where the weary sun sinks out of sight
over the desolate highlands.

I stop and listen. - I hear a note:
the forests' song.
A trembling cry from the wild bird's throat,
a murmuring brook where the fall winds float
over the desolate highlands.

How blessed those notes of its music are,
the forests' song.
They rise in the light of both sun and star
where tree-shaking winds blow near and far
over the desolate highlands.

The moose hears a dusky melody play:
the forests' song.
He rests in the moss through the lulling day
till twilight calls him out on his way
over the desolate highlands.

And the hunter hears the old tune run:
the forests' song.
He polishes up his shot-blackened gun
as smoke coils up when the day is done
up in the desolate highlands.

And the song flows on in each slumbering glen,
the forests' song.
They stop and they listen again,
the lonely beasts and the lonely men
up on the desolate highlands.


Hans Børli (translated by Louis Muinzer)


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 04:21pm PT
Have You Listened to the Rivers in the Night?

Have you listened to the rivers in the night?
They speak of other things.

They send no laughter trickling over their sand bars,
hum no song about
girls' brown bodies
that glide outward at the bathing place
or wide meadows with their curlew-cries
or the ferryman who looks at the clouds
as he rows.

They speak of other things.
Things that are homeless in the day,
things that are Never and without words.

If you listen long to the rivers in the night,
listen long,
it is at last as if your soul
is mysteriously remembering its future.


Hans Børli (translated by Louis Muinzer)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 04:49pm PT
For a Young Girl

So slim and supple in your eighteen years!
Your being is a wind-bent straw
where your smile's shy grass-butterfly
sits tipping its wings slantwise
and shining for nobody
and everyone.


Hans Børli (translated by Louis Muinzer)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 05:16pm PT
The Moose Heart

He cut the heart out from
the hot and steaming cavity
and threw it in the heather.

Gentle snowflakes
came slanting through the grey air
and settled silently, melted
against the reeking redness.

But before we'd cut the carcass up,
the heart was snow-covered.
just a little hump in the whiteness.

And when we set off homewards
with big wet sacks
that scratched against green branches,
we forgot the moose heart...


Hans Børli


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 24, 2013 - 03:28pm PT

The Little Flute

You mend your instrument.
give it more and better strings,
a deeper ring -

but the little flute...

The little bone flute
waits
till the bows are lowered
waits
till the trumpets are silent
and the light goes out on the podium
then
it makes lonely music in the darkness
by the backdoor.

A naked tone
white
as a bird-bone
in the bog wind.

There is No One playing.
The little bone flute.


Hans Børli



Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 25, 2013 - 04:32am PT

Kvarntorp and Ritamäki, old Forest Finn farms in Värmland, Sweden.

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 1, 2013 - 10:51am PT

Otto Tyskeberget's great grandfather, Daniel Tyskeberget (1778-1856), was a legendary bear hunter at Finnskogen. He is known to have killed close to 100 bears. Daniel had a deep passion for bear hunting. Other words than passion could of course be used. Once a serious disease had reached Tyskeberget. But a bear had been seen in the area and Daniel wanted to hunt it down. His wife asked him to stay, but he couldn't. He left with his gun and didn't return until some weeks later. Two of his children had died. As the story goes - that was the only time Daniel was seen crying.


A bear claw left by Daniel

Daniel's gun - rebuilt from flintlock to percussion cap during his life-time.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 1, 2013 - 10:54am PT

"Jag väntar" ("I'm waiting"), a tune by Gunnar Turesson (1906-2001) with lyrics by his brother-in-law, Dan Andersson. Gunnar Turesson was only 16 years old when he composed the tune.

Sofia Karlsson singing "Jag väntar"

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 2, 2013 - 02:26pm PT

The Lady Wanderer

It is as if your face has listened somewhere
near the springs. - Sister, it is
as if you brought dawn's stillness with you
from the heights with sacred trees.

Many a time you filled my loneliness
in days when my heart was lost:
I sensed your nearness in the roe dear's leap
and in the kestrel's wings of fire.

Now I stand with my hands heavy from their loss,
so poor, so coarse-made and grey.
You are like an image, a shining name
of something I shall never reach.

You have gone on slanting rays of sunlight
towards the highland deep inside you.
Your listening, averted being has gained
a scent of snow in autumn mountains.

I look at you. The way a lost man
in the darkness may stand and see
a star above an unknown country
where the paths are snowbound.

Hans Børli
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 6, 2013 - 04:01pm PT

Halling after the "Limping boy" Ola Porkkala Lehmoinen, Grue Finnskog.

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 6, 2013 - 04:04pm PT

Cemetery in natural forest (Finland)

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 12, 2013 - 05:03pm PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Inscription

Your life. Your dream:
The warmth beneath the foot of a bird
that's dozing in the autumn dawn...

H.B.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 15, 2013 - 01:28pm PT
At dawn this weekend
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 15, 2013 - 01:33pm PT
Some tools for shoes and leather
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 15, 2013 - 01:42pm PT
Some old tools for timber and wood
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2013 - 11:22am PT
Backpacks

A well used "neverkont"

Bergans Original, Made in Oslo, Norway
KlimbIn

climber
Sep 16, 2013 - 12:22pm PT

He explained, “One thing that really divides Norway is bark.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/20/world/europe/in-norway-tv-program-on-firewood-elicits-passions.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2013 - 12:39pm PT
KlimbIn

I haven't read the book, but the article was great. TFPU!

When I grow old, climbing and firewood will be a part of my life. My mother calling out "Boys, now it's dinner..." from the house and the sound and rythm of my grandfather sawing and chopping firewood behind the barn is still part of my idea of everything being well, something stable and reliable in life. My grandfather died 35 years ago, but I'm still carrying the sound...

This is the saw that made the sound in the hands of my grandfather:
KlimbIn

climber
Sep 16, 2013 - 10:00pm PT
Marlow, thank you for these pictures.

Cutting, chopping and stacking firewood was the only way for me to keep warm for several years. The toil is natural, and beneficial for the mind. As I think of my dream home for my later years, a fireplace and a wood chopping block are essential.
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Sep 16, 2013 - 11:40pm PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 17, 2013 - 11:42am PT
For hay:

At the other end - the name of my grandfather (my father's father):

using this tool:

The last name comes in many varieties: Faldås - Faldaas - Fallaas - Fallås

The first part of the last name, "Fall", is connected to forest Finns and falling trees. "The fall" was the name of chopped-down-trees to be burned next spring.

Trees were chopped down one year. Next spring they were burned. The ash nurtured the soil. Rye was sown and so on...

Before my mother's mother married, she had Ryen as her last name. Ryen from rye.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2013 - 12:58pm PT

Old tool used by grindermen - slipestein

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2013 - 05:49pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Till min syster/To My Sister (Dan Andersson)

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2013 - 05:52am PT
A Musician's Last Journey (Dan Andersson)

Thorstein Bergman - the whole poem/song
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Malin Foxdal - the first half of the poem/song
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Ere the rosy morning brightens over Himmelmora's Crest,
See a dead man faring forth from Berga By:
And silent o'er the hillside they bear him to his rest,
Beneath the dawning grey, the chilly sky.
And their boots go heavy-heeled through the rose-bespattered
field,
And heavy heads are bowed as tho' in prayer.
From the desert spaces' Need comes a Dreamer who is dead,
Through dewy meads that shine with flowers fair.

"He was strange and he was lonely," say the four dark
bearing men,
"And often lacked he resting-place and bread,"-
"Lo, a King!" say the roses - and are trodden down again -
"Lo, a King and a Dreamer that is dead!"-
"We are slow," say the bearers, "and mile on mile it seems,
Ever sultrier brows the day this morning tide." -
"Walk ye warily, speak softly," sigh the willows by the
streams,
"Maybe it is some flow'ret that has died."

But when thro' green Spring woodlands the pitch-black
coffin swings,
Runs a silence through the morn-awakened fields,
And the West Wind stays to listen who it is such escort
brings,
Mid the roses, with such footsteps heavy-heeled.
"Tis but Olle, the musician," sigh the whispering forest
trees,
"For ended is his homeless day." -
"Oh, would I were a hurricane," replies the gentle breeze,
"I would pipe him on his journey all the way!"

Over ling and yellow marshes sway the dead man's stiffening
bones,
Sway wearily the sun's pale rays beneath:
But when evening's lovely coolness falls on bilberries and
stones
Sounds the tramp again on Himmelmora Heath:
Tramp of four tired men, who in grief march home again,
With their heads bowed low as if in prayer.
But deep upon their track see the roses trampled back,
Through the dewy meads that shine with flowers fair.

"He is gone," say the bearers, "and his mother bides forlorn
In Torberga behind the poorhouse bars. -
"We are trampled 'neath your footsteps, with your heavy
shoes are torn,"
Cry the rose-buds, pointing to their scars.
"It is Death that has gone dancing over Himmelmora
Heath,"
Each tistle by the clover pasture moans:
"He has ground you all to garbage his clumsy boots beneath,
While he danced with the Dreamer's bones."

O'er the grass and the grey roof-tops like a whisper comes
the night,
With her few pale stars' wretched fire:
And East across the moorland to the tarn goes down a light,
Goes a song through the lily-sprinkled mire.
Far and wide the black storm thunders, and round the islet
there
Chant the waves of the desert spaces' Need:
O'er the dark and angry waters, lo, the night sounds call to
prayer,
For a Dreamer, a Musician, lies dead.

Translation: C. D. Locock
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 24, 2013 - 04:04pm PT

Tapio

It still exists old photos of Norwegian Forest Finns standing on their knees praying to the forest god Tapio before a hunt. They prayed and asked for permission to hunt - bearers of an old pagan natur-religion as they were.

"Tapio is a forest spirit or god, who figured prominently in the Kalevala. His wife is the goddess of the forest, Mielikki. He was the father of Annikki, Tellervo, Nyyrikki (the god of hunting), and Tuulikki. Tapio is imagined to have a beard of lichen and eyebrows of moss.

He lends his name in the form of Tapiola to:
(a) one of the major urban centres within the city of Espoo, outside of Helsinki; and
(b) an unincorporated community in the USA state of Michigan.

Jean Sibelius's tone-poem Tapiola (1926) is a depiction of the forest Tapio inhabits."


Tapiola (Sibelius) - Neeme Järvi

[Click to View YouTube Video]
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 24, 2013 - 04:31pm PT
Carlow Marlow, is there such a toy as a Norwegian woodie?

FOR SURFING, NOT BANGING!

I looked for one but couldn't find one. This is the best I could do.

http://www.arcticsurfblog.com/2012/09/norwegian-nuggets//

I envision a poodle (Tami-certified and tested) on a board, sacrificing his existence for the greater good by checking for undertow, equipped with transmitters to record currents, temps, etc., the gang gathered to watch the data on the computer set up on the tailgate...

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 24, 2013 - 04:36pm PT
The history of Otter Lake or Tapiola, Michigan

By the Pupils of the Askel School under the direction of Elina Collected and Written Heikkinen School year 1927-1928

Introduction

"Askel, as the eastern shore of Otter Lake is called, is strictly a Finnish settlement. It has a population of only 219 people divided among 34 families, but its history is a remarkable story of wilderness in America. It is this story of How the wild woods were changed into a promising farming community and how the foreign element was Americanized in the short period of 38 years. The Story is here set forth as put together by the Eighth grade civics class of Askel school in 1928.

The First Settlers

The first settlers who lived at Otter Lake were the French and the Indians. There is no accurate information of their existence here as they left before any of the present settlers came. There were however, ruins of log cabins and old pine stumps to show that the Finnish people were not the first to penetrate into this wilderness. With the cutting of the soft wood trees the French left, having no intentions of making their homes here, and settled elsewhere. Later, the Finnish people met some of them occasionally and were told how they had lived in log cabins at Otter Lake when there were yet Indians there. There is said to be in Chassell, a very old French women who claims to have been born at Otter Lake. At the northeastern end of Otter Lake, there is a large beech supposed to have been planted by a women now living in Houghton.

It was early in 1890 that a number of woodcutters at Bootjack near Torch Lake, who had recently come from Finland, heard of a fresh water lake rich in fish somewhere up the Sturgeon, not very far from Chassell. At once, two of these, named Peter Tauriainen and Enock Pyykkonen lured by the tale of fish, set out to investigate. They rowed up Portage lake to Chassell end then up the Sturgeon River. After some time they came to the forks of the Otter and the Sturgeon, and not knowing which branch to take they decided to camp at the fork overnight. They spent a rather lonely night by a bonfire. There was a dark deep forest on all sides and they heard the howling of wolves. In the morning they rowed up the Sturgeon and not finding a lake, they came back and went Otter. Soon they came to the lake they were looking for. It was all they had expected and more. Lying in a deep valley with dense forest around it and high hills and deep ravines on either side they found a very beautiful lake a bout 3 miles long and a mile wide. So pleased were they with its beauty, its abundance of fish, and its resemblance to the lake of Finland that they set back determined to get possession of the land near by. After some time they were pleased to find that the government was giving the land away as free homesteads to those who would make their homes there."

http://www.migenweb.org/baraga/history/otterlake.html



Mouse

Norway has never been a car producing country, but we tried with the car Troll. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll_(automobile)


When I was a kid my grandfather made wooden cars for me and my brothers. We used to pull them around with a certain pride because they were large, well built and had wood-wheels that rolled quite well.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2013 - 12:54pm PT

Carl Axel Gottlund (February 24, 1796, Ruotsinpyhtää – April 20, 1875, Helsinki) was a Finnish explorer, collector of folklore, historian, cultural politician, linguist, philologist, translator, writer, publisher and lecturer of Finnish language at the University of Helsinki. He was a colorful cultural personality and one of the central Finnish national awakeners and - later - one of the leading dissidents at the same time.

Gottlund pursued the creation on an autonomous Finnish territory from the Finn Forests on both sides of the Swedish-Norwegian border, with great economic and political independence.

Gottlund is commonly attributed with saving the folklore of the Forest Finns.



Finn Forests' autonomy in Central Scandinavia

"In 1817, Gottlund made an exploration trip to the Finnish-inhabited Dalarna area of Central Sweden, to collect Finnish folklore and other ethnographic data as well as genealogical information, the latter partly because he wanted to improve the social circumstances of the Forest Finns and to prevent Sweden from taking ownership of their land. He recorded total of about 50 Finnish language poems, songs and spells during this expedition.

In the summer of 1821, Gotlund launched another expedition to a Finnish-inhabited part of Sweden, this time covering the south-central Swedish area of Värmland. The expedition lasted until January 1822, after which Gottlund began acting as a political advocate on behalf of the Finnish population of Sweden. Among his accomplishments, Gotlund founded three congregations for the Forest Finns.

Furthermore, in 1821 starting Gottlund began pursuing the creation of an autonomous Finnish county called Fennia from the Finn Forests on both sides of the Swedish-Norwegian border, north and northeast from the modern-day Norwegian area of Oslo, with great economic and political independence. The tax border would have been removed and land ownership by Swedes and Norwegians would have been restricted. The Swedish-Norwegian border had not been properly established before 1751.

In attempts to have the Finnish population of Sweden Proper "Swedified" and assimilated into the mainstream Swedish society, the use of the Finnish language had become strictly prohibited in Sweden Proper in the mid-17th-century. However, Gottlund estimated that in the beginning of the 19th century the Central Scandinavian Finn Forests' areas which he had visited alone were still home to approximately 40'000 Finnish-speaking Finns, of whom about 14'000 lived in Värmland - this in addition to other Finns such as the Tornedalians and Kvens and their descendants and the Forest Finns in other parts of Sweden an Norway. It is estimated that "one of each five Swedes has their roots amongst the Forest Finns".

Eventually - however -, due to his political activism, Gottlund nearly became expelled from Sweden. He was banned from operating in Stockholm, and - amidst his lobbying and campaigning - he was finally exiled from Stockholm to Uppsala. In spite of this total political failure in the creation of the Central Scandinavian autonomous Finnish area, Gottlund had positive cultural influence on the Forest Finns and became a legendary, heroic character in the Finn Forests.

While still living in Uppsala and while attending the Uppsala University part-time, Gottlund began preparing an ambitious publication, Otava, aimed to become a Finnish literary monument. Otava was published in three parts between 1828 and 1832. It consisted of articles pertaining to linguistics, history, ethics, religion, folklore and poetry.

However, in Finland, Otava was not met with the type of enthusiasm which Gottlund had hoped for. The work was considered to favor too much the Savonian dialects of Finnish language, and it's mainly enlightenment-spirited contents were overshadowed by the current of romanticism which now had encaptured Finland, producing epics such as The Kalevala in 1835 and The Tales of Ensign Stål in 1848.

In 1831, Gottlund married Charlotta Augusta Brink. Over time, the two gave birth to total of 10 children together.

Some of the folklore poetry collected by Gottlund in the early 19th century was considered sexually too explicit to be published during his lifetime, and even until quite recently. Some poems collected by him stayed archived until 1997, when they became included in the book Suomen Kansan Vanhat Runot ("Old Poems of the Finnish People")."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2013 - 04:51pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Du liv...(Dan Andersson)

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 26, 2013 - 02:24pm PT

Dan Andersson

"Daniel "Dan" Andersson was born April 6, 1888, in the school house in Skattlösberg, Grangärdesgatan parish (in current Ludvika), Dalarna, and died September 16, 1920, in Stockholm by cyanide poisoning. He was a Swedish author and poet. In 1893, five years old, he learned to read. 1896, at the age of eight, he got a violin, and learned to play by himself. He had three brothers. A sister Anna was born in 1892 but died six months later. Next sister who was born in 1899 was also named Anna, and was dedicated the poem "To My Sister" on his 18th birthday. Andersson set to music some of his own poems, including "To My Sister", "Jungman Jansson" and "Per Ols Per Erik." He was married June 19 1918 to småskollärarinnan Olga Turesson, sister of the troubadour Gunnar Turesson. Dan Andersson is in part seen as a proletarian writer, but his poetry is not limited to this genre. He sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Black Jim."

"Dan Andersson's poetry enjoys a broad popularity among the Swedish people because of its naturalist mysticism. In 2005, Sofia Karlsson recorded a new interpretation of Andersson's songs, which received a Grammy award in both Sweden and Denmark, but before this his poems had been sung by a number of artists, including the Hootenanny Singers, Love Explosion and Fred Åkerström. In 1988, at the centenary of Andersson's birth, Posten, the Swedish postal service, published two stamps in his honour. In Ludvika, a Dan Andersson week is celebrated the first week of every August. In Ludvika there is also a Dan Andersson museum, and a statue of him. A bust is also to be found at Järntorget in Gothenburg."

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2013 - 05:05pm PT

Deep Into The Woods (Langt Innpå Skoga) - Hans Børli

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2013 - 02:25pm PT

Flisa at the border of Finnskogen - today


Map: Finnskogen with Flisa in the upper left corner (Norway red, Sweden green)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2013 - 03:39pm PT

From log driving history - Log driving director Johs Johannesen, river - Glomma, writes (around 1870):

"Yes, the log drivers are an elite corps, chosen through many hundred years of natural selection. Only the most quick-witted and resilient are attracted to be log drivers, while other men have gone in other directions. Only the most vigorous have wanted this work, because only they have the ability - and this has been the case also with their sons. This way it has been for many generations and because of that we now have log drivers that in fastness, resilience and quick-wittedness are the best ones you can ever hope to find." (Source: Ragnvald Bødtker. Norwegian log driving history. 1860 to 1943)

To repeat the great Canadian video posted by MH2 earlier:

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 29, 2013 - 03:51pm PT

The river Rottnan (Swedish)/Rotna (Norwegian)

[Click to View YouTube Video]

Rotna is a 110 km long river that flows through Finnskogen from two small lakes at Hof Finnskog (in Aasnes kommune, Norway) to the lake Mellanfryken close to Rottneros (in Sweden). The video shows places down the river: one of the lakes at Hof Finnskog (Norway), Svullrya (Norway), Lekvattnet (Sweden), Gräsmark (Sweden) and Fryksdalen close to Rottneros where the river ends in Mellanfryken.

Most of the pictures are from Sweden.

Music: Mando Diao - Strövtåg i Hembygden (poem/lyrics by Gustaf Fröding)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2013 - 01:56pm PT
Thorstein Bergman - Omkring tiggaren från Luossa ('Round the begger from Luossa...) - Poem/lyrics: Dan Andersson

[Click to View YouTube Video]

'Round The Begger From Luossa

From Luossa came a beggar singing to the village folk.
Round the watch fire they lingered while he sang
Songs of pilgrims and of beggars, song of wondrous, wondrous things
And of his yearning did he sing the whole night long


"There is something beyond mountains, beyond stars and all the blossoms,
Something, too, behind my song, behind this burning heart of mine
Listen — something goes and whispers, goes and lures me and beseeches
Come to us, for earth below is not the kingdom that is thine!"


I have listened to the lapping of waves upon the shore,
I have dreamed that the wildest seas were calm and still.
And in spirit I have hurried to that contourless land,
Where the dearest we have known we´ll know no more.


To a wild, eternal longing were we born of ash-pale mothers,
And from travail, anxious, painful, rose our first, our wailing cry
Were we tossed on plain and hillside, just to tumble round and frolic,
Then we played at elk and lion, beggar, God and butterfly.


Did I sit beside her, silent, she whose heart was as my own,
Did she tend our home with soft and gentle hands,
Loudly was my own heart shouting, "What you own there is not yours!"
And my spirit drove me onward to find peace.


What I love is lying yonder, lies concealed in dusky distance,
And my rightful way leads high to wonders there.
In this clamor I am tempted to beseech Him, "Lord, O Master,
Take all earth away, for own I will what no one, no one has


Join me, brother, beyond mountains with their still and cooling rivers,
Where the sea is slow to slumber in its peak-encircled bed.
Somewhere far beyond the heavens lies my home, have I my mother
In a gold-besprinkled vapor, in rose-tinted mantle clad.


May the black and brackish waters cool our cheeks with fever reddened,
May we be from life far distant where the morning is awake
Never was I one with this world, and unending tribulation
Suffered, restless, unbelieving, suffered from my burning heart.


On a seashore sown with cockles stands a gate with roses laden,
There in slumber, vagrants perish and all weary souls find peace.
Song is never heard resounding, viols never echo, ringing
Under arches where forever cherubs of salvation dwell.


Translated by Caroline Schleef
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 03:36am PT

Gräsmark - Varmland - in the Swedish part of Finnskogen


Map: Finnskogen with Grasmark in the lower right corner (Norway red, Sweden green)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 03:50am PT

Grasmark in our time

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 04:08am PT

Once upon a time in Grasmark

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 04:18am PT

Volvo PV 444/544 history

[Click to View YouTube Video]
In 1955 the first Volvo PV was exported to USA - on post order.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 01:25pm PT

Lekvattnet (in the Swedish part of Finnskogen - you find it just below the middle on the map):

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 01:46pm PT

Old Forest Finns' farms in the Lekvattnet area

Karmenkynna

Ritamaki

Kvarntorp
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 13, 2013 - 04:43am PT

Mid-summer in Varmland - Sweden...
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Song: Små grodorna (The little frogs)


Edited:
Thanks for the information Mouse. If you could see them, they're slightly intoxicated, but they've got rythm and style...

Here's another example of the little frog dance (Falun, Sweden):
[Click to View YouTube Video]
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 13, 2013 - 07:02am PT
That video is blocked in this US of A.

Content issues and so for the love of god, tell us what we are missing.

Is this another Monty Python Morris Men thing?*

*Well, that wasn't far, now, was it? The Flames got Morris. He's being held hostage.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 18, 2013 - 02:29pm PT

Finnskogen June 2012
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 18, 2013 - 04:42pm PT

Joakim Thåström - A Musician's Last Journey (Dan Andersson)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 19, 2013 - 11:56am PT

Sofia Karlsson - Broder Joachim (lyrics: Dan Andersson)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 20, 2013 - 12:43pm PT
This weekend

On the road

Sønsterud
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2013 - 02:19pm PT

Once upon a time when ironing really was iron-ing: 100 years old tool.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2013 - 04:09pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Le Vin des Amants - Charles Baudelaire (translated by Dan Andersson)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 3, 2013 - 12:37pm PT
Finnskogen this weekend
Autumn
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 3, 2013 - 01:12pm PT
Kaare Tveter
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 7, 2013 - 02:17pm PT
Cranes at Finnskogen
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Ron

It's not my own video. There's so many excellent bird photographers at the bird thread posting their own photos...

I find cranes to be deeply fascinating birds... their cries as from another world, another time... as a kid I loved to see them fly, hearing them cry... it was an experience that left me completely lost for a while...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 19, 2013 - 12:48pm PT
An old man from Finnskogen was saved by a snuff box (Swedish Ettan)after falling into a bog hole where he was left alone for two days. It all started when he wanted to shoot a jay and was tempted to go deeper and deeper into the forest by the mocking birds. "Solung" is spoken here:

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 22, 2013 - 04:10pm PT

Livet i Finnskogarna
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 8, 2013 - 03:48pm PT

BMW GS meeting Finnskogen, Norway, September 2013 - Black tour
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 20, 2013 - 02:39pm PT

Ural motorcycle at Finnskogen
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Jan 3, 2014 - 12:52pm PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Fröding Det var dans bort i vägen, performed by Sven-Ingvars

There was dance on the road on a Saturday night,
over the vicin'ty the sound
of the game and the laughter was heard,
it was tjoh! there was jump! it was hey!
Nils Utterman, the fool and fiddlerman,
he played by the roadside,
for dudeli ! dudeli ! dey!

There was Bolla, the proud Takenegirlie,
she's beautiful, nice, but has nothing in her pocket,
she is eluding and fun and grand.
There was Kersti, the defiant, wand'ring & wild,
there was Finnbacka Britta and Kajsa and Tilda
and the stuck-up Marja in Brooks.

There was Petter from Toppsta
and Gusten from Hill,
they are boys with strength in their arms
who can lift a maiden high in the sky.
There was Flaxman at Croft
and Niklas in Svängen
and recruitee Pistol and Högvalta farmhand
and Cold-Johan from Skräddarebyn.

And they had like burning tow in their bodies,
as grasshoppers they jumped the Rejlandssteps,
and against stones they clicked their heels.
And coattails flapped, and aprons flew,
braids they jumped and the skirts swung around ,
and the music squealed and mewed.

In the thickets of birch trees
and alders and hazels
was whispering talk, it was tittle-tattle
among the darkening shadows there,
it was play, it was game among logs and rocks ,
it was cooing and cuddling under the shady branches
 If you want me, well, you have me here!

Over the countryside laid the twinkling starbeuty night,
gleaming light shone over the rippling water
in the deciduostree-garlanded lake
there was a smell from clover in the flowering fields
and from resinous cones on spruce and pine,
which shaded the crests of the hills.

And a fox there joined in their frolicing song,
and a owl shouted uhu! from Brynbärsbråten,
and they didn't notice, they heard it not.
But uhu! the echo in Getberget brayed,
and in response to Nils Utterman's dudelidia !
came the dudeli! dudeli dey!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 3, 2014 - 04:37pm PT
Cool Lollie. At Finnskogen Sven-Ingvars was even more famous than Abba later became...

To stay in Värmland: Sven Ingvars - Fröken Fräken (1964)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Jan 3, 2014 - 05:01pm PT
I grew up with them. The local band. :-)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 22, 2014 - 04:57pm PT

A couple of other tunes based on lyrics by the Finnskogen poet Dan Andersson

Hootenanny Singers (Abba-Björn singing)- Omkring tiggarn' från Luossa
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Jailbird Singers - Där björkarna susa
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 8, 2014 - 05:41pm PT

On a wet day, on the road, in and out of focus, at the border of Finnskogen, last weekend...
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 17, 2014 - 05:39pm PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]


[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 19, 2014 - 12:49pm PT

Mouse: Thanks for posting! Grieg, Munthe and fjords - Norway at it's best...

Sønsterud this weekend:
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 19, 2014 - 12:58pm PT

Where the water from Bråtebekken flows into the Flisa river:

The land of fallen trees where the wind blows and beavers rule...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 19, 2014 - 02:01pm PT
Morn morn, Marlow! I've been waiting to say that. ;-)

Finnskogen del Sur...


The Beaver was introduced to Tierra del Fuego in the 1950's in the misguided
belief that the fecund beasts would provide a new source of livelihood for
the natives. Sadly, Peronism and the dole were more attractive. Thanks
to the lack of predators the furry devils' population exploded much to the
detriment of the environment.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 19, 2014 - 02:16pm PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 19, 2014 - 02:19pm PT

Reilly: "Öppna landskap" of great beauty. TFPU!
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Introducing animals to ecosystems where they don't belong is an experiment to be avoided.

In Norway the situation is horrible concerning wild salmon. Wild salmon is dying and disappearing... Fishing is now an industry... and fish a product ("oppdrettslaks")...

TGT

Is Norwegian Wood the name of the crack/route? Do you know what's behind the choice of name. The Beatles?
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 19, 2014 - 02:35pm PT
No Beatles involved.

FA, Dag Kolsrud, Trond Ornhei & Hank Levine, December 1978

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/norwegian-wood/105723646

Nice route and in the shade all day.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 19, 2014 - 02:38pm PT

TGT

Dag is still climbing strong and barefooted. Trond died last year.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 19, 2014 - 07:46pm PT
Finnskogen del Sur hytte. I bet you'd feel right at home here, Marlow.
Even the decorations could be norsk, ikke sant? This is only about 15 km
from the sea, hence the nautical bent.

The name says "Akeaata". Hell, for all I know that is Sami!

We got up out of the bog...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 20, 2014 - 03:55am PT

Reilly

The "hytte" (cabin) is as taken from a Norwegian fairytale. Don't ask me which... a generic fairytale...

Curious as I am, I googled "akeaata". The closest I came was "akata", which is surely not the same word, but had a cool meaning:

"a cat that is not at home"

Do you know the origin of the word "akeaata"?

As you see from the following picture there's also something African about the two teeth by the left cabin at Akeaata, unless they're from a mammut...
Quite a place Akeaata...

Here's something Norwegian - an "akematte"
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Apr 20, 2014 - 06:01am PT
Jag älskar Öppna Landskap, Marlow. Omkring tiggaren vid Loussa kommer inte långt efter.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 20, 2014 - 01:09pm PT
Here's the other 'hytte' with the 'teeth' in front. ;-)
I didn't notice the Akeaata sign when I was there or I would have asked about it.
I suspect it has its origins with the original inhabitants...



This is Kongen of Akeaata...

and his subjects...


This was about 25km from Akeaata; lots of 'teeth'. :-)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 20, 2014 - 01:24pm PT
Lollie: Ulf Lundell has captured something of Northern substance in that song...

John: That's great. You've seen things in Norway, I haven't seen. What a place... ;o)

Reilly: The stuff of dreams and nightmares. Quite mouthy in a physical sense. An awesome place... and you don't mess with the King...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 20, 2014 - 02:33pm PT

Janne Schaffer and Björn J:son Lindh - Brusa högre lilla å (Sough louder little brook)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 29, 2014 - 10:19am PT

Svedjebruk (slash-and-burn agriculture) at Finnskogen. You can see the whole process in the video. There is no sound.
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Flickan från Finnskogarna
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 15, 2014 - 08:19am PT

Norwegian Wood beer
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 26, 2014 - 05:28pm PT
A cool winter video from Östmark, Sweden
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 28, 2014 - 04:31pm PT

Volvo Amazon - much loved at Finnskogen...
[Click to View YouTube Video]
The Volvo Amazon is a mid-size car manufactured by Volvo Cars from 1956 to 1970 and introduced in the USA as the 122S at the New York International Auto Show in April 1959.

The Amazon shared both the wheelbase from its predecessor, the PV, as well as its tall posture and high H-point seating — while offering three model configurations: 2-door sedan, 4-door sedan and wagon. In 1959 Volvo provided front seat belts as standard equipment on all the cars, including the export models, becoming the world's first manufacturer to take this step — later becoming the first car featuring three-point seat belts.

When introduced, the car was called the Amason (with an 's'), which derives from the fierce female warriors of Greek mythology, the Amazons. Kreidler, German manufacturer of motorcycles had already registered the name, and the two companies agreed Volvo could only use the name domestically (i.e., within Sweden), modifying the spelling to Amazon. Subsequently, Volvo began its tri-digit nomenclature and the line became known as the 120 Series.

The Amazon was originally manufactured at Volvo's Lundby plant in Gothenburg and subsequently at the company's Torslandaverken, which began operating in 1964. By the end of production, 234,653 four-door models, 359,917 two-door models and 73,220 station wagons had been produced, 60% of them for export — for a total of 667,791 vehicles.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 28, 2014 - 04:58pm PT
Saw a nice one just a few weeks ago. You can't swing a dead Swede without
hitting one in Seattle.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 28, 2014 - 05:29pm PT
... Which makes Seattle a lovely place on earth...

There's always a place for a couple of North Seattle Wood Ducks on the Norwegian Woods thread...
[Click to View YouTube Video]
and some wooden ducks...
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 28, 2014 - 05:49pm PT
I suppose I would be remiss if I didn't talk about my old friend Oddvar.
He was born in a little village near Bergen. When he was about 3 his mum
was boiling the torsk water and he reached up and pulled the huge pot full
right onto his head. He had something like a dozen operations and even had
a few as an adult to relieve scar tensions. After that he was fearless.
He was a legend in Ballard and throughout the Seattle Police Dept. He had
a shop called British American Automotive. Now you may wonder, WTF? Well,
he raced Sprites so that was the start of that. Then he realized he couldn't
make a living on British cars, although any owner of a British car would
justifiably wonder why not. Anyway, he went to the Volvo factory mechanic's
course and started in on Volvos, partly because he got so sick of tracing
electrical faults in British cars. Anyway, he did quite well but he was a
a racer at heart and a thorough wildman. He loved going out late at night
and driving the Seattle PD crazy. They got him once or twice but only due
to weight of numbers. When he got his first BMW Cafe race bike they never had a chance.

One night he worked late and left to go home. His shop was on Shilshole Ave
just below Market St, the main drag in Ballard and down which the 17 Mai Parade
goes. Anyway, Shilshole takes a 45 turn just before Market and a sharp uphill.
Oddvar was fond of sitting at the shop and watching the light. When it would
turn yellow for the cross traffic he would haul ass. He would hit the uphill
at about 80 in one of his souped up Volvos, full-race mind you, and he would
get enough air to clear all four lanes of Market St. Then he would go home
and eat some torsk. This one night some drunk ran the light. The good
news is that Oddvar had enough air to clear the guy's hood and he loved to
tell how he looked down at the guy's saucer-sized eyeballs. The bad news
is there just happened to be a SPD cop car sitting at the light. Oddvar
pulled over immediately, as did the drunk. The cop let Oddvar go and wrote
the drunk up.

When Oddvar retired the Seattle Times ran a front page story about him. There
were hundreds of his faithful at the party, including a number of SPD.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 29, 2014 - 10:21am PT

Reilly

That's a reilly great story. When there's a Norwegian in your Seattle story, it's no surprise to find a "bergenser" like Oddvar. People from the Bergen area are known for their extremely high level of self-confidence...


Self-confidence was also found deep inside the woods...

Log-driving 1953
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Superb log driving video, only Norwegian spoken, no texting in English.

If the log drivers could swim or not didn't matter, they were water rats...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 15, 2014 - 10:11am PT

Photos from this weekend...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 15, 2014 - 11:30am PT
Wow, the log-driving video was amazing! Tusen takk! Those guys were crazy! I thought for
sure that guy was toast!

In northern Wisconsin big money is made by guys who salvage sunken logs from 100 years ago.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 15, 2014 - 12:53pm PT

Reilly

In northern Wisconsin big money is made by guys who salvage sunken logs from 100 years ago.

For what purpose do they use the sunken log in Wisconsin?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 15, 2014 - 01:11pm PT
Marlow, waterlogged wood is very much more beautiful plus is old-growth and hence straight-grained
and works beautifully. I believe some of it sells for $30/ board foot (2.5 x 30 x 30 cm)!

http://www.nytimes.com/1997/09/24/us/with-timber-scarce-old-logs-deep-in-a-lake-become-a-sunken-treasure.html
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 15, 2014 - 01:16pm PT

Cool article, Reilly. TFPU.

The idea for the company came to Mr. Mitchen while he was exploring for shipwrecks in Lake Superior in the early 90's, after he had seen countless logs in his dives. The abundance of old logs, together with rising timber prices, convinced Mr. Mitchen that a forgotten treasure was waiting in the water.

The Water-Logged company pays Wisconsin one-third of the value of each log, based on the current market value of freshly cut timber. After a drying process that takes weeks, the old wood is cut and sold for much higher prices than new wood, sometimes 10 times as much. About a dozen kinds of trees are retrieved, including oak, maple, birch, elm, ash and pine. Birds-eye maple, with its iridescent grain, sells for as much as $80 a foot after being cut.

While most of the salvaged wood goes for furniture and craft work, some has been used to make stringed instruments, like a flat-topped acoustic guitar the company is giving to the country singer Johnny Cash.

The company's keenest hopes lie in finding wood for exquisite violins. A sample of 300-year-old maple has been analyzed by Joseph Nagyvary, a researcher and violin builder at Texas A&M University, who has compared it to the material used by Antonio Stradivari, who built the world's finest violins in the 17th and 18th centuries in Italy.

''I have not seen anything like this in modern times -- it's in the same ball park as a Stradivarius,'' said Mr. Nagyvary, whose research has indicated that Stradivari soaked his wood in water, which removed gums and resins. So it is possible that the lake water has cleansed the old wood in a similar way.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 16, 2014 - 11:10am PT

Sigurd & Bernt Ruotimaa - Vid min mila
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Sofia Karlsson : Resan till Österlandet (Travelling to the Eastern Country - Finland)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 16, 2014 - 12:03pm PT
I'm a big Knut Hamsun fan, Marlow. I always liked this thread. The first Hamsun tale I read was "Growth of the Soil". It is still one of my favorites.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 16, 2014 - 12:26pm PT
Wayno

Thanks for the feedback. I've read "Markens grøde" a couple of times. It's a great read.

My favourite author the last ten years has been an American, Cormac McCarthy.

When one appreciates the earth and the vitalism of Hamsun as we both do, an awareness of the darker forces in the human psyche and human society is an excellent counter-weight... ;o)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2014 - 11:49am PT

Gottlundmarsjen 2014

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2014 - 11:53am PT

Gottlundmarsjen 2014 continues
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2014 - 11:57am PT

Gottlundmarsjen 2014 encore...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2014 - 12:31pm PT

Finnskogdagene 2014
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2014 - 12:34pm PT

Finnskogdagene 2014 continues
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2014 - 12:37pm PT

Finnskogdagene 2014 encore...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 13, 2014 - 06:04pm PT
SWEET 544!
My mechanic is restoring a PV445 which are super rare here.
I gotta say I enjoy driving my XC70 T5 with the turbocharged engine a LOT! ;-)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2014 - 09:23am PT

Reilly.

PV 445 is rare everywhere -it's quite a gem...

Here's a photo - I had to look it up. I can remember seeing the car a few times during my childhood.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2014 - 09:28am PT

Finnskogdagene 2014: The Forest-Finn museum at Svullrya (Finnetunet)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2014 - 09:30am PT

The Forest-Finn museum at Svullrya continues...

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 14, 2014 - 09:44am PT
^^^^ Det aer mega bra! Takk takk!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 17, 2014 - 02:50pm PT
Hej, Marlow, from the Life Imitates Art Dept:

This is a print I bought in Oslo...




So, 5 years after I bought this I was north of the Brooks Range in
Alaska when this exact scenario repeated itself! Obviously, I'm here
to tell about it. ;-)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2014 - 11:11am PT
Reilly.

Nansen was multitalented. That's an excellent drawing.

You're a lucky man. Both the owner of the Nansen drawing and nearly eaten by a polar bear. Great luck twice in a lifetime. I guess you've been on a hard work to luck ratio of 50 to 50, while most men are on a 99 to 1 ratio. Maybe that's how life as art unfolds. ^^^^ ... if you work hard...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2014 - 12:24pm PT

Johnokner. TFPU! Was it a bit wet?

Lillehammer is a town who has managed to keep a quite sympathetic atmosphere rooted in Norwegian tradition.

Another Norwegian town well kept is Røros, north of Lillehammer.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2014 - 01:03pm PT

Most of the Southern part of Norway

On this map you find Røros in the north where the blue lines meet and Oslo in the south (under the red spot Stopp). If you start from Oslo you will find Elverum where the blue line splits into two lines. North-west of Elverum you find Lillehammer and north-west of Lillehammer you find Jotunheimen.

South-east of Elverum you see Kirkenær. In the area east of Kirkenær and up north to Innbygda you find Finnskogen.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2014 - 01:06pm PT

Lom is a beautiful place...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 18, 2014 - 01:45pm PT
That map is crap, it doesn't have Hov on it. Stefaren would be mad!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2014 - 01:50pm PT

Reilly.

There's many Hov/Hofs in Norway. Where in Norway do Stefaren live?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 18, 2014 - 01:55pm PT
He would have argued there is only one Hov, at least on Randsfjorden. ;-)
The family also had the inn at Odnes at the north end.

Are there as many Hovs as there are Å's? (trick question)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 18, 2014 - 02:06pm PT

Reilly

Here's a crap map (I can't see Finnskogen ;o)) to make Stefaren happy. You find Hov in the south-east, just west of Gjøvik, by the long great lake Randsfjorden. Randsfjorden is number four among the greatest Norwegian lakes. The greatest Norwegian lake you see a part of east of Randsfjorden - name: Mjøsa. Around Mjøsa you see two towns (red areas) with a name - Gjøvik and Hamar. In the northern end of Mjøsa you find Lillehammer (for some reason without name). You also find Lom in the north-western part of the map.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 6, 2014 - 01:30pm PT

Motti

The most well-known Forest-Finnish dish is Motti.

This is how motti is made:
1 cup of water and 1 teaspoon of salt is boiled. Then 2 cups of flour is poured into the water. Oat or barley is used as flour for the motti. The flour should cover the surface of the water. The water will boil up in small "volcanoes". While you carefully move the flour into the "volcanoes" you should sing the first verse of «Vår Gud han er så fast en borg» ("Our God is a solid castle"), and then you should stir the water and flour until the flour is forming into small lumps the size of a fingernail. It you stir the water and flour too early, the motti will end up in big wet lumps. If you stir too late the motti will end up in small dry lumps. It’s said that a lazy cook will make good motti, or also that you can go out to the shed and cut pork for the motti while the motti is boiling. The motti is served with fried pork and liquid fat. What's left of the motti is used as a dessert with sour milk and sugar on.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 6, 2014 - 01:37pm PT

Rømmegrøt

Another traditional Norwegian dish is "rømmegrøt". Rømmegrøt is a summer food and is traditionally served with vannkringle and spekemat. Spekemat is either thinly sliced cured leg of lamb (fenalår) or marinated, cured ham (skinke). Sometimes flatbrød, a crisp, thin bread, is served instead of vannkringle.

This is how "rømmegrøt" is made
Ingredients:
2 cups sour cream
1 cup flour
1-1//2 cups milk
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2 teaspoon salt
butter
cinnamon
sugar

Preparation:
Bring sour cream and cream to a soft boil for 5 minutes. Sift and stir in 3 tablespoons flour - one spoon at a time. Keep at low heat while adding the remainder of the flour and milk intermittently.

After all is added, bring up to a boil on low heat and cook for an additional 5 minutes while stirring. This porridge/pudding is thin and light.

Ladle the rømmegrøt onto individual dinner plates or bowls. If you want to eat like a real Norwegian Viking, you have to sprinkle sugar and cinnamon on top of the pudding.

Wait, don't forget to put a smørøye (eye of butter - exact translation) - that is a dab of butter in the center of the sour cream pudding.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 10, 2014 - 12:03pm PT

Kongsvinger this weekend
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 10, 2014 - 12:10pm PT

Finnskogen this weekend.

On Monday last week it was a bit o' the breezy...

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 16, 2014 - 11:58am PT
Jan Johansson

 Vallåt från Jämtland ("Forest People")
[Click to View YouTube Video]

 Visa Från Utanmyra
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2014 - 12:04pm PT

Solitary Pine

Plenty of space here, you've been able to
stretch up and spread your crown
wide.

But you stand alone.
When the storms come, you have no one to lean on.


And I was sorrow

And I was sorrow and stayed in a cave.
And I was pride and built beyond the stars.
Now I build in the nearest tree
and in the morning when I waken
the pine threads it's needle with gold.

Olav H. Hauge

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2014 - 12:28pm PT

An old photo from the Swedish part of Finnskogen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2014 - 09:04am PT

Autumn at Sønsterud this weekend.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2014 - 09:27am PT

The ones who built this country (De som byggde landet) - Mora-Per, Mikael Wiehe and Sofia Karlsson
[Click to View YouTube Video]
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Sep 24, 2014 - 01:53pm PT
hey there say, just a bump, to help our FIRST PAGE,

HOWEVER, awww, yes, i DO love the post that i am bumping, too...
you are of value, ...


just that i can't always visit everything and post...
but today, is REALLY NEEDED FOR HELP, TO US ALL...

WILL TRY to bump some more...
this 'message will repeat' for a bit, in the bumps...
:)

hope i am helping...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 7, 2014 - 11:34am PT

Thorstein Bergman - Helgdagskväll i timmerkojan (Weekend night in the cabin)
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Sofia Karlsson & Odd Nordstoga - Jag väntar... (I'm waiting...) Lyrics: Dan Andersson. Music from 1:50.
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 7, 2014 - 12:50pm PT
Sveeds? Jo? OK, I'm going back to watching Lilyhammer.
That should be required watching for any potential immigrant, ikke sant?
(and don't pretend you haven't watched it!)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 7, 2014 - 12:55pm PT

Reilly.

I'll start watching Lillyhammer and Hurtigruta 24 hours a day den dagen jeg emigrerer ^^^^
Tripod? Swellguy? Halfwit? Smegma?

Trad climber
Wanker Stately Mansion, Placerville
Oct 7, 2014 - 01:13pm PT
Isn't this when Chuck cracks a boner?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 11, 2014 - 11:28am PT

Two villages in Värmland
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 11, 2014 - 11:45am PT

The best beer cars of Sweden
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 13, 2014 - 12:36pm PT

The river Rotna flows through Finnskogen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 13, 2014 - 01:24pm PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 18, 2014 - 02:09pm PT

As a follow-up to Reilly's polar bear (excellent drawning by Nansen)

Nansen and Fram on a well made medal:
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 19, 2014 - 12:44am PT

In a present commentary to Nansen's "In Northern Mists" the following is written about the relationship between the Sami people and Finns/Forest-Finns in Scandinavia:

Lapps are now generally known as ‘Sami’ or ‘Same’ [pronounced ‘Sar-mi’]. They are the same people who were named in the remote past ‘Finns’, [the “small (?) very mild Finns...” of Jordanes] or Procopius’s Scrithifini]. Nansen remarks that “Lapps are called ‘Finns,’ both in Old Norse and modern Norwegian...” It has been suggested that the Lapps may be unique among the present-day Arctic peoples in that they have remained in the same place in the Arctic since just after the last ice age. Their home has been the northern regions of Norway, Sweden and Finland, and the Kola Peninsula of Russia for a period of about eight thousand years.

The modern people known as Finns, inhabitants of Finland, are quite different. They are descended from a collection of tribes speaking similar languages of the ‘Finno-Ugric’ family - the same language which they passed to the Lapps and which is now spoken by them. This succession of land-hungry tribes probably arrived in the area of the eastern Baltic, Finland and Karelia around 100 B.C. to 100 A.D. and included the Estonians and Karelians. These peoples came from central Russia, and brought with them the ability to cultivate cereals. Those migrating to what is now Finland would have displaced small numbers of resident nomadic Lapps [Sami], who withdrew to the north. [‘Finnic Peoples’, Encyclopædia Britannica, Britannica (R) CD 99 Multimedia Edition (C) 1994-1999 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 19, 2014 - 12:51am PT

And then a tender tune with a traditional Scandinavian vibe...

Åsa Jinder - Cajsa Stina Åkerström - Av längtan till dej
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 9, 2014 - 03:32am PT

Finnskogen in watercolor (Manne Larsson)

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 9, 2014 - 11:18am PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 9, 2014 - 11:21am PT

Finnskog-blues

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Rock poet Joakim Thåström: 1. Främling överallt (Stranger everywhere) 2. Kort Biografi Med Litet Testamente (Short Biography With Small Testament) 3. Sönder Boulevard

The Dan Andersson of our time...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 10, 2014 - 12:30pm PT

Inspired by Kalevala.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 25, 2014 - 11:36am PT

The Kalevala has seen some great illustrators. One of them is Mud Mechev in a Russian edition from 1956. For those of us who are living among lakes in the northern forests these paintings look familiar even if we've never seen them before.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 25, 2014 - 11:36am PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 25, 2014 - 11:36am PT

Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Nov 25, 2014 - 02:38pm PT
Some of those look like they could have been used to illustrate Kristin Lavransdatter. Nice.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 26, 2014 - 11:34am PT

Fossil.

They do.

It's interesting to see how different Kalevala illustrators are giving their own interpretation colored by their own references and sensibilities. The characters are given a cartoonish look by some illustrators, some make them look like vikings, and some like ordinary people. Some dress them up in clothes from a time long gone and others in clothes from their own present time. Mechev is possibly the one I have seen who are best able to make them look like ordinary people from the time when the runes were told and sung. Though he has his own take on their clothes. It's seldom ordinary peoples everyday clothes.

In my view Mechev has an extraordinary ability to paint the landscape, the forest. He must know the area well.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 30, 2014 - 02:07pm PT

The forest on a Finnish medal
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 21, 2014 - 03:29pm PT

Thorstein Bergman - Helgdagskväll i timmerkojan
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2014 - 08:31am PT

Sønsterud jula 2014
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 1, 2015 - 11:50am PT

Larin Paraske, the "Finnish Mnemosyne".


Larin Paraske (December 27, 1833–January 3, 1904) was an Izhorian oral poet. She is considered a key figure in Finnish folk poetry and has been called the "Finnish Mnemosyne". Her frequent listeners included several romantic nationalist artists, such as Jean Sibelius, seeking inspiration from her interpretations of Kalevala, an epic poem compiled from Finnish folklore by Elias Lönnrot.

Paraske could recite over 32,000 verses of poetry, which made her an important source for Karelian culture. Her poems were written down by Adolf Neovius in the 1880s, and after several years of work, approximately 1200 poems, 1750 proverbs and 336 riddles were documented, along with several Finnic lamentations known as itkuvirsi, performed by crying and sobbing.

In 1936, sculptor Alpo Sailo created a statue of Paraske. It was planned for the Kalevala building, which however never realized, so the statue was erected in 1949 in the Hakasalmi park, off Mannerheimintie, in Helsinki. A street named after Paraske is located in Kaarela, a district of Helsinki. In 2004, Paraske placed 87th on Suuret suomalaiset, a vote arranged by YLE, the Finnish Broadcasting Company, to determine the "100 greatest Finns". Paraske is also one of the people on stamps of Finland.

Biography

Paraske was born as Paraskeva Nikitina, her official Russian name, in Lempaala, Northern Ingria. Her father Mikitta Mikitanpoika (1802–1851) was a landless peasant, a lampuoti, who rented a farm. Both of her parents were ethnic Izhorians. Paraske took on poetry at early age by memorizing all the poems known in the area, and creating many more herself. Her relatives, Timon Tarja and Kondrolan Maura, were also prolific poets. Paraske's father died in 1851 and her mother, Tatjana Vasilovna, had died three years earlier in 1848.

In 1853, Paraske married a peasant named Kaurila Teppananpoika, or Gavril Stepanov, from Vaskela village in Sakkola (later Metsäpirtti municipality) of Viipuri Province. Her husband was sickly and 20 years older than she was, but the marriage produced nine children during the years from 1855 to 1878. However, only three of them survived until adulthood. Besides her own children, Paraske cared for 50 orphans from St. Petersburg. Her life was hard as the livelihood of the family depended on her income. She was eventually widowed in 1888.

Paraske's life changed in 1887, when she came to the attention of the clergyman Adolf Neovius, who was documenting national folk poetry. Neovius recognized her talent and paid Paraske a ruble per hour for singing her poetry. With this money, Paraske was able to save her house from seizure. Their collaboration resulted in transcriptions of 1200 poems, 1750 proverbs and 336 riddles. Her poems had earlier been written down by A. Borenius-Lähteenkorva in 1877, but this work consisted of only 26 poems.

In 1891, Neovius moved to Porvoo and Paraske traveled to the city with him to complete their project. During the years from 1891 to 1894, she gave several performances in Porvoo and Helsinki, becoming very popular. Her often Kalevala-themed rune singing influenced several prominent artists. Jean Sibelius' Kullervo, Op. 7 has been said to contain elements of Paraske's hypnotic, incantatory singing style. Albert Edelfelt and Eero Järnefelt painted portraits of Paraske in 1893.

Paraske returned to Vaskela, Sakkola, in 1894. Despite her success, she remained poor. Her house was sold during the summer of 1899 due to tax arrears, and she had to move into her neighbour's sauna. The Finnish Literature Society granted Paraske an artist's pension in 1901, but she was unable to overcome her financial problems. She died destitute in Sakkola in 1904.

Wikipedia


Andy Fielding

Trad climber
UK
Jan 1, 2015 - 04:32pm PT
Hey Marlow nice pictures. I'm curious how most of them seem to have white fluffy clouds and blue skies. I've been to Norway three times and each time I get photos like this one of me on Preikestolen. Apparently the view is fantastic :)

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 2, 2015 - 02:45pm PT

Andy.

If you live in Norway all year round and run out with you camera every time you see clear blue sky, you may be fast enough to get a non-misty photo.

That's a great misty Prekestolen photo.

Edited: Happy New Year Wilbeer!
wilbeer

Mountain climber
Terence Wilson greeneck alleghenys,ny,
Jan 2, 2015 - 02:50pm PT
Looks a lot like western New York.[Your great photos just above]

Happy New Year Marlow.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 20, 2015 - 02:15pm PT

Oskar Lindberg: Gammal fäbodpsalm (Old Pastoral Hymn) / cello & organ
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 1, 2015 - 08:32am PT

Fantastic nature filming
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Jean Sibelius - Finlandia
Thanks to Mouse for posting the music on the Classical Music thread...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 30, 2015 - 10:34am PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 3, 2015 - 10:32am PT

Out of the Woods - A Norwegian city today: Oslo
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2015 - 09:33am PT
Out of the Woods II - Oslo the day after yesterday:
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 16, 2015 - 12:10pm PT

Till Min Syster (To My Sister). A poem written by Dan Andersson to his sister, Anna Andersson.
[Click to View YouTube Video]



Till Min Broder (To My Brother). A poem written by Anna Andersson to her brother after his death from cyanid poisoning at Hotel Hellman in Stockholm 1920.
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 1, 2015 - 09:05am PT

Signs and symbols can tell

Signs and symbols can tell; the pentagram (viisikanta, viskant, viisnurk) was used to test the axman. With five blows he would make a symmetrical pentagram. I did not succeed. My cousin Johannes Säterbakken (1908 -1990) took me to a big spruce tree. "Here I have sat many times, thinking,” he said. "The first cut should be angled correctly." He took off his hat and demonstrated a cut in the tree-calf. "Cut the next four," he said, and gave me the ax. "This is a great star. The tip of it is pointing straight up at the top of the bush." I firmly believe that he succumbed to the tree before he put on his hat. We went back to the farm. When he put down his ax, he said, "She knows she shall be cut down come winter." That it had magical significance is not surprising. The pentagram with the tip up represents the world (maa - ilm) and with the tip down it simulates the underworld (maa - all). The Finns used it as protection for the cows, especially when they grazed in the forest. During the meal afterwards, Ellen said, half loudly: "Höss, - is it for the spruce by the sauna --- I wonder ---?" Johannes reassured that she should remain at peace. "The giant spruces standing until the old age itself lie them down. The rot ate them up from the inside and the wind had been working to tear them down. After they had eaten from the earth for a hundred years, they lied down and gave it all back. And the moss wove them fallen into the green, and Linnea decorated the graves with nodding bells on fine wire stems "(Holth 1982 223).
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 1, 2015 - 09:10am PT

Slash and burn shifting cultivation

The terminology in shifting or swidden literature is often confusing and inconsistent. I would recommend Spencer's comments (Spencer 1966 6) and Appendix B, (Spencer 1966 175).[1] which treats this terminology with English literature using "slash-and-burn or shifting cultivation". Shifting cultivation means change of place, and the cultivation refers most often in older literature to a simpler agriculture than the meaning of the word "agriculture" today. "Swidden" is rarely used in current literature, and is completely omitted in several recent dictionaries.


The clan

The heads of swidden family groups or clans (noite) had to have, at all times, an overview of their own clan's activities in order to put together these three parameters (according to their own experiences and conscious thought.

The time frame covers the first three cues of removal of the existing vegetation, which is controlled by man. The next three deal with the new vegetation, crops, and regrowth of new forests.

The time between harvest and regrowth varies from direct transition to regrowth through a number of years with a second use of swidden (vuoma) to never regrow, i.e. direct transition from the crop (pühä) to a permanent farm place / settlement (Piha).

Natural influences noite need only register and take into account in assessment: climate with rain, wind, temperature, drainage conditions, soil type, topography, flora and fauna, but he mastered his seeds brought for planting.

Noite coordinate so that all valves within the clans function: technology with adequate treatment of the area at the right time, cutting, burning, and social order. Runic poetry was a faithful helper in the exploitation of past experience and knowledge, and poems thankfully have the ability to survive generations.

Swidden cultivation requires a large number of people in the group to survive as an operational unit. It is a complex cycle of synchronized processes performed by individuals and / or groups in binding cooperation.

Such production union is often called a clan, extended family, kind, thiod, ätt, or tribe; in Russian plemja, rod; in Persian tauma, and Sanskrit jana, kula-. The village name in today's Finno-Ugric languages is küla. The word küllä is a reinforced yes: those that say yes and agree. Each man in swidden society had significance as a participant in the community, not as a person.


Mythology

Finnish mythology and the belief in supernatural forces, beings, and effects, can be traced primarily from the swidden manager ( noita ). He had the people's respect, and everyone accepted his assessment and obeyed his commands. The clan’s existence depended on his knowledge and decisions.

Missionary priests have often concluded from such loyalty that noitas practice witchcraft and possess supernatural powers; this was effective because people believed blindly in noita. But many of the priests did not truly understand what noitas’ power over the people actually consisted of. People's loyalty stemmed from the old days of noitas’ ability to lead cultivation. Could he not guide satisfactorily, he was promptly deposed, exiled or killed. Priests’ sermons about the Christian religion and promise of eternal life or suffering and destruction in the opposite case were not enough for swidden culture. The Incarnation was a completely alien thought, as well as eternal life as something desirable. The numerous Finnish runes / poems says that he who molests other clan’s selections or swidden plots should not be allowed to go back to nature, ordered to wander around forever.

Per Martin Tvengsberg
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 1, 2015 - 10:40am PT
Morn morn, Marlow! Takk for the gud stuff!
Just back from nordskog!

The way was clearly marked...

Parry Sound is part of Lake Huron on the Ontario side.

There are some things you have to put up with getting there,
such as bad spelling...

Why does the Orre cross the road? Interesting that Parry Sound's most
famous son is Bobby Orr!!!!!! Coincidence?

This is the home of the rare Massassauga Rattlesnake.
Sorry, no pics of them as it was too cold for them to come out.

You can drink this water...

But it wasn't quite ready for swimming...

Logging industry ruins from 1890's...

Hej, am I in Norge?


Uhhh, WTF?

Oh, I get it...

They don't do it the old-fashioned way any longer.

Storskraker...

Wild beasts, too! If you look closely you can see he is only
pretending to sleep...

Local art...

Hej daa from the 6cm man!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 1, 2015 - 11:23am PT

Reilly.

Awesome TR, very American and very Norwegian. TFPU!

I recently found this American loon. You also find them at Finnskogen. They have no respect for borders.

At Finnskogen you mostly find red-throated and sometimes black-throated loon. The painting above shows a common/great northern loon.
hashbro

Trad climber
Mental Physics........
May 1, 2015 - 08:33pm PT
glad to see traditional lifestyles being maintained in Norway.....but sad to see ecologically destructive images of apex predators being killed (cuz we live in the age of human-caused extinctions now)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 2, 2015 - 12:35am PT

Vappu (Walpurgis day)

In Finland, Vappu is one of the four biggest holidays along with Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, and Midsummer (Juhannus). Walpurgis witnesses the biggest carnival-style festival held in the streets of Finland's towns and cities. The celebration, which begins on the evening of 30 April and continues to 1 May, typically centres on copious consumption of sima, sparkling wine and other alcoholic beverages. Student traditions, particularly those of the engineering students, are one of the main characteristics of Vappu. Since the end of the 19th century, this traditional upper-class feast has been appropriated by university students. Many lukio (university-preparatory high school) alumni (who are thus traditionally assumed to be university bound), wear a cap. One tradition is to drink sima, a home-made low-alcohol mead, along with freshly cooked funnel cakes.

In the capital Helsinki and its surrounding region, fixtures include the capping (on 30 April at 6 pm) of the Havis Amanda, a nude female statue in Helsinki, and the biennially alternating publications of ribald matter called Äpy and Julkku, by engineering students of Aalto University. Both are sophomoric; but while Julkku is a standard magazine, Äpy is always a gimmick. Classic forms have included an Äpy printed on toilet paper and a bedsheet. Often, the magazine has been stuffed inside standard industrial packages, such as sardine cans and milk cartons. For most university students, Vappu starts a week before the day of celebration. The festivities also include a picnic on 1 May, which is sometimes prepared in a lavish manner, particularly in Ullanlinnanmäki in Helsinki city.

The Finnish tradition is also a shadowing of the Socialist May Day parade. Expanding from the parties of the left, the whole of the Finnish political scene has adopted Vappu as the day to go out on stumps and agitate. This includes not only political activists. Other institutions, such as the state Lutheran church, have followed suit, marching and making speeches. Left-wing activists of the 1970s still party on May Day. They arrange carnivals. And radio stations play leftist songs from the 1970s.

Traditionally, 1 May is celebrated by a picnic in a park. For most, the picnic is enjoyed with friends on a blanket with good food and sparkling wine. Some people, however, arrange extremely lavish picnics with pavilions, white tablecloths, silver candelabras, classical music and extravagant food. The picnic usually starts early in the morning, where some of the previous night's party-goers continue their celebrations undaunted by lack of sleep.

Some student organisations reserve areas where they traditionally camp every year. Student caps, mead, streamers and balloons have their role in the picnic, as well as in the celebration as a whole.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 2, 2015 - 12:37am PT

Havis Amanda or Merenneito (English: The Mermaid)

Havis Amanda is a nude female statue in Helsinki, Finland. It was sculpted by Ville Vallgren (1855-1940) in 1906 in Paris, but was not erected at its present location at the Market Square in Kaartinkaupunki until 1908.

Havis Amanda is one of Vallgren's Parisian Art Nouveau works. It is cast in bronze and the fountain it resides in is made of granite. She is a mermaid who stands on seaweed as she rises from the water, with four fish spouting water at her feet and surrounded by four sea lions. She is depicted leaning backwards as if to say goodbye to her element. Vallgren's intention was to symbolize the rebirth of Helsinki. The height of the statue is 194 centimetres and with the pedestal it stands 5 metres tall. According to Vallgren's letters the model for the statue was a then 19-year-old Parisian lady, Marcelle Delquini.

Vallgren himself simply called the work Merenneito (English: The Mermaid), but it quickly started to get additional nicknames. The Finland-Swedish newspapers dubbed it Havis Amanda and the Finnish Haaviston Manta or simply Manta. Havis Amanda is the common name used in brochures and travel guides.

It was unveiled on September 20, 1908. The work drew a lot of criticism at first, especially from women. Its nakedness and seductiveness were considered inappropriate. Not all groups objected to the nudity per se, but putting it on a pedestal was thought to subjugate women by making them appear weak and create sexual objectification and belittling of women (equal and common suffrage was introduced in Finland in 1906). Some women's rights groups criticised the look of the figure as plain and some even as "a common French whore", lacking pristine and innocence. The sea lions, with their human tongues hanging out, were said to represent men lusting after the mademoiselle. Vallgren considered himself a worshipper of women. Many in the cultural elite of Finland considered Vallgren an outsider and had judged his work even before it was finished. A good friend of his, Albert Edelfelt, was instrumental through his influence in getting the work ordered. Thanks to a small group of mainly Finland-Swedish supporters, the work gradually started gaining wide acceptance and natives started seeing it as the spirit of the city. Today it has been consistently voted the most important and most beautiful piece of art in Helsinki.

Every year on Vappu, Manta serves as a centrepiece for the celebrations. Students of the local universities put a cap on the statue in an elaborate ceremony. For many it is a "must see" event.

There is also an urban legend that Havis Amanda patronizes men's sexual potency. Some men believe that washing one's face with water from one of Havis Amanda's fountains and shouting thrice "Rakastaa!" (Finnish verb "love") increases men's sexual ability.


Havis Amanda Fountain
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 3, 2015 - 12:25pm PT

The first car I drove was a Swedish Saab 96 (V4), looking like this one:


Saab 96: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saab_96

Here's Saab history:
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 14, 2015 - 10:30am PT

Into the woods of Sweden: Arctic Circle or Bust
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 22, 2015 - 10:03am PT

Swedish man attacking bear
[Click to View YouTube Video]
No plan B...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 22, 2015 - 10:07am PT
That wasn't an attack, bjorn just wanted to play but the Sweed was too mean!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 22, 2015 - 10:27am PT

Reilly.

You're right. I changed the heading. Swedish man attacking bear...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 14, 2015 - 12:20pm PT

Into the Woods

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2015 - 01:26pm PT

The Flisa river this weekend

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2015 - 01:31pm PT

Temppeliaukio Church - Helsinki Rock Church

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2015 - 01:34pm PT

Tapiola

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 28, 2015 - 01:40pm PT

Norwegian Woods - Jazz at Berlin Philharmonic
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 12, 2015 - 11:14am PT

Finnskogdagene 2015 - Gottlundmarsjen 1
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 12, 2015 - 11:18am PT

Finnskogdagene 2015 - Gottlundmarsjen 2
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 12, 2015 - 11:25am PT

Finnskogdagene 2015 - Finnetunet 1
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 12, 2015 - 11:30am PT

Finnskogdagene 2015 - Finnetunet 2
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Jul 12, 2015 - 02:22pm PT
Those Brits are bloody weak. "Epic drive" indeed. :-D

I've done that trip numerous times. Admittedly, not from Copenhagen, but a few hours north thereof. And most of them my parents drove, not I, as it was visits to our grandparents who lived up in the Arctic.
It IS a long drive. Especially when you're a child.

Cool photos, Marlow.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 12, 2015 - 03:28pm PT

Thanks Lollie.

Funny Brits... I've done the trip (to Bodø) many times, though in a train...

Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Jul 12, 2015 - 04:26pm PT
I've hitchhiked from Stockholm to Bodö twice. We did beat the train.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 13, 2015 - 02:26am PT

It's a slowmoving train, Swedish roads are excellent and the cars are fast, so if you're a lucky hitchhaiker...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 21, 2015 - 11:48am PT

Helgdagskväll i timmerkojan - Sven Olof Sandberg - 1939
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2015 - 10:07am PT

Polsdans fra Finnskogen - I Grenseland - Audun Grüner-Hegge og Anbjørg Myhra Bergwitz
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2015 - 10:28am PT

Som fågelen (Like a bird)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2015 - 08:15am PT

Finnskogen an early morning in late July
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2015 - 08:22am PT

Meet America's Most Obsessed Saab Collector.

Bruce Turk turned a childhood love for the Saab Sonett into a 25-year obsession and a collection of Saab cars, parts and memorabilia you must see to believe.
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Swedish Automaker Saab/History (Car Documentary)
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Gnome Ofthe Diabase

climber
Out Of Bed
Aug 2, 2015 - 08:23am PT
#302!! Congratulations Marlow.
Isn't it good?
Norwegian wood.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2015 - 08:26am PT

Gnome.

Yes, not bad. Det er gærbra...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 20, 2015 - 11:18am PT

Där näckrosen blommar - Carl Jularbos orkester spelar
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 20, 2015 - 12:31pm PT

Omkring tiggarn från Luossa

Hootenanny Singers
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Sonja Aldén
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2015 - 12:01pm PT
Flisa today

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 1, 2015 - 12:11pm PT

A great musician documentary - Sofia Karlsson - with a lot of music. The lyrics are often written by Dan Andersson, her favourite poet.

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2015 - 01:25pm PT

Finnskogen this weekend

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2015 - 01:29pm PT

Lake Røgden
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2015 - 01:34pm PT

Lake Kirkesjøen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2015 - 02:05pm PT

Day and night
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 4, 2015 - 03:47pm PT
Hej, Marlow, not in Finnskogen but plenty of Norwegians hereabouts.
Found a boat for us when you visit me in Port Townsend, Washington...

Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Oct 5, 2015 - 12:28am PT
Lovely thread, this one. Beautiful pictures.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2015 - 12:44am PT

Thanks Lollie.

The name of Reilly's boat is "Torsk" - "Cod" in English.

And here's a picture of fishing at Norkapp around year 1900:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 20, 2015 - 01:23pm PT

Rune songs

During the late Bronze Age, a hunting-cultivation culture arose alongside the ancient wilderness culture, along the coastal and inland areas of the Gulf of Finland and Lake Ladoga. As had happened in other shamanic cultures, the transformed economic basis of the hunting-cultivation culture strained the limits of traditional shamanic practices. It led to the development of a unique ‘Finnish solution’ to the crisis, building upon, but also departing from, elements of wilderness culture.

First, in order to maintain protection and guidance, the new hunter-cultivators continued to embrace and honour their ancestors, as the wilderness culture had done. However, over time, hunter-cultivators changed their allegiance from the clan to the extended family, or lineage. At the same time, they continued their respectful relationships with the spirit persons of nature, the haltijas, reflecting their continuing reliance on wilderness subsistence activities.

The second development, in response to the crisis of relevance of the ancient shamanic practices for the hunting-cultivation culture, was the appearance of a new transitional shamanic practitioner, the proto-tietäjä. This figure was a variation on the Siberian model of the “independent shaman”, who could be mobile and could serve the former members of various clans. However, the new proto-tietäjä lacked a cohesive base of support and recognition, as the wilderness band had provided for the noita.

In developing new forms of practice relevant to hunting-cultivation life, the proto-tietäjä had access to unique resources: nearby bands of the wilderness shamanic culture, with their shamanistic noitas, as well as rich cultural influences arriving on their shores from Baltic and proto-Scandinavian areas. The fruit was the development of Kalevala metre runes. The runes incorporated the ancient shamanic world view in sacred folk poetry, in fixed form, that would be passed on thereafter through a vibrant oral folk tradition.



The photo above from the 19th century depicts the singing of runes, in which one singer leads and the other responds. It suggests the ancient roots of the tradition in wilderness culture: “The specific position taken by the singers and their cooperation could be a vestige of shaman activity. The fore-singer corresponded to the shaman and the after-singer to the shaman’s helper.” (Pentikäinen: 1999)

Over time, tietäjä-poets began to add songs to the body of runes composed by the wilderness noita-poets. Their songs, while maintaining wilderness motifs and images, also reflected sacred themes of the hunter-cultivation, and later swidden, culture.

According to Oinas (1997), singing the runes was not seen as “art for art’s sake, but an act of magical significance. These songs contain the most sacred and powerful knowledge that could be used to influence man’s life”. In effect, they encoded the ancient shamanic world view of the Finns and later additions to it by tietäjä-poets.

Formerly this world view had been maintained as part of the “grammar of mind” of the wilderness noita, but now it was the property of the people of the hunting-cultivation culture (and eventually, the whole Finnish people), including the tietäjäs, in the form of the Kalevala metre runes.

The body of runes or magic poems were carried down from singer (laulaja) to singer, generation to generation, over centuries and millennia in Finland. “Men and women sang—either in groups or alone—as they worked in the fields, hunted, fished, or attended to domestic duties. In the evening the men and women sang and listened to each other as they performed household tasks, the men spinning or weaving, the men carving or mending their nets.” (Kuusi, et al: 1977)

Because the runes were passed on orally, in the words of Comparetti (1898), they became a “fluctuating mass of verse, of poetic thought…in a perennial state of transformation, of decomposition and of recomposition.” In spite of the often superior aesthetic qualities of this body of verse, it never became the property of elites, including ‘artistic’ ones. Comparetti says, “In truth the traditional poetry of the Finns is popular poetry in the full sense of the word”.

The Rise of Kalevala Era Shamanism: The Kalevala Metre Runes: http://spiritboat.blogspot.dk/2012/04/rise-of-kalevala-era-shamanism-kalevala.html
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 22, 2015 - 01:19pm PT

On the eastern coast of Sweden: Stockholm around 1900

On the western coast: Smögen

Balladen om " Briggen Blue Bird of Hull", Smögen (with nice Norwegian pictures out of context)
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Smögen, Bohuslän today - fishing and eating lobster
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 1, 2015 - 11:23am PT

A tune by a musician from Finnskogen who died too early, Ted Gärdestad, and his brother, Kenneth - I den Stora Sorgens Famn (The great sorrow)

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 2, 2015 - 10:32am PT

Thorstein Bergman 1975 - Gässen flytta (lyrics: Dan Andersson)
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Freddie Wadling - "Blott en dag ett ögonblick i sänder"
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 2, 2015 - 12:45pm PT

Old winter postcards from the souteastern part of Norway:

Svullrya
Elverum
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 3, 2015 - 08:29am PT

Finnskogen long ago - pictures from Värmland, Sweden
JC Marin

Trad climber
CA
Dec 3, 2015 - 08:38pm PT

One of 7 lakes on our farm in South west Norway--tons of rock to climb too.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Dec 3, 2015 - 09:02pm PT
The Nordmarkingar look ready for anything, ikke sant?
JC Marin

Trad climber
CA
Dec 3, 2015 - 09:17pm PT
Maybe everything but A-Ha
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 28, 2015 - 09:53am PT

JC and Reilly

I have to agree. Anything, but wimpy music, one-eyed devils, removable blade safety-razors, wimpiness generally and soul-speak...

And wimpy music would also mean noisy music performed by groups of long-haired girly men in girly clothes - Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin and The Rolling Stones as examples.


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 29, 2015 - 01:51am PT

Popular music from Vittula

Mikael Niemi has written a book about about the 1960's/70's in Vittula, Pajala, in the northern part of Sweden. I'll leave to you to find the meaning of the word Vittula, but it's an appraisal of female fertility.

The book handles the transformation from a traditional code to a more modern code, in part driven by rock music. It is also a story about what it means to be a man in this Finnish-language part of Sweden, what's acceptable and what is not - what is "knapsu" (something only women do) and what is not. New times, new technology and new concepts give trouble.

Some activities that are clearly "knapsu":
 hanging up the curtains
 knitting
 milking a cow by hand
 washing the dishes by hand
 watering the flowers

Some activities that are clearly manly:
 hunting
 fishing
 chopping wood
 log driving
 fighting

But what about:
 eating low fat diet
 driving an electric car
 meditating
 yoga
 milking a cow using a milking machine
 washing something using an electric washing machine
 popular music


The arrival of the first Beatles record in Vittula

While the old folk sat around cackling away like black-clad crows, we youngsters wandered off outside. The boys from Missouri followed us out. They were twins, aged about eight, dressed in smart suits and ties. They spoke English to each other while Niila and I conversed in Tornedalen Finnish; they kept yawning due to jet lag, and were shivering noticeably. They both had crew cuts and looked like miniature marines with ginger hair, like their Irish-American father. You could see they were bewildered by being transplanted to the Old World and their mother’s roots. It was May, the snow was melting after the long winter, but the river was still covered in ice. The birches were naked, and last year’s grass was flat and yellow in the meadows where the snow had barely finished thawing away. They trod cautiously in their patent leather shoes, peering around uneasily on the look-out for Arctic predators.

I was curious and started chatting to them. They told us in sing-song Swedish-American that on their way to Sweden they’d broken their journey in London and seen the Beatles. I told them to cut out the fairy-tales. But they both swore blind the Beatles had driven past their hotel in a long, open Cadillac through rows of girls screeching and shrieking. It had all been filmed from a lorry following close behind.

The twins had bought something as well. They produced a paper bag and took out a record with an English price tag.
“Beatles,” I spelled out slowly. “Roskn roll musis.”
“Rock ’n roll music,” they chorused, correcting my pronunciation with a grin. Then they handed the single over to Niila.
“It’s a present. To our cousin.”

Niila took hold of the record in both hands. Fascinated, he slowly slid out the circular piece of vinyl and stared at the hair-thin grooves. He was holding it so gingerly, as if afraid it would crack, like a wafer-thin disc of ice from a frozen water-bucket. Although this disc was black. Like sin.

“Kiitos,” he mumbled. “Tack. Fenk yoo.”
He sniffed at the plastic, then held it up towards the spring sun and watched the grooves glittering. The twins glanced at each other and smiled. They were already composing the story about their meeting with the natives they’d recount for their buddies back home in Missouri as they all sat around chewing hamburgers and slurping coke.
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Dec 29, 2015 - 02:23am PT
thank you marlow for everything even in advance. it's like window peeking at cousin school
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Dec 29, 2015 - 08:38am PT
I am reading a book my oldest son gave me, entitled Norwegian Wood, by Lars Mytting. It is about chopping, splitting and stacking wood for use in wood stoves. It is a quirky little book that waxes eloquent about the joys of wielding an ax with authority and splitting a log on the first blow.

I love a wood fire and have been having one every night during a recent cold spell.

From the book:

Many people are at their most contemplative when addressing a chopping block.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 29, 2015 - 11:31am PT

Hooblie
"It's like window peeking at cousin school". Hehe... great...

Rick A
That book inspired a Norwegian TV station to send a continuously running television program about wood that lasted for 12 hours. It is not on Youtube.
Here it is on NRK: https://tv.nrk.no/serie/nasjonal-vedkveld

A skilled wood-chopper at work using old equipment.
[Click to View YouTube Video]

A film about a locally made, effective wood chopping machine that was used by the whole local community in Vänsjö, Sweden.
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Dec 29, 2015 - 12:37pm PT
Why are all the cartoons in svensk? (I love the last one)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 29, 2015 - 12:43pm PT

Cool that you understand Swedish, Reilly. To speak the truth - I was too lazy to even try to translate bits of the text and I have no idea how to translate some of the words.

More Norwegian wood - Norwegian Wood (acoustic Beatles cover) - Mike Masse and Jeff Hall
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Dec 29, 2015 - 12:49pm PT
I didn't say I understood them! ;-)

OK, I did look some of the big words up.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 29, 2015 - 01:34pm PT

Now there is an intended translation connected to each of the Swedish cartoons.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 2, 2016 - 08:44am PT

Around new year's eve there must be a place for an Irish tune on the Norwegian woods thread: Seán Keane - Journey Round The Sun

[Click to View YouTube Video]

and then: Sofia Karlsson & Martin Hederos - Julkortet
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2016 - 09:10am PT

Folque - Harpa
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 21, 2016 - 02:14pm PT

An early morning by Huldretjern - Jonna Jinton
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2016 - 11:18am PT

Slash and burn agriculture (Huuhtasvedjebruk) - how it spread


Huutha is supposed to have developed in the forests northeast of Viborg 1300-1400. The inner circle above shows where Huutha had spread in the 1500s. The middel line shows the 1600s and the outer line the 1700s. In the 1800s Huutha spread to Twer in Russia, Delaware in USA and many areas in Siberia.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2016 - 12:15pm PT

The map below shows where Forest Finns settled in Norway and Sweden (Scandinavia):


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2016 - 12:16pm PT

Rye from Huuhta - how it looks when it's grown:


The diversity of the rye - here showed by weight:


No monoculture involved here. Different areas had different rye.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2016 - 12:16pm PT

Sometimes we cry

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2016 - 12:16pm PT

Haldis

I dedicate this thread to the memory of my dear mother, Haldis.
She died on the 4th of March 2016.

She was born at Svullrya in 1935 and grew up at Kirkesjøberget in a home full of life and music. She loved to dance. She had five siblings - one sister and four brothers.

In her youth she helped her mother in the house and caring for the animals. She kept on doing that during the summer holidays until she married my father, Kjell. She also worked in the woods measuring timber, she worked at a bakery and in the shop at Svullrya. When she was 20 she took an education and later worked in the office.

The nature of my mother: Haldis was kind, caring, helpful, hospitable, wise and a little shy. She gave her children a safe haven to return to after their adventures. We knew she was there for us, completely to be trusted and always caring and helpful. She was also a great organizer of family holidays and family gatherings with our grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins.

The last eight years of her life dementia reduced her ability to function well at home and she spent the last six years at Åsnes sykehjem where she was treated very well. She kept her kind and helpful personality and she always had a smile for everyone.

I will thank my mother for all the wonderful memories and everything I learned from her. She gave me the values that have served me well.

Here are some pictures from the life of my mother:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2016 - 12:46pm PT

Thanks Andy, I appreciate that...
nita

Social climber
chica de chico, I don't claim to be a daisy.
Mar 6, 2016 - 01:18pm PT
*
Marlow,

Lovely tribute ..Thank you for sharing your Mom's life and posting your family photos...Very Beautiful.

Sending my heartfelt condolence ..
Take care..

Paz..
Saludos..
ps..The sound & feel of this Norwegian fiddle made me think of you...
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Love
Nita..


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2016 - 01:21pm PT

Thanks Nita...

The Maple's Lament video you posted do not function on my PC, so here is another version that plays.

"The Maple's Lament"
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
Mar 6, 2016 - 06:22pm PT
Thanks, Marlow, and very sorry to hear about your mother.

This is a favourite thread, because it celebrates the folk and history of natural spaces.
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Mar 6, 2016 - 06:24pm PT
Very sorry to hear about the loss of your mother Marlow. What a beautiful tribute. Thanks so much for taking the time to share it with us. It is wonderful.
nita

Social climber
chica de chico, I don't claim to be a daisy.
Mar 7, 2016 - 08:22am PT
*
Marlow, too bad you could not not hear the video i posted. It is a beautiful version of the song because of the bittersweet sound of the Norwegian fiddle.. It is quite a beautiful sounding instrument.

There is a live version of Laurie Lewis singing the song, but the sound quality is not good.

Looking at your Mom's pictures again.. and thinking of you and your family..
Sweet dreams..

Nita.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 7, 2016 - 08:36am PT

Andy, Anders, Callie and Nita: I deeply appreciate your support...
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Mar 7, 2016 - 11:14am PT
This thread is a wonderful tribute to your mom.

Her generation was the one that involved the transition from "the old ways" to the new, and the adoption of so much on an industrial level.

We cannot help but view the passing of such a person as a tragedy, although it is nothing but the natural order. Perhaps not so much for the person involved, as we become increasingly diminished with age, but certainly for the rest of us and our memories.

As they say in old Norse:

As-salamu Alaykum
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 7, 2016 - 11:19am PT

So true Ken.

...and sorrow is a part of the natural order...

Wa-Alaikum-us-Salaam
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 22, 2016 - 11:13am PT

Log driving down the Rotna river (mostly 1950s). The pictures belonged to my mother's uncle Jakob who wrote a book about the log driving.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 22, 2016 - 11:19am PT

The people

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 22, 2016 - 11:25am PT

Along the Rotna river

Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Mar 22, 2016 - 01:33pm PT
I'm really sorry for your loss, Marlow. Haldis sounds like a great person and mom.

And I really enjoy Norwegian Woods thread. Our geography has certain similarities, and the frontier here is only a hundred or so years back so the historic photos are fascinating. And some people still live in log cabins here in Atlin.

I do envy Norway's long history. I was in Norway in 1949, visited a farm down below Spiterstulen (might have been in Lom, but not sure). I was sitting on a carved wooden chest and commented on it to the host. He said that it had been in the family for a long time. How long? I asked. Eight hundred years.

I got up in a hurry.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 22, 2016 - 03:14pm PT

Thanks Wayne. I appreciate that.

There are clearly similarities between parts of Canada, the Northern parts of the United States, and Norway. Reilly previously posted some photos that could have been taken at Finnskogen. I think many Scandinavian emigrants found landscapes in Canada and the US that had similarities to the landscapes that they had left behind in Scandinavia.
feralfae

Boulder climber
in the midst of a metaphysical mystery
Mar 22, 2016 - 07:12pm PT
Marlow,
My condolences on the loss of your wonderful mother. I can see the warmth of her spirit in her smile. Thank you for sharing about her with us.

Your photographs of Norway remind me of Alaska, where I know many people who live in log cabins. Actually, I know a few folks here in Montana and in Wyoming as well who live in log cabins. I lived in a Swedish-coped log home for many years. The images of your homeland have a feel of the embracing and nurturing of the Earth about them. Beautiful to see.

I hope you and your family are doing well. Peace to your heart.

With Sympathy,
feralfae
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 23, 2016 - 11:04am PT

Thank you, Feralfae, I appreciate your feedback very much. Do you have Swedish ancestors?
feralfae

Boulder climber
in the midst of a metaphysical mystery
Mar 23, 2016 - 12:05pm PT
Thank you Marlow.
No Swedes in my line of the family, except for one who married in, but he was from the Orkneys, although both his parents were from Sweden. I have many family members from and some still in the Highlands. Our family line is incredibly international, however, so I am purely a mongrel of many races. :)

Our Swedish-coped home was built by a chap from Sweden That home is up Lolo Pass in western Montana, a few miles from the Idaho border. We had elk and moose in the yard all the time, because the creek ran through our place. And we had the entire Bitterroot Range Of Montana and Idaho for our back yard playground, right out the door and 427 steps away. (We counted the steps to the gate.)

Your black and white photos have a feeling of loving intimacy and sense of place that drew me in to the scenes. So lovely.

I hope you and your family are doing well.

Kind Regards,
feralfae
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 7, 2016 - 02:13pm PT

Visiting Heiki at Finnskogen

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2016 - 12:36pm PT

Kirkesjøberget
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2016 - 12:44pm PT

Finnskogen this weekend

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Apr 10, 2016 - 12:50pm PT
Wonderfuls.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 10, 2016 - 12:54pm PT

Sønsterud today

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 10, 2016 - 02:04pm PT
As seen not long ago in Southern Kalifornia...


I was dying to meet the owner but couldn't wait. I've got him beat on
the first one but not the second. I only made it to Åndalsnes.

The Åndalsnes 'hood':

OK, now back to our regularly scheduled programming.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 17, 2016 - 10:39am PT

The midnight sun at Nordkapp

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 17, 2016 - 10:42am PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 22, 2016 - 09:23am PT

The Forest - A Time-Lapse Journey Through the Forgotten Norway

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 3, 2016 - 12:26pm PT

Somliga går med trasiga skor - Alexandra under Solør-Mart'n 2013

[Click to View YouTube Video]

Pernilla Wahlgren och Cornelis Vreeswijk - Cecilia Lind & Fredrik Åkare

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 5, 2016 - 01:53pm PT

Faldaasen skole 2012

Faldaasen skole was in use 1901-1947. My grandfather went to this school some time around 1910. Today the school is a museum.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 5, 2016 - 01:56pm PT

This winter a marten had eaten it's way through the roof of the school and when it couldn't get out, nearly eaten it's way through a door. It was found this spring by the first visitor.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
May 5, 2016 - 04:31pm PT
My compliments on this peaceful, charming thread, Marlow.

It is so different from the frenzy that is apparent from where I come.

Fred.

Mouse from Merced.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 14, 2016 - 11:25am PT

Rally Sweden 2016 at Finnskogen

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 14, 2016 - 11:29am PT

Mart'n at Svullrya this weekend

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 14, 2016 - 01:16pm PT
Paamindelse for alle børn?. Gammel norsk?


Russisk Karelian 'doll'.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 14, 2016 - 01:19pm PT

Reilly: Norwegian from a time when Danish had an even greater influence on the Norwegian language...

That's a cool Russian Karelian doll. As taken from the Kalevala.


Kalevala, Runo 1 - the Sampo


The Sampo

In the expanded second version of the poem, the Sampo is forged by Ilmarinen, a legendary smith, as a task set by the Mistress of Pohjola in return for her daughter's hand.

"Ilmarinen, worthy brother,
Thou the only skilful blacksmith,
Go and see her wondrous beauty,
See her gold and silver garments,
See her robed in finest raiment,
See her sitting on the rainbow,
Walking on the clouds of purple.
Forge for her the magic Sampo,
Forge the lid in many colors,
Thy reward shall be the virgin,
Thou shalt win this bride of beauty;
Go and bring the lovely maiden
To thy home in Kalevala."

Ilmarinen works for several days at a mighty forge until finally the Sampo is created:

On one side the flour is grinding,
On another salt is making,
On a third is money forging,
And the lid is many-colored.
Well the Sampo grinds when finished,
To and fro the lid in rocking,
Grinds one measure at the day-break,
Grinds a measure fit for eating,
Grinds a second for the market,
Grinds a third one for the store-house.

In Finnish mythology, the Sampo or Sammas was a magical artifact of indeterminate type constructed by Ilmarinen that brought good fortune to its holder. When the Sampo was stolen, it is said that Ilmarinen's homeland fell upon hard times and he sent an expedition to retrieve it, but in the ensuing battle it was smashed and lost at sea.

The Sampo has been interpreted in many ways: a world pillar or world tree, a compass or astrolabe, a chest containing a treasure, a Byzantine coin die, a decorated Vendel period shield, a Christian relic, etc. In the Kalevala, compiler Lönnrot interpreted it to be a quern or mill of some sort that made flour, salt, and gold out of thin air. The world pillar hypothesis, originally developed by historian of religions Uno Harva and the linguist Eemil Nestor Setälä in the early 20th century, is the most widely accepted one.

According to Giorgio de Santillana, professor of the history of science at MIT, and student of mythology, the sampo and the world pillar both refer to the precession of the equinox. In Hamlet's Mill, co-authored with Hertha von Dechend, the authors find that the sampo or precession process was believed to grind out different world ages, from dark age to golden age and back again over the long precession cycle.


These two were made by my mother's uncle Jakob:


hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
May 14, 2016 - 03:14pm PT
got pangs?

http://www.motorcyclenews.com/news/new-bikes/2014/september/matchless-is-back/
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 15, 2016 - 12:21am PT

Hooblie: Great link.

From the link:

Matchless is a name which has long been missing from the roll call of active motorcycle manufacturers, but recent patent applications and statements of intent from the current owners promised that a new model was under development – and MCN has gained access to exclusive details of the new bike ahead of its expected launch at the Milan motorcycle show in early November.

Having been the leading British manufacturer, and the catalyst for the once enormous superpower that was AMC (Associated Motorcycle Company: Matchless, AJS, Sunbeam, Indian and Norton), Matchless effectively ceased to exist in 1966 (they thought it was all over, and it was). But the rights to the brand were purchased by the Malenotti family – of recent Belstaff fame – in 2012, and used on a new clothing line called Matchless London, managed by Michele Malenotti, in the spirit of the original clothing division of Matchless formed by the founder Henry Collier in the 1930s.

And now the firm is moving from clothing to bikes, with the expected launch of its first new bike, the Model X Reloaded, a design inspired by the legendary Model X originally built over 80 years ago. Reloaded has been designed by renowned industry stalwart Franco Malenotti, along with the Matchless design team.

Original Matchless Model X



Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 17, 2016 - 01:47am PT

Fanfanfan - a tune by Swedish singer, songwriter, rock poet Joakim Thåström

[Click to View YouTube Video]

Thåström - Långtbort

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - May 20, 2016 - 01:12pm PT

Sibelius: Karelia Suite (Full) - Philharmonia Orch. / Ashkenazy

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2016 - 11:03am PT

Finnskogen this weekend

Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
Jun 5, 2016 - 03:45pm PT
Det er sikkert at Finnskogen er en fin skog.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 10, 2016 - 11:29am PT

Carl Michael Bellman: Fredman's Epistles No.81 - Kyösti Rautio

[Click to View YouTube Video]

Carl Michael Bellman: Glimmande Nymph - Elina

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 18, 2016 - 03:01am PT

Elias Lönnrot (1802-1884) - the author/editor of the Kalevala


A statue in Helsinki showing Elias Lönnrot and Kalevala's Vainamoinen


The Kalevala heritage - Song challenge - singing the runes:

[Click to View YouTube Video]

Education and early life
Lönnrot was born in Sammatti, in the province of Uusimaa, Finland, which was then part of Sweden. He studied medicine at the Academy of Turku. The Great Fire of Turku coincided with his first academic year. As the university was destroyed in the fire, it was moved to Helsinki, the newly established administrative center of the Grand Duchy and the present capital city of Finland. Lönnrot followed and graduated in 1832.

Early medical career
Lönnrot got a job as district doctor of Kajaani in Eastern Finland during a time of famine and pestilence in the district. The famine had prompted the previous doctor to resign, making it possible for a very young doctor to get such a position. Several consecutive years of crop failure resulted in losses of population and livestock. In addition, lack of a hospital further complicated Lönnrot's work. He was the sole doctor for 4,000 or so people, most of whom lived in small rural communities scattered across the district. As physicians and novel drugs were expensive at the time, most people relied on their village healers and locally available remedies. Lönnrot himself was keen on traditional remedies and also administered them. However, he believed strongly that preventive measures such as good hygiene, breastfeeding of babies and vaccination were the most effective cures for most of his patients.

Travels and writing
His true passion lay in his native Finnish language. He began writing about the early Finnish language in 1827 and began collecting folk tales from rural people about that time. In 1831, the Finnish Literature Society was founded, and Lönnrot, being one of the founder members, received financial support from the society for his collecting efforts.

Lönnrot went on extended leaves of absence from his doctor's office; he toured the countryside of Finland, Sapmi (Lapland), and nearby portions of Russian Karelia. This led to a series of books: Kantele, 1829–1831 (the kantele is a Finnish traditional instrument); Kalevala, 1835–1836 (the "old" Kalevala); Kanteletar, 1840; Sananlaskuja, 1842 (Proverbs); an expanded second edition of Kalevala, 1849 (the "new" Kalevala). Lönnrot was recognised for his part in preserving Finland's oral traditions by appointment to the Chair of Finnish Literature at the University of Helsinki in 1853.

He also undertook the task of compiling the first Finnish-Swedish dictionary (Finsk-Svenskt lexikon, 1866–1880). The result comprised over 200,000 entries, and many of the Finnish translations were coined by Lönnrot himself. His vast knowledge of traditional Finnish poetry made him a definite authority in Finland and many of his inventions have stuck. Finnish scientific terminology was in particular influenced by Lönnrot's work and therefore many abstract terms that have a Latin or Greek etymology in mainstream European languages appear as native neologisms in Finnish. Examples from linguistics and medicine include kielioppi (grammar), kirjallisuus (literature), laskimo (vein) and valtimo (artery). This may be well contrasted with the so-called inkhorn debate of English, in which proponents of Saxon-based words were largely defeated.

Work in botany
Botanists remember him for writing the first Finnish-language Flora Fennica – Suomen Kasvisto in 1860; in its day it was famed throughout Scandinavia, as it was among the very first common-language scientific texts. The second, expanded version was co-authored by Th. Saelan and published in 1866. The Flora Fennica was the first scientific work published in Finnish (instead of Latin). In addition, Lönnrot's Flora Fennica includes many notes on plant uses in between descriptions of flower and leaf. The standard author abbreviation Lönnrot is used to indicate this individual as the author when citing a botanical name.

Wikipedia

Lönnrot travelled extensively collecting the runes/stories. Her is a map showing his field trips:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 18, 2016 - 10:15am PT

The Kalevala has inspired many artists. This is Yuri Lukshin


Starting the creation of the ex-libris cycle on the basis of "Kalevala", the drawing master from Saint Petersburg, Yuri Konstantinovich Lukshin has reconstructed not only the drawing style, the manner, but also the techniques. Lukshin has conceived a series of fifty ex-librises covering the plots of all the 50 runos of the epos. An exhibition of Yuri Lukshins Kalevala art has been shown in Helsinki.

The Kalevala ex-librises of Lukshin have been addressed to one bibliophile, Pekka Heikkila, inhabitant of the small Finnish town of Tammela. Under the initiative of Heikkila, many outstanding artists from many countries have created book-marks on the basis of "Kalevala". Heikkila has managed to attract such masters-of-art-drawing as Evald Okas, Mihail Verholantsev, Vladislav Stanishevsky, Vladimir Vereshchagin, Konstantin Kalinovich, Gennady Vereshchagin and Yuri Lukshin...

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2016 - 01:20pm PT

Elgå: The woodshed in the south wind - from the book Norwegian Wood by Lars Mytting


Close to Femunden Water, the third-largest lake in Norway, lies Elgå, a tiny community that has always lived close to the forces of nature. The village was inaccessible by road until 1956, and the fifty people who live there enjoy harsh weather conditions, bitter cold, and fabulous natural surroundings. Domestic heating is provided by a full spectrum of woodstoves. The heart of the community is its one and only store, the well-stocked and well-run Peder Røsten. Fuel is dispensed from a battered old pump that still uses a mechanical counter.

Not far from the shop is a small, neat house with an equally neat woodshed. This is the home of Ole Haugen, born in 1926. Ole is a real firewood enthusiast and all the heating in the house comes from firewood he has prepared himself.

Ole has been a joiner and woodcutter all his life and has always cut his own firewood. In his childhood the usual thing was to burn dry pine, felled using a svans (a large two-man crosscut saw) and dragged back home to the village by horse. Heavy, time-consuming and exhausting work.

“The chain saw was a revolution when it came”, says Ole. “Those first saws could weigh anything up to twenty kilograms and a lot of people didn’t take to them, but to me they were a miracle to work with”.

In time, he says, foresters developed a real fondness for the chain saw. Elgå and the surrounding districts became typical “Husqvarna towns” – they didn’t think much of saws made by Stihl. Toward the end of his working life he switched brands and his last two saws – both of them now in his work shed and displaying all the signs of years of loving care and hard use – are Jonsereds, a 590 and a 2051.

Ole used to get all his firewood from a birch wood growing high up on a nearby hill. Because of the undulating terrain and the distance involved he usually leaf-felled the trees, leaving them unlimbed to make transportation easier. As the leaves continue to grow the moisture is drawn up out of the trunk, and after a few weeks the trees can be limbed and sawed up in the usual way. Because the logs are now much lighter, the method is especially suitable for places where the wood has to be transported over a distance.

With the trees felled, the timetable for the rest of the work is less critical. So if you are a little behind with the chopping and splitting and final drying, there is no great harm done. Woodcutting using the leaf-felling method also makes it easier to fit in around the other jobs.
….
Over the years Ole has observed how important it is to stack the wood so that the wind comes at it from the most advantageous angle.
“Wind blowing through the stack is what gets it really dry. Heat is important, but damp wood should be out in the sun and wind as much as possible.

Ole likes to try out new things and refine his understanding of the factors that influence the quality of the firewood. During his life he has experimented with a number of different designs for his woodshed. Now, just past his eightieth birthday, he has finally come up with one he thinks is satisfactory.

This shed is long and narrow, with a rear wall that can be removed. The four doors at the front run the full width of the shed, and when these are opened the wind blows through the entire stack. The shed is positioned so that the south wind strikes the open rear wall. Inside, the logs are stacked so that the wind blows along them lengthwise. The dark corrugated iron roof retains heat, which speeds up the drying. The removable rear wall means that the wood can be stacked from the front or back. As winter approaches the doors are closed or the back wall placed in a position so that the snow does not blow in. The design makes maximum use of all available space, and the wood is easy to get at. And, of course, the shed has its own permanent reserve for the extra cold winters.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2016 - 01:57pm PT

Norwegian Wood

An article about the book: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/how-a-book-about-norwegian-wood-has-become-a-global-hit-a6747431.html

From the article:
We meet Ottar at the beginning of the book. He is a likeable, stoic neighbour in the small town of Elverum in south-eastern Norway, where Mytting had moved to, and the man who taught Mytting that "a wood fire is about so much more than heat". In Elverum, winter temperatures hang around the -30C mark. Ottar, retired with poor lungs, treats the annual arrival of his logs in spring and the subsequent time spent chopping, seasoning and stacking as a life-giving ritual. The book is a paean to all Norwegians who revere wood. These people know that without it man would never have been able to inhabit land so far north in the first place.

"Ottar spent a month on his woodpile," writes Mytting. "I've never seen a man change quite the way he did.

"Was it just the activity and the summer warmth that made him better? I don't think so. It was the wood. All his life he'd chopped his own firewood… He enjoyed the feel of each log in his hand, the smell that made him feel he was at work inside a poem, the sense of security in his stack, the pleasing thought of the winter that lay ahead, with all those hours of sitting contentedly in front of his woodburning stove."


Elverum

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2016 - 01:59pm PT

"The scent of fresh wood
is among the last things you will forget
when the veil falls.
The scent of fresh white wood
in the spring sap time
as though life itself walked by you,
with dew in its hair."

Hans Børli



And then an Irish poem faring well on the Norwegian Woods thread: Seamus Heaney - Out West

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2016 - 08:57am PT

Portrait of a dogwalker: https://vimeo.com/122416858

In 2010 after working in Finance for nearly 5 years Matt Hein quit his job and headed off to follow his dreams.
After living and working in the French Alps he moved to Oslo, Norway where he has resided since 2012. There he put his previous experience and training to good use, combining it with his passion for dogs and nature, launching his own dog-walking company.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 24, 2016 - 09:39am PT


Kalevala - drawings by Tamara Yufa

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 26, 2016 - 01:42pm PT

The song I think my mother loved most of all: Tapani Kansa - Käymme yhdessä ain. 1968.

[Click to View YouTube Video]

The version she played: Gunnar Wiklund - Vi ska gå hand i hand.

[Click to View YouTube Video]

A month before my mother died, my brother sang this song for her. At the time, she was struggling with words. But hearing this song, the words she spoke to my brother were as clear as clear could be: "Du er fortsatt like fin, du".
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 26, 2016 - 02:04pm PT
Marlow, I'm behind, unnskyld! Are there any homes for sale in Elgå?
A god friend in Seattle was Karl Haugen and his dad was Ole. Jo, not a big coincidence. :-)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 26, 2016 - 02:09pm PT

^^^^ There's plenty of room left around Femunden. 50 persons live in Elgå... There's certainly room for you, Reilly... hunting, fishing and chopping wood...
Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
Jun 26, 2016 - 02:18pm PT
Any photos from Fiskevollen, on Sølensjøen? I've been fishing there, and it's not far from Femund.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 26, 2016 - 02:26pm PT

Anders.

I have no photos, but there is always help to find on the web... a beautiful place...

Fiskvollen, Sølensjøen


Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 26, 2016 - 02:28pm PT
^^^^^ I'll take THAT house!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2016 - 11:56am PT

Finnskogen turist og villmarksenter this weekend

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2016 - 12:03pm PT

Places around Kirkesjøen

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2016 - 12:10pm PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 5, 2016 - 01:26pm PT

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Norrøna Finnskogen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 10, 2016 - 11:57am PT

Finnetunet 2016

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 10, 2016 - 12:02pm PT

Gottlundmarsjen 2016

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 10, 2016 - 12:10pm PT

Gottlundmarsjen 2016 continues

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 10, 2016 - 12:17pm PT

Finnskogdagene 2016

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 11, 2016 - 12:34pm PT

Woodcuts by Erkki Tanttu

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 11, 2016 - 12:36pm PT

Sauna diorama

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 23, 2016 - 11:26pm PT

Swedish heirloom recipes from the community of Galva, Illinois


The proud Swedish community of Galva, Illinois and nearby Bishop Hill and the farms thereabouts date back to the 1860's as does this community church. Wonderful separate section is entirely Swedish heirloom recipes of the local families and all are given with the names of the cook.



Galva, Illinois

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 26, 2016 - 10:18am PT

Hunting moose (Elgjakt) - from Malm, Åkerman and Andreæ, Älgjägarens bok, 1959, ed. 2.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 26, 2016 - 10:21am PT

Hunting moose 2

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 29, 2016 - 11:28am PT

Finnskogen this week

Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
Jul 29, 2016 - 08:19pm PT
Well, it's not quite like being there in person. Maybe next summer. But still very evocative. Even if it wasn't raining. Thanks!

And it sounds like those nice Norwegians may give their neighbours a bit of land, so they have a mountain: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/28/norway-finland-move-mountain-halti-halditsohkka-highest-peak
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 30, 2016 - 01:54am PT

Mighty Hiker

That's a great idea - a mountain peak as a gift on the 100 years of independence anniversary.

The peak “would be a wonderful gift to our sister nation”, said the mayor of Kåfjord in Norway, Svein Leiros, who with other local politicians has written to the government in Oslo to express enthusiastic support for the plan.

Responding, the foreign ministry said that although it appreciated the suggestion, article 1 of Norway’s constitution unfortunately stipulated that the country is a “free, independent, indivisible and inalienable realm”.

But Øyvind Ravna, a law professor at the Norwegian Arctic university, told the paper the constitution did not apply to minor border adjustments, pointing out that Norway’s borders with both Finland and Russia had moved in recent times to reflect changes in riverbeds and the shifting position of sandbanks and islets.

A Facebook page, Halti as anniversary gift, run by Harsson’s son from his home in the US and calling on supporters to allow “Finland, on its centenary, to rewrite both its history and its geography books”, has so far garnered nearly 14,000 likes.

Public reaction has been overwhelmingly positive in both Norway and Finland, with the only objection so far coming from the indigenous Sami community, whose reindeer roam freely across the border and who argue that the land should belong to neither country.

Norway’s government has confirmed that for the centenary of Finland’s independence next year it is considering moving the border, gifting its Nordic neighbour a mountain peak that would be the country’s highest point.

“There are a few formal difficulties and I have not yet made my final decision,” the Norwegian prime minister, Erna Solberg, told NRK, the national broadcaster. “But we are looking into it.”

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2016 - 12:43pm PT

Two Swedish tunes that were played during my mother's funeral in March 2016 were:
 "Blott en dag ett ögonblick i sänder"
 "Bred Dina Vida Vingar"

Here's a Youtube example of each of the tunes:
[Click to View YouTube Video]
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
Aug 3, 2016 - 02:48pm PT
And now Jesper, the adventurous cat from east central Norway - not far from Finnskogen - has ascended Galdhøpiggen, the highest mountain in Norway. The first recorded feline ascent ("FRFA"). A book about Jesper ("Jesperpus") will appear in a few months, and he's all over the internet.

http://www.h-a.no/nyheter/jesperpus-sov-seg-helt-til-topps
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2016 - 03:35pm PT

... and here's the picture documenting Jesperpus on the summit


His use of the Norwegian guide is hilarious... he was carried sleeping to the top...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 4, 2016 - 02:29am PT

Sofia Karlsson - Spelmannen (lyrics: Dan Andersson)

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 4, 2016 - 03:00am PT

Kalevala drawings by an Ukrainian or Russian artist:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 10, 2016 - 02:45pm PT

Alongside poets Dan Andersson and Hans Børli, and singer/songwriter Sofia Karlsson, rock poet Joakim Thåström has an important role to play on the Finnskogen and Nordic woods thread.

[Click to View YouTube Video]

1.Främling överallt (Stranger everywhere)
2.Kort Biografi Med Litet Testamente (Short Biography With Small Testament)
3.Sönder Boulevard (Broken Boulevard)
phylp

Trad climber
Upland, CA
Aug 10, 2016 - 06:59pm PT
Somehow I have missed this thread until now, Marlow. I will come back and enjoy it in full, soon.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 11, 2016 - 01:02am PT

You're welcome, Phylp...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 15, 2016 - 02:22am PT

Røykstue

Ten years ago, my mother's sister, Synnøve, was at a seminar where an expert told the participants that no one still alive had grown up in a "røykstue". Synnøve stood up and replied that she had grown up for the first ten years of her life in a "røykstue". Synnøve died recently, 91 years old.


The oven
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 15, 2016 - 02:33am PT

Slash-and-burn agriculture



One culture which flourished in pre-agricultural Europe survives: the Forest Finns in Scandinavia. Martin Tvengsberg, a descendant the Forest Finns, studied them in his capacity as curator of the Hedmark Museum in Norway. The Savo-Karelians had a sophisticated system for cultivating spruce forests. A runic poem about Finland's spruce forests reads, "Gåivu on mehdien valgoinen valhe" ("The birch is the forest’s white lie"). The best spruce forests reportedly contain birch trees, which grow only after a forest has burned once or twice.

Telkkämäki Nature Reserve in Kaavi, Finland, is an open-air museum which still practices slash-and-burn agriculture. Farm visitors can see how people farmed when slash-and-burn agriculture became the norm in the Northern Savonian region of eastern Finland beginning in the 15th century. Areas of the reserve are burnt each year.

Slash-and-burn agriculture was initially practiced by European pioneers in North America such as Daniel Boone and his family, who cleared land in the Appalachian Mountains during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. However, land cleared by slash-and-burn farmers was eventually taken over by systems of land tenure focusing on long-term improvement and discouraging practices associated with slash-and-burn agriculture.

Telkkämäki Heritage Farm

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 15, 2016 - 02:37am PT

Rye/Rie: The house where the rye was stored and dried. The oven is seen.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 15, 2016 - 12:51pm PT

The strange story of the dialect spoken in Södra Finnskoga (Sweden).

Södra Finnskoga had a unique situation among the dialects of Värmland, Sweden. In Södra Finnskoga they have never spoken “värmländsk”. During the 1600s and the 1700s, Finnish was spoken. The connections they had from Södra Finnskoga went to Norway. They started speaking the Norwegian Solör-dialect. The forest owners of Södra Finnskoga went to Kristiania (Oslo, Norway) to sell their timber and get their payment. This went on a long time into the 1900s. When the school-children from Bograngen in Sweden was studying at “Karlstads läroverk” in Sweden, they had a long way to go to school. First they went, by car in summer and by horse in winter, to Flisa railway station in Norway, a distance of 30-40 km. And from Flisa they went by train to Kongsvinger (Norway), a distance of 50-60 km, then to Charlottenberg in Sweden, a distance of 40-50 km. And from Charlottenberg they finally ended up in Karlstad (Sweden), a distance of 110-120 km. Which totally gives a distance of around 250 km (155 miles) from Bograngen to school in Karlstad. In 1914, during wartime, Swedish schoolchildren had no passports. That made the passing of the border more complicated, but they were let through. Because of school, TV and radio the youth of Södra Finnskoga has more and more started speaking “rikssvenska” (statement from 1975). Source: Finnbygden nr.1, våren 1975.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2016 - 07:10am PT

Viljo Vesterinen and Lasse Pihlajamaa v.1950 - Metsäkukkia (Forest Flowers)

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
Aug 21, 2016 - 09:28am PT
To think that I have cousins living within 50 km of Finnskogen, and all through that area on the Norwegian side, and had not heard of it before.

Marlow, what about Lars Anders of Forsstugan, who Axel Munthe memorably speaks about in The Story of San Michele? From a somewhat similar area, but much farther north.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2016 - 12:38pm PT
Anders.

I don't know much about the story of Lars Anders of Forsstugan. Axel Munthe was an interesting person - doctor of a queen, a king and a tzar, author, traveller and so on.

"Axel Munthe was born in Oskarshamn, Sweden, his family's home. His family was originally of Flemish descent, and settled in Sweden during the 16th century.

Munthe began college in 1874 at Uppsala University. While travelling in Italy in 1875, Munthe sailed in a small boat from Sorrento to the island of Capri. Climbing the Phoenician stairs to the village of Anacapri, he came upon a peasant's house and the adjacent ruin of a chapel dedicated to San Michele, and was immediately captivated by the idea of rebuilding the ruin and turning it into a home.

Munthe studied medicine in Uppsala, Montpellier and Paris (where he was a student of Charcot), and graduated as M.D. in 1880 at the age of 23. Though his thesis was on the subjects of gynaecology and obstetrics, Munthe was deeply impressed by Professor Jean-Martin Charcot's pioneering work in neurology, having attended his lectures at the Salpêtrière hospital. He later had a falling out with Charcot, and left the Salpêtrière denouncing his former teacher's work on hypnotism as fraudulent and scientifically unsound."

If I remember right, Charcot had specialized in treating women for hysteria (Hysteria from Greek "Hystera" (Uterus)). Munthe followed a similar path and earned a fortune treating rich frustrated upperclass women for imagined colitis (that he diagnosed himself).

A Swedish book about a related theme a couple of hundred years earlier: Mikael Häll. Huldra, Näcken och Djävulen - erotic creatures in nature and demonic sexuality 1600-1700s Sweden.

In his book Munthe mentions "Skogsrået"/Huldra/The Lady of the forest.

"Her name derives from a root meaning “covered” or “secret”. The huldra is a stunningly beautiful, sometimes naked woman with long hair; though from behind she is hollow like an old tree trunk, and has an animal’s tail. She is the watcher of the forest and all of its creatures, and will not be kind to those who are cruel to her subjects.

Tales of huldra tell of her using her beautiful appearance and seductive charm to lure young men back to her cave, or subterranean home, where they may be kept aS slaves, lovers, or worse - depending on the tale. Sometimes the humans are released, but are cursed with the constant temptation to return to their captor. Other tales describe them getting married to humans, losing their tails, and becoming human themselves - but retaining their magic."

Rikesten, a man from Finnskogen known for his shamanic abilities, who lived the last years of his life in the house of my great grandparents in Rya, was telling a story about meeting Huldra by a water/lake at Finnskogen. After the incident, the water/lake was given the name "Huldretjern", a name that it still carries today. Huldra didn't seduce him, but told Rikesten to leave at once. He was fishing in her waters.





Huldra is said to have the ability to transform to different animals.


This is an ability she shares with Louhi, the main opponent of Vainamoinen in the Kalevala.

"Louhi (Finnish pronunciation: [ˈlouɦi]) is a queen of the land known as Pohjola in Finnish, Karelian and Lappish mythology. Louhi is probably an alter-ego of the goddess Loviatar.

Louhi is described as a powerful queen ruling over the northern realm of Pohjola, with the ability to change shape and weave mighty enchantments. She is also the main opponent of Väinämöinen and his group in the battle for the magical artifact Sampo in the Kalevala. She has a number of beautiful daughters, whom Ilmarinen, Lemminkäinen and other heroes attempt to win in various legends. Louhi sets them difficult to impossible tasks to perform in order to claim such a prize, which leads to the forging of the Sampo."

Louhi transforming to a bird:



And here is Rikesten at an old age:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2016 - 12:55pm PT

The hulder I knew best during my childhood was "Tandberg Huldra 5", a great radio looking just like the one in the photo below (model 1956).

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2016 - 01:39pm PT

And in the age of the video: Here's Axel Munthe's Capri and The Story of San Michele

[Click to View YouTube Video]

For all I know, Reilly could have a photo he has taken in one of the localities seen in the video, showing a bottle of fine wine on one of the tables...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 21, 2016 - 02:03pm PT
Jo, Reilly har mange fotos fra Capri and he walked right by San Michele
without knowing of its connection to Skogland! It's no wonder he felt
such a strong attraction to Capri, not that it is short on other attributes.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 26, 2016 - 10:00am PT

Here is a video from Finnskogdagene 2016 and a story about Bjørn Waalberg's ancestors (in Norwegian)

[Click to View YouTube Video]

And then an old film from the land of slash-and burn (1937)

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 4, 2016 - 08:25am PT

Finnskogen this weekend

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 4, 2016 - 08:27am PT

Wet weather this morning

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 14, 2016 - 08:57am PT

Dagny (Sofia Andersson, Sara Nilsson & Anna Malmström) - Nya Finnskogen | Folk You Sessions

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 14, 2016 - 09:20am PT
Det var bra! It clearly helps not to wear shoes.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2016 - 12:52pm PT

The seven torp walk at Finnskogen this weekend - starting at Lebiko:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2016 - 01:00pm PT

The seven torp walk at Finnskogen continuing: Ritamäki on the Swedish side of Finnskogen:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 19, 2016 - 01:08pm PT

The seven torp walk at Finnskogen this weekend: Once again on the way...


Lomstorp

and then we're back at Lebiko on the Norwegian side:
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 19, 2016 - 06:53pm PT
'Skogsrået, Näcken, och Djävulen' looks like my kind of magazine!
i-b-goB

Social climber
Wise Acres
Sep 19, 2016 - 07:07pm PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2016 - 12:24pm PT

One the recent page I wrote about the story of the dialect spoken in Södra Finnskoga (Sweden) and the distance travelled by the children from Södra Finnskoga to get an education in Karlstad.

Here the story is repeated and followed by old photos/postcards from the main railway stations that they passed on their way.

Södra Finnskoga had a unique situation among the dialects of Värmland, Sweden. In Södra Finnskoga they have never spoken “värmländsk”. During the 1600s and the 1700s, Finnish was spoken. The connections they had from Södra Finnskoga went to Norway. They started speaking the Norwegian Solör-dialect. The forest owners of Södra Finnskoga went to Kristiania (Oslo, Norway) to sell their timber and get their payment. This went on a long time into the 1900s. When the school-children from Bograngen in Sweden was studying at “Karlstads läroverk” in Sweden, they had a long way to go to school. First they went, by car in summer and by horse in winter, to Flisa railway station in Norway, a distance of 30-40 km. And from Flisa they went by train to Kongsvinger (Norway), a distance of 50-60 km, then to Charlottenberg in Sweden, a distance of 40-50 km. And from Charlottenberg they finally ended up in Karlstad (Sweden), a distance of 110-120 km. Which totally gives a distance of around 250 km (155 miles) from Bograngen to school in Karlstad. In 1914, during wartime, Swedish schoolchildren had no passports. That made the passing of the border more complicated, but they were let through. Because of school, TV and radio the youth of Södra Finnskoga has more and more started speaking “rikssvenska” (statement from 1975). Source: Finnbygden nr.1, våren 1975.

Flisa railway station

Kongsvinger railway station

Charlottenberg railway station

Charlottenberg - area near the railway station

Karlstad railway station

Karlstad - the railway street (Jernvägsgatan)

Karlstad - a big city for the children from Södra Finnskoga
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Sep 23, 2016 - 10:34am PT
Karlstad. That´s where I´m born.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 23, 2016 - 11:14am PT

That's cool, Lolli. Also Karlstad has got it's Forest Finn museum at Mariebergsskogen - "Ol-Pålssonstorpet"

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2016 - 09:03am PT

In bronze - three Finns of distinction:

Carl Gustaf Mannerheim

Urho Kekkonen

Georg Henrik von Wright
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2016 - 09:15am PT

Georg Henrik von Wright - obituary in The Guardian by PMS Hacker, Friday 4 July 2003

Wittgenstein's successor at Cambridge, he wrote perceptively on logic, values and human action


Georg Henrik von Wright was one of the most eminent philosophers of the second half of the 20th century, and a distinguished essayist and cultural critic. His philosophical interests ranged from inductive reasoning to deontic logic, from the study of values and norms to the logic of explanations of human action. To all these great themes he made important and original contributions.

His general essays (mostly in Swedish) are reflections on problems of our civilisation. They extend from discussions of contemporary strife to ecology, from Tolstoy and Dostoevsky to the condition of modern man. He wrote in a distinctive personal style, with luminous clarity, austere elegance and a magisterial overview of western culture. Much influenced by the logical empiricism of the Vienna circle, and by his great teacher Ludwig Wittgenstein, he was a rationalist humanist, who became increasingly pessimistic about the effects of science and technology on the modern world. He was renowned not only for the brilliance of his thought and writing, but also for his integrity and moral virtue.

Von Wright was born in Helsinki, the son of Tor von Wright and Ragni Elisabeth Alfthan. His family belonged to the Swedish-Finnish aristocracy and were of Scots ancestry. He was educated at Helsinki University from 1934 to 1937, majoring in philosophy, history and political science, with mathematics as a minor subject. His philosophy teacher was Eino Kaila, an affiliate of the Vienna circle, whose influence was crucial in steering him towards logic and logical analysis, and introducing him to the writings of the logical empiricists.

Von Wright resolved to do postgraduate work on the problem of the justification of inductive reasoning and went to Vienna to study with members of the circle. His wishes were frustrated by the Anschluss, and, early in 1939, he went to Cambridge to work with CD Broad and RB Braithwaite. It was there that he first met Wittgenstein, whose lectures he attended and whose impact upon him was profound. He also met GE Moore, another important influence.

In the summer of 1939, von Wright returned to Finland and, with the outbreak of the winter war between his country and the Soviet Union, being unfit for military service, he worked in a voluntary organisation for propaganda on the home front. In 1941, he married Maria Elisabeth von Troil, and they had a son and a daughter. That year, too, he published The Logical Problem Of Induction, which was his doctoral dissertation.

During the continuation war of 1941 to 1944, he worked at the government information centre. He was appointed lecturer at Helsinki University in 1943, and elevated to a chair in 1946. In 1947, he returned to Cambridge on a visit, attended Wittgenstein's last lectures on the philosophy of psychology, and renewed his friendship with his teacher. On Wittgenstein's retirement in 1948, von Wright was elected to his chair at the age of 32.

During this period, he continued working on induction but also pursued a new interest in modal and deontic logic - a subject he virtually invented. Wittgenstein died in 1951, and von Wright was appointed one of his literary executors. Over the next 40 years, he produced the authoritative list of Wittgenstein's manuscripts, and contributed extensively to their editing and publication. He wrote many illuminating papers on the life and works of his revered teacher, some of which he collected in his volume Wittgenstein (1982).

After Wittgenstein's death, von Wright resigned his Cambridge chair and resumed his professorship at Helsinki. In 1961, he was elected to the prestigious Academy of Finland, which relieved him of all teaching and adminstrative obligations. Having been invited to give the Gifford lectures at Edinburgh in 1959, he wrote two of his greatest works for the occasions, The Varieties Of Goodness and Norm And Action (both published 1963). The former was, in many ways, his favourite among his writings, and it is indeed the deepest investigation of general value theory in philosophy; the latter was a remarkable pioneering work on the logic of norms.

Von Wright was elected Andrew D White professor- at-large at Cornell University, New York state (1965-77), which enabled him to make regular visits to Cornell, and to his good friend Norman Malcolm, another of Wittgenstein's eminent pupils. Cornell became, as he said, his "third intellectual home", after Helsinki and Cambridge. From 1968 to 1977, he was chancellor of Abo Academy in Finland.

From the 1970s, von Wright's philosophical interests shifted. Beginning with Explanation And Understanding (1971), he wrote extensively on action and intention, on reasons for action and the ways in which actions are explained by reference to reasons. Opposed to the reduction of reasons to causes, he championed methodological pluralism in explanation, arguing for the autonomy of the sciences of man and against attempts to reduce the characteristic forms of explanation of human behaviour to causal explanation. These investigations led him to explore the nature of human freedom, about which he wrote luminously in Freedom And Determination (1980) and Of Human Freedom, his Tanner lectures in 1985.

His interests in philosophical psychology expanded, and, in the 1990s, he became increasingly preoccupied with the mind-body relation. In The Shadow Of Descartes (1998) is a collection of essays on these themes. He published his autobiography Mitt Liv in Swedish in 2001.

Many honours and honorary doctorates came von Wright's way. He was elected a member of learned academies and societies in Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Britain and the United States, and elected to an honorary fellowship at his old Cambridge college, Trinity, in 1983. He was awarded numerous medals and prizes, including the Alexander von Humboldt Forschungspreis (1986), the gold medal of the Swedish Academy (1986), the Selma Lagerlof literary prize (1993), the Tage Danielsson humanist prize (1998), and the Critical European prize last year.

· Georg Henrik von Wright, philosopher, born June 14 1916; died June 16 2003

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2016 - 11:56am PT

Carl Gustaf Mannerheim


Mannerheim – hero in Finland and Russia: http://finland.fi/life-society/mannerheim-hero-in-finland-and-russia/


Mannerheim: The Mighty Finn

The improbably tall, 29-year-old guardsman wearing a helmet crowned with the Romanov double eagle, caught on film attending Tsar Nicholas II at his coronation in St Petersburg, was known to his fellow officers as Lieutenant Gustaf Karlovich. Twenty-two years later, shortly after Nicholas had been shot by the Bolsheviks, the same imposing fellow, now a highly decorated general in a magnificent white fur hat, signed himself Kustaa - Finnish for Gustaf. He was now Regent of a Finland he had played a key role in liberating from both tsarist and Soviet Russian rule. Outmoded and superseded, Gustaf Karlovich has passed into the pageant of his own extraordinary history.

The Regent's family - aristocratic Finns of Dutch descent - knew the Hero of Finland simply as Gustaf, or, formally, Baron Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim. On missions where secrecy had been vital during the crossover between Russian and Finnish soldiering, the greatest Finn - as he was voted by his countrymen last year - had slipped across borders under the Swedish soubriquets Gustaf Malmstrom and Gustaf Andersson. Mannerheim, who had a theatrical bent, would have enjoyed such disguises as much as Robert Byron or Lawrence of Arabia revelled in theirs.

He spoke six languages, served the last of the tsars, fought the Japanese, routed the Reds during the Finnish civil war, squared up to Stalin and played cat and mouse with Hitler. He rode thousands of miles through unchartered central Asia, served as president of his country, hunted tigers, collected exquisite artefacts and created a beautiful home in Helsinki's Kaivopuisto Park. The cosmopolitan Marshal of Finland cut a figure every bit as complex and as contradictory as Winston Churchill, his British equivalent and cavalier contemporary.

Now Mannerheim is the subject of an exhibition at the State Hermitage, St Petersburg, called Mannerheim. Russian Officer. Marshal of Finland . In fact, the show is housed not in the former Winter Palace, but across Palace Square in Karl Rossi's magnificent General Staff Building (1819-29), a neoclassical design every bit as sweeping, spectacular and unlikely as Mannerheim's career.

Squeezed into six handsome rooms, the Mannerheim exhibition attempts to tell the story of this extraordinary adventurer through 600 objects. The curators have rounded up starchily posed photographs of bigwigs from before the Russian Revolution, elegantly written letters, unlikely medals, wartime newsreels and extravagant weaponry. This is something of a museological handshake between Russia and Finland: Mannerheim was accused of being a fascist by the Soviets, until four years ago when Vladimir Putin laid a wreath on Mannerheim's tomb in Helsinki as a gesture of reconciliation. And so there are paintings of weather, mostly of snow, in which the wars between Hitler, Stalin and Mannerheim were fought out and exhausted.

Then there are those exceptional pieces that make this show not simply a three-dimensional biography, but an art exhibition in its own right. Besides intricate astrophysical calendars, votive images and a pocket-sized portable altar, here are dazzling costumes drawn from across central Asia and China - the everyday garb of tribespeople, settled and nomadic, that make the costly offerings of today's international fashion houses seem lustreless and thin.

Mannerheim took many fine photographs of the peoples he encountered on his daunting ride across central Asia between 1906 and 1908. Ostensibly this was a fact-finding mission for the tsar's government; in practice, it proved to be a cultural treasure hunt for the gimlet-eyed cavalry officer rather thinly disguised - in a Burberry trenchcoat - as a scientist. At every turn on his epic journey, Mannerheim discovered new, undocumented ways of life together with the costumes, jewellery, weapons and calligraphy that framed and adorned them.

Although those he met would have been gloriously exotic to contemporary European eyes, Mannerheim took care to be dressed in a manner suited to the occasion. There was always an appropriate hat or pair of riding boots to enable him to cut the sartorial dash needed to mix it with emirs, warlords and mandarins. There is also a photograph on display in the Hermitage of the dashing colonel in 1944 looking, in today's terms, decidedly "cool", dressed in a mix of half-native, half-St Petersburg chic outside the mission church of Ganzhou. Mannerheim knew very well how to make an impression whenever the camera lens turned his way. He never looked less than a head of state or commander-in-chief, and - perhaps rightly, if not inevitably - he was to become both at the same time.

The third child of Count Carl Robert and Countess Helene Mannerheim, née von Julin, he was born in June 1867 at Louhisaari, a tall baroque manor house filled with music, paintings and play on the southwest coast of Finland. The Grand Duchy of Finland was then a nominally autonomous protectorate of Imperial Russia. For a charismatic young Finn, the one possible way out of a corner of provincial tsardom was on horseback through the Nikolaevsky Cavalry School, St Petersburg. Here, Mannerheim excelled. Almost immediately afterwards, he made a socially, if not emotionally, advantageous marriage to Anastasia Arapova, the daughter of a Russian general; she bore him two much-loved daughters.

As a 37-year-old colonel, Mannerheim volunteered to fight in the Russian-Japanese war of 1904-05, before making his trip to the Orient in 1906. Promoted to major-general in 1910, he was with the Russian army until the October Revolution. Virulently anti-communist, and therefore effectively redundant - or perhaps under an unspoken death sentence - in Soviet Russia, he returned, aged 50, to Finland, cementing its independence as he crushed leftist forces in the country. He then put art into national service, commissioning his future aide-de-camp , the artist Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931), to design flags, uniforms and decorations for the new republic.

This sense of artistry was woven through each act in a deftly judged life. Mannerheim believed a leader had to be someone to live up to, an almost mythical figure. Many Finns - certainly in the 1960s and 70s - found him a difficult figure, a national hero hard to reconcile with their country's democratic, largely non-hierarchical and unshowy way of life. Was Mannerheim too much of a work of art - a leader as remote, perhaps, as a painting of some mounted monarch hanging in the halls of the Hermitage?

Not if you listen to the many Mannerheim veterans who rode the train from Helsinki to St Petersburg to attend the exhibition opening in company with today's senior Russian military. "He was always calm and wise," said 94-year-old Rafael Backman, the marshal's adjutant from 1942 to 1946. "He was one of those people who treated any person with respect, be it a high-ranking official or a humble soldier. In response, he earned incredible respect."

He earned respect from the Russians, too - unofficially - for refusing Hitler's request that he use the Finnish air force to bomb Leningrad. For Mannerheim, this was simply out of the question. "In Russia," says Mikhail Pietrovsky, director of the Hermitage, "we are used to thinking that many of Mannerheim's exquisite and non-standard political decisions had to do with his wish not to harm the city where he spent his youth."

Mannerheim accepted the presidency to ease Finland from war to peace. He was 79 when he finally retired to write his memoirs, moving between his home in Helsinki and Lausanne, where he died in 1951. Today, his equestrian statue, sculpted by Aimo Tukiainen, prances confidently in front of Steven Holl's ultra-modern Kiasma art gallery on the Helsinki boulevard that bears the marshal's name. This, perhaps, is as it should be, for here was a man who, although a consummate politician and inspired soldier, lived his life - whether as Karlovich, Kustuu or the Marshal of Finland - as a work of art.

Jonathan Glancey in The Guardian 09.04.2005


The Hermitage Museum: http://www.hermitagemuseum.org/wps/portal/hermitage/what-s-on/temp_exh/1999_2013/hm4_1_96/?lng=en
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 27, 2016 - 12:30pm PT
Mannerheim was just grumpy that Hedin beat him to Central Asia by a few years. ;-)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2016 - 12:38pm PT

What you know, Reilly.

Sven Hedin Foundation: http://svenhedinfoundation.org/

Sven Hedin and the mountains of Iran

Sven Hedin is well known for his relationship to the mountains of Central Asia. In 1890 he struggled across the Alai Mountains to reach East Turkestan from West Turkestan, an arduous crossing that he repeated in 1894 (Hedin 1898 and 1903). These early encounters with high alpine terrain were followed by his mapping of the Pamir juncture of immense mountain ridges in 1894-95, and simultaneous attempts to climb Mount Mustagh Ata (five attempts, which all failed). In 1897 he crossed the Kun Lun mountains to reach the northern flank of the Tibetan plateau, which he surveyed with all its individual isolated mountains, like the Koko Chili range (which he later regretted having named “King Oscar’s Mountains” – Sven Hedin strongly favoured finding and using indigenous names of mountains, rivers and lakes.). In 1901 he again crossed the Kun Lun Mountains to enter the Tibetan plateau, striking south then to cross it from east to west. 1906-1908 he devoted to the complicated landscape of West and South-western Tibet, crowned by what he considered to be the discovery of a mountain ridge north of the Yarlung Tsangpo river valley (upper Brahmaputra) which he named “Transhimalaya” (Hedin 1909-1912) Both the discovery and the name were quickly challenged (see Forêt 2004), but the existence of the ridge is clear on modern maps, though it is nowadays given the name Gangdise. Hedin´s view of orographic processes was then still the one held at the time; mountain ridges were the result of our earth’s crust slowly crumbling as the earth cooled off. The modern Wegener view of plate tectonics, though, did reach him as soon as it was published, In his library there are copies of the 1922 2nd edition as well as its first Swedish translation of 1926 (Wegener 1922 and 1926), and the analysis of the results of his last expedition were increasingly influenced by that framework (primarily through the main geologist on that team, Erik Norin).

Håkan Wahlquist

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 27, 2016 - 04:22pm PT
Jeg vet ikke noe, men jeg tror at Sven Hedin var den siste av de store oppdagelses.

I saw some of what he saw but I was not worthy...

I was weak...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2016 - 09:51am PT

Awesome, just an awesome life...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2016 - 10:13am PT

Urho Kaleva Kekkonen



Urho Kaleva Kekkonen was born Sept. 3, 1900, in Pielesvesi in central Finland. He was 17 years old when Finnish independence was declared. His 36th year turned out to be one of special achievement; during it he took his doctorate in law at Helsinki University, won election to Parliament and entered the Government as Minister of Justice. He served through the years in several ministries, and also was Speaker of Parliament.

He demonstrated his flexibility by becoming one of two members of Parliament to oppose accepting the Soviet terms for ending the Winter War of 1939-40 and then, before what was called the Continuation War of 1941-44 was over, by suggesting in a speech that postwar neutrality was Finland's only hope for national salvation. Lifelong Interest in Sports

While attending Helsinki University, he became the national high jump champion, and he maintained his interest in sports throughout his life, avidly skiing, jogging, hiking and camping.

He was a noted author, publishing books on politics and collections of speeches, weekly columns written during the wars and letters. He delighted in the latter part of his tenure in writing columns under a pseudonym in a national magazine in which he criticized the political moves of President Kekkonen.

His wife, Sylvi, whom he married in 1928, was also a writer, mainly of novellas and collections of aphorisms. She died in 1974. They had twin sons, Matti, who followed his father into Parliament and a later became an official in the Agriculture Ministry, and Taneli, who was a diplomat.

President Kekkonen read avidly and often said that one of his favorite books was ''Don Quixote,'' as it reminded him of his political career. But, he said, he was never sure whether he most resembled the knight of the woeful countenance or Sancho Panza.




Urho K. Kekkonen, Finland's President for more than 25 years, died in 1986, 85 years old.

Mr. Kekkonen, who was an adroit practitioner of a policy of neutrality and friendship with the neighbouring Soviet Union, died at the seaside residence that he had occupied during his long presidency. The cause of death, it was announced in Helsinki, was a ''circulatory disorder in the brain.''

Upon his retirement on Oct. 27, 1981, because of arteriosclerosis, the Finnish Government decided to allow him to continue living in the President's residence for fear that moving him might aggravate his illness.

Led Nation's Emergence

During his presidency Mr. Kekkonen helped lead Finland's slow emergence from the long shadow of two military defeats by the Soviet Union to self-assured participation in international affairs.

He first took office in March 1956 after an uneasy period in which Finnish leaders dared not even mention ''neutrality'' for fear of provoking Moscow.

To Finland's postwar neutrality policy, developed during the administration of his predecessor, Juho Paasikivi, Mr. Kekkonen added an ability to convince Moscow that he could be trusted to guide Finnish affairs in a way that would pose no threat to the Soviet Union. Thus, with him at the helm, Finland was able to safeguard its trade with its major trading partners in the West by becoming an associate member of the British-led European Free Trade Association and by obtaining a special relationship with the European Economic Community.

Two-Edged Sword

But the trust that Mr. Kekkonen enjoyed in Moscow also led to a shattering of presidential elections in Finland during his quarter of a century in office. With Moscow making clear at the end of each of his six-year terms that it wanted to see him continue in office, normal elections proved impossible in Finland until January 1982, when the current President, Mauno Koivisto, won a landslide victory.

Mr. Kekkonen was chosen in a normal election only once, in his first race in 1956, when he won by the narrowest of margins, an electoral-college vote of 151 to 149 on the third ballot. Another election battle appeared to be looming as his first six-year term drew to a close, but his opponent, Olavi Honka, a civil servant endorsed by five parties, withdrew in late 1961 ''in the national interest'' under the pressure of Soviet demands for military consultations, with Russians asking whether the attempt to defeat President Kekkonen was a move to change Finnish foreign policy.

Elections Were a Formality

Thereafter, with no political party willing to chance Soviet displeasure by running a real candidate against him, formal elections with only nominal opposition candidates were held in 1962, 1968 and 1978, and the 1968 term was extended by act of Parliament to 10 years from six years. The special legislation was decided upon at a time when Finland was negotiating for its Common Market link and when, close presidential associates said, the Soviet Union was demanding absolute guarantees that Mr. Kekkonen would continue as President long enough to insure that the new association with a Western organization would bring about no change in Finnish foreign policy.

President Kekkonen, an imperious leader with a military bearing that made him look taller than his 5 feet 11 inches, achieved an almost unchallengeable political position during his long presidency and eventually won universal respect within Finland for his leadership. But to his regret he could never match the warm public acceptance achieved by his gruff predecessor, President Paasikivi, who was much beloved as a father figure.

The Kekkonen presidential era began as a stormy one, with the new President accompanied into office by a reputation as an often Machiavellian poltician achieved during a political career that included serving five times as Prime Minister. There was no controversy in Finland over the necessity of a neutrality policy, but there was plenty over his judgment on what had to be done to carry it out, and he was denounced by political foes as a cynical politician playing a dangerous game with the Soviet Union to remain in office and to keep his agrarian Center Party in a dominant position.

No Headway With the Russians

Once discussing privately the problems he faced, he said that he sought in meetings with Soviet leaders to defend some of his political foes whose sidelining was demanded by Moscow on the ground that they were rigidly anti-Soviet. But, he said, he stopped when he saw that he was making no headway, and he subsequently called publicly for those Finnish figures to retire from center stage as a contribution to their fatherland.

Chief among them was Vaino Tanner, the Social Democratic leader whom the Soviet Union never forgave for his actions in the early days after Finland's 1917 declaration of independence, when he oriented the Finnish labor movement westward toward the Nordic lands instead of toward Moscow.

Emerging after World War II from the prison to which he had been sentenced as a war criminal at Soviet insistence because of his service in wartime Governments, Mr. Tanner was re-elected party leader in 1957. In 1958, with Social Democrats heading a coalition Government, a crisis developed with the Soviet Union, and thereafter they were kept on the political sidelines for eight years or until after Mr. Tanner and his associates had been retired.

Privately, Mr. Kekkonen said that independent Finland owed a huge debt to Mr. Tanner, but publicly he denounced the Social Democrat as a stubborn self-centered politician who had no regard for his country's best interests.

Finland at the Mercy of Moscow

In numerous interviews, the President declared that Finland's freedom of action on the world stage depended directly on the degree of trust Finland enjoyed in Moscow. Pointing out that the Finnish Constitution charges the President with the conduct of foreign policy, he stressed that his interest was in keeping the freedom of maneuver at its widest.

He said that Finland could not proceed haphazardly on the assumption that everyone knew its foreign policy was one of neutrality and friendship with the Soviet Union. Finns, he said, could never take their foreign policy for granted but must rededicate themselves to it every day.

An important part of his presidency was spent in cultivating Soviet leaders, something he would do with frequent private trips to the Soviet Union for hunting and other pursuits as well as with official visits. During these trips and during the visits of Russians to Helsinki, where he would entertain them in the presidential sauna as well as at luncheons and dinners, there would be much talk of strengthening Soviet-Finnish relations. But he would also take the opportunity to remind the Russians of the difference between the Finnish and Soviet ways of life.

Tart Exchange With Khrushchev

In September 1960, for example, when the Soviet leader, Nikita S. Khrushchev used a luncheon speech in Helsinki as an occasion to suggest that Finns put anti-Soviet politicians into their Government at their own peril, Mr. Kekkonen declared in turn:

''The leaders of the Soviet Union know that under all circumstances we defend our own system because we regard it best suited to us.''

Throughout his presidency, he was referred to in Government circles as Finland's ''trump card,'' to be played during touchy periods in relations with Moscow.

He seemed able to take risks, as in late 1960 when he went to Moscow to clear the way for Finland to become an associate member of the European Free Trade Association, he took off his shoe during a luncheon and, imitating Mr. Khrushchev's United Nations etiquette, pounded the table to attract the Soviet leader's attention.

Cool and self-assured though he would appear, his stomach would churn during some of his tensest missions. Returning from crisis talks in 1961 with Mr. Khrushchev in Novosibirsk, Mr. Kekkonen cleared his calendar and reportedly spent most of a week in bed.

Kennedy Was 'Understanding'

While insuring Soviet acceptance of Finland's foreign policy, he also sought Western recognition of Finnish neutrality and in the early 1960's made a series of trips for that purpose, the principal one being to Washington in 1961. The acknowledgement he received from President Kennedy, who publicly expressed his ''understanding of why Finland is neutral,'' reflected State Department reluctance to ascribe neutrality to Finns but nevertheless was welcome as the first statement of its kind from the White House.

Toward the end of his tenure, Mr. Kekkonen was much pained by the concoction of the term ''Finlandization'' in Western Europe to describe a nation's drift under Soviet domination, and he and other Finnish officials sought through numerous speeches to argue that the name of Finland could properly be attached only to a policy of independence and neutrality.


Werner Wiskari in The New York Times, August 31, 1986



More to read about Kekkonen: http://www.kansallisbiografia.fi/english/?id=632


Urho Kekkonen National Park
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Slow flow tv...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2016 - 11:05am PT

Satchmo, av Hans Børli

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2016 - 12:56pm PT

Swedish "folkparksmusik": Benny Anderssons orkester med Helen Sjöholm - Kära Syster

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Mighty Hiker

climber
Outside the Asylum
Oct 5, 2016 - 01:09pm PT
Other famous Fenno-Scandinavians:

Nils Adolf Erik Nordenskjold - First to navigate the northern sea route/northeast passage, 1878-79, in Vega.

Tove Jansson: Finn Family Moomintroll!

(It's surprising that the children of Finnskogen would have had to get passports to cross the border to go to school in Norway, in 1914 - 18, as both countries were neutral. But what about 1940 - 45?)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2016 - 01:26pm PT

Anders

I don't know more than what was written above and if what was written above is correct the children should have had passports, which they had not, but with a bit of trouble they were let through without the passports. The story does not tell if they after a while got passports, but at least at the beginning the lack of passports caused trouble.

Remember that the Norwegian - Swedish union ended in 1905. There was a certain tension between the countries. My great grandfather was one of the men who in 1905 were at the border ready to answer a Swedish attack. Luckily there was no attack.

During WW2 the border was controlled. The Germans wanted to stop refugees, but those who lived close to the border had some kind of border passes and could pass more freely.

My great grandmother Karoline was known as Mother Svullrya during the war. She organised the transport of refugees across the border to Sweden. Her son Jakob was one of them who followed the refugees through the woods from an unsafe Norway to a safer Sweden. My mother's ten years older sister Synnøve was involved in bringing food and weapons to places along the routes followed.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2016 - 01:33pm PT

To add a well known Swedish Forest Finn, Tage Erlander.


Tage Erlander was Swedish prime minister 1946-69. No prime minister in any democratic country has had a longer tenure than his 23 years.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 8, 2016 - 12:26pm PT

Olav H. Hauge


There are similarities between his relationship to nature and his relationship to folk poetry and other types of folklore, Old Norse and Western tradition, classical Chinese poetry and Japanese Haikus, as well as Eastern religion: primarily Zen Buddhism. Hauge evinces an immediate empathy with these traditions. He seems to speak directly with and with familiarity about Acestes (from the Aeneid); figures from the classical Chinese era; and characters from early Nordic tradition, such as Ogmund of Spånheim (from The Saga of Håkon Håkonsson), Leif Eiriksson and others. Such poems are also often meta-texts, such as “I have three Poems”. It tells of Emily Dickinson who wrote so many poems, but published hardly any: “she just cut open a packet of tea / and wrote another one.” This is how poems should be, they should ”…smell of tea. / Or of raw earth and freshly split wood.”

I Stop below the Old Oak on a Rainy Day
My own translation

It’s not only the rain
that makes me stop
under the old oak
by the road. It’s
safe under the wide
crown, it must be
old friendship that lead
the old oak and me to stand there
in silence, listening to the rain
dripping on the leaves, looking out
at the grey day,
waiting, understanding.
The world is old, we think,
both getting older.
Today I don’t stand here dry,
the leaves have started to fall,
there is a sour smell in the
moist air, I feel
the drops through my hair.

Olav H. Hauge


It's the Dream
Translated by Robin Fulton

It's the dream we carry in secret
that something miraculous will happen,
that it must happen –
that time will open
that the heart will open
that doors will open
that the mountains will open
that springs will gush –
that the dream will open,
that one morning we will glide into
some little harbour we didn't know was there.

Olav H. Hauge


It's the Dream: The poetry of Olav H. Hauge: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=PoemArticle&PoemArticleID=78

Olav H. Hauge Centre: http://www.haugesenteret.no/ohh/en/
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 16, 2016 - 01:00am PT

Swedish radio and Svensktoppen (Top of the Pops Sweden)


Four popular tunes that we heard on Swedish radio during our childhood (before we got a TV):

Jan Malmsjö - En Sång En Gång För Länge Sen - 1967: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqjMqFQENf8

Anna-Lena Löfgren - Lyckliga gatan - 1967: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YE0-KWo_dhs

Gunnar Wiklund - Vi ska gå hand i hand - 1968: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCiXKdatuRs

Hootenanny Singers - Omkring Tiggarn Från Luossa - 1973:
[Click to View YouTube Video]

And then the three tunes that have spent longest time on Svensktoppen:

278 weeks from 2004 to 2009: Benny Anderssons Orkester, Helen Sjöholm - Du Är Min Man: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CU5wo2lq_xg

240 weeks 2007 to 2012: Lars Winnerbäck and Miss Li - Om Du Lämnade Mig Nu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70J3Reo8M1g

167 weeks from 2012-2016: Mando Diao - Strövtåg i hembygden - Rottnadalen, Värmland:
[Click to View YouTube Video]

Another radio wonder - Radionette Symfoni 3D HiFi 1956-57

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 16, 2016 - 01:07am PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 24, 2016 - 12:48pm PT

Oslo on a wet day, Saturday last week:

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 2, 2016 - 02:36am PT
Got wood?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 3, 2016 - 10:14am PT

To stay in the western part of Norway - Hardanger 1870: Photographer Knud Knudsen's sister Martha Tokheim has collected food for the animals.

Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Nov 3, 2016 - 10:24am PT
How I love those beautiful old boats! Works of art.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 3, 2016 - 10:42am PT

My grandfather had an old log driver's boat that we used when fishing at "Lindsjøen" during my youth. Not such a beauty as the Hardanger boat above, but a beauty-in-motion and completely to be trusted.

The boat looked much like the log driving boat below.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 12, 2016 - 10:01am PT

Roine Lindström - Omkring tiggaren från Loussa - Dan Andersson

[Click to View YouTube Video]

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 19, 2016 - 10:06am PT

Utadans - Dancing, Gothenburg area 1977


We often visited Elgsjövallen in Bjuberget during our youth. Popular "dansband" like Hep Stars, Jerry Williams, Sven-Ingvars, Tonix, Vikingarna, Gyllene Tider etc played at Elgsjövallen. And there we could see and listen to many cool cars, often American. Both cars and petrol were more expensive in Norway, so the Swedes had much more, for a young mind, impressive cars. We, the Norwegians, were driving a Swedish Saab 96 V4, but when we were in Sweden we could see Dodge Charger, Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, Chevrolet Camaro and so on.

By the way, do you know the story behind the name Camaro?


Stig Arnesson, Mr. Elgsjövallen, was the driving force behind Elgsjövallen since it's startup in 1958.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 20, 2016 - 09:54am PT

Gothenburg harbour, early 1900

Gothenburg, May 1965
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Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 20, 2016 - 10:24am PT

At Järntorget in Gothenburg you can see a sculpture of Dan Andersson.

While still alive Dan Andersson had a connection to Järntorget: For two years he worked at the newspaper ”Ny Tid” (New Time). His signature was "Black Jim". Often he was found at the pub ”Tullen”. At the base of the sculpture one can read: "Pray for those strangled by the city that they long may stay young and at the black pub of ”Tullen" of trolls and highlands dream."

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 22, 2016 - 11:09am PT

Swedish "Folkparksmusik": Benny Anderssons orkester - Why Did It Have to Be Me?

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 24, 2016 - 12:15pm PT

Sofia Karlsson & Göteborgs Symfoniker - Moesta et errabunda (Grieving and wandering).

Lyrics by Charles Baudelaire, translated by Dan Andersson. Music by Sofie Livebrant.

[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 25, 2016 - 12:07pm PT

Gothenburg 1913-1915

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 3, 2016 - 09:28am PT
Finnskogen this weekend

Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Dec 9, 2016 - 10:43am PT
[Click to View YouTube Video]
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 9, 2016 - 11:49am PT

Nice addition, Lollie.

More Yule or Jul


Yule is attested early in the history of the Germanic peoples; from the 4th-century Gothic language it appears in the month name fruma jiuleis, and, in the 8th century, the English historian Bede wrote that the Anglo-Saxon calendar included the months geola or giuli corresponding with either modern December or December and January.

While the Old Norse month name ýlir is similarly attested, the Old Norse corpus also contains numerous references to an event by the Old Norse form of the name, jól. In chapter 55 of the Prose Edda book Skáldskaparmál, different names for the gods are given. One of the names provided is "Yule-beings". A work by the skald Eyvindr Skáldaspillir that uses the term is then quoted, which reads "again we have produced Yule-being's feast [mead of poetry], our rulers' eulogy, like a bridge of masonry".[9] In addition, one of the numerous names of Odin is Jólnir, referring to the event.

The Saga of Hákon the Good credits King Haakon I of Norway with the Christianisation of Norway as well as rescheduling the date of Yule to coincide with Christian celebrations held at the time. The saga states that when Haakon arrived in Norway he was confirmed a Christian, but since the land was still altogether heathen and the people retained their pagan practices, Haakon hid his Christianity to receive the help of the "great chieftains". In time, Haakon had a law passed establishing that Yule celebrations were to take place at the same time as the Christians celebrated Christmas, "and at that time everyone was to have ale for the celebration with a measure of grain, or else pay fines, and had to keep the holiday while the ale lasted."

Yule had previously been celebrated for three nights from midwinter night, according to the saga. Haakon planned that when he had solidly established himself and held power over the whole country, he would then "have the gospel preached". According to the saga, the result was that his popularity caused many to allow themselves to be baptised, and some people stopped making sacrifices. Haakon spent most of this time in Trondheim. When Haakon believed that he wielded enough power, he requested a bishop and other priests from England, and they came to Norway. On their arrival, "Haakon made it known that he would have the gospel preached in the whole country." The saga continues, describing the different reactions of various regional things.

A description of pagan Yule practices is provided (notes are Hollander's own):
It was ancient custom that when sacrifice was to be made, all farmers were to come to the heathen temple and bring along with them the food they needed while the feast lasted. At this feast all were to take part of the drinking of ale. Also all kinds of livestock were killed in connection with it, horses also; and all the blood from them was called hlaut [ sacrificial blood ], and hlautbolli, the vessel holding the blood; and hlautteinar, the sacrificial twigs [ aspergills ]. These were fashioned like sprinklers, and with them were to be smeared all over with blood the pedestals of the idols and also the walls of the temple within and without; and likewise the men present were to be sprinkled with blood. But the meat of the animals was to be boiled and served a