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Messages 1 - 20 of total 98 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 18, 2012 - 06:01pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#241361

Warms your soul 5ive times. . .

Cuttin' it

Movin' it

Stackin' it

Movin' it, again

BURNIN' IT. . .

Maybe it's really six times. . . .

LOVIN' IT!

oxoxo

eK@
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Mar 18, 2012 - 06:26pm PT
It is also the dirtiest and most carbon intensive fuel on the planet.

Don't want to rain on the firewood parade, but chemistry is chemistry...

I am a wood splitting machine. An artist. But it IS dirty fuel.
kennyt

climber
Woodfords,California
Mar 18, 2012 - 06:28pm PT
Nothing like a little Tamarack
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 06:31pm PT
In a place like Montana. . . where the population, of the entire state is less than San Jose, CA, I have to say. . . .

BURN IT, NOW. . .



TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 18, 2012 - 06:31pm PT
One of the frequent comments about America from precolonial times right on through the 1840's was that any American frontiersman had more fuel available than a European nobleman.
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Mar 18, 2012 - 06:33pm PT
I can relate to Kath a lot. In my case, the cleanup of the ranch is ongoing. I use the cleanup of down trees and branches to heat the house, thereby using less electricity and propane.

As you said, chemistry is chemistry.

We can either burn it and release carbon dioxide in the process, or we can let it rot as the bacterial degradation produces the same amount of carbon dioxide. Not. A. Dirty. Fuel. It's simply stoichiometry and mass balance. In one case we aver using other resources while the firewood produces something useful instead of the same carbon dioxide output through rotting without any side benefit.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 06:34pm PT
The wind comes down from the Arctic. . . swirls around a bit. . . then settles - right here. . . where the Nation's forests FLOURISH beyond your wildest dreams.

I say

Tread lightly

Harvest

Burn

Live

okie

Trad climber
Mar 18, 2012 - 06:52pm PT
Don't listen to that oil field guy. Embrace your primal quest for fire. Let it burn.
mtnyoung

Trad climber
Twain Harte, California
Mar 18, 2012 - 07:00pm PT
BASE104 said: "It is also the dirtiest and most carbon intensive fuel on the planet."

While firewood is smoke and particulate intensive (dirty), it's not as carbon intensive as you think.

As was mentioned above, we can burn wood and release the carbon, or let it rot over 100 years and release the same carbon.

Compare that to oil-based heating: if it weren't for human heating needs, that oil, or natural gas would have remained underground and the carbon would have remained sequestered forever (or essentially forever).

Wood's dirty but it is not a carbon issue to anywhere near the same degree as oil and gas.

And, Kat, I agree that lots of firewood gives a sense of security, "warmth" ahead of time. Nice post.
jmap

Social climber
NC
Mar 18, 2012 - 07:05pm PT
Credit: jmap

1. Cut it
2. Haul it to the truck
3. Unload the truck
4. Split it
5. Stack it
6. Burn it

In North Carolina, you can get a Forest Products Permit for 20 buck which lets you gather 12 truckloads of downed wood from the National Forest. There a couple of spots nearby where they've been logging and the leftover--Chestnut Oak, Red Oak, Locust--is prime fuel.

Apparently if you split and let season for at least six months the woodsmoke is less of a pollutant. Don't know why.
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Mar 18, 2012 - 07:27pm PT
Looks like about 45, 000 more people in Montana than San Jose.... they each have about 190% of the population of Montana's neighbor, Wyoming, the 50th state, population wise. I'm gonna guess that Montana has more trees than Wyo & San Jose and, WTF, 29 Palms, put together.

Trivia- what state has the smallest Capitol?
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 07:35pm PT
And, Kat, I agree that lots of firewood gives a sense of security, "warmth" ahead of time. Nice post.

YAY!
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 07:40pm PT
Funny thing . . . .

wood. . .

It's there

All the time

BRIGHT

SHINING

AVAILABLE

Within grasp
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Mar 18, 2012 - 07:49pm PT
I heat this house with Dogs.



Wood heats the yard.



eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 08:44pm PT
I own a forest. . . Seriously. . . OWN a forest. . . I protect it. . . thin it. . . leave it alone. . . remove the crumbles. . . chop them up. . . stack them nicely. . . and when it's cold. . . I put parts of it in this big cast iron box, in my house, and I catch them on fire. . . that's got to be the weirdest thing in the world!

BRING FLAMABLE MATERIALS INTO YOUR HOUSE AND CATCH THEM ON FIRE?

It doesn't make sense. . . .

or is makes the most sense, ever. . . .

It's primal.

I revel in knowing how it works. . .



eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 08:52pm PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#241380
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Mar 18, 2012 - 08:58pm PT
Chaz, you don't sing "Throw another dog on the fire" do you ?
Karl Baba

Trad climber
Yosemite, Ca
Mar 18, 2012 - 09:07pm PT
As was mentioned above, we can burn wood and release the carbon, or let it rot over 100 years and release the same carbon.

That's only if you burn downed trees. If you cut the tree down, it goes from making oxygen to making pollution.

I have a fireplace and have a slight feeling of guilt whenever I use it (although I'm burning down wood usually

All that chain-sawing, splitting and moving wood around is pure chore for me....hate it

But I can see how some wood dig it

Peace

Karl
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 09:22pm PT
Somewhere, out there, somebody wrote a program depicting what will happen to our forests by 2038.

Supposedly, there will be a cataclysmic fire that will denude them.

We never should have protected them so well.

There aren't enough wildland firefighters in our midst to fight said conflagration.

We should be

Thinning

Thinning

Thinning

And nobody's thinning. . .

There aren't enough thinners. . . .

SOOOOOOOOOOOO. . . in the meantime. . . manage your own forests. . . think for yourselves. . . collect those volatile stumbling blocks, stack them nicely and take them inside. . . catch them on fire. . . and warm your soul before 2038 comes along and escalates the whole mess!

And. . . stay away from Montana. . . you'd hate it here!

:-)



eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 18, 2012 - 09:30pm PT
Nothing like a little Tamarack

YEAH!

Deciduous pine trees. . . .

photo not found
Missing photo ID#241383
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