Norwegian Woods (OT)

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Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Original Post - Sep 30, 2012 - 01:33pm PT
Finnskogen in autumn
Credit: Marlow
Roy Tore Fallaas
Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Roy Tore Fallaas
Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Roy Tore Fallaas
Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Sep 30, 2012 - 01:35pm PT
NICE,, any Capercailes in those woods?
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Sep 30, 2012 - 01:36pm PT
I once had a Girl...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 30, 2012 - 01:38pm PT
Yes Ron, there are. Open woods, mostly pine trees, moss, ling, cow- and blueberry..
Cosmic: from Finnskogen? Point taken... Lol...
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Sep 30, 2012 - 01:38pm PT
im gettin old,, took me a minute to figure that one out Cosmic lol!


Marlow, i have a freind over there who hunts them this time of year- the woods looked exactly the same! Lovely!
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Sep 30, 2012 - 01:40pm PT
Or should I say
She once had me...
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Sep 30, 2012 - 03:49pm PT
Pretty Rocks!

Kinda small tho.

Jus Teas'in
BB
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Sep 30, 2012 - 03:53pm PT
Well those are some nice photos, and cccSman, my mind is coming back - I got it right away.




If only we all knew so much.
socialclimber

Trad climber
CA
Sep 30, 2012 - 04:28pm PT
Gorgeous photos, and I thought this was going to be an inappropriate thread about a certain poetical climber from near about Placerville...

Charles
Prod

Trad climber
Sep 30, 2012 - 04:35pm PT
Credit: Prod

?
Prod.
turd

climber
Sep 30, 2012 - 05:00pm PT
_^^^^__^^^ <br/>
Norwegian_Woods...
_^^^^__^^^
Norwegian_Woods

Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Sep 30, 2012 - 05:38pm PT
She showed me her room,
and then I showed her
My Norwegian WOOD.
zBrown

Ice climber
chingadero de chula vista
Sep 30, 2012 - 08:45pm PT
Didn't somebody start to laugh?

Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Sep 30, 2012 - 09:02pm PT
^^^^^^^
No.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2012 - 12:31pm PT
Finnskogen
Det här är mina skogar, fast jag äger dom inte.
Det här är mina skogar, fast jag äger dom inte.
Kaisa Vilhuinen
Kaisa Vilhuinen
Nitahå Jussi
Nitahå Jussi
Credit: Finnskog og trollskap
Tiur
Tiur
Orreleik
Orreleik
Elg
Elg
Credit: Oddvar
Svedjebrenning
Svedjebrenning
Låve
Låve
Røykstue
Røykstue
Flesk og motti
Flesk og motti
Hesjing
Hesjing
Credit: Sverre Viggen
Credit: Sverre Viggen
Abbor
Abbor
Det gode liv
Det gode liv
Credit: Anne paa Aasen
Credit: Jon Flydal
Aasta Holt
Aasta Holt
Sinikka Langeland med kantele
Sinikka Langeland med kantele
Roy Lønhøiden ved Røgden
Roy Lønhøiden ved Røgden
Credit: Sverre Viggen
Merete Furuberg
Merete Furuberg
Credit: Svein, Norsk forum for BMW
Rally Finnskog, Mikko Hirvonen
Rally Finnskog, Mikko Hirvonen
One Multe for Reilly
One Multe for Reilly
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 5, 2012 - 12:36pm PT
Hvor ær multebærene?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 5, 2012 - 01:55pm PT
Marlow, tusen takk! So this sweet young thang in Bergen tried to seduce me
with her hellig bible. When it became apparent that wasn't having the desired
effect she brought out her multe jam and my gås was cooked!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev. and land o da SLEDS!
Oct 5, 2012 - 01:56pm PT
Beautifull PICS Marlow!!!! Thanks!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 5, 2012 - 02:42pm PT
Lolli,

Hehe.. yes some are.. Cosmic is excused. Sitting in the wheelchair with only one hand available, he is pre-occupied with his Norwegian wood. I'm not so sure. I think it's an American. Elg er moose og elk er hjort og hjortron er multe. De'ække greitt... lol...

Thanks for the story Reilly. Klatrer, gammal gubbe, globetrotter og glad i matglade damer... Lol...

Ron: Thanks! The last photos are not my own, but they are telling a lot about Finnskogen and it's story.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Oct 5, 2012 - 09:30pm PT
Read and appreciated while nibbling lakerol (salt licorice) donated by Lolli. Thanks!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 7, 2012 - 09:50am PT
Some relatives of Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Roy Tore Fallaas
Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Dec 7, 2012 - 09:57am PT
Beautiful stuff Marlow- Any chance of removing the dead bear so I can show this thread to my wife? She's always dreamed of visiting Norway.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Dec 7, 2012 - 10:01am PT
No offense meant Wade, but hunting shouldn't be censored. It's far more respectful than the factory farms most folks get their food from.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 7, 2012 - 10:05am PT
Wade

If it matters to your wife: Tell her that the bear was killed after killing several sheep inside a high electric fence that was built to safely keep it out and safe from being shot. It's the truth.
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Dec 7, 2012 - 11:37am PT
Selfish request. I have no desire to censor. but she'll go all PETA on me, if she sees that.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 11, 2012 - 02:47pm PT
Fishing - Great grandfather Lauritz on the right
Fishing - Great grandfather Lauritz on the right
Credit: Marlow
Grandfather Martinius with Trond
Grandfather Martinius with Trond
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
nita

Social climber
chica de chico, I don't claim to be a daisy.
Dec 11, 2012 - 03:52pm PT

Marlow , cool pictures...I like the hay drying system.....and

Thanks!.... for turning me on to...Roy Lønhøiden.........Beautiful country...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGfM9eYtD5Q
MikeL

climber
SANTA CLARA, CA
Dec 11, 2012 - 04:52pm PT
Romantic images, Marlow. Partially reminds me of my grandparents and their histories (polish).
jogill

climber
Colorado
Dec 11, 2012 - 05:29pm PT
Nice thread, Marlow. I was in Trondheim at a math meeting in the summer of 1997 and the woods and fiords were beautiful. The olympic team gave us a demonstration of ski jumping that was thrilling to watch. The color was so magnificent that when I flew to Ireland after the meeting was over, the emerald isle seemed a little pale by comparison.


;>)
Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Dec 11, 2012 - 07:52pm PT
Marlow - love your Norsk input. I've always thought - and more so recently - that Norway is the best country on earth in so many ways. Especially politically.

Environmentally it is quite similar to where I live in extreme northern BC.
Maybe I gravitated here because of spending a summer in Norway in '49, just out of high school. Loved it to pieces.

Anyway, keep sharing please. Mange takk.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 12, 2012 - 12:12pm PT
Nita
The hay drying system worked very well... Lol...

MikeL
Romantic images, yes.

jogill
Ski-jumping is a thrill to watch if you see the jumps well. And I'm glad you like the color, there is color even in the b/w photos. Though in my view nothing really compares to Ireland.

Fossil climber
People living in Norway right now are lucky. It's a very good place to live. By the way: picture number 3 above is taken 1949/1950.

For Nita - some other aspects of the hay drying system
Slaattonn
Slaattonn
Credit: Marlow
Hesjing
Hesjing
Credit: Marlow
If you don't use a horse you can carry the hay on your back to the bar...
If you don't use a horse you can carry the hay on your back to the barn.
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 12, 2012 - 12:25pm PT
Collecting the raw material from Birch. My grandmother Lina to the lef...
Collecting the raw material from Birch. My grandmother Lina to the left.
Credit: Marlow
Carrying the product &#40;"neverkont"&#41; on their back. Grandmother ...
Carrying the product ("neverkont") on their back. Grandmother Lina to the right.
Credit: Marlow
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
Dec 13, 2012 - 07:45am PT
Great stuff Marlow. Keep it coming. Even though I don't speak Norge (is that the way to spell it?)
I spent a month in Norway and Svaalbard in summer '85. Have always wanted to return.
le_bruce

climber
Oakland, CA
Dec 13, 2012 - 09:46am PT
Great thread, Marlow.

The woods that most blew me away in Norway were of a particular kind of tree out west, often lining the fjords, like these:





Not sure what type of tree, but in copses they seemed to glow. Walking through them was amazing - bright with filtered light, open to wandering, never impenetrable or dour, interesting vertical spaces, full of bird song. Strolling for 15 minutes could easily turn into a few hours. Felt like something from a storybook.



We saw so many awesome things in Norway. Next time I go back I hope to tour by bike - just one of those countries that begs to be taken slowly, and without engines. Will need good rain gear.



Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 13, 2012 - 10:31am PT
le_bruce

Great photos from a mountainous part of Norway. The trees: It's not easy to see from the photos, but I think it's mainly birch trees. http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bj%C3%B8rkeslekten It is not montane birch since this is in the lowlands, but when you get higher you will find the montane birch: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandinavian_Montane_Birch_forest_and_grasslands

Birch is also the tree the "raw material" on the photo above is taken from, and it's only the outer layer that is taken, so the tree lives on very well.


HighTraverse

When you live in the country "Norge" you speak the language "norsk".
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 16, 2012 - 11:02am PT
1920ies: Grandfather Henrik on his way out to play for dance.
1920ies: Grandfather Henrik on his way out to play for dance.
Credit: Marlow
Having their picture taken. Grandfather Henrik on the left with his un...
Having their picture taken. Grandfather Henrik on the left with his uncle Daniel on the right.
Credit: Marlow

A couple of tunes often played in the area:


Dancing
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Dec 16, 2012 - 11:03am PT
Marlow! Thanks for that Caper hunting vid you posted yesterday-- before i die, i would love to go do that hunt,, some day!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 16, 2012 - 10:25pm PT
Hoo's it hungeeng, Merloo? Bork Bork Bork!--the Chef, MrE's pal

http://www.flickr.com/photos/skotoh/812105909/

Credit: NGMag
Credit: NGmag
Norwegian birches.
Norwegian birches.
Credit: Beautiful Norway
The first two photos are from NG, July, 1930, two articles:
Norway--A Land of Stern Reality & Fjords ahd Fjells of Viking Land.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 20, 2012 - 01:42pm PT
Mouse: Great Norwegian pictures.

How work was done in the year 1915 (excellent film, no sound). Filmed in Sweden I think.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 12:55pm PT
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Horse pulling "bukk" and "geit"
Horse pulling "bukk" and "geit"
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Dec 26, 2012 - 12:57pm PT
i LOVE Norway..;-) Thanks man!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 01:01pm PT
I'm glad to hear Ron!

Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Once in a while connected to a rope.
Once in a while connected to a rope.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Using dynamite to get the timber to flow.
Using dynamite to get the timber to flow.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
At the end station - still some work to do.
At the end station - still some work to do.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 01:15pm PT
There's still people working with a horse, but it's unusual.

What's usual today:

In earlier times the best Norwegian skiers were working in the woods. The two persons to the left in the photo below were world champions - Gjermund Eggen and Harald Grønningen.
Gjermund Eggen, Harald Grønningen, Reidar Hjermstad, Jo Eggen og Johs....
Gjermund Eggen, Harald Grønningen, Reidar Hjermstad, Jo Eggen og Johs. Harviken.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk

A picture from the old days
On his way out to work.
On his way out to work.
Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Dec 26, 2012 - 01:27pm PT
NICE! Those were some MEN doing that log walking!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 26, 2012 - 01:41pm PT
The work had to be done and it was not without danger. Doing what had to be done and doing it also under danger - that's what it was to be a man. At a later time also a few women participated.

Credit: Lasse Trædal. Skaufolk.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2013 - 01:35pm PT
Svedjebruk Karelen 1920



Edited: Cosmic. That's the prayer I prayed every night as a child. I learned it from my mother. Your Norwegian is excellent.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Jan 10, 2013 - 01:50pm PT

Vår Far i himmelen!

La navnet ditt helliges.

La riket ditt komme.

La viljen din skje på jorden

slik som i himmelen.

Gi oss i dag vårt daglige brød,

og tilgi oss vår skyld,

slik også vi tilgir våre skyldnere.

Og la oss ikke komme i fristelse,
men frels oss fra det onde.

For riket er ditt,

og makten og æren i evighet.

Amen.
otisdog

Big Wall climber
Sierra Madre & McGee Creek, Ca.
Jan 10, 2013 - 02:20pm PT
Marlow - What kind of big (dead) bird is that?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2013 - 02:36pm PT
Otisdog - The big dead bird in an earlier post is capercailzie - "tiur" in Norwegian.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jan 10, 2013 - 02:40pm PT
Idyllic!
"Ten thousand Swedes, running through the trees, chased by one Norwegian."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2013 - 02:52pm PT
Donini,

Is there a story?

The border didn't exist at Finnskogen - Finnskogen is large woods and many lakes at the "border" between the "two countries".

"These woods are my woods, though I do not own them."

The Swedes are in reality nice people. They gave us this country, but kept Jämtland and Härjedalen. Some Norwegians think we should do our best to buy J & H back with the oil money.

A painting giving us a not so romantic impression of "svedjebruk"
Credit: Eero Jarnefelt
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 11, 2013 - 01:22pm PT
A somewhat relevant article, about the return of wolves to the forests of Norway. Leading to the usual "debate" about it, which we don't need to repeat here. http://www.newsinenglish.no/2013/01/11/wolf-pair-marking-territory-in-oslo/

Marlow's photos are very similar to displays in the Skogsbruksmuseet in Elverum, and also in books of historical photos from Rendalen, where my father's family is from. In Hedmark, in fact, not far from the border with Sweden, which is where most of the wolves (and bears) live.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 11, 2013 - 01:43pm PT
Mighty Hiker

Most of the pictures are from Grue and Finnskogen and some are from Trysil. Grue and Finnskogen are about 230 km from Rendalen and Trysil is closer.

This drawing shows where Hedmark is in Norway.
Hedmark in yellow.
Hedmark in yellow.

And this map shows Grue and Finnskogen in the south, Trysil in the middle and Rendalen in the north of Hedmark.
Hedmark with Grue, Trysil and Rendalen.
Hedmark with Grue, Trysil and Rendalen.
When I was a kid fishing and football were my favourite activites. We lived close to a river, Flisa. We also went to the Rendalen area a couple of times to fish in Sølensjøen.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 11, 2013 - 01:59pm PT
Svullrya - at the heart of Finnskogen
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow

Old pictures from Handelsforeningen, the shop at Svullrya
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 11, 2013 - 04:26pm PT
Thanks, Marlow! Various cousins have hytter in Sølensjøen, and I've been there and of course Rendalen. Lovely spot.

I've never been to Jamtland, just across the border, where there are more distant relatives. It must be quite similar to Rendalen and area.
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Jan 11, 2013 - 05:56pm PT
When I saw the title of this thread I kinda thought what Prod did...

Weege cutting wood.
Weege cutting wood.
Credit: justthemaid
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 12, 2013 - 11:57am PT
Östmark on the "Swedish side" of Finnskogen

Värmland in Sweden with Finnskoga and Östmark in the north.
Värmland in Sweden with Finnskoga and Östmark in the north.
Kläggen, Östmark
Kläggen, Östmark
Credit: Mikael Klarstrom
Röjdafors mill, Östmark
Röjdafors mill, Östmark
Östmark church
Östmark church
Many went from Östmark to America. "They searched for a future in the ...
Many went from Östmark to America. "They searched for a future in the big country in the west"
BIS 1986 Putte - Owner Rune Frykeskog
BIS 1986 Putte - Owner Rune Frykeskog
Tractor club in Östmark: Svenska Grålle klubben
Tractor club in Östmark: Svenska Grålle klubben
Östmark motor club
Östmark motor club
The Elvis Cafe in Östmark
The Elvis Cafe in Östmark
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2013 - 02:22am PT
Resting while picking cloudberries at Fjørhanaberget in Sweden
Roy Tore Fallaas
Roy Tore Fallaas

The self-made cow-berry-sorting machine in use
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2013 - 11:27am PT

Ack Värmeland du sköna - Jussi Björling
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2013 - 12:03pm PT
Modern times: jumping and freerunning
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2013 - 11:08am PT
Rally Finnskog 2012
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 28, 2013 - 11:40am PT
Rikesten, a man from Finnskogen, known for his shamanic abilities. He lived the last years of his life in the house of my great-grandparents on my mother's side.

Rikesten means someone living on land owned by someone else.

Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 30, 2013 - 11:54am PT
Forest Finns in Scandinavia
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 15, 2013 - 10:57am PT
Motorcycles at Finnskogen long ago. I don't know what kind of motorcycles. Maybe one of them is an Indian?
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 8, 2013 - 08:46am PT
Ack Värmeland, du sköna (Värmlandsvisan) - with explanation in English - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2792-go7i8&feature=player_detailpage

Jussi Björling

Esther & Abi Ofarim (video with pictures from all over Sweden)

Mauno Kuusisto (1959) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=7ctzhy7r-FI

Göteborgs Symfoniker - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzMLnreaUrg&feature=player_detailpage

Jan Johansson - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s30lq3fseB0&feature=player_detailpage

Stan Getz - http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=0ycw7CAzwSY

Chet Baker & Stan Getz

Sommarkören 2012 Kulturskolan Lund - http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=DBbonX_knYM

In Flames - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anKqpTBQLuQ&feature=player_detailpage

Victor Kastelein and Yr Kettelhake
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 13, 2013 - 11:49am PT
Alf Hågedal Trio - Flickan från Finnskogarna (Carl Jularbo)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 16, 2013 - 09:14am PT
Finnskogen this weekend.
The road - Roy Tore Fallaas
The road - Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Thriving in the sun.
Thriving in the sun.
Credit: Marlow
On a wet day.
On a wet day.
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Roy Tore Fallaas
Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow

Ed: Thanks Ron. I appreciate your feedback very much.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Jun 16, 2013 - 09:16am PT
Thanks Marlow for your continued tour!!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 09:40am PT
Kaisa Vilhuinen (1855-1941)
Kaisa Vilhuinen
Kaisa Vilhuinen
Kaisa Vilhuinen knew many poems similar to Kalevala, the result of an old oral storytelling tradition carried by rune songs. The tradition of the forest Finns was rooted in shamanism. Kaisa was at her time the best source researchers had at Finnskogen. She was from Röjdåfors in Sweden and is seen as one of the last tietäjä (the one who knows) at Finnskogen. She was known to be able to influence the forces/powers of nature and protect and cure both people and animals. Her teacher had been Puru Juhoin, a man with great shamanic powers. He said: "Never put a sword in the hand of a fool and never teach a person older than yourself. Through your powers you will be able to do both good and bad. Teach someone younger than yourself and do it secretly, if not, the power of the runes will be lost."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 09:40am PT
Kalevala

Poems 1-2
Ilmatar (the Virgin of the Air) descends to the waters. A pochard lays its eggs on her knee. The eggs break and the world is formed from their pieces. The mother of the water then gives birth to Väinämöinen. Sampsa Pellervoinen sows the forest trees. One of the trees, an oak, grows so large that it blots out both the sun and the moon. A tiny man rises from the sea and fells the giant oak. The sun and moon can shine once again.
Ilmatar The creation of the world
Ilmatar The creation of the world
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Poems 3-4
Joukahainen challenges Väinämöinen to a contest of wisdom and is defeated. With his singing, Väinämöinen causes Joukahainen to sink into a swamp. In order to save himself, Joukahainen promises his sister' s hand in marriage to Väinämöinen. Upon learning of the bargain, the sister Aino mourns her fate and finally drowns herself.
Vainamoinen and Aino
Vainamoinen and Aino
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Poems 5-7
Väinämöinen searches the sea for Aino and catches her (she has been transformed into a fish) on his fishing hook. However, he loses her again and sets out to woo the maiden of Pohjola, the daughter of the North Farm. Meanwhile, eager for revenge, Joukahainen watches out for Väinämöinen on the way to Pohjola and shoots Väinämöinen's horse from underneath him as he rides across a river. Väinämöinen falls into the water and floats out to sea. There an eagle rescues him and carries him to Pohjola's shores. The mistress of Pohjola, Louhi, tends Väinämöinen until he recovers. In order to be able to return home, Väinämöinen promises that Ilmarinen the smith will forge a Sampo for Pohjola. The maiden of Pohjola, Louhi's daughter, is promised to the smith in return for the Sampo.

Poems 8-9
On his way home, Väinämöinen meets the maiden of Pohjola and asks her to marry him. She agrees on the condition that Väinämöinen carry out certain impossible tasks. While Väinämöinen carves a wooden boat, his axe slips and he receives a deep wound in his knee. He searchers for an expert blood-stauncher and finally finds an old man who stops the flow of blood by using magic incantations.

Poem 10
Using magic means, Väinämöinen sends the unwilling Ilmarinen to Pohjola. Ilmarinen forges the Sampo. Louhi shuts it inside a hill of rock. Ilmarinen is forced to return home without his promised bride.
Ilmarinen Crafts the Sampo
Ilmarinen Crafts the Sampo
Credit: Akseli Gallen-Kallela
Poems 11-12
Lemminkäinen sets off to woo Kyllikki, a maiden of Saari Island. He makes merry with the other maidens and abducts Kyllikki. He later abandons her and leaves to woo the maiden of Pohjola. With his singing he bewitches the people of Pohjola to leave the farmhouse at North Farm. Only one person, a cowherd, does not fall under his spell.
Lemminkainen leaves for Pohjola
Lemminkainen leaves for Pohjola
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Poems 13-15
Lemminkäinen asks Louhi for her daughter, but Louhi demands that he first hunt and kill the Demon's moose, then the Demon's fire-breathing gelding, and finally the swan in Tuonela River, which is the boundary between this world and the next. There the vengeful cowherd kills Lemminkäinen and throws his body into the river. Lemminkäinen's mother receives a sign of her son's death and goes out in search of him. She rakes the pieces of her son's body out of Tuonela River, puts them back together and brings her son back to life.
Hunting the magic moose
Hunting the magic moose
Credit: Vaino Hamalainen
Lemminkainens mother anoints her sons body into life
Lemminkainens mother anoints her sons body into life
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Poems 16-17
Väinämöinen begins to build a boat and visits Tuonela in order to ask for the magic spells need to finish it. He does not find them. He then seeks the missing spells from the stomach of the ancient wise man, Antero Vipunen, who has long been dead. He finds them and finishes his boat.
Vainamoinen builds a boat
Vainamoinen builds a boat
Credit: Nicolai Kochergin
Poems 18-19
Väinämöinen sets off in his boat to woo the daughter of Pohjola, but she chooses instead Ilmarinen, the forger of the Sampo. Ilmarinen successfully performs the three impossible tasks set before him: he plows a field full of vipers, hunts down the bear of Tuonela and the wolf of Manala and finally fishes the Great Pike out of the Tuonela River. Louhi promises her daughter to Ilmarinen.
The Beauty of Pohjola Chooses a Husband
The Beauty of Pohjola Chooses a Husband
Credit: Nicolai Kochergin
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 09:40am PT
Poems 20-25
In Pohjola, preparations are made for the wedding and invitations are sent to all except Lemminkäinen. The groom and his folk arrive in Pohjola, and there is great feasting. Väinämöinen entertains the wedding guests with his singing. The bride and groom are given advice concerning marriage, and the bride bids farewell to her people and departs with Ilmarinen for Kalevala. There a banquet is also ready for the guests. Väinämöinen sings the praises of the wedding guests.
Vainamoinen sings to the beer
Vainamoinen sings to the beer
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Poems 26-27
Lemminkäinen shows up at the banquet in Pohjola uninvited, and demands food and drink. He is offered a tankard of beer filled with vipers. Lemminkäinen engages the master of Pohjola in a singing contest and a swordfight and kills him.

Poems 28-30
Lemminkäinen flees the people of Pohjola who are rising up in arms against him and hides on Saari Island, living among the maidens of the island until he is forced to flee once again, this time from the island's jealous menfolk. Lemminkäinen finds his home in ashes and his mother hiding in a cottage in the forest. Lemminkäinen sets out to seek revenge on Pohjola, but is forced to return home because a cold spell cast by the mistress of Pohjola has frozen his ships in the sea.
Lemminkainen meets his mother
Lemminkainen meets his mother
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Lemminkainen struggles against the frost
Lemminkainen struggles against the frost
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Poems 31-34
Brothers Untamo and Kalervo quarrel violently, Kalervo's troop is slain, and of his kin only his son Kullervo remains. Because of his superhuman powers, Kullervo fails in every task he is given. Untamo sells the boy to Ilmarinen as a serf. The wife of Ilmarinen send Kullervo out to be a cowherd and out of spite bakes a stone into the bread which is his only provisions. Kullervo breaks his knife on the stone while trying to cut the bread, and in revenge drives the cows into the swamp and brings home a pack of wild animals instead. The mistress, intending to milk the cows, is mauled to death. Kullervo flees. He finds his family in the forest, but hears that his sister has disappeared.
Ilmarinen Takes Kullervo into his House
Ilmarinen Takes Kullervo into his House
Credit: Nicolai Kochergin
Ilmarinens wife and cow changed into a bear
Ilmarinens wife and cow changed into a bear
Credit: Bjorn Landstrom
Poems 35-36
Kullervo's father sends him to pay the taxes. On his return trip, Kullervo unwittingly seduces his sister, who then drowns herself in the rapids upon discovering the truth. Kullervo sets out to seek revenge from Untamo. Having killed Untamo and his family, Kullervo returns home to find is own family dead. Kullervo commits suicide.

Poem 37
Ilmarinen mourns the death of his wife and decides to forge a woman of gold. The golden maiden remains, however, lifeless and cold. Väinämöinen warns the young people against worshipping gold.

Poem 38
Ilmarinen is rejected by the youngest daughter of Pohjola and carries her off in his sleigh. The girl reviles Ilmarinen and so offends him that he finally turns her into a seagull with his singing. Ilmarinen tells Väinämöinen of the wealth and prosperity that the Sampo has brought the people of Pohjola.

Poems 39-41
Väinämöinen, Ilmarinen and Lemminkäinen set out to steal the Sampo from Pohjola. In the course of the journey, their boat runs aground on the shoulders of a giant pike. Väinämöinen kills the pike and fashions a kantele from its jawbone. No one else is able to play the instrument, but Väinämöinen holds all living things spellbound with his playing.
Vainamoinen and Ilmarinen Go to Pohjola to Take the Sampo
Vainamoinen and Ilmarinen Go to Pohjola to Take the Sampo
Credit: Nicolai Kochergin
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 19, 2013 - 09:40am PT
Poems 42-43
Väinämöinen puts the people of Pohjola to sleep with his kantele playing and the Sampo is taken to the travellers' boat and rowed away. The people of Pohjola awaken and Louhi, the mistress of Pohjola, sends obstacles in the path of the raiders to hinder their escape. The seafarers survive, but the kantele falls into the sea. Louhi sets off in pursuit and transforms herself into a giant bird of prey. In the ensuing battle the Sampo is smashed and falls into the sea. Some of the fragments remain in the sea, but others wash ashore and bring Finland good fortune and prosperity. Louhi is left with only the worthless lid of the Sampo and an impoverished land.
Vainamoinen Plays the Kantele
Vainamoinen Plays the Kantele
Credit: Nicolai Kochergin
The Mistress of Pohjola Chases Vainamoinens Boat
The Mistress of Pohjola Chases Vainamoinens Boat
Credit: Akseli Gallen-Kallela
Poem 44
In vain, Väinämöinen seeks the kantele which fell into the sea. He makes a new kantele from birchwood and his playing once again delights the whole of creation.
Vainamoinen Makes a New Kantele of Birch
Vainamoinen Makes a New Kantele of Birch
Credit: Nicolai Kochergin
Poem 45-46
Louhi sends diseases to destroy the people of Kalevala, but Väinämöinen cures the sick. Louhi sends a bear to attack the Kalevala cattle, but Väinämöinen slays the bear. The people of Kalevala organize a bear-killing feast.

Poems 47-48
The mistress of Pohjola hides the sun and the moon inside a hill and steals the fire as well. Ukko, the supreme god, makes a new sun and moon by striking fire, but the fire falls to earth, into the belly of a giant fish. Väinämöinen asks Ilmarinen to go fishing with him. They catch the fish and place the fire in the service of humankind.

Poem 49
Ilmarinen forges a new sun and moon, but they do not shine. After battling the people of Pohjola, Väinämöinen returns to ask Ilmarinen to fashion a set of keys with which to release the sun and moon from Pohjola's mountain. While Ilmarinen is forging, Louhi sets the sun and moon free to return to their places in the sky.
The Hosts of Heaven set free
The Hosts of Heaven set free
Credit: Nicolai Kochergin
Poem 50
Marjatta conceives a child from a whortleberry. Her baby boy is born in the forest, but soon disappears, to be found finally in a swamp. Väinämöinen condemns the fatherless child to death, but the child speaks out against the sentence and is christened King of Karelia. Väinämöinen departs in a copper boat with the prediction that he will be needed again someday to make a new Sampo for the people, to bring new light and play new songs.
Vainamoinen
Vainamoinen
Credit: Sami Makkonen
Vainamoinens departure
Vainamoinens departure
Credit: Akseli Gallen-Kallela
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 21, 2013 - 10:03am PT
In the forest.

Music by Gåte.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 22, 2013 - 12:35am PT
Fishing trout
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 1, 2013 - 10:32am PT
Celebrating Finnskogen: Finnskogdagene - http://www.finnskogdagene.no/
Finnskogdagene
Finnskogdagene
Credit: Sverre Viggen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2013 - 10:19am PT
Nitahå Jussi
Nitahå Jussi
Credit: Finnskog og trollskap

Nitahå-Jussi is said to have been the last wanderer at Finnskogen. He knew the woods well and took a job where he found it, when he needed it. He lived and worked for a while in the US, but returned to Sweden to take over the farm after his father's death. Someone had illegally taken the farm and years of juridical trouble started. In the film "Finnskog and trollskap" we are following Jussi. The film made him "famous", as did the book that was written about him. The book carried his own name. He was still active as an old man - as you see from the picture. I think he's in his 80's. The film "Finnskog and trollskap" has finally reached dvd and is now to be bought. In that film I can also see my great grandfather on my father's side - Laurits - a man worth his own film.

Some of the quotes living after Jussi:
"These woods are my woods, though I do not own them."
"I'm following the bird-paths."
"There's a trick to solve everything." (Det er et knep ved alt)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 4, 2013 - 11:06am PT
Roy Lønhøiden - Finnskogens dronning (Queen of Finnskogen)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 07:52am PT
Finnskogen this weekend
Credit: Marlow
Lichen on old Common Juniper
Lichen on old Common Juniper
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Stars on the ground
Stars on the ground
Credit: Marlow
Dry weather
Dry weather
Credit: Marlow
On a wet day.
On a wet day.
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 08:13am PT
Old Nimbus motorcycle with sidecar parked outside Finnetunet
Old Nimbus motorcycle with sidecar parked outside Finnetunet
Credit: Marlow
Canoes waiting, Rotna
Canoes waiting, Rotna
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 08:21am PT
A couple of tractors at Finnskogen
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 09:59am PT
Finnskogdagene 2013 Gottlundmarsjen 1
View from the start
View from the start
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
The first path through the forest
The first path through the forest
Credit: Marlow
A bridge crossing Rotna
A bridge crossing Rotna
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Drying firewood
Drying firewood
Credit: Marlow
Following the path
Following the path
Credit: Marlow
On the ground
On the ground
Credit: Marlow
Stone on stone and one more fence
Stone on stone and one more fence
Credit: Marlow
On the way with their dogs
On the way with their dogs
Credit: Marlow
Flowing water
Flowing water
Credit: Marlow
Finnskogen - Gottlundmarsjen - The play of light and shadow
Finnskogen - Gottlundmarsjen - The play of light and shadow
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Gottlundmarsjen - The magic forest 1 - Roy Tore Fallaas
Gottlundmarsjen - The magic forest 1 - Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 09:59am PT
Finnskogdagene 2013 Gottlundmarsjen 2
The magic forest 2
The magic forest 2
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Roots crossing the chosen path
Roots crossing the chosen path
Credit: Marlow
The magic forest 3
The magic forest 3
Credit: Marlow
A road on the way
A road on the way
Credit: Marlow
Gottlundmarsjen - On the roadside
Gottlundmarsjen - On the roadside
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Surfing at Finnskogen.
Surfing at Finnskogen.
Credit: Marlow
An old barn at Furuberget
An old barn at Furuberget
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Back in Svullrya
Back in Svullrya
Credit: Marlow
Rotna Bridge
Rotna Bridge
Credit: Marlow
Reaching the first path where Gottlundmarsjen started
Reaching the first path where Gottlundmarsjen started
Credit: Marlow
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 14, 2013 - 10:55am PT
Roy, tusen takk for alt this! I really enjoyed the Forest Finns video and the music vids.
I never knew anything about Finnskogen. What a hard life. Did you grow up in Hedmark?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 14, 2013 - 11:00am PT
Reilly

Yes, I grew up in Hedmark. Mostly Sønsterud close to Flisa, but also Gjesåsen, Løten and Kongsvinger (if you know the local geography).
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 19, 2013 - 12:01pm PT
The history of timber floating in Rotna - written 1983 by Jakob Ryen, an uncle of my mother. The floating in Rotna ended in 1965.

The history of timber floating in Rotna
The history of timber floating in Rotna
Credit: Marlow
Log driver Heikki Leikaasen
Log driver Heikki Leikaasen
Credit: Marlow

Ed: MH2 - That's sweet - it's the first time I'm exposed to the Canadian log driving bit. lol...
MH2

climber
Jul 19, 2013 - 12:12pm PT
Ha, Ha! Mighty fine.


A possibly relevant albeit over-exposed Canadian log-driving bit:


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 22, 2013 - 11:25am PT
Roy Lønhøiden plays "Gjennom Livet" ("Through Life") from his record "Sanger fra skogen" ("Songs from the forest")
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2013 - 09:19am PT
A poem by Dan Andersson, a poet from the forest, translated in the original metres by C.D. Locock (1929):

Song

My love was born in the sweet of the year,
By the banks of a rippling, hurrying river;
Wild nectar I quaffed in my youth-days there,
In dew-drenced meads where the moonbeams quiver.

My love was born where the salmon leap
In Paiso's river of waters dancing;
And it grew to a melody sung in sleep,
A wild man's revel, a tale entrancing.

It seethed in my blood like a draught divine,
Born anew with each Springs returning,
When the world goes reeling, as drunk with wine,
And Earth and Heaven are burning.

But never more have I loved as then
In the moon of roses by Paiso's river;
My love grows grey, nor findeth again
Sweet nectar in meads where the moonbeams quiver.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2013 - 10:33am PT
Finnskogen and mountains - a great fantasy. In Norway the closest you get to this painting, this dream, is in Trysil.

Credit: Marlow
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 25, 2013 - 03:01pm PT
Jeg aer i Finnskogen av Nord Amerika - the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. You would feel right at home here, Marlow. I'm visiting the old family farm, now owned by others :-(
They have let it go so maybe I can get it back cheaply.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 26, 2013 - 12:34am PT
Reilly

My best wishes for you and the old family farm. Do you have any photos from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan? Be free to post them on this thread.


Edit.: Here's a picures I found on the web showing a lot of similarities between the two landscapes:

Michigan Upper Peninsula
Michigan Upper Peninsula

Some differences: The Michigan peninsula has a great "coastal" line that you do not find at Finnskogen, where you have smaller lakes. And I think Finnskogen is generally more dominated by pine and spruce than the Michigan peninsula. The peninsula is as I can see extremely colour-rich in the autumn when the leaves change their ways - as seen from this picture:

Credit: Murat Kara
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2013 - 09:03am PT
Dan Andersson - Heldagskväll i timmerkojan


Dan Andersson's first book (1914) - Kolarhistorier. Cost: Swedish kroner 1,-
Kolarhistorier &#40;Charcoal Burner's Tales&#41;
Kolarhistorier (Charcoal Burner's Tales)
Credit: Marlow

Joakim Thåström singing his song "Om Black Jim" - a song about Dan Andersson who died 32 years old from cyanid poisoning in a bed at room 11 at Hotel Hellman in Stockholm. Choose your hotel room with care when you get to Stockholm...

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 28, 2013 - 09:39am PT
Marlow, fotos to come when I reach a computer. Saw wolf tracks a few days ago, big ones.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2013 - 09:45am PT
Reilly.

That's much appreciated!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 29, 2013 - 01:43pm PT
Sorrow 1894 - A forest Finn and his wife

Sorg 1894
Sorg 1894
Credit: Albert Edelfeldt
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 31, 2013 - 10:32pm PT
See, Marlow, I told you I would have pics...
Credit: Reilly

Beaver lodge
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 08:27am PT
Reilly.

Norwegian Woods.com. Hehe... that's cool. The similarity between Finnskogen and the picture you posted is striking - it could be anywhere at Finnskogen.

Some lichens from this week:
Finnskogen
Finnskogen
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Finnskogen
Finnskogen
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 08:27am PT
Some other parts of the nature
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 08:29am PT
And memorablia
Finnskogen
Finnskogen
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 12:18pm PT
"In his youth Dan Andersson led a wandering life. He worked as woodsman, temperance lecturer, factory worker, and travelling salesman." At the age of 14, Andersson was by his father sent to the United States to explore possibilities for immigration. He worked there at his aunt and uncle's farm, but after eight months, his father asked him to return to Skattlösberg, Sweden.

Dan wrote a book about America - "Chi-Mo-Ka-Ma. Stories from Northern America." (Bonniers 1920).
Credit: Marlow

This is how the book starts:
"I was still young the first time I met Charlie Day, alias Red Shadow, an Indian who had been given this name by the people from Rice Lake, a place near the center of the railway triangel Brainerd - Duluth - Beminji, just like in a big box, with the clear blue sky of Northern Minnesota as roof."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 12:22pm PT
Credit: Marlow
My mother ready to go skiing (in front on the right side) and her mother, my grandmother, with equipment for carrying water on the left.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Aug 2, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
Dette er en fantastisk tråd, Marlow, og du har et godt øye.

As well as a refined sense of place. My pleasure to visit.

I climbed in YV in the eighties with a fellow from Eben Junction, MI. His family, the Laaksos, were Finns. He himself, Kelly, was just as small as a guy gets and looked dwarfed by his rack on El Cap. But he was a strong climber, just not wall-savvy.

"See ya to da U.P., eh?" was the sticker on his bumper. I met him in the C4 parking lot, you can BELIEVE IT OR NOT!

MFM
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
Thanks Mouse. Your Norwegian was perfect. Har du hatt hjelp? Can't just be Google?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 2, 2013 - 03:04pm PT
Har du hatt hjelp?

Jeg tror saa men kanskje Musen aer ett Rattus norvegicus?


Who says Devil's Lake is the only climbing in Wisconsin?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2013 - 03:26pm PT
From the woods: This is for Bats only...

Credit: Marlow

Mouse - Mus eller Rotte - as a matter of translation:

Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 08:37am PT
Wolf tracks
Wolf
Wolf

Bear tracks
Bear
Bear

Guns made by the smith at Bortomaaa farm, Orsa Finnmark, Sweden

Bortomaaa farm: Nine different keys needed to open the door

Grue Finnskog: "Den skal tidlig krøkes som god krok skal bli"
Credit: Marlow

Shooting bear, Dalarna, Sweden, January 1877
Shooting bear, Dalarna, Sweden, January 1877
Shooting bear, Dalarna, Sweden, January 1877
Credit: Joseph Wilhelm Wallander
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 08:50am PT
"Neverkont"

Collecting the raw material "never" from birch
Collecting the raw material from Birch. My grandmother Lina to the lef...
Collecting the raw material from Birch. My grandmother Lina to the left.
Credit: Marlow

Working with "never"
Finnskogen - Orsa - Mickels-Olle &#40;1801-1882&#41;
Finnskogen - Orsa - Mickels-Olle (1801-1882)
Credit: Marlow

"Neverkont" in use (my grandmother to the right)
Carrying the product &#40;"neverkont"&#41; on their back. Grandmother ...
Carrying the product ("neverkont") on their back. Grandmother Lina to the right.
Credit: Marlow

"Nerverkont" - still made today, but never in work-related use
Neverkont
Neverkont
Credit: Marlow
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 3, 2013 - 09:01am PT
Ekte Finnskog, ikke sant?

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 09:03am PT
Reilly

Yes, looks exactly like. Is the picture from Finnskogen in Norway, Sweden or Finland?
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 3, 2013 - 09:16am PT
Hahaha, nej, Wisconsin!

Den gammel kahytt...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 3, 2013 - 09:21am PT
Great place. Is it the family farm?

And what has happened to the photo? (there's a round spot full of colours on the right side, lower part of the photo)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 4, 2013 - 01:10am PT
The settlement of forest Finns in the central part of Sweden
Credit: Richard Broberg

The settlement of forest Finns in the south-eastern part of Norway
Credit: Richard Broberg

Words: före = before, efter = after
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 4, 2013 - 01:14am PT
Haukugle - Northern Hawk-Owl (Surnia ulula)


Ash and Glow:

Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 7, 2013 - 01:08pm PT
"The spruce is blooming well this year", people from the forest say.
They stop where their paths cross in the forest
and are there for each other
with a silent glow of joy in their eyes."

Freely after Hans Børli

Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 7, 2013 - 01:18pm PT
Credit: Marlow


I'm standing by the river. It's late at night. I've been walking along the river, fishing, for many hours. The last hour I haven't caught a fish. Darkness is approaching. Colours are fading around me. Mist is starting to spread down the river. I can feel a cold breeze softly touching my cheek. The humming sound from the river is growing deeper. I'm standing in some kind of enthrallment. I'm filled with energy, connected, yet calm. I can sense, I can feel, all of this, and still not, since there is no sense of a separate I. The river flows and the river flows in me. I am the river.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 8, 2013 - 01:12pm PT
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas


It is the ephemeral things
that you carry with you:
the shadow of a bird’s wing
crossing the path in front of your foot
the smell of ice and frozen fruit of mountain-ash
an early autumn morning long ago, a word
spoken in the mist and wind
by an open fire
deep inside the moose-fields

It is the ephemeral things
that live inside you
and firmly hold a picture of yourself
and life - shimmering
like beaches reflected
in a flowing river

Freely after Hans Børli

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 16, 2013 - 10:38am PT
The Forest Finns brought with them many customs from Finland. Sauna, "svedjebruk" (slash-and-burn agriculture), a special kind of rye, the use of "never" from birch as material and so on.

The sauna was often the first building the forest Finns built and the sauna served as a multi purpose house.

Old sauna
Old sauna

The beginning of Urho Kekkonen's book describing the story ot the "Sauna":

"In the beginning was only a heap of rocks. They were heated, they were worshiped. Perhaps they were propitiated, perhaps they were appeased by having water cast upon them.

Rituals have always been an inherent part of the sauna. Once it had become an everyday bathing place, ceremonial uses remained: the bride was bathed in the sauna before the wedding.

The very earliest Finnish woodsmen used the sauna as a multiple purpose building, it was both dwelling and sauna. It could also be used for drying grain.

The first saunas were probably earthen saunas: a pit was dug in the ground and the rocks to be heated were heaped at the bottom. The sides of the pit were reinforced with tree trunks and eventually the entire construction began to rise out of the ground, with walls made of logs.

The functions of the sauna kept increasing: of course the sauna was for washing and bathing and laundring; but it was also a dispensary, where the old cupping women would draw the "evil blood" from the veins with their cupping horns, where painful muscles were massaged, where the children were born and the deceased laid out to be washed. Flax was dried in the sauna, hams and mutton were cured, and malt was dried. The sauna was the source of indispensable hot water. The water was warmed on the hot rocks, or in the hot-water cauldron.

The old saunas were often very large, 25 square meters up to 40 square meters. The door was at the gable end of the sauna and led directly into the sauna-room with it's earthen floor."...

Urho Kekkonen and the book Sauna
Urho Kekkonen and the book Sauna

The Helsinki Yacht Club and Bar - Finntown/Butte - Montana - where the annual naming of St. Urho takes place... And: Yes, there are saunas in there :-) Posted by Mojede on the Finland thread.

Credit: Mojede
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 21, 2013 - 12:13pm PT

Look - the lake's shining with scarlet
from the land of the sunsetting sky.
And bright as a piece of old silver
is the diver's red-throated cry.

Hans Børli


Smaalom (Gavia Stellata - Red-throated Loon )

Filmed by Gunnar Fernqvist, Sweden.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 01:12pm PT
The Forests' Song

It sounds so sad on the moor at night:
the forests' song.
Its lyrics are written in gold twilight
where the weary sun sinks out of sight
over the desolate highlands.

I stop and listen. - I hear a note:
the forests' song.
A trembling cry from the wild bird's throat,
a murmuring brook where the fall winds float
over the desolate highlands.

How blessed those notes of its music are,
the forests' song.
They rise in the light of both sun and star
where tree-shaking winds blow near and far
over the desolate highlands.

The moose hears a dusky melody play:
the forests' song.
He rests in the moss through the lulling day
till twilight calls him out on his way
over the desolate highlands.

And the hunter hears the old tune run:
the forests' song.
He polishes up his shot-blackened gun
as smoke coils up when the day is done
up in the desolate highlands.

And the song flows on in each slumbering glen,
the forests' song.
They stop and they listen again,
the lonely beasts and the lonely men
up on the desolate highlands.


Hans Børli (translated by Louis Muinzer)


Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 01:21pm PT
Have You Listened to the Rivers in the Night?

Have you listened to the rivers in the night?
They speak of other things.

They send no laughter trickling over their sand bars,
hum no song about
girls' brown bodies
that glide outward at the bathing place
or wide meadows with their curlew-cries
or the ferryman who looks at the clouds
as he rows.

They speak of other things.
Things that are homeless in the day,
things that are Never and without words.

If you listen long to the rivers in the night,
listen long,
it is at last as if your soul
is mysteriously remembering its future.


Hans Børli (translated by Louis Muinzer)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 01:49pm PT
For a Young Girl

So slim and supple in your eighteen years!
Your being is a wind-bent straw
where your smile's shy grass-butterfly
sits tipping its wings slantwise
and shining for nobody
and everyone.


Hans Børli (translated by Louis Muinzer)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 22, 2013 - 02:16pm PT
The Moose Heart

He cut the heart out from
the hot and steaming cavity
and threw it in the heather.

Gentle snowflakes
came slanting through the grey air
and settled silently, melted
against the reeking redness.

But before we'd cut the carcass up,
the heart was snow-covered.
just a little hump in the whiteness.

And when we set off homewards
with big wet sacks
that scratched against green branches,
we forgot the moose heart...


Hans Børli


Credit: John Unsgaard
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 24, 2013 - 12:28pm PT

The Little Flute

You mend your instrument.
give it more and better strings,
a deeper ring -

but the little flute...

The little bone flute
waits
till the bows are lowered
waits
till the trumpets are silent
and the light goes out on the podium
then
it makes lonely music in the darkness
by the backdoor.

A naked tone
white
as a bird-bone
in the bog wind.

There is No One playing.
The little bone flute.


Hans Børli



Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 25, 2013 - 01:32am PT

Kvarntorp and Ritamäki, old Forest Finn farms in Värmland, Sweden.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 1, 2013 - 07:51am PT
Otto Tyskeberget
Otto Tyskeberget

Otto Tyskeberget's great grandfather, Daniel Tyskeberget (1778-1856), was a legendary bear hunter at Finnskogen. He is known to have killed close to 100 bears. Daniel had a deep passion for bear hunting. Other words than passion could of course be used. Once a serious disease had reached Tyskeberget. But a bear had been seen in the area and Daniel wanted to hunt it down. His wife asked him to stay, but he couldn't. He left with his gun and didn't return until some weeks later. Two of his children had died. As the story goes - that was the only time Daniel was seen crying.

Bear hunting. A wounded bear.
Bear hunting. A wounded bear.
Credit: A Lundholm

A bear claw left by Daniel

Daniel's gun - rebuilt from flintlock to percussion cap during his life-time.
Daniel Tyskeberget's gun.
Daniel Tyskeberget's gun.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 1, 2013 - 07:54am PT

"Jag väntar" ("I'm waiting"), a tune by Gunnar Turesson (1906-2001) with lyrics by his brother-in-law, Dan Andersson. Gunnar Turesson was only 16 years old when he composed the tune.

Sofia Karlsson singing "Jag väntar"


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 2, 2013 - 11:26am PT

The Lady Wanderer

It is as if your face has listened somewhere
near the springs. - Sister, it is
as if you brought dawn's stillness with you
from the heights with sacred trees.

Many a time you filled my loneliness
in days when my heart was lost:
I sensed your nearness in the roe dear's leap
and in the kestrel's wings of fire.

Now I stand with my hands heavy from their loss,
so poor, so coarse-made and grey.
You are like an image, a shining name
of something I shall never reach.

You have gone on slanting rays of sunlight
towards the highland deep inside you.
Your listening, averted being has gained
a scent of snow in autumn mountains.

I look at you. The way a lost man
in the darkness may stand and see
a star above an unknown country
where the paths are snowbound.

Hans Børli
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Sep 2, 2013 - 07:09pm PT
Thanks Marlow! Lovin the pictures of your land!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 6, 2013 - 01:01pm PT

Halling after the "Limping boy" Ola Porkkala Lehmoinen, Grue Finnskog.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 6, 2013 - 01:04pm PT

Cemetery in natural forest (Finland)

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 12, 2013 - 02:03pm PT


Inscription

Your life. Your dream:
The warmth beneath the foot of a bird
that's dozing in the autumn dawn...

H.B.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 15, 2013 - 10:28am PT
At dawn this weekend
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 15, 2013 - 10:33am PT
Some tools for shoes and leather
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 15, 2013 - 10:42am PT
Some old tools for timber and wood
My grandfather's old saw
My grandfather's old saw
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2013 - 08:22am PT
Backpacks

A well used "neverkont"
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas

Bergans Original, Made in Oslo, Norway
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
KlimbIn

climber
Sep 16, 2013 - 09:22am PT

He explained, “One thing that really divides Norway is bark.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/20/world/europe/in-norway-tv-program-on-firewood-elicits-passions.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 16, 2013 - 09:39am PT
KlimbIn

I haven't read the book, but the article was great. TFPU!

When I grow old, climbing and firewood will be a part of my life. My mother calling out "Boys, now it's dinner..." from the house and the sound and rythm of my grandfather sawing and chopping firewood behind the barn is still part of my idea of everything being well, something stable and reliable in life. My grandfather died 35 years ago, but I'm still carrying the sound...

This is the saw that made the sound in the hands of my grandfather:
My grandfather's old saw
My grandfather's old saw
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Grandfather Martinius with Trond
Grandfather Martinius with Trond
Credit: Marlow
KlimbIn

climber
Sep 16, 2013 - 07:00pm PT
Marlow, thank you for these pictures.

Cutting, chopping and stacking firewood was the only way for me to keep warm for several years. The toil is natural, and beneficial for the mind. As I think of my dream home for my later years, a fireplace and a wood chopping block are essential.
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Sep 16, 2013 - 08:40pm PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 17, 2013 - 08:42am PT
For hay:
Credit: Marlow

At the other end - the name of my grandfather (my father's father):
Credit: Marlow

using this tool:
Credit: Marlow

The last name comes in many varieties: Faldås - Faldaas - Fallaas - Fallås

The first part of the last name, "Fall", is connected to forest Finns and falling trees. "The fall" was the name of chopped-down-trees to be burned next spring.

Trees were chopped down one year. Next spring they were burned. The ash nurtured the soil. Rye was sown and so on...

Before my mother's mother married, she had Ryen as her last name. Ryen from rye.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2013 - 09:58am PT

Old tool used by grindermen - slipestein

Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 20, 2013 - 02:49pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Till min syster/To My Sister (Dan Andersson)

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2013 - 02:52am PT
A Musician's Last Journey (Dan Andersson)

Thorstein Bergman - the whole poem/song


Malin Foxdal - the first half of the poem/song


Ere the rosy morning brightens over Himmelmora's Crest,
See a dead man faring forth from Berga By:
And silent o'er the hillside they bear him to his rest,
Beneath the dawning grey, the chilly sky.
And their boots go heavy-heeled through the rose-bespattered
field,
And heavy heads are bowed as tho' in prayer.
From the desert spaces' Need comes a Dreamer who is dead,
Through dewy meads that shine with flowers fair.

"He was strange and he was lonely," say the four dark
bearing men,
"And often lacked he resting-place and bread,"-
"Lo, a King!" say the roses - and are trodden down again -
"Lo, a King and a Dreamer that is dead!"-
"We are slow," say the bearers, "and mile on mile it seems,
Ever sultrier brows the day this morning tide." -
"Walk ye warily, speak softly," sigh the willows by the
streams,
"Maybe it is some flow'ret that has died."

But when thro' green Spring woodlands the pitch-black
coffin swings,
Runs a silence through the morn-awakened fields,
And the West Wind stays to listen who it is such escort
brings,
Mid the roses, with such footsteps heavy-heeled.
"Tis but Olle, the musician," sigh the whispering forest
trees,
"For ended is his homeless day." -
"Oh, would I were a hurricane," replies the gentle breeze,
"I would pipe him on his journey all the way!"

Over ling and yellow marshes sway the dead man's stiffening
bones,
Sway wearily the sun's pale rays beneath:
But when evening's lovely coolness falls on bilberries and
stones
Sounds the tramp again on Himmelmora Heath:
Tramp of four tired men, who in grief march home again,
With their heads bowed low as if in prayer.
But deep upon their track see the roses trampled back,
Through the dewy meads that shine with flowers fair.

"He is gone," say the bearers, "and his mother bides forlorn
In Torberga behind the poorhouse bars. -
"We are trampled 'neath your footsteps, with your heavy
shoes are torn,"
Cry the rose-buds, pointing to their scars.
"It is Death that has gone dancing over Himmelmora
Heath,"
Each tistle by the clover pasture moans:
"He has ground you all to garbage his clumsy boots beneath,
While he danced with the Dreamer's bones."

O'er the grass and the grey roof-tops like a whisper comes
the night,
With her few pale stars' wretched fire:
And East across the moorland to the tarn goes down a light,
Goes a song through the lily-sprinkled mire.
Far and wide the black storm thunders, and round the islet
there
Chant the waves of the desert spaces' Need:
O'er the dark and angry waters, lo, the night sounds call to
prayer,
For a Dreamer, a Musician, lies dead.

Translation: C. D. Locock
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 24, 2013 - 01:04pm PT

Tapio

It still exists old photos of Norwegian Forest Finns standing on their knees praying to the forest god Tapio before a hunt. They prayed and asked for permission to hunt - bearers of an old pagan natur-religion as they were.

"Tapio is a forest spirit or god, who figured prominently in the Kalevala. His wife is the goddess of the forest, Mielikki. He was the father of Annikki, Tellervo, Nyyrikki (the god of hunting), and Tuulikki. Tapio is imagined to have a beard of lichen and eyebrows of moss.

He lends his name in the form of Tapiola to:
(a) one of the major urban centres within the city of Espoo, outside of Helsinki; and
(b) an unincorporated community in the USA state of Michigan.

Jean Sibelius's tone-poem Tapiola (1926) is a depiction of the forest Tapio inhabits."


Tapiola (Sibelius) - Neeme Järvi


mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 24, 2013 - 01:31pm PT
Carlow Marlow, is there such a toy as a Norwegian woodie?

FOR SURFING, NOT BANGING!

I looked for one but couldn't find one. This is the best I could do.

http://www.arcticsurfblog.com/2012/09/norwegian-nuggets//

I envision a poodle (Tami-certified and tested) on a board, sacrificing his existence for the greater good by checking for undertow, equipped with transmitters to record currents, temps, etc., the gang gathered to watch the data on the computer set up on the tailgate...

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 24, 2013 - 01:36pm PT
The history of Otter Lake or Tapiola, Michigan

By the Pupils of the Askel School under the direction of Elina Collected and Written Heikkinen School year 1927-1928

Introduction

"Askel, as the eastern shore of Otter Lake is called, is strictly a Finnish settlement. It has a population of only 219 people divided among 34 families, but its history is a remarkable story of wilderness in America. It is this story of How the wild woods were changed into a promising farming community and how the foreign element was Americanized in the short period of 38 years. The Story is here set forth as put together by the Eighth grade civics class of Askel school in 1928.

The First Settlers

The first settlers who lived at Otter Lake were the French and the Indians. There is no accurate information of their existence here as they left before any of the present settlers came. There were however, ruins of log cabins and old pine stumps to show that the Finnish people were not the first to penetrate into this wilderness. With the cutting of the soft wood trees the French left, having no intentions of making their homes here, and settled elsewhere. Later, the Finnish people met some of them occasionally and were told how they had lived in log cabins at Otter Lake when there were yet Indians there. There is said to be in Chassell, a very old French women who claims to have been born at Otter Lake. At the northeastern end of Otter Lake, there is a large beech supposed to have been planted by a women now living in Houghton.

It was early in 1890 that a number of woodcutters at Bootjack near Torch Lake, who had recently come from Finland, heard of a fresh water lake rich in fish somewhere up the Sturgeon, not very far from Chassell. At once, two of these, named Peter Tauriainen and Enock Pyykkonen lured by the tale of fish, set out to investigate. They rowed up Portage lake to Chassell end then up the Sturgeon River. After some time they came to the forks of the Otter and the Sturgeon, and not knowing which branch to take they decided to camp at the fork overnight. They spent a rather lonely night by a bonfire. There was a dark deep forest on all sides and they heard the howling of wolves. In the morning they rowed up the Sturgeon and not finding a lake, they came back and went Otter. Soon they came to the lake they were looking for. It was all they had expected and more. Lying in a deep valley with dense forest around it and high hills and deep ravines on either side they found a very beautiful lake a bout 3 miles long and a mile wide. So pleased were they with its beauty, its abundance of fish, and its resemblance to the lake of Finland that they set back determined to get possession of the land near by. After some time they were pleased to find that the government was giving the land away as free homesteads to those who would make their homes there."

http://www.migenweb.org/baraga/history/otterlake.html

History of Otter Lake or Tapiola
History of Otter Lake or Tapiola


Mouse

Norway has never been a car producing country, but we tried with the car Troll. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll_(automobile)

Troll
Troll

When I was a kid my grandfather made wooden cars for me and my brothers. We used to pull them around with a certain pride because they were large, well built and had wood-wheels that rolled quite well.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2013 - 09:54am PT

Carl Axel Gottlund (February 24, 1796, Ruotsinpyhtää – April 20, 1875, Helsinki) was a Finnish explorer, collector of folklore, historian, cultural politician, linguist, philologist, translator, writer, publisher and lecturer of Finnish language at the University of Helsinki. He was a colorful cultural personality and one of the central Finnish national awakeners and - later - one of the leading dissidents at the same time.

Gottlund pursued the creation on an autonomous Finnish territory from the Finn Forests on both sides of the Swedish-Norwegian border, with great economic and political independence.

Gottlund is commonly attributed with saving the folklore of the Forest Finns.

Carl Axel Gottlund
Carl Axel Gottlund


Finn Forests' autonomy in Central Scandinavia

"In 1817, Gottlund made an exploration trip to the Finnish-inhabited Dalarna area of Central Sweden, to collect Finnish folklore and other ethnographic data as well as genealogical information, the latter partly because he wanted to improve the social circumstances of the Forest Finns and to prevent Sweden from taking ownership of their land. He recorded total of about 50 Finnish language poems, songs and spells during this expedition.

In the summer of 1821, Gotlund launched another expedition to a Finnish-inhabited part of Sweden, this time covering the south-central Swedish area of Värmland. The expedition lasted until January 1822, after which Gottlund began acting as a political advocate on behalf of the Finnish population of Sweden. Among his accomplishments, Gotlund founded three congregations for the Forest Finns.

Furthermore, in 1821 starting Gottlund began pursuing the creation of an autonomous Finnish county called Fennia from the Finn Forests on both sides of the Swedish-Norwegian border, north and northeast from the modern-day Norwegian area of Oslo, with great economic and political independence. The tax border would have been removed and land ownership by Swedes and Norwegians would have been restricted. The Swedish-Norwegian border had not been properly established before 1751.

In attempts to have the Finnish population of Sweden Proper "Swedified" and assimilated into the mainstream Swedish society, the use of the Finnish language had become strictly prohibited in Sweden Proper in the mid-17th-century. However, Gottlund estimated that in the beginning of the 19th century the Central Scandinavian Finn Forests' areas which he had visited alone were still home to approximately 40'000 Finnish-speaking Finns, of whom about 14'000 lived in Värmland - this in addition to other Finns such as the Tornedalians and Kvens and their descendants and the Forest Finns in other parts of Sweden an Norway. It is estimated that "one of each five Swedes has their roots amongst the Forest Finns".

Eventually - however -, due to his political activism, Gottlund nearly became expelled from Sweden. He was banned from operating in Stockholm, and - amidst his lobbying and campaigning - he was finally exiled from Stockholm to Uppsala. In spite of this total political failure in the creation of the Central Scandinavian autonomous Finnish area, Gottlund had positive cultural influence on the Forest Finns and became a legendary, heroic character in the Finn Forests.

While still living in Uppsala and while attending the Uppsala University part-time, Gottlund began preparing an ambitious publication, Otava, aimed to become a Finnish literary monument. Otava was published in three parts between 1828 and 1832. It consisted of articles pertaining to linguistics, history, ethics, religion, folklore and poetry.

However, in Finland, Otava was not met with the type of enthusiasm which Gottlund had hoped for. The work was considered to favor too much the Savonian dialects of Finnish language, and it's mainly enlightenment-spirited contents were overshadowed by the current of romanticism which now had encaptured Finland, producing epics such as The Kalevala in 1835 and The Tales of Ensign Stål in 1848.

In 1831, Gottlund married Charlotta Augusta Brink. Over time, the two gave birth to total of 10 children together.

Some of the folklore poetry collected by Gottlund in the early 19th century was considered sexually too explicit to be published during his lifetime, and even until quite recently. Some poems collected by him stayed archived until 1997, when they became included in the book Suomen Kansan Vanhat Runot ("Old Poems of the Finnish People")."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 25, 2013 - 01:51pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Du liv...(Dan Andersson)

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 26, 2013 - 11:24am PT

Dan Andersson
Dan Andersson
Dan Andersson

"Daniel "Dan" Andersson was born April 6, 1888, in the school house in Skattlösberg, Grangärdesgatan parish (in current Ludvika), Dalarna, and died September 16, 1920, in Stockholm by cyanide poisoning. He was a Swedish author and poet. In 1893, five years old, he learned to read. 1896, at the age of eight, he got a violin, and learned to play by himself. He had three brothers. A sister Anna was born in 1892 but died six months later. Next sister who was born in 1899 was also named Anna, and was dedicated the poem "To My Sister" on his 18th birthday. Andersson set to music some of his own poems, including "To My Sister", "Jungman Jansson" and "Per Ols Per Erik." He was married June 19 1918 to småskollärarinnan Olga Turesson, sister of the troubadour Gunnar Turesson. Dan Andersson is in part seen as a proletarian writer, but his poetry is not limited to this genre. He sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Black Jim."

"Dan Andersson's poetry enjoys a broad popularity among the Swedish people because of its naturalist mysticism. In 2005, Sofia Karlsson recorded a new interpretation of Andersson's songs, which received a Grammy award in both Sweden and Denmark, but before this his poems had been sung by a number of artists, including the Hootenanny Singers, Love Explosion and Fred Åkerström. In 1988, at the centenary of Andersson's birth, Posten, the Swedish postal service, published two stamps in his honour. In Ludvika, a Dan Andersson week is celebrated the first week of every August. In Ludvika there is also a Dan Andersson museum, and a statue of him. A bust is also to be found at Järntorget in Gothenburg."

Dan Andersson statue - Jarntorget - Goteborg - Sweden
Dan Andersson statue - Jarntorget - Goteborg - Sweden
Credit: Eli
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 27, 2013 - 02:05pm PT

Deep Into The Woods (Langt Innpå Skoga) - Hans Børli

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2013 - 11:25am PT

Flisa at the border of Finnskogen - today

Flisa. The claw...
Flisa. The claw...
Credit: Marlow
Flisa, Aasnes kommune, Hedmark fylke, Norway. Log driving district.
Flisa, Aasnes kommune, Hedmark fylke, Norway. Log driving district.
Credit: Marlow
Flisa. Log driver 1.
Flisa. Log driver 1.
Credit: Marlow
Flisa. Log driver 2.
Flisa. Log driver 2.
Credit: Marlow
Flisa. Log driver 3.
Flisa. Log driver 3.
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Flisa. The eye stone.
Flisa. The eye stone.
Credit: Marlow

Map: Finnskogen with Flisa in the upper left corner (Norway red, Sweden green)
Finnskogen &#40;Norway in red, Sweden in green&#41;
Finnskogen (Norway in red, Sweden in green)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 28, 2013 - 12:39pm PT

From log driving history - Log driving director Johs Johannesen, river - Glomma, writes (around 1870):

"Yes, the log drivers are an elite corps, chosen through many hundred years of natural selection. Only the most quick-witted and resilient are attracted to be log drivers, while other men have gone in other directions. Only the most vigorous have wanted this work, because only they have the ability - and this has been the case also with their sons. This way it has been for many generations and because of that we now have log drivers that in fastness, resilience and quick-wittedness are the best ones you can ever hope to find." (Source: Ragnvald Bødtker. Norwegian log driving history. 1860 to 1943)

To repeat the great Canadian video posted by MH2 earlier:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 29, 2013 - 12:51pm PT

The river Rottnan (Swedish)/Rotna (Norwegian)



Rotna is a 110 km long river that flows through Finnskogen from two small lakes at Hof Finnskog (in Aasnes kommune, Norway) to the lake Mellanfryken close to Rottneros (in Sweden). The video shows places down the river: one of the lakes at Hof Finnskog (Norway), Svullrya (Norway), Lekvattnet (Sweden), Gräsmark (Sweden) and Fryksdalen close to Rottneros where the river ends in Mellanfryken.

Most of the pictures are from Sweden.

Music: Mando Diao - Strövtåg i Hembygden (poem/lyrics by Gustaf Fröding)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 4, 2013 - 10:56am PT
Thorstein Bergman - Omkring tiggaren från Luossa ('Round the begger from Luossa...) - Poem/lyrics: Dan Andersson



'Round The Begger From Luossa

From Luossa came a beggar singing to the village folk.
Round the watch fire they lingered while he sang
Songs of pilgrims and of beggars, song of wondrous, wondrous things
And of his yearning did he sing the whole night long


"There is something beyond mountains, beyond stars and all the blossoms,
Something, too, behind my song, behind this burning heart of mine
Listen — something goes and whispers, goes and lures me and beseeches
Come to us, for earth below is not the kingdom that is thine!"


I have listened to the lapping of waves upon the shore,
I have dreamed that the wildest seas were calm and still.
And in spirit I have hurried to that contourless land,
Where the dearest we have known we´ll know no more.


To a wild, eternal longing were we born of ash-pale mothers,
And from travail, anxious, painful, rose our first, our wailing cry
Were we tossed on plain and hillside, just to tumble round and frolic,
Then we played at elk and lion, beggar, God and butterfly.


Did I sit beside her, silent, she whose heart was as my own,
Did she tend our home with soft and gentle hands,
Loudly was my own heart shouting, "What you own there is not yours!"
And my spirit drove me onward to find peace.


What I love is lying yonder, lies concealed in dusky distance,
And my rightful way leads high to wonders there.
In this clamor I am tempted to beseech Him, "Lord, O Master,
Take all earth away, for own I will what no one, no one has


Join me, brother, beyond mountains with their still and cooling rivers,
Where the sea is slow to slumber in its peak-encircled bed.
Somewhere far beyond the heavens lies my home, have I my mother
In a gold-besprinkled vapor, in rose-tinted mantle clad.


May the black and brackish waters cool our cheeks with fever reddened,
May we be from life far distant where the morning is awake
Never was I one with this world, and unending tribulation
Suffered, restless, unbelieving, suffered from my burning heart.


On a seashore sown with cockles stands a gate with roses laden,
There in slumber, vagrants perish and all weary souls find peace.
Song is never heard resounding, viols never echo, ringing
Under arches where forever cherubs of salvation dwell.


Translated by Caroline Schleef
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 12:36am PT

Gräsmark - Varmland - in the Swedish part of Finnskogen

Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden
Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden
Grasmark - Sweden - The church
Grasmark - Sweden - The church
Grasmark - Borrsjön &#40;Borr-lake&#41;
Grasmark - Borrsjön (Borr-lake)

Map: Finnskogen with Grasmark in the lower right corner (Norway red, Sweden green)
Finnskogen &#40;Norway in red, Sweden in green&#41;
Finnskogen (Norway in red, Sweden in green)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 12:50am PT

Grasmark in our time

Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden - Hembygdsgarden
Grasmark - Varmland - Sweden - Hembygdsgarden
Grasmark - Hembygdsgarden - New roof
Grasmark - Hembygdsgarden - New roof
Gräsmark - Flötmarkens Lukas and Anders Näsman
Gräsmark - Flötmarkens Lukas and Anders Näsman
Fishing Grasmark
Fishing Grasmark
Jawaklubben at Grasmarks Grillen
Jawaklubben at Grasmarks Grillen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 01:08am PT

Once upon a time in Grasmark

Grasmark - Kolarekoja 1902 - Uddekullen
Grasmark - Kolarekoja 1902 - Uddekullen
Credit: Axel Aurelius
Grasmark - Russian tinkers 1902
Grasmark - Russian tinkers 1902
Grasmark - Log drivers - River Rottnan 1927
Grasmark - Log drivers - River Rottnan 1927
Credit: M Larsson
Grasmark by the river Rottnan - Hunting moose 1920s
Grasmark by the river Rottnan - Hunting moose 1920s
Credit: M Larsson
Grasmark - In the kitchen
Grasmark - In the kitchen
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 01:18am PT

Volvo PV 444/544 history


In 1955 the first Volvo PV was exported to USA - on post order.

Grasmark - Volvo PV 444/544 - PV-klubben Varmland
Grasmark - Volvo PV 444/544 - PV-klubben Varmland
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 10:25am PT

Lekvattnet (in the Swedish part of Finnskogen - you find it just below the middle on the map):

Finnskogen &#40;Norway in red, Sweden in green&#41;
Finnskogen (Norway in red, Sweden in green)
Lekvattnet
Lekvattnet
Neverbovagen 22
Neverbovagen 22
Credit: Villmarktouren
Winter road...
Winter road...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 6, 2013 - 10:46am PT

Old Forest Finns' farms in the Lekvattnet area

Karmenkynna
Karmenkynna 1
Karmenkynna 1
Karmenkynna 2
Karmenkynna 2
Karmenkynna 3
Karmenkynna 3
Credit: John Lysen

Ritamaki
Ritamaki 1
Ritamaki 1
Credit: Mikael Klarstrom
Ritamaki 2
Ritamaki 2
Credit: Mikael Klarstrom
Ritamaki 3
Ritamaki 3
Credit: Mikael Klarstrom

Kvarntorp
Kvarntorp 1
Kvarntorp 1
Kvarntorp 2
Kvarntorp 2
Kvarntorp 3
Kvarntorp 3
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 13, 2013 - 01:43am PT

Mid-summer in Varmland - Sweden...

Song: Små grodorna (The little frogs)


Edited:
Thanks for the information Mouse. If you could see them, they're slightly intoxicated, but they've got rythm and style...

Here's another example of the little frog dance (Falun, Sweden):

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 13, 2013 - 04:02am PT
That video is blocked in this US of A.

Content issues and so for the love of god, tell us what we are missing.

Is this another Monty Python Morris Men thing?*

*Well, that wasn't far, now, was it? The Flames got Morris. He's being held hostage.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 18, 2013 - 11:29am PT

Finnskogen June 2012
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 18, 2013 - 01:42pm PT

Joakim Thåström - A Musician's Last Journey (Dan Andersson)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 19, 2013 - 08:56am PT

Sofia Karlsson - Broder Joachim (lyrics: Dan Andersson)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 20, 2013 - 09:43am PT
This weekend

On the road
Looking through the glass 1. Between Kongsvinger and Flisa.
Looking through the glass 1. Between Kongsvinger and Flisa.
Credit: Marlow
Looking through the glass 2. Between Kongsvinger and Flisa.
Looking through the glass 2. Between Kongsvinger and Flisa.
Credit: Marlow

Sønsterud
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Roy Tore Fallaas
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2013 - 11:19am PT

Once upon a time when ironing really was iron-ing: 100 years old tool.
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Oct 21, 2013 - 01:09pm PT

Sofia Karlsson - Le Vin des Amants - Charles Baudelaire (translated by Dan Andersson)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 3, 2013 - 09:37am PT
Finnskogen this weekend
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Autumn
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 3, 2013 - 10:12am PT
Credit: Kaare Tveter
Credit: Kaare Tveter
Credit: Kaare Tveter
Kaare Tveter
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 7, 2013 - 11:17am PT
Cranes at Finnskogen


Ron

It's not my own video. There's so many excellent bird photographers at the bird thread posting their own photos...

I find cranes to be deeply fascinating birds... their cries as from another world, another time... as a kid I loved to see them fly, hearing them cry... it was an experience that left me completely lost for a while...
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Nov 7, 2013 - 11:21am PT
NICE Marlow! Should put that one in the BIRD thread too!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 19, 2013 - 09:48am PT
An old man from Finnskogen was saved by a snuff box (Swedish Ettan)after falling into a bog hole where he was left alone for two days. It all started when he wanted to shoot a jay and was tempted to go deeper and deeper into the forest by the mocking birds. "Solung" is spoken here:

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 22, 2013 - 01:10pm PT

Livet i Finnskogarna
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 8, 2013 - 12:48pm PT

BMW GS meeting Finnskogen, Norway, September 2013 - Black tour
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 20, 2013 - 11:39am PT

Ural motorcycle at Finnskogen
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Jan 3, 2014 - 09:52am PT


Fröding Det var dans bort i vägen, performed by Sven-Ingvars

There was dance on the road on a Saturday night,
over the vicin'ty the sound
of the game and the laughter was heard,
it was tjoh! there was jump! it was hey!
Nils Utterman, the fool and fiddlerman,
he played by the roadside,
for dudeli ! dudeli ! dey!

There was Bolla, the proud Takenegirlie,
she's beautiful, nice, but has nothing in her pocket,
she is eluding and fun and grand.
There was Kersti, the defiant, wand'ring & wild,
there was Finnbacka Britta and Kajsa and Tilda
and the stuck-up Marja in Brooks.

There was Petter from Toppsta
and Gusten from Hill,
they are boys with strength in their arms
who can lift a maiden high in the sky.
There was Flaxman at Croft
and Niklas in Svängen
and recruitee Pistol and Högvalta farmhand
and Cold-Johan from Skräddarebyn.

And they had like burning tow in their bodies,
as grasshoppers they jumped the Rejlandssteps,
and against stones they clicked their heels.
And coattails flapped, and aprons flew,
braids they jumped and the skirts swung around ,
and the music squealed and mewed.

In the thickets of birch trees
and alders and hazels
was whispering talk, it was tittle-tattle
among the darkening shadows there,
it was play, it was game among logs and rocks ,
it was cooing and cuddling under the shady branches
 If you want me, well, you have me here!

Over the countryside laid the twinkling starbeuty night,
gleaming light shone over the rippling water
in the deciduostree-garlanded lake
there was a smell from clover in the flowering fields
and from resinous cones on spruce and pine,
which shaded the crests of the hills.

And a fox there joined in their frolicing song,
and a owl shouted uhu! from Brynbärsbråten,
and they didn't notice, they heard it not.
But uhu! the echo in Getberget brayed,
and in response to Nils Utterman's dudelidia !
came the dudeli! dudeli dey!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 3, 2014 - 01:37pm PT
Cool Lollie. At Finnskogen Sven-Ingvars was even more famous than Abba later became...

To stay in Värmland: Sven Ingvars - Fröken Fräken (1964)
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Jan 3, 2014 - 02:01pm PT
I grew up with them. The local band. :-)
moosedrool

climber
Stair climber, lost, far away from Poland
Jan 3, 2014 - 02:14pm PT
Cool stuff!

TFPU!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 22, 2014 - 01:57pm PT

A couple of other tunes based on lyrics by the Finnskogen poet Dan Andersson

Hootenanny Singers (Abba-Björn singing)- Omkring tiggarn' från Luossa


Jailbird Singers - Där björkarna susa


Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 8, 2014 - 02:41pm PT

On a wet day, on the road, in and out of focus, at the border of Finnskogen, last weekend...
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
Credit: Marlow
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 17, 2014 - 02:39pm PT


Credit: mouse from merced

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