MIDWAY!!!!

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Messages 21 - 40 of total 97 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Jun 5, 2012 - 08:37am PT
P Ron, I apologize for the thread drift. I just completed the Tin Can Sailors book a few days ago. I think you recommended it on some thread, possibly the what book thread.

Can you imagine what was going through George Gay's mind as he floating in the sea for those hours surrounded by all the enemy ships? His survival and rescue are miraculous.

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 5, 2012 - 08:44am PT
I re-watched MIDWAY last night- thought of my Uncle Bill, and My Dad. Dad was buidling airplanes (Grumman) that were used in the battle that my uncle was in. Lots of spin off history from world changing events!
FRUMY

Trad climber
SHERMAN OAKS,CA
Jun 5, 2012 - 09:04am PT
Admiral Nimitz --- The best of the best.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2012 - 09:46am PT
Actually, Tobia, it was Woody who started the thread about the book which got me to read it.

Wasn't George Gay played by Eddie Albert Jr.?
His dad was a real hero of the war in the Pacific. As I recall he waded out in the coral at Tarawa and recovered many wounded men.

As Hollywood is want to do, they threw some imaginary characters into the greater story, but the film did a good job of depicting a complicated battle.
Dos XX

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Jun 5, 2012 - 09:58am PT
A concise video summary with film footage from the battle:
plund

Social climber
OD, MN
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:12am PT
Compass & map over open water....all those guys (fliers AND sailors)had bowling balls...

I think Ensign Gay was quoted, in reply to a question re: treating his wounds, that he "soaked them in salt water for several hours"

What a f'in stud.

Curt -- I've checked out the website of your dad's squadron / group -- good stuff!!

Somewhat related (WWII) drift -- my sister's dad-in-law (RIP) flew the Burma Hump (157.5 round trips!), her hubby showed me a big plastic storage bin with ALL his maps, logbooks & mementos -- there's a currency strip (money from posts) that's signed by probably half the CNAC pilots -- WAY COOL!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:15am PT
i have a brass electricians crescent wrench from the Enterprise which was given to me. A prized possesion.
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:16am PT
Credit to Woody then, it was a great read. I read the Rising Sun prior to that.

The sacrifices the role players made in that war and all other wars is humbling. I feel good about picking up litter. I am not sure I am made of the same metal as these guys were and thankful that I may never have to find out; their gift to me and everyone else.

I have never seen a brass wrench before, Ron can you post a picture of it?

Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:24am PT
Brass wrenches were used in areas of highly volatile fluids to prevent spark.....and utter destruction!

Great treasure indeed!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:26am PT
ill find it and take a photowww...
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:36am PT
Come guys, the Hollywood version of Midway is pretty lame. At least watch the real stuff. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKXVTZo6gIg]

Edit: meh, still figuring out this video button.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2012 - 10:39am PT
I was a little worried there. I was afraid that they just used brass wrenches to match the pilots' balls.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Moundhouse Nev.
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:48am PT
found the wrench, but my batts on the camera are kaput- will post a pic later..And Cragman is correct- they used the brass wrenches to avoid sparks in critical areas like FUELING stations and AMMO/powder storages.
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Jun 5, 2012 - 10:58am PT
To be honest I kept wondering why brass, thinking about how malleable it is; it wouldn't be a strong wrench maybe corrosiveness? I never considered sparks.

Fat dad, thanks for the video link. It wasn't too long ago I streamed the whole documentary.

I discovered this link at the end of the Midway video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlGI0vX14vU
Battle 360 ~ Battle of Leyte Gulf
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Jun 5, 2012 - 11:00am PT
Ron... nice topic.

We owe a greater debt, then we could ever pay back, to our brave Fathers and Mothers who
sacrificed it all.

Victory at Midway goes way back in our history.

Billy Mitchell proved you could sink capital ships with 1,000 lb bombs.

His success and the way he conducted his demonstration, created some bad feelings within the congress.

Congress showed Billy and the Army Air Corps and cut their budget.

The Navy got the money and some smart forward thinking types got behind the idea of the Aircraft Carrier.

All the other nations that had ACs thought of them as floting airfields.

The US Navy saw them as weapons of war, for offense.

During the 1930s our cash strapped nation built the best Carriers, they went way over budget, ever.

Our were made to survive.

All other Nations ACs were built on the cheap, ESP the Japaneese ones.

"Kindling wood soaked in gasoline" was a quote I recall.

At the onset of WW2 these AC were the only "state of the art" weapons we had. Every thing else was obsolete and outclassed by our foes.

So lucky for US we had brave men willing to fly crappy airplanes and use faulty torpedodes on a vastly superior enemy fleet.

These men died wholesale.

I think that the lesson we learned at Midway is this.

Never be unprepared and weak.

Something that is becoming forgotten today.





Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Jun 5, 2012 - 11:07am PT
Guyman,
Great Carriers, lousy torpedoes!

Thanks Ron!

James D. Hornfischer published a new book in March, Neptune's Inferno: The U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal. Anyone read it?
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2012 - 11:18am PT
Yeah, its weird. The Japanese had great planes (offensively) and great torpedoes, but really crappy small arms.

Of course they went from fighting with swords and armor to trouncing the Russian fleet in less than 40 years!
zBrown

Ice climber
mercenario de merced
Jun 5, 2012 - 11:19am PT
++ Unbroken
Tobia

Social climber
Denial
Jun 5, 2012 - 11:20am PT
What they were lacking in small arms they sure made up with nerve!
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 5, 2012 - 11:24am PT
Yeah, or they were brainwashed into believing that they had already given their lives to the Emperor.

Like I said; Carnage And Culture. Give it a read.
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