The Coast Range B.C./Mt Bute/Waddington etc.

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Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 5, 2012 - 09:32am PT
From more southerly parts in the coast ranges.
Credit: Mighty Hiker
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Mar 5, 2012 - 09:45am PT
Big stab but I think it's Raleigh Gilbert.

Did I win the camels behind door number three ?

Sorry Tami, but maybe you get the horde of fleas that's all over the camel.

but Gilbert would be about the same distance away, if it wasn't hidden by other stuff. It's Mt. Alfred, at the head of Jervis Inlet. Really stands out from the west.

Bruce, that was indeed an epic that your dad did in the 1950s (with greats like Elfrida Pigou, Neal Carter, Alan Melville and others). Like you, I've had the pleasure of bushwhacking in some of those valleys, and I've got nothing but admiration for that bunch.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Mar 5, 2012 - 10:00am PT
"Iron rations" ... no. I 'm trying to remember what my parents called their provisions. Everything they used was Army-surplus.

Dad had a "Trapper Dan" pack. Just as awful heavy as the Nelson. Not quite sure of the differences. Tricouni or hamie might be familiar with this rig.

Bruce your Dad was part of a generation of hardass climbers who did some really cool trips. Randy A's dad was also part of it as well. My parents did small trips but were more into skiin'.

Glad to hear Tony R is active. Isn't he a SARtech in the CF ? Or is that Howie's other son ?
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 5, 2012 - 10:25am PT
Luckily we have geologists and geographers, and other 'ists, to answer such questions. People here often say "coast ranges" as a generic term. The 1965 guide - the 'bible' - was titled A Climber's Guide to the Coastal Ranges of British Columbia, and may be where it started.

And then there's the Pacific Ranges...
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Mar 5, 2012 - 10:36am PT

Dad had a "Trapper Dan" pack. Just as awful heavy as the Nelson. Not quite sure of the differences. Tricouni or hamie might be familiar with this rig.

Actually, my top-of-the-line Arcteryx pack is just as heavy as my Trapper Nelson. Bloody heavy, all right. Never heard of Trapper Dan - must be a knock-off.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Mar 5, 2012 - 10:50am PT
I not only had (and used) a Trapper Nelson, I built it myself. It worked just fine, better than some of the stupid rigs that were available commercially back then.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Mar 5, 2012 - 11:15am PT
. People here often say "coast ranges" as a generic term. The 1965 guide - the 'bible' - was titled A Climber's Guide to the Coastal Ranges of British Columbia, and may be where it started.

Dick used "Coastal Ranges" to emphasize that the thing is not one range but many. Current terminology is Coast Mountains, in parallel with Columbia Mountains (includes Purcells, Monashees, Selkirk ranges), Rocky Mountains, and Insular Mountains (Vancouver Island, Haida Gwaii) as a first-order division. As a composite term, Coast Mountains is very appropriate: there's no single watershed divide (as with the Rockies or Sierras or North Cascades; many rivers such as the Homathko, Dean, have their headwaters well east of the Coat Mtns.

Within the Coast Mountains we've got many ranges: the somewhat useless Pacific Ranges, Fiord Ranges, Kitimat Ranges, Boundary Ranges, etc. Within these ranges we've gotlots of individual ranges: Waddington, Pantheon, Whitemantle, Miut, and other useful terms.

Coast Mountains is old (official since 1902). Coast Ranges is old, probably older. Climbers still tend to use Coast Range; geologists use Coat Mountains to avoid confusion with the geologically dissimilar Californai/Oregon Coast Range.
laughingman

Mountain climber
Seattle WA
Mar 5, 2012 - 03:48pm PT
Going up the knights inlet by boat is possible and has been done look at this TR.
http://cascadeclimbers.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/860096/TR_Jubilee_Waddington_Knight_I

Mt Jubilee is climbable from the knights inlet but requires a 2 day bushwack from canyon lake up a "unused logging road" that is overgrown with alders. Then you have to follow the ridge line (bottom left hand corner) onto the Lomolo glacier this gives you options to climb any of the various peaks around that valley.

Credit: laughingman

Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Mar 6, 2012 - 06:52am PT
Never heard of Trapper Dan - must be a knock-off.


Another particularly viscously miserable pack design of that era involved a triangular
frame of solid steel round stock of about 5/16 inch diameter, loosely supporting a sack of potatoes style bag. For some reason, maybe because i was the smallest of four boys, I got to carry that POS rather than the delux trapper nelson. I don't recall the name but I bet it was WW II army surplus. We (us kids) called them kidney killers. Maybe Mike Blenkarn could rework it for Archteryx?

Tami, TR is a tech design geek at Archteryx, his bro (Robin?) is the sar tech at commox.

Also, Iron rations were the precursor of gorp. It may have been a "Mom-ism" but i think it actually came from the Mundays.

We used to brew tea in a "Billy'' too..... thats what you call a pot these days



Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Mar 6, 2012 - 09:08am PT
Maybe you're thinking of a Bergens pack? My father has one. They were state of the art for the early 1960s.

As I started with the scouts, we had the whole nine metres - Trapper Nelsons, tin can cooking, etc.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Mar 6, 2012 - 09:50am PT
hey Anders, what was all that about all those old guides having no integrity or something?

maybe on the coast with some people but never the case in the rockies, and for good reason
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Mar 6, 2012 - 09:53am PT
Bruce - Was that your mother's pack ? Because my mum had one just like it. Whaddaya wanna bet the gals gottem together ....or that the VOC acquired 'em and hawked them to the unsuspecting women.

A ghastly thing for sure. Lucky for me I never carried it. WOrst pack I was stuck with was a 5$ job we bought at the Esso service station. Orange nylon, "trapper nelson" type external frame, no zippers but weak tie-downs, no hip belt.... and never intended to be carried on a hiking trip , I packed that thing into Atwell Peak stuffed with my gear. Thought I was gonna die. My 3 friends also on the trip figured I"d never go into the hills again........well, I didn't with that pack.

Heinous Backpacks We Have Carried, eh :-D
Synchronicity

Trad climber
British Columbia, Canada
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2012 - 12:59pm PT
Yeesh that TR was about what I expected, more time spent bushwhacking and less time spent climbing. I guess I was trying to avoid having fly-in be the only option considering my budget is only slightly above dirtbag status. As far as I know thats the closest alpine granite to where I live, save for Greyback peak on the island which is remote and has one route i think? Its mostly low angle.

Curse you mainlanders and Valley folk, I hope you never take your rock for granted. If you do, I'm sure a short trip to the island will have you crying for home.

I made a sad realization that as much as I love Vancouver Island because I can do everything here (climbing, hiking, skiing, aid, not really ice) most of it is just training for objectives elsewhere. The coast range (coastal ranges?) still seems like a beautiful place I'd like to explore. I'm hoping to make a trip over to Eldred for the cleanup this year (never been) and do some climbing. Maybe do some scrambles in the area to check out the peaks.
Synchronicity

Trad climber
British Columbia, Canada
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2012 - 01:06pm PT
If you've been gazing across the water from, say, Comox, why not take a boat up Homfray Channel and do the NW buttress on Mt. Denman? I've looked at it for many years and never been in that particular area. Looks good, and rock should be ok.

Just did some looking into that peak (as yes I am in Comox) and it looks wicked! For those of you who are curious....

Credit: Synchronicity
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Mar 6, 2012 - 02:07pm PT
There's always The Colonel for ya Synchro. Might not pass as "good granite" :-D

In Comox, eh? You in the CF ?
Synchronicity

Trad climber
British Columbia, Canada
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 6, 2012 - 02:37pm PT
Nope not CF although that's why many people move here. I've spent most of my life here, its not a bad place to be when the weather is decent. Rock climbing, hiking, swimming, mtn. biking, skiing all within a half hour drive. More stuff just a bit further, like Horne Lake but i'm not a 5.14 sport climber. We lack the consistent cold temps for good stable ice, but they say the ice is good for all 3 days of the season :P

The Colonel is definitely the heart of alpine climbing on the island. Although I haven't climbed it, I've heard a ton about the choss that can be found there. A friend of mine capped off an epic summer of alpine climbing by ascending the Colonel via the Culbert route I believe, which was the first major route on the east face. He told me some horrendous stories about VW sized blocks of rock and ice cascading down the gullies, pitches with 3 pieces of crap gear in an entire ropelength and no belay anchors. He also said it was the best climbing day of his life.

There are some cool ridge scrambles/enchainments to be had, but I'd have to do most of them solo as its hard to find partners that are interested. I don't have a ton of alpine climbing experience, but I am comfortable soloing up to easy 5.10. There's also the complete Elk Valley traverse which I believe was attempted by Foweraker and Croft before eventually being completed by some locals.


Tami

Social climber
Canada
Mar 6, 2012 - 02:50pm PT
Mr. Foweraker has a hilarious and epic Foster story to share. Hee hee.

He went in with Joe B to attempt something on the E face ( maybe the thing Joe, Peter and I had tried.........not sure ) . Under the E face and ogling it, they realized they needed iceaxes. Which were back in Nanaimo. So they squirreled their packs there, sprinted back down the trail, drove to Nanaimo, got the aforementioned item of equipment, drove back to the trailhead and started back up the trail.

Any of you who know this drive and hike know they put many hours of driving to get those iceaxes. The trail up the Elk Valley is , what? 13km ? I remember it being 7 miles - substantial even if you got long legs like Foodeater..........

Well it got dark partway up the the trail and the boys decided to bivi under the trees. Then it started to rain. Wx turned to North Island Foulness so they bid a retreat back to the cars.

Now remember where their backpacks were...........waaaaay up the trail somewhere.

Joe offered to come back the next week and retrieve the packs.

Or something like that. I"m sure gf can fix the details of my story .

Heh heh heh.........

PellucidWombat

Mountain climber
Berkeley, CA
Mar 6, 2012 - 04:42pm PT
Great thread! An ascent of Waddington via kayaking up the Knight Inlet has been one of my 'dream/nightmare' climbs that I've been thinking about for a long time. My first alpine climb involved kayaking across Leigh Lake to climb Mt Moran in the Tetons, and ever since then I've been intrigued with the idea of doing some Coastal mountains that way.

Somehow I figure the crux would be finding competent and dedicated partners who could spare the time for such an adventure. I mean, who doesn't like the sound of wearing crampons to assist in log crossings?! ;-)

I've even gone so far as to find some interesting looking peaks north of Sechelt that could be nice multi-day trial runs for the whole kayak-'schwak'-and climb deal. Maybe I'll put up what I was thinking for the trial peaks & Waddington here to see what you guys think?

I'll be poring over the links you've all shared. I had been meaning to look up the CAJ report of the Knight Inlet approach, and now it looks like I don't have to :-)
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Mar 6, 2012 - 07:37pm PT
Cruising up Bute Inlet way via kayak and sailboat with our good friends Rob and Lauri Wood back in the early 80ish. Quintano was the mother ship. After years in the South Pacific this was a wonderful respite into virgin turf. One of the most memorable trips ever.

Rob and I had done a number of routes in the Valley in the early 60s and he was on the first British ascent of the Nose with Mick Burke. Rob and Doug Scott made the first winter ascent of Waddington.

In the mid 80s we sailed our boat up from New Zealand and spent a summer in British Columbia. God's country. The most impenetrable forest I have ever experienced.

Sadly Rob and Lauri lost Quintano in a fire last year but they are building another catamaran, so if you are looking for a ride up yonder in the future they may be able to help. Sorry about the quality of the slides but Sir Haan is busy with his literary career right now and I have to be patient.

Credit: guido
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
running downwind wing and wing with a paddle.
running downwind wing and wing with a paddle.
Credit: guido
Credit: guido
Base camp the Homathko River&#40;sic?&#41; river-Waddington "just arou...
Base camp the Homathko River(sic?) river-Waddington "just around the corner", yah right mate!
Credit: guido

laughingman

Mountain climber
Seattle WA
Mar 6, 2012 - 07:41pm PT
Mt Jubilee from the Lomolo glacier.

from "Wastral" TR: link posted earlier.
from "Wastral" TR: link posted earlier.
Credit: "wastral"
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