The Fun Facts, Outrageous Trivia Thread!

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survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Original Post - Apr 28, 2012 - 04:22pm PT
Did you know?


The distance of the first flight by the Wright brothers was less than the length of the C-5 Galaxy cargo floor.



Credit: survival



Tell me something fun, strange or interesting. Maybe all three!!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:32pm PT
Why is a Navy jet coming out of an Air Force plane? Quelle horreur!
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:33pm PT
Oh my gosh. I am PACKED with useless trivia.

Which bird is the state bird for the most states?

Which state borders the highest number of other states?

Clearly too much time with a road atlas in my lap. :)

BTW, if you have not gone to the new Air & Space Museum at Dulles Airport, you MUST. It is really awesome and has a lot of the early planes. It's worth booking a flight to Dulles, going to the museum, having dinner and a night in a local hotel, then flying home the next day. Totally want to do it again.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:38pm PT
No fair usin the net, Tacos and Taco belles!

My question:

Which state name appears most as a city or town in the most other states?

i.e., Minnesota, Minnesota (a for reals place).

the pelican, my final guess.

Hawaii, AK, don't think so.

this beats the library or the NFL draft all to hecknback falls.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:41pm PT
Tell me something fun, strange or interesting. Maybe all three!!

Here's one for you: If you were to replace a standard 100-meter roll of dental floss with an equal weight of spider silk, it would be long enough to reach the moon. Of course if you actually did stretch it to the moon, hordes of lunar spiders would swarm down it, invading the earth and ending civilization as we know it.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 28, 2012 - 04:41pm PT
Crimpie,

I too, am packed with useless trivia. SOOO many amazing things to see/do in the DC area. We worked hard at it for two years and only scratched the surface. The National Arboretum was one of my favorites. Uncrowded and unbelievable!


Are all these little factoids true?
Alpine County, south of Lake Tahoe, is the eighth smallest of California's 58 counties. It has no high schools, ATMs, dentists, banks, or traffic lights. It is also the only county in the state that doesn't generate agricultural production.



Which state name appears most as a city or town in the most other states?
Washington?
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:44pm PT
Cannabis is not an ag crop? Yer stoned.
But a gold star for you, and I think Washingtons are om , er, I ama gessin, twenty-seven cities in the same # of sstates.
My neighbor, Big Georg , just came in a minute ago. guess what we're up to...

How high is Half Dome? It's lower than 20,000 feet, Herbert.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:48pm PT
February 25, 1961 Paul Bikle set the world altitude record for a sailplane
by reaching 46,267 feet in a Schweizer 23E which would be considered an
entry-level sailplane these days. 26 years later Bob Harris landed his
Grob 102 sailplane after a flight to 49,009 feet a few miles north of Inyokern*.
The Grob probably has almost a two-to-one advantage over the Schweizer in
glide ratio! Bikle obviously tapped into an outrageous wave as evidenced
by the fact that he broke off his climb as he felt things were getting too
dangerous and his canopy was getting frosted over!

*The same area that Bikle achieved his record.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 28, 2012 - 04:51pm PT
Here's one for you: If you were to replace a standard 100-meter roll of dental floss with an equal weight of spider silk, it would be long enough to reach the moon. Of course if you actually did stretch it to the moon, hordes of lunar spiders would swarm down it, invading the earth and ending civilization as we know it.

Love that!


Similar to this, but different....
Credit: survival
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:53pm PT
Is that the JET you are coming in, to visit me in Vegas, Survival?

Is it a DOUBLE SEATER?

:)

photo not found
Missing photo ID#144420
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:57pm PT
The other threads appear to have stopped in their tracks. Everyone's either gone to the Moon or they are scrounging interesting trivia, like how many buttons were on the original North Face Mountain Parka, size small. Too tough, huh. Did you know the Rugby shirt is named for some town in North Dakota?
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Apr 28, 2012 - 04:59pm PT
Maybe people are out climbing dude.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:01pm PT
It's hard to find a real store anymore that sells rugby shirts, Mouse.
I find places online but I like seeing and feeling the material first so I can tell if it's one of those thin Rugbyshirts or the thick which I prefer.
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:08pm PT
Which state borders most others?

Answer below a la Locker:

































There are two: Missouri and Tennessee both border 8.
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:09pm PT
And which bird is the state bird for most states?





Scroll Locker style...



























Answer: The Northern Cardinal. Sort of funny given it is not a bird that is found across the US. Still a pretty bird and nice choice.
Stephanie Bergner

Trad climber
Planet Send
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:09pm PT
What do you call a group of 12 or more cows?

A flink
cintune

climber
Midvale School for the Gifted
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:09pm PT
Cleopatra lived closer in time to the present than she did to the building of the Great Pyramid.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:11pm PT
The brand I remember selling was "Buffalo Breath" and they were as thick as my brain trying to think of a decent simile.
Who would want to climb on such a fine day?
I tossed a perfectly good but soppingly wet one off EC Spire. I regretted it and wonder who ended up with that one.*
Interesting story but I'll save it for the campfire.
Speaking of campfires I posted a thing on the TM Appreciation thread this a.m. He speaks of the past. I can't tell which brand of beer he's drinking though. Can you. You sound like the expert. :000

Didja know or care that a group of nightingales is referred to as a "watch?"




*I'm talking about SHIRTS, with an R.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 28, 2012 - 05:39pm PT
Cool Californian inventions: Barbie Dolls, blue jeans, the boysenberry, the pill, white zinfandel wine, the square tomato, natural soda, the computer "mouse," the wetsuit, and theme parks.
paul roehl

Boulder climber
california
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:48pm PT
Which is farther north Halifax Nova Scotia or Portland Oregon?

Which is farther west Papeete, Tahiti or Honolu, Hawaii?
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:49pm PT
My flimsy excuses for not climbing today:

1. First day in a long time that I could just be at home without crushing work deadlines or other commitments. Enjoying lounging (and cleaning, and laundry, and watering the flowers, and changing sheets and cleaning closets, etc).
2. I climbed yesterday.
3. I will climb tomorrow.
4. It's cold outside (63).

Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:52pm PT
4. It's cold outside (63).

Pansy. Wimp. Feeb. Coward.

63 is perfect climbing weather.

Me? I'm stuck behind a desk today, but aim to be out tomorrow.
nick farley

climber
bishop
Apr 28, 2012 - 05:59pm PT
T.M. would prefer Bud-lite if my memory is correct.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 06:17pm PT
Sir Viable--

Square tomatoes?
Yu think 'Califarnio' and hipster tomatoes comes to mind.

Merced's pretty tomatoes are round.

Green catsup was first developed by HJ Heinz Co. in Pittsburgh, PA, not in Pittsburg, CA.

The same for blue catsup. It was first marketed in 2003. Green was out in 2000. Surprisingly, the recipe for green catsup calls for green tomatoes! There are no blue tomatoes, only blue tomatos, who are upset over the plural, understandably.

Banana catsup calls for bananas (yellow) and tomato paste, not whole tomatoes. It also calls for 2 tbs of dark rum, added to it at the last.

Banana Dreams is a Clevenger route.

Catchy is a Pettigrew route.

Both are at the Cookie Cliff.

Waverly Wafers are delicious with any of the above condiments.

Nabisco offers a dynamite Wheat Thin with sun-dried tomato and basil.

Got the munchies. Bye.

Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Apr 28, 2012 - 06:17pm PT
Pansy. Wimp. Feeb. Coward.

:) Indeed. And lightweight. Fragile. Weak. Oh, I could go on. But, I will do so with a really clean house! :)
jogill

climber
Colorado
Apr 28, 2012 - 07:43pm PT
Here's a trivia puzzle. determine the next number in this sequence:


46, 59, 61, 78, 82, ??
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Apr 28, 2012 - 07:52pm PT
What is the longest song ever to make it to #1 on the Billboard charts?






































American Pie, Don McLean
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Apr 28, 2012 - 07:53pm PT
What was the name of the 'Fifth Beatle'?











































Pete Best. Ringo replaced him.
apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Apr 28, 2012 - 07:56pm PT
At the last moment, Stevie Ray Vaughn replaced what well known rock star on the ill-fated private plane?













































Eric Clapton
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 28, 2012 - 07:58pm PT
46, 59, 61, 78, 82, ??

103 is one possible answer
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 07:59pm PT
McLeaning towards mean.

I got that years ago. I was in my van parked down by the river, and I heard the announcer say so. I think it was in 19 something.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:07pm PT
Would you tell me the real name of the man with whom Frank Zappa feuded for years and years, until just before Frank died? Inquiring minds want to know.






































Don van Vliet, aka Captain Beefheart.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:19pm PT
Gullible is a slang word.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:19pm PT
On-Topic and worth bragging about over and over and over again . . .



What are the 2 counties in the USA, where you can surf awesome waves, free-dive or scuba among large pelagic fish and mammals in Giant Kelp forests (fastest growing algae in the world, 2-3 feet in a day!), climb excellent rock on very well known crags, BC ski descend real mountains, and get deliriously hot on a desert hike looking for wildflowers, and paraglide and HG up to 14,000' riding thermals all in the same day? (Yes, certain years apply. Can't do this every year, but in these 2 counties within the USA we often can.)



Easy but great to know.





Edit:


OK, no one is guessing so it must be too easy and too well known.


San Diego County

A great book by a geography prof of mine . . .
San Diego: An Introduction to the Region [Paperback]
Philip R. Pryde (Author)
http://www.amazon.com/San-Diego-An-Introduction-Region/dp/0916251683/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_T1?ie=UTF8&coliid=I284VI71BT5MT&colid=2GL3DFQ4AXH2G

and


Los Angeles County




Now you know why everyone wants to come here. That and the weather. ;-)
locker

Social climber
CO
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:25pm PT

FACT:

Robert Goulet is DEAD...






"My flimsy excuses for not climbing today:"...

My "Flimsy" excuse is that I am heading out on a four day climbing trip next week and don't want to take the chance of pulling something other than my pork...

~kief~

Trad climber
nor-cal
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:34pm PT
8.4 million Iphones sold in 2010 worldwide
7.6 million children died of hunger in 2010 worldwide

Our priorities are F*#KED.

Sorry,this was spose' to be fun:(
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:38pm PT
It's supposed to be trivial and fun.
My triviality is surpassed only by my feelings of inadequacy, but you don't wanna hear me whine.
Like some.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:41pm PT
OK, which county in the USA has the most Native North American "Indian" reservations?












































Locker edit:



San Diego County




Which county has the most Indian Casinos?


San Diego County

("The Las Vegas of the Pacific Southwest")
~kief~

Trad climber
nor-cal
Apr 28, 2012 - 08:47pm PT
does trivia have to be trivial ?

The world is full of self-absorbed trivial distractions,
and very few bright people,working on real problems.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 28, 2012 - 09:54pm PT
The world is filled with bad-ass problems. Many of us, bright or dim, deal with them constantly. And seem to get no where near a solution.

All work and no play make Jack a dull boy.

To take a break now and again is the right of anyone not a slave.

The pursuit of happiness comes after the work. Most of us Taconians know this.

I am retired. I don't just wanna have fun, though. There are other things which I do to help relieve problems. I used to teach in a literacy program.
I still volunteer a few times a month as a docent at the local history museum. It isn't much but it gets 'em out from in front of the TV. And teaches them to read the screen on their I-phone.

t*j got me worked up the other day and I went online to scout the local volunteerism programs, looking for more.

Allow us to triviate according to our consciences.

Does trivia have to be trivial? I suppose it does. Other wise, it's serious trivia and the words seem different together, kind of meaningless...

It's a discussion point. An ice-breaker, too.

Nice to meet you, Kief. I'm Brian.

:) Hello.--middle--Howdy. (:
~kief~

Trad climber
state of Awakening
Apr 28, 2012 - 10:07pm PT
more fun facts

how much do Americans throw away?

• Americans represent 5% of the world’s population, but generate 30% of the world’s
garbage.

• In the U.S. industry moves, mines, extracts, shovels, burns, wastes, pumps and disposes
of 4 million pounds of material in order to provide one average middle-class American
family’s needs for one year.

• In sum, Americans waste or cause to be wasted nearly 1 million pounds of materials per
person every year. This figure includes 3.5 billion pounds of carpet landfilled, 3.3
trillion pounds of CO2 gas emitted into the atmosphere, 19 billion pounds of
polystyrene peanuts, 28 billion pounds of food discarded, 360 billion pounds of organic
and inorganic chemicals used for manufacturing, 710 billion pounds of hazardous waste
and 3.7 trillion pounds of construction debris.

• If wastewater is factored in, the total annual flow of waste in the American Industrial
system is 250 trillion pounds.

• Less than 2% of the total waste stream in the United States is recycled.

• For all the world to live as an American we would need two more Earths; three more if
the population should double and twelve Earth’s altogether if worldwide standards of
living doubled in the next forty years.

To put it another way…

• Americans throw away enough garbage everyday to fill 63,000 garbage trucks, which if
lined up end to end for an entire year would stretch half way to the moon.

• In a lifetime, the average American will personally throw away 600 times his or her
body weight, which for an average adult would leave a legacy of 90,000 pounds of
trash at the end of their lifetime.

• Of the garbage Americans throw out, half could be recycled, which is enough to fill a
football stadium from top to bottom everyday.

• Of these recyclables, Americans throw away enough aluminum to rebuild the entire
commercial air fleet every three months, enough steel to reconstruct Manhattan, and
enough wood to heat 5 million homes for 200 years.

• U.S. waste disposal costs exceed $100 billion annually.






apogee

climber
Technically expert, safe belayer, can lead if easy
Apr 28, 2012 - 10:08pm PT
This thread is rapidly losing its fun-factor.
~kief~

Trad climber
state of Awakening
Apr 28, 2012 - 10:12pm PT
You are simply a statistic.... craving a mindless diversion

Credit: ~kief~
jogill

climber
Colorado
Apr 28, 2012 - 10:33pm PT
46, 59, 61, 78, 82, ??



The next one is 84. Can you determine the one after that?


;>)
~kief~

Trad climber
state of Awakening
Apr 28, 2012 - 10:33pm PT
666...sorry,if you were hoping for kittens
Credit: ~kief~
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 28, 2012 - 10:48pm PT
According to the Association of American Railroads, a freight train uses only 1 gallon of diesel fuel to move a ton of freight 436 miles.

Yo kief,

Why don't you start the American gloom thread?

Or the great awakening thread?

Here's a pair of perky breasts to make you feel better!

( * )( * )

ME Climb

climber
Behind the Orange Curtain
Apr 28, 2012 - 11:21pm PT
This one is for RLF

What does "taser" stand for?












Thomas A Swift Electric Raygun

Eric
~kief~

Trad climber
state of Awakening
Apr 28, 2012 - 11:55pm PT
survival,Sorry i jacked ur thread,i know,i am full of gloom :^(
Kittens will help
Credit: ~kief~
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 28, 2012 - 11:56pm PT
BWA HA HA hahahaaaa!!!
Russ Walling

Gym climber
Poofter's Froth, Wyoming
Apr 28, 2012 - 11:57pm PT
Here is a fun fact: a Caucasian males penis is exactly 1/6th of the length of his arm minus the thickness of his left eyelid.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 29, 2012 - 12:46am PT
Fires move how fast?

If you've traveled Hwy 41 into the South Entrance to Yosemite, you know where Oakhurst is and maybe Deadwood Mtn, at the south end of the valley where that town is located (junction of Hwy 49). Miami Mtn has a fire look-out tower, and is at the north end of the valley (historically known as Fresno Flats).

In July,1961, the Harlow Fire, "one of the fastest-moving fires in California history," burned from the Miami look-out to the base of Deadwood Mtn's north side in nine minutes. That is, more or less, about the equivalent distance from Pohono Bridge into Tenaya Canyon below Half Dome.

Then the fire got to the top of Deadwood in seventeen seconds.

It burned 42,000 acres in 2.5 days, made an 18,000 acre run in two hours.

If you have a good map you can plot a straight line from Miami to Deadwood. The fire did not deviate; it went point to point, just missing Oakhurst.

It wasn't fun. That's a fact.

No kittens were burned up, though.

And what happened to Papeete and Nova Scotia, eh?
~kief~

Trad climber
state of Awakening
Apr 29, 2012 - 01:20am PT
ok,got one for ya survival

There were 112 deaths associated with the construction hoover dam. Included in that total was J. G. Tierney, a surveyor who drowned on December 20, 1922, while looking for an ideal spot for the dam. He is generally counted as the first man to die in the construction of Hoover Dam. His son, Patrick W. Tierney, was the last man to die working on the dam's construction,
13 years to the day later.

thats strange.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 29, 2012 - 01:49am PT
The most famous quote from the Sherlock Holmes canon is

"Elementary, my dear Watson."

Yet the truth of the matter is that although Holmes uttered both "elementary" and "my dear Watson" on several occasions, not once did he do so together.
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Apr 29, 2012 - 02:03am PT
Yep.

And Captain Kirk never said "Beam me up Scotty"
locker

Social climber
CO
Apr 29, 2012 - 02:08am PT
"In the Original Series episodes "The Gamesters of Triskelion" and "The Savage Curtain", Kirk said, "Scotty, beam us up"; in the animated episodes "The Lorelei Signal" and "The Infinite Vulcan", when he said, "Beam us up, Scotty"; in Star Trek IV, saying, "Scotty, beam me up"; and in Star Trek Generations, by saying, "Beam them out of there, Scotty". The phrase was used on a bumper sticker with the tag line "Beam me up Scotty. There's no intelligent life down here."

The complete phrase was eventually said by William Shatner in the audio adaptation of his novel Star Trek: The Ashes of Eden.

James Doohan, the actor who played Scotty, later chose this phrase as the title of his autobiography.[1]

Similar misquotations"Beam me up, Scotty" is similar to the phrase, "Just the facts, ma'am", attributed to Jack Webb's character of Joe Friday on Dragnet, "It's elementary, my dear Watson", attributed to Sherlock Holmes, "Luke, I am your father", attributed to Darth Vader, or "Play it again, Sam", attributed to Humphrey Bogart's character in Casablanca and "We don't need no stinkin' badges!" attributed to Gold Hat in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. All five lines are the best known quotations from these works for many viewers, but not one is an actual, direct quotation."...

mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 29, 2012 - 02:55am PT
Who will bite on this subject?

There are how many species of poisonous snakes indigenous to North America?

Oddly, there are no "poisonous snakes" native to our continent.

However, there are "venomous snakes" aplenty. Four species, including a various number of sub-species.

What are the common names of these four venomous species? Match them to the following three scientific names.

1) Crotalus
2) Micrurus and Micruroides
3) Agkistrodon

Answers downhill from here. Watch your step!



































1) Rattlesnake
2) Coral snake
3) Cottonmouth and Copperhead
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 29, 2012 - 03:03am PT
Lehman Bros.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-compensation-20120427,0,6481155.story
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 29, 2012 - 03:20am PT
"As recently as 1999, a Gallup poll reported that forty-seven per cent of Americans believe that God created the human race within the last 10.000 years. Stephen Hawking notes in A Brief History of Time that a date of 10.000 years fits curiously well with the end of the last Ice Age, which is when archeologists tell us that civilization really began."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 29, 2012 - 03:32am PT
"Modern map makers can make huge mistakes: in the early nineteenth century, with American-British relations under extreme stress, the United States erected two fortresses beyond Lake Erie, at the huge cost (for the time) of USD 113.000. In October 1818 after six years work, astronomers carrying out a boundary survey discovered that the border was three-quarters of a mile to the south - both forts had been erected in Canada".
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 29, 2012 - 03:48am PT
The National Conservation Good Turn of 1954

The Boy Scouts of America carried out around 135,000 different unit conservation projects, spent over 561,000 hours at them, and worked approximately 23,400 man-days.

Locally, in 1961-62, the "pack of howling fools" (as their sainted Scoutmaster, Willis Stribling called them) of Troop 98, supported by the Kiwanis and Stribling's Nurseries, collected over 2,000 two-pound empty coffee cans to plant seedling red-buds along Highway 140, mostly in the Merced River canyon. Look at how they have thrived. Jeff Mathis and myself were two of those howling fools. Yer welcome, travelers. They are in flower now but are fading fast in the heat.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 29, 2012 - 08:19am PT
Locker, tough luck about your nose in the bolting thread. :)



"We'll see about that." "Whattaya, a wise guy?"

"Hey, that's an insult."

"I got sick of the dough and thought I'd go on the loaf."

"A victim of coicumstance!"



How many actors starred as one of the Three Stooges over the course of their film career?






































"Speak to me kid, say somethin'. C'mon, please say somethin'!" "Somethin."
































1) Moe Howard
2) Larry Fine
3) Curly Howard
4) Shemp Howard
5) Joe Besser
6) Joe DeRita


"Nyuk-Nyuk-Nyuk."
MH2

climber
Apr 29, 2012 - 11:19am PT
I suspect that few minds are as crammed full of whatnot as the mind of Mr. Frank Key.

For example, in connection to the OP he tells us that news of the Wright brothers' flight first appeared in print in Gleanings in Bee Culture.

Fun, strange, and interesting? I think so. Also a bit disturbing. As if a hyper-intelligent alien or an omnivorous super-computer were trying to encompass human reality. Perhaps to save it from destruction.

**Instructions for the proper care of ostriches in captivity. Street map of Skegness. Photo of a duck escaped from Rouen. Pig brain diagram. Bootlace aglet comparisons. Lopped Pol Pot poptart. Torn and rent stuff. Widow’s buttons. Tips on bell ringing. Sandwich paste reviews. Drawing of ghost. Railway station smudge. Voltage statistics. Unsullied napkin from a remote canteen. Gunshot punctures. Drool from a pauper. Old Halob’s hat measurements. Imaginary portrait of Tecwen Whittock. Muggletonian dinner menu. Fatal microbes. Winnipeg pumpkineer’s cravat knot schema. Potter’s duffel bag toggle analysis. Starling feathers. Stalin brooch. Desiccated plum pulp. Rubberised atomic sackcloth scrap. Latch. Pins. Bolt. Set of amazing stains. Devotional card of St Abodwo, arguably the patron saint of monkeys. Periodic table of the crumplements. Gravy recipe. Tabulation of Orwellian egg count. Snapshot of Schubert’s grave. Mezzotint of Schubert’s boot. Handwritten screed of gibberish. Lock of Pontiff’s hair. Gummy ick. Definitions of flotsam and jetsam and plankton and krill and lemon meringue pie. The dust of death. The dewdrops of doom. Pointless scribblings.
**

And there is more. Oh yes, much more.

http://hootingyard.org/
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Apr 29, 2012 - 02:17pm PT
Somebody mentioned Cleopatra.

She was not Egyptian. She was Macedonian.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 29, 2012 - 02:28pm PT
Yeah, but she had her green card.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 29, 2012 - 02:35pm PT
"The French word for eighty - quatre-vingt, four-twenty - survives as a reminder that our ancestors counted on their toes as well as on their fingers."
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 29, 2012 - 02:43pm PT
I thought Frank Key wrote the Star-spangled Banner...
Yet long do I rave, in the home of the free and the home of the homeless.
What, do I know?

Marlow, it doesn't take a detective to know that a man with nine fingers takes down his pants to count to ten or his boots to count twenty, then lines up the Three Stooges, strips them, and then is able to count to eighty.

"You some kinda genus, Mouse?"
"That's right, Moe. Mus musculus. How'd ya know."
"I was counting on you to tell me."

Who's the fastest to correct Mouse's arithmetic? Nyuk nyuk nyuk (approved spelling of "nyuk").
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 29, 2012 - 03:18pm PT
"A modern stade is a tenth of a nautical mile, about 600 feet, but lengths in the ancient world and on into the seventeenth century - were rarely uniform. A stadion could vary considerably, even within a single society: some say it represented the distance a man in ancient times could cover running flat out without taking breath, and that this governed the length of the sports stadiums. Others say it originated as a standard length of a ploughed furrow, 600 pedes (from pes - foot); but the length of a pes varied, and in consequence so did that of a stade."
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Apr 29, 2012 - 03:28pm PT
Dam_it,
where's Weld_It with his, "Facts"????

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 29, 2012 - 03:46pm PT
"For as long as we have records, eclipses have awakened fear and end-of-the-world imaginings, independent of mythology or culture. Eclipses as well as other heavenly occurences that were believed to be almost impossible to predict, such as auroras, comets and meteor showers, are described in a Greek word meaning that the stars are aligned against you: dis-astra - the stars are against. Eclipse itself comes from the Greek and means abandonment or forsaking. The Chinese word translates as "being eaten away" (rishi, literally "Sun-eat"; in Spanish the word means to make dim or indistinct, and in Russian to black out. For the Cakchiquel tribe of North America it glosses as "the Sun carries sickness" - a belief shared by many cultures. In Asian folklore, children born at the moment of the deepest darkness will emerge mute or deaf. Even today, many Thais hoard black joss sticks and jelly and sacrifice black chickens to Rahu, the Sun-devouring demon, much as their ancestors did, and give eclipse-tainted goods as alms to beggars in the belief that their sins will be redeemed by their donations"
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 29, 2012 - 04:07pm PT
"A particularily terrifying and bloodthirsty religious sect founded in 1090 was violently opposed to the Abbasid caliphate. Amin Maalouf, in his history of the Assassins, writes: "The serenity with which the members of the sect accepted their own death led their contemporaries to believe that they were drugged with hashish, which is why they were called hashashun, or hashishin, a word that was distorted into "Assassin" and soon incorporated into many languages as a common noun"
locker

Social climber
CO
Apr 29, 2012 - 04:13pm PT

Fun FACT:

Many people on SuperTopo HATE this...


























































































aka, "the locker Scroll"...

;-)






















































...

mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 29, 2012 - 07:00pm PT
Where in the hell is Bootjack?

edit: To lazy to seek the answer? To lazy to tell me?

Bootjack is near Mariposa on Hwy 49, east of town. If you run up the hill from the town of Bootjack, it goes to Jerseydale, home of the now-defunct Double Eagle Golf Course, a 9-hole affair long-reverted to the meadow.

What is a "double eagle?"
In golf, it is 3-under par on any individual hole, either a 2 scored on a par-5 or a 1 scored on a par-4.
OR
It is a gold coin in the $20-dollar denomination, first minted in 1849; it is so-called because it is double the value of the $10 gold "eagle."

Bootjack and Sevilla, Spain, lie on the same degree of latitude.

edit: Seeing mistakes above, crew. Two, too many to count.









Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 30, 2012 - 12:03pm PT
The Knife Man - John Hunter

"When Robert Louis Stevenson wrote his gothic horror story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, he based the house of the genial doctor-turned-fiend on the home of John Hunter. The choice was understandable, for Hunter was both widely acclaimed and greatly feared.

From humble origins, John Hunter rose to become the most famous anatomist and surgeon of the eighteenth century. In an age when operations were crude, extremely painful, and often fatal, he rejected medieval traditions to forge a revolution in surgery founded on pioneering scientific experiments. Using the knowledge he gained from countless human dissections, Hunter worked to improve medical care for both the poorest and the best-known figures of the era—including Sir Joshua Reynolds and the young Lord Byron.

An insatiable student of all life-forms, Hunter was also an expert naturalist. He kept exotic creatures in his country menagerie and dissected the first animals brought back by Captain Cook from Australia. Ultimately his research led him to expound highly controversial views on the age of the earth, as well as equally heretical beliefs on the origins of life more than sixty years before Darwin published his famous theory.

Although a central figure of the Enlightenment, Hunter’s tireless quest for human corpses immersed him deep in the sinister world of body snatching. He paid exorbitant sums for stolen cadavers and even plotted successfully to steal the body of Charles Byrne, famous in his day as the “Irish giant.”

In The Knife Man, Wendy Moore unveils John Hunter’s murky and macabre world—a world characterized by public hangings, secret expeditions to dank churchyards, and gruesome human dissections in pungent attic rooms. This is a fascinating portrait of a remarkable pioneer and his determined struggle to haul surgery out of the realms of meaningless superstitious ritual and into the dawn of modern medicine."

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/11/books/review/11roach.html?_r=1

Charles Byrne's skeleton

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8971853/Skeleton-of-Charles-Byrne-the-Irish-Giant-should-be-buried-at-sea.html
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 30, 2012 - 12:31pm PT
During WWII Black Widow spider silk was used for the cross hairs of US submarines.

ydpl8s

Trad climber
Santa Monica, California
Apr 30, 2012 - 12:36pm PT
Lima Peru and Washington D.C. are at the same longitude.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 30, 2012 - 12:55pm PT
Lima, Ohio, and San Jose, Costa Rica are at the same degree of "longitrude."
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 30, 2012 - 01:03pm PT
The International Space Station solar array surface will be large enough to cover the U.S. Senate Chamber more than three times over.
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Apr 30, 2012 - 01:21pm PT
The only player to lead the NCAA, ABA and NBA in scoring for an individual season?


Rick Barry




Can you name the four brothers who played major league baseball?


The Alou brothers: Matty, Felipe, Jesus and Boog Powell.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 30, 2012 - 01:22pm PT
Now if they could only deploy an array to cover up the House Chamber too!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 30, 2012 - 01:41pm PT
Which has more stars, Gary: one can of chicken and stars soup or Old Glory?
TwistedCrank

climber
Dingleberry Gulch, Ideeho
Apr 30, 2012 - 02:00pm PT
The Alou brothers: Matty, Felipe, Jesus and Boog Powell.

That's the funnest fact and most outrageous trivia ever posted.
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Apr 30, 2012 - 02:31pm PT
Which has more stars, Gary: one can of chicken and stars soup or Old Glory?

The California Air National Guard.
DanaB

climber
CT
Apr 30, 2012 - 02:50pm PT
1. What does radar stand for?
2. Five smallest states in area?
3. Four states that are officially called commonwealths?
4. Last French colony in North America?
5. Only vice president to take the oath of office outside the US?
6. The two vice presidents that were charged with treason?
7. The vice president that also served in the government of the Cofederacy?
8. The vice president of the Confederacy?
9. Vice president that served in the Maine Coast Guard during a war?
10. Unusual accomplishment by the baseball Hall of Famer George Brett?
11. State with the shortest ocean coast line?
12. Who was Edith Cavell?
13. What do the words silhouette and leotard have in common - aside from being french in origin?
14. What is the name of the units that are used to measure how hot a pepper is?
15. How is the President Pro Tem of the Senate chosen?
16. What is the origin of the name Jumar?
17. First female cabinet member?
18. Who were the Know Nothings?
19. Origin (possibly) of the word okay?
20. Which city was the scene of the great molasses flood?
21. Where did the names Sten and Bren for the Sten and Bren guns come from?
22. First woman to run for the presidency (there is some dispute about this).
23. Who was the editor of the famous abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator?
24. What was the Hartford Convention and its significance to the war of 1812?
25. What was the significance of Plessy vs. Ferguson?
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 30, 2012 - 04:46pm PT
Is there a man or woman who doubts the US Senate chamber alone produces enough gas in one day to:

A) Surpass the amount of gas produced by the Taco in a decade?
B) Answer a simple trivia question.
C) __.

Be my guest...fill in the blank.

And for possibly the longest, certainly the most boring, Wiki article ever:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Space_Station

I wondered where all the money was going.

Radar never stood for Col. Potter when he entered except when he was accompanied by a General, but he knew what the acronym meant. I'm more familiar with the ever-popular RURP.

KY and Mass. are two commonwealths....

Is the answer to #23 perchance Mr. Garrison? I'm stretching my brian cells.

If the great molasses flood didn't happen to San Louis Obispo, it should've.

Mighty, good, questions! ;)
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 30, 2012 - 05:12pm PT
En garde, Monsieur Gary.

The ever-popular "BASEBALL STAR" is in a constellation which is visible only from the planetoid Boogus16.

Boog was a mountain guide's nickname in the BC area. He was Hans Gmoser's go-to guide.
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Apr 30, 2012 - 05:51pm PT
You're not fooling me, mouse. I just looked on the Internets, there is no Boogus 16!
Gene

climber
Apr 30, 2012 - 05:59pm PT
17. First female cabinet member?
Frances Perkins. Sec of Labor in FDR's cabinet.

15. How is the President Pro Tem of the Senate chosen?
Longest tenured member of the majority party (???)

g
labrat

Trad climber
Nevada City, CA
Apr 30, 2012 - 06:32pm PT
Where is the interosseous ligament located?




















Hint: Horses have it.























The ligament (interosseous ligament), tying the splint bones to the cannon bone, is quite elastic in young horses; however, as the horse ages, the ligament ossifies and is replaced by bone and the three bones fuse.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Apr 30, 2012 - 06:59pm PT
11. State with the shortest ocean coast line?

NH.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Apr 30, 2012 - 08:37pm PT
Gary, there is a baseball card online. It shows the Boog in a jersey with the number 16. Hence, the cosmic origin of the imaginary Boogus16. Interesting thing, I think, is that in reality, there is a planetoid named Bogus16. Millis told me, of yore, "It boogles the imagination how gullible you are, Mouse." Bogus16 is one of the few known "coming and going" planets, famously mentioned by Father Guido on SNL. Would a man o' God pull a Millis?

I love Merced County history. Are you listening, GENE?

There is a small town in North Merced County named Delhi. People generally pronounce its name correctly, but are boogled when they try to reconcile it with the large number of Sikhs living in that area (many many).
It's named Delhi because of its proximity to the Delta-Highline Canal; its name has nothing to do with the sub-continent from which the Sikhs come.

Further, and here is the crux, manner of speaking:
the famous Yosemite bus-boy, "Blind Glen" Denny, lived for as long as he could stand to, in the neighboring town of Livingston.

History ever repeats itself. Visit the Merced County Courthouse Museum.
Email me and I will give you the personal docent treatment. Mike Corbett set his climbing display up many years back, and it was CAPITAL!

I'm a-goin' to the mission for din-din. I'm a-comin' back here for seconds.
manzanita man

Social climber
somerset, ca.
May 1, 2012 - 10:59am PT
Massed opposing armies fight each other along a front. The fighting continues for days, and millions die. This is not trench warfare among men. The armies are the weaver ants of African forests. The ants are so fierce that when the battle is resolved and the boundaries of the opposing colonies have been fixed, a "no-ant’s-land" exists between them, where ants from each side do not dare to enter.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
May 1, 2012 - 11:21am PT
Isn't Massachusetts a commonwealth?
Wasn't the molasses flood in Boston?

Sten and Bren were both made at the ENfield plant, with the Bren an original design from BRno (CZ), and the STen designed by 2 guys whose names start with S and T.
(Wasn't it Shepherd and Turvis?)
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 1, 2012 - 11:23am PT
manzanita, my wife is from Africa. Don't get her started on army ants, really.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 2, 2012 - 03:06am PT
"where in the hell is Bootjack?"

The alternative answer to the question...

It's in Mariposa County, "the Poison Oak capital of the world" (I've always pictured it in that way, but I'm a humble stay-at-home; have we any alternative or similar nominees for that dubious distinction?) and some of the nastiest patches of purplish, people-eating manzanita in the world.
Riley103

Mountain climber
gfg
May 2, 2012 - 04:54am PT
Thank you so much for the post.

__
http://freeonlinemovie.biz/
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 2, 2012 - 05:58am PT
President Pro Tem of the Sent is chosen by the President of the US. He is the Vice-President of the US. HSs civix class. I hailed typing.

Don't let's get overly technical on this "choosing" sh or electing cr.
manzanita man

Social climber
somerset, ca.
May 2, 2012 - 10:09am PT
11. State with the shortest ocean coast line?

NH.


not according to george straite, hes got ocean front property in arizona. lol
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 3, 2012 - 11:07am PT
The dunes of the White Sands Nat Mon are not sand. They're gypsum which
starts out clear but as it gets tumbled by the wind turns 'white' from the scratches.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 3, 2012 - 12:49pm PT
One of the Western hooknose snake's (Gyalopion canum) primary
defensive behaviors is to make a popping noise with its cloaca, i.e., farting.
During a laboratory experiment carried out by Bruce Young, a morphologist
at Lafayette College, the snakes only farted when they felt threatened,
and some farted so energetically that they lifted themselves off the ground.
llk

climber
May 3, 2012 - 12:59pm PT
Who sh#t on a climbing rope 30 years ago and recently came clean to everyone's relief?
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 3, 2012 - 01:10pm PT
It was a poor, harmless, somewhat defenseless hooknose, who saw what he thought was a much bigger snake, and natural reflex took over; but the overreaction was what, ...regrettable?

Probably not. Hooknose snakes couldn't live thirty years...or could one, great big SOB be waiting, looking to sh#t on YOUR rope?

Never stand on my rope. Never sh#t on my rope. And don't think about falling on it.
-Andre the giant mountain guide
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
May 6, 2012 - 07:07pm PT
Ron wrote about Cleopatra...

She was not Egyptian. She was Macedonian.

Come on Ron, we all know that Liz was born in England.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
May 10, 2012 - 04:00pm PT
Seamstress

Trad climber
Yacolt, WA
May 10, 2012 - 05:58pm PT
What state was originally two separate colonies?
DanaB

climber
CT
May 10, 2012 - 06:25pm PT
Massachusetts and Maine?
Seamstress

Trad climber
Yacolt, WA
May 10, 2012 - 08:18pm PT
That is backwards. New Haven and CT colony were two separate colonies. CT Colony sent an anvoy to England to sort out some troublesome charter issues. New Haven Colony asked them to take care of their issues, too. CT did - and brought home a charter which incorporated New Haven Colony into its own charter. There was nearly some skirmishes between the two, but New Haven eventually caved. Thus the very separate communities of interest between the Hartford area and New Haven area go waaay back. The folklore surrounding this also involves a climbing site:

Charles II came to the throne in 1660. Puritan power was over. Two judges, or regicides, who had signed Charles I's death warrant escaped to New England in 1661. They were Colonel William Goffe, and his father-in-law Colonel Edward Whalley. While at first warmly greeted in the Bay Colony, the word of troops hot on their heels cooled the Bostonian's welcome. They traveled overland to New Haven where they were greeted by Reverend Davenport. They took up refuge on West Rock in an outcrop of massive boulders that now is call Judge's Cave. When the royal authorities arrived it was the Sabbath. They were Coerced to attend service, at which the Reverend Davenport read from the Bible, "'Hide the outcasts, and betray not him that wandereth"' he then read the supposed secret royal warrant aloud to those present . The officers could not find a trace of the regicides and departed empty-handed. For more than a month the judges remained in their natural hideaway. Daily a local farmer left food for them on a stump about half way from the center of town. They were prompted to leave their shelter after hearing what they thought might be a mountain lion or another fierce wild animal. Colonel Dixwell, the third regicide, had initially traveled to Europe after his escape from England and did not join his fellow judges until 1664. In 1664 another detachment of royal officers arrived in search of the regicides. Now all three hid at the West Rock site. Once again the search was fruitless and the troops left. The judges fled north spending time in Hadley and Hartford. Colonel Dixwell is the only one on record to have returned to New Haven. He assumed the name James Davids and established himself as a respected member of the community. He started a family and is the only one of the three judges we are sure of lain to rest on the New Haven Green.

"It is felt but not established in any written record that this snub of the Charles II government officials may have hastened the end of the proud and independent New Haven Colony. It was brought to Governor Leete's attention that the Connecticut colony was sending an emissary to England to establish friendly relations with the new government. Eaton had died in 1658. New Haven was without a statesman and without funds. Governor Leete sent a hurried message to the Connecticut Colony's Governor Winthrop to request that he plead New Haven's case. Whether or not the message ever reached Governor Winthrop is unknown. What is known is that the Connecticut Colony envoy sought and obtained a charter which included the independent Colony of New Haven. Governor Winthrop returned in 1663 and proposed a compromise and after a two year argument New Haven acquiesced. On January 5, 1665 an act of submission was passed by the General Court of the New Haven Colony. The New Haven Colony was now officially part of the Connecticut Colony."

The old New Haven Colony records are housed on Whitney Avenue near the Yale Campus. Pawing through those manuscripts from the 1600's was part of my well rounded ivy league education which includes many fun facts and uselss trivia.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 10, 2012 - 08:52pm PT
Trivia-insignificant or inessential matters; trifles.

Trivium-the study of the three basic subjects of rhetoric, grammar, and logic before other subjects.

Fun-that which there can never be too much of (especially when studying the Trivium).

Outrageous-beyond the bounds of good taste.

This thread should go forever.

JINX!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
May 10, 2012 - 11:27pm PT
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - May 10, 2012 - 11:49pm PT
What the hell is that thing?
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 10, 2012 - 11:52pm PT
The previous footage is a clear rip-off of Disney's seminal work, "Cascade Willie." Its intent is simply to amuse by lampooning gay marriage but this has clearly turned it into poonography. I frankly can't tell poon from lam in this simulacrum. The original CW is far superior.

All the best and thanks for the outrage, TGT!
MFM

Aha!

I knew it was a fool's troll--
that whatchamahoosit is the seldom-seen Jinxus atlanticus!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
May 12, 2012 - 06:09am PT
Dead you know? Yosemite is Deadly!

Warning: the following content may lead to dis-content.--Chuck Yolunj

In the entire decade of the 1950s only one (1) person died climbing, and some other guy suffered fatal hypothermia.

In the 1960s, ten (10) died.

The seventies saw twenty-nine dead (29), three of these in the time it takes to complete a long climb--June 16-18, 1975: one death on each day.

The eighties: Twenty-six goners (26).

The nineties: "Only" the lonely seventeen (17).

From 2000 to 2006: Fourteen (14).

1 + 10 + 29 + 26 + 17 + 14 = 97.

Think about the pro?

No.

Just be aware.

In the dark. In the light.

aaaaaaaaaand on rappel.

Please. Don't become a number.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 7, 2012 - 09:35pm PT

To this day, nobody knows.
Survival of the ignorants.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 7, 2012 - 11:05pm PT
Outrageous, but it isn't trivial.

Twenty-five percent of prison inmates in the world are locked up in the US.

China is the 87th in the world in the proportion of its people who are imprisoned. China is a billion people bigger than the United States--more than four times the population--yet US prisons house in excess of 600,000 more people than China does.


Outrageous Fact: ALL CLIMBERS SMOKE WEED.

Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Oct 7, 2012 - 11:20pm PT
China s less shy about using capital punishment.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 8, 2012 - 01:29pm PT
Facts about the British empire

"The Decline and Fall of the British Empire presents a glittering panoply of decadence, folly, farce and devastation. Brendon's characters alone could fill a pantomime stage many times over. The empire seemed to abound in British oddballs, from the notorious Richard Burton, who "liked to boast that he had indulged in every vice and indulged in every crime", to the maverick General Orde Wingate, who "would ... hold interviews while lying naked on a bed and combing his body hair with a toothbrush". Postcolonial heroes fare little better. Jomo Kenyatta "sported plus-fours, drank literally inflammatory Nubian gin and so indulged his sexual appetites that he was suspended from church membership", while Tunku Abdul Rahman of Malaysia was "notorious for dancing, horse-racing, driving fast cars and getting into tight corners with loose women". Kwame Nkrumah "studied the occult, consulted oracles" and "compared himself to Christ"."
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 8, 2012 - 01:33pm PT
More facts about the British empire. This time - Churchill as oddball.

"In the nineteen-twenties and thirties, Churchill had been loudest among the reactionaries who were determined not to lose India, “the jewel in the crown,” and, as Prime Minister during the Second World War, he tried every tactic to thwart Indian independence. “I hate Indians,” he declared. “They are a beastly people with a beastly religion.” He had a special animus for Gandhi, describing him as a “rascal” and a “half-naked” “fakir.” (In a letter to Churchill, Gandhi took the latter as a compliment, claiming that he was striving for even greater renunciation.) According to his own Secretary of State for India, Leopold Amery, Churchill knew “as much of the Indian problem as George III did of the American colonies.”

In 1942, as the Japanese Army advanced on India, the Congress Party was willing to offer war support in return for immediate self-government. But Churchill was in no mood to negotiate. Frustrated by his stonewalling tactics, the Congress Party launched a vigorous “Quit India” campaign in August of 1942. The British suppressed it ruthlessly, imprisoning tens of thousands, including Gandhi and Nehru. Meanwhile, Churchill’s indispensable quartermaster Franklin D. Roosevelt was aware of the contradiction in claiming to fight for freedom and democracy while keeping India under foreign occupation. In letters and telegrams, he continually urged Churchill to move India toward self-government, only to receive replies that waffled and prevaricated. Muslims, Churchill once claimed, made up seventy-five per cent of the Indian Army (the actual figure was close to thirty-five), and none of them wanted to be ruled by the “Hindu priesthood.”

Von Tunzelmann judges that Churchill, hoping to forestall independence by opportunistically supporting Muslim separatism, instead became “instrumental in creating the world’s first modern Islamic state.” This is a bit unfair—not to Churchill but to Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan. Though always keen to incite Muslim disaffection in his last years, the Anglicized, whiskey-drinking Jinnah was far from being an Islamic theocrat; he wanted a secular Pakistan, in which Muslims, Hindus, and Christians were equal before the law. (In fact, political Islam found only intermittent support within Pakistan until the nineteen-eighties, when the country’s military dictator, working with the Saudis and the C.I.A., turned the North-West Frontier province into the base of a global jihad against the Soviet occupation of neighboring Afghanistan.)

What Leopold Amery denounced as Churchill’s “Hitler-like attitude” to India manifested itself most starkly during a famine, caused by a combination of war and mismanagement, that claimed between one and two million lives in Bengal in 1943. Urgently beseeched by Amery and the Indian viceroy to release food stocks for India, Churchill responded with a telegram asking why Gandhi hadn’t died yet."
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Oct 8, 2012 - 02:54pm PT
One of John Bachar's hero's was Fred Zeil.
Fletcher

Trad climber
Fumbling towards stone
Oct 9, 2012 - 03:29am PT
The "What the hell is that?" SNL sketch is probably my all time favorite. Saw it live back in the day (how else would one have seen it then????).

The Alou brother's post made my day.

Speaking of the eponymous plant of the world's poison oak capital: Poison Oak is not a poison, but an allergen. And humans appear to be the only creature allergic to it. It's deer food!

Trivia comes from the Latin for "three roads" or "paths." Probably where three roads meet. AKA a street corner. And street corners are where the vulgar masses hang out discussing fun, interesting, but often useless information. If you dig deep and trace the etymology, you'll learn that trivia = SuperTopo Forums. Really. You can look it up.

Way, way back in the day, when you had guests, you'd flip your dining table top over to show the nice, finished side. The other side was the rough everyday side on which your kids would carve with their pen knives, dad would pound his fists, and grandma would sling cast iron frying pans. However..... if your guests stayed for days on end, turning into weeks, thereby violating the basic laws of a good guest, the hosts would "turn the table" to let them know that their welcome was wearing out.

Now your know......... the REST of the story!

I have somewhat of a reputation for being a master of arcane knowledge. Most of it is on the backside of the ferris wheel in my mind. Will have to wait for it to make its way to the front. All in time.

Someone once told me I have a degree in MSU. Making Sh#t Up. I wish I were so talented, but unfortunately, I just seem to recall a lot of odd things.

Eric
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 9, 2012 - 03:44am PT
How else, indeed, Watson.

But WAY backin the day we'd just flup the lid on the eighty-eight and let the guests orate.


Top that,Kerouac.

Or the Cat in the Street, man.

If you think you can.





mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 9, 2012 - 03:50am PT
Marlow, are you sure you got your facts straight, because I heard the Empire didn't fall, so much as it was tripped.
The Call Of K2 Lou

climber
Squamish
Oct 9, 2012 - 04:47am PT
This one's fairly high on the scale of uselessness:
Dog boners have actual bones in them.
In the immortal words of Dave Barry, I swear I'm not making this up.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 9, 2012 - 04:47am PT
Mouse
I'm quite sure you're right. Official history writing is not to be trusted. The British umpire fell because of tripping and inbreeding of the upper classes. Monthy Python is to be trusted...
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 9, 2012 - 05:19am PT
Marlow,
Have you read "My Mind: Synch or Swhim" by Unsartren?

Because in it he describes having thought of the Fall of the fall of the British Empire>Monty Python's Flying Circus>>>>>>>>
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 9, 2012 - 05:34am PT
Mouse

No, I haven't. My ignorance is quite impressive. If there were such a book, I would have read it. Lol...
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 9, 2012 - 08:06pm PT
Here what I think. Life's short. Art's shorter because it is is.

Life has four letters, valued thus, L=11, I=8, F=6, E=5, a total letter value of 30.

Art, three letters, valued thus, A=1, R=18, t=20, a total letter value of 39.

Do the math, draw your conclusions, get back to me.

You're a RT/38, pretty good for the first two initials!

Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Oct 9, 2012 - 09:09pm PT
http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1245834&msg=1245834#msg1245834
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Oct 9, 2012 - 10:18pm PT
How many 3 Stooges were there?


























[ I had to look so i'm disqualified. ]
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 9, 2012 - 10:51pm PT
Larry Moe Curly
Larry Moe Shemp
Larry Moe Curly Joe
this is on this thread already, you stooge.

Howard, Fine, howard, Howard, Besser, and DeRita.

Who was the famous fourth stooge from Fresnon?

You can call me Al.
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Oct 9, 2012 - 11:05pm PT
this is on this thread already, you stooge.



You gotta be kidding....





And I suppose no need to mention where mole hair really comes from?
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 9, 2012 - 11:11pm PT
Mountains come from mole hills, often.
Tell us, oh wiseone unto the Kth degree.
Whence, or whair from cometh the lowly disgusting mole hair?
Timid TopRope

Social climber
'used to be Paradise, CA
Oct 9, 2012 - 11:53pm PT
Mouse forgot one.....Moe, Larry, Cheese
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 22, 2012 - 10:31am PT
Hohohoho! Camembebert!

OK, back to class. Since we have been speaking of Cheese, a subject dear to me:

The name of the cheese shop Mary, Mother-o-God ran in the village?

Cheeses of Nazareth.

What were the names of her goats?

Gott and Son of Gott. Smellzy. Holy Goat. Goat Tell-it-on-the-mountain. Goat One. Goat Two. Goat To-Go. Goat Ripping. Goat Milk. John's Favorite. John's Other Favorite.

It is widely speculated among the biblical scholars who have researched rock climbing in the bible, that John the cousin of Jeshua was a phenomenally gifted boulderer. His pad was filled with goat hair and goats were his main companions in the desert and taught him much about reading rock.

There are just seven references to goats in the entire New Testament.

In the Old Testament, there are a total of 138, of which, 82 are in the Pentateuch, the others scattered through-out other books.

And he shall take of the congregation of the children of Israel two kids of the goats for a sin offering, and one ram for a burnt offering.--Leviticus 16:5




mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 22, 2012 - 11:36am PT

Kauklahti


Kauklahti ( Köklax in Swedish, alternative spelling Köklaks , old Finnish Kaukalaksi ) is a district of Espoo, in the Greater Helsinki area of Finland. It is one of the oldest population centers in the city: it was already inhabited 4000 years B.C.E. Kauklahti is growing fast and in 2006 hosted The Finnish Housing Fair.
Fletcher

Trad climber
Fumbling towards stone
Oct 23, 2012 - 12:42pm PT
Little known (and believed fact): In addition to a B.A. in Classical and Oriental Studies, I also hold a Ph.D. in MSU. MSU=Making Sh#t Up! Ha ha!

Eric
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 23, 2012 - 02:16pm PT
That's funny! Did you make that up or did Hannah Ha Ha?

C.R.S. stands for something funny, but I can't remember what.

I bet you forgot, too.
Indianclimber3

Trad climber
Oct 23, 2012 - 04:45pm PT
The phrase "rule of thumb" is derived from an old English law which stated that you couldn't beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Oct 23, 2012 - 04:59pm PT
Nancy Grace has a penis, but it's so small she can fit it inside a shot glass.

I swear this is true.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 21, 2013 - 08:36pm PT
Hawaii is antipodal to the Kalahari Desert in northern Botswana.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Oct 21, 2013 - 08:48pm PT
Alaska is both the westernmost AND easternmost state.....the last Aleutian Is. crosses the international date line.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 21, 2014 - 10:41am PT
Babe Ruth’s immense talents did not lead to instantaneous stardom. After pitching two games for the Red Sox in 1914, he was sent down to the minors.

It was there, while playing for the Providence Grays, that he hit his first professional home run, in Toronto, of all places.

It was the only home run he ever hit in 46 minor-league games.

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