Surfing v. Climbing... Complimentary Pursuits?

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Messages 1401 - 1420 of total 1736 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Dr.Sprock

Boulder climber
I'm James Brown, Bi-atch!
Jan 28, 2014 - 12:11am PT
whats up with Mavericks?

o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Jan 31, 2014 - 03:05pm PT
This has become my favorite thread and I am pleased to meet all you guys that are passionate about surfing as well as climbing. I'm very stoked get all the great feedback on the surfing stuff that I have been posting all this time.
It seems that this thread is dominated by surfing and there is very little climbing input lately other that the great stuff that"drljefe" posts from time to time. So I thought I would go out on a limb and tell a climbing story to bump this thread along. It's a bit long winded but here goes.

Maurice Reed and I were on the summit of Cynical Pinnacle back in the spring of 84 when he pointed out a steep face on a rock formation over toward Sunshine Wall. The face had three crack systems on it and one of them went right up the middle.
Maurice said to me, (in his thick southern drawl) “Ma’an, we gotta climb that thang!”
Several people that we contacted said they had been looking at it and thought it looked really cool, but, nobody that we could find, had actually tried it.
We went on a reconnaissance hike and scouted a route through the massive boulders at the base of the formation. We also scoped the face with binoculars. Along with a healthy bush that was growing out of the crack I noticed an old tattered rap sling about 1/3 way up the second pitch. Maurice said,”Ma’an, I sure hope that sling was left by some ole aid climber when he bailed off the thing?”
A few days later we returned with leather gloves, tree loppers, a saw, and a crow bar. With this equipment we chopped, cut, stomped and trundled our way to the base of the climb. We had to negotiate dense anti-personal bushes, downed trees, and several large and very loose boulders. With all the obstacles we encountered, it was obvious that no one had been in this gully in many years or, maybe ever.
Maurice and I drove back down to Foxton a week later. We parked in our usual spot. I stashed some beer in the river while Maurice sorted the climbing gear. We then shouldered our packs and walked down the road a ways before we crossed over the old barbed wire fence. We marched past the symmetrically cut Rose Granite slabs, steel cables and other equipment that was abandoned when the rock quarry operation shut down decades earlier. We then headed up the, steep, gravel hillside through stands of aspen, needle sharp yucca plants, blooming cactus and patches of kininnikinnick. When we took the occasional rest break we could hear the Platte River as it blended harmoniously with the wind rushing through the Ponderosa Pines and spreading their thick scent of butterscotch. In those days there were only game trails in the Cathedral Spires and we usually took a different route each time.
Once we were at the base of the climb, Maurice led the first pitch up to a large belay ledge. He made it look easy although it involved some of the hardest moves on the entire climb.
The belay ledge was littered with loose rocks. We trundled most of them before attempting the next pitch. (Ah, the sight, sounds, and smells of granite boulders gaining momentum on their way to the valley below!) My dog “Beau” was at the base and he just wouldn’t “STAY or SIT!” like I told him to. Beau was running excitedly all over the place. He thought we were playing some sort of game. Maurice said” Ma'an, he’ll get out of the way, believe me, he’ll get out of the way!” It’s luckily for Beau that he didn’t get clobbered by one of those non- guided projectiles!
Pitch two was my lead. It started off as a continuously difficult but well protected finger crack that lead up to a steep, poorly protected, lay back section. I had trouble committing to those moves with the marginal gear that I had in. I could see the sequence that I needed to make but my strength was draining fast.
I was really getting pumped and there was no natural rest to be found. After several tries I was completely exhausted so I down climbed to my last good gear placement. Maurice then lowered me back to the belay ledge.
Maurice was now chomping at the bit to give this pitch a go. We quickly switched the belay over and I handed him the rack. He charged up to my high point and got really pumped trying to commit to those poorly protected moves.
I could tell Maurice was frustrated as he down climbed to the last piece of gear. Reluctantly, he clipped in and tied off and yelled,”Ma’an , send me the pins and a hammer”. Although he was tied off he refused to hang on the protection any more than he had to while we negotiated the gear transfer. Maurice climbed back up to our high point and put in two solid pitons without hanging. Getting those pins in proved to be very tiring. It would have compromised his ethics to hang on the gear while he regenerated, so, he had me lower him all the way down to the belay ledge
With the rest I got while belaying, and the security of the pitons Maurice placed, I gained the strength and confidence I needed to pull through those steep, committing layback moves. This put me at the start of the elegant and slightly overhanging hand sized crack in the head wall.
With the layback section out of the way all seemed straight forward. That is, until I encountered a completely detached spike that can only be described as the tip of a miniature pinnacle. There was no way around this gnarly feature. The spike actually moved when I touched it. I didn’t dare put any outward force on it!
I had some decent gear right below my feet but nothing any higher. I had a solid foot jam for a stance. I yelled down to Maurice,” Dude, move the belay as far over to the right as possible and, Watch Out! OK?”
His response was “ Ma’an, I am as far over as I can get! And YOU better watch out your own self!”
With no other holds to use I mantled, and stood up ever so carefully on the tip of that detached spike! I was trembling after I completed those delicate moves! Fortunately, there was a great nut placement just as I stood up and put all my weight on the point of the spike. I moved up quickly and got some good hand and foot jams. I then leaned out from the rock and looked down at Maurice and said “Dude that was Dicey!” I can’t imagine what it would have been like if that teetering block had come off while I was attempting that sketchy mantle move!
Next was what turned out to be some of my all time favorite moves in the Platte. The elegant and overhanging headwall proved to be well protected, strenuous, thin hand jamming all the way up to a semi-hanging belay stance!
While seconding the pitch Maurice jettisoned that dangerous block. This created a great rest stance before the steep and continuous crack climbing at the end of the pitch.
As we set up the rappel anchors, I said to Maurice,” Dude, what do you want to name it?” He thought for a second and said “Well, Ma’an, we’re both from Mississippi so let’s call it Mississippi Half Step!”
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the top of the Half Step we noticed a steep rippling face on the formation across the gully toward Cynical Pinnacle. Maurice said,” Ma’an we gotta climb that!”
Maurice and I had been putting up some steep friction climbs over on Snake buttress in traditional, ground up, style.
This face was long, blank, and real steep. It had a number of sloping features that looked as though they might be stances that we could drill bolts from.
Once again the approach was blocked by large loose boulders and the ever present thorn bushes(A.P.B.s) so again we had our work cut out for us, just getting to the base of the climb.
For this climb we were armed with only a hammer, a hand drill, and 1.5”x1/4” expansion bolts.
It was our usual style on these type climbs to swap the lead after each bolt placement.
The climb was going just as we thought it would .We would delicately climb away from the safety of our last bolt placement making steep friction moves that were close to the point of repose. Each section ended with a thin and technical, mantle move. Once we made the mantle and gained our vertical balance, (using only the friction of the rubber of our (EB) climbing shoes against the granite), on one of those less steep bumps. We would then pull out the hand drill and hammer and start the long tedious process of drilling a hole in the granite face. We would then pound in the expansion bolt from the sloping stance.
After the third bolt, I climbed up a steep section of micro- flakes that ended in a mantle move at a difficulty of about 5.11. I drilled and hammered in bolt from the steep stance and then had Maurice lower me back to the base.
On Maurice’s try, a critical flake disintegrated while he was pulling through on it. We were so bummed because without that flake, our climb became a whole lot harder! We pulled the rope through our top bolt and tried to lead the section again and again. We each took several substantial pendulum falls and our finger tips were starting to bleed so we gave up it up and called it a day.
We swiftly skied the loose gravel mountain side down to the valley where we had some of our favorite beverage stashed in the icy river. We sat on the tail gate and enjoyed some much needed refreshment, and reflected on the day’s efforts. We absorbed the view of the Cathedral Spires as last rays of sun hit Cynical Pinnacle along with the sounds of the raging Platte River and the comradely of two best friends! We were well into our beverages and completely blissed out when were approached by a climber that appeared out of nowhere. He seemed friendly enough and looked thirsty. Maurice said Ma’an, you want a beer?” He accepted the offer so we shared the tail gate and our cold beer with him as we name dropped and swapped climbing stories. The conversation eventually turned to bolting. The guy said that he had been up at The Dome and he had been chopping the bolts on a route that had been placed on rappel. He stated that he intended to chop all the bolts in the Platte that had been placed on rappel! When Maurice heard this fellows bold statement he looked the guy in the eye and said, “Ma’an, I don’t Rapp bolt, BUT, if I did, and you were to chop ANY of MY bolts, and I found out about it, I’d find out where you lived and slash your tires!” And, I personally believe, he meant it!
Maurice moved away soon after that first attempt and our climb was unfinished business. I vowed to wait until Maurice returned but I became impatient.
I enlisted the help of Noel Childs to work on the route with me. I was able to climb that section on my next try.
With the crux section climbed Noel was stoked to finish the pitch. He was bummed when I stated that I wanted to wait a couple of months until Maurice returned to Colorado to finish the pitch that we started. Noel was not pleased but he agreed reluctantly.
When Maurice did return we finished the first pitch in one push. We named the climb Mr. Mantle since there were so many wild mantle moves on that pitch.
The second pitch was steep but relatively moderate hand and fist crack that the late Catherine Freer and I did on a beautiful spring day not long before her tragic accident.
Olaf Mitchell on Mississippi Half Step <br/>
Photo: Ken Trout
Olaf Mitchell on Mississippi Half Step
Photo: Ken Trout
Credit: o-man
Noel Childs on "Mister Mantle" <br/>
Photo: Olaf Mitchell
Noel Childs on "Mister Mantle"
Photo: Olaf Mitchell
Credit: o-man
WTF

climber
Jan 31, 2014 - 03:43pm PT
Nice ride at the 3:21 Mark. Some big ones there.

Is it me or is there a serious increase in numbers out there.
Gregory Crouch

Social climber
Walnut Creek, California
Jan 31, 2014 - 04:18pm PT
Damn, you're THAT Olaf Mitchell. :-)

I had a great ride up that route, once upon a time. Lost a contact on that big ledge, dusted it off, lubed it with spit, popped it back in, then had a go at P2. What a GREAT climb.
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Jan 31, 2014 - 04:46pm PT
Credit: drljefe
Shaka Olaf
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Feb 1, 2014 - 09:56pm PT
Credit: pyro
Credit: pyro
plenty of North L.A surf shot's
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 1, 2014 - 10:07pm PT
Olaf,
You have to put that on a separate thread.

But w.r.t this one, thanks again for all the surfing content.
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Feb 1, 2014 - 10:46pm PT

somebody had asked about Maverick's!
o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Feb 2, 2014 - 01:54am PT
Olaf,
You have to put that on a separate thread.

But w.r.t this one, thanks again for all the surfing content.

Copy that Darwin!
pyro, YOU RULE DUDE!
RP3

Big Wall climber
Sonora
Feb 2, 2014 - 10:59am PT
Getting pitted by the Teahupo'o of Yosemite!

Credit: RP3
clinker

Trad climber
California
Feb 2, 2014 - 11:14am PT
Charles,
You surf? That is disgusting. I just noticed the author of this thread that has polluted ST's forum. My respect for you is shredded. You suck. Really?
JC :)
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Feb 2, 2014 - 04:57pm PT


All the drone footy showing up(Pipe, Jaws)is truly incredible.

I'm home sick on Super Bowl Sunday and it's a beautiful day.
So I decided to re read this entire thread.
It's epic.
The stories and photos from the many contributors are great.

O Man,
funny, your Halfstep story was very familiar to me. Turns out you'd posted it before- it's buried back in the 500s.
Your stories, updates, and photos are much appreciated.

Lurkers like Esparza and the Alpine who obviously rip, T2, ESU, adamd, rp3, thanks for your stuff.
Pyro's gopro stills, and I'm sure his surfing too, have progressed. Cool to see.
Everyone, thanks for sharing.

And I saw some posts from GhoulweJ, who just passed away recently. Ride on, J.

And I got to re read some of my posts that I'd totally forgotten about.
In most threads I'm just a drive by poster or photo sharer but I realize that I've actually contributed some writing to this thread. Personal stuff, emotional stuff, and stories I'm actually proud of.

It's been a joy and a stoker to revisit this thread from the beginning.
And while other surfing threads have come and gone, I'm glad this one has endured.
Thanks to Charles for starting it.

Now I'm waiting for my old pal bobJ to post up the field test results of his hand shaped freak board.

Credit: drljefe
FA Shock Collar 5.11

Credit: drljefe
Minus tides

Credit: drljefe
Lowers

Credit: drljefe
Mirage V4

Credit: drljefe
these feet, my carriage
supported my weight on minuscule edges
thousands of feet above the ground, jammed
into cracks screaming, cut on reefs in the middle
of the pacific, apply just the right pressure to hold a line
pitted fifty feet from the sand, carried me miles to the base
of the rock, squeaked in the finest sand, clung to cobbles, stuck
to wax, tattooed in the islands, cut in Central America, colored red
in Hueco, frozen solid in big sur. these feet. Aloha motherf*#kers.



speelyei

Trad climber
Mohave County Arizona
Feb 2, 2014 - 05:30pm PT
@ Gregory Crouch:
Nope, Oregon! That board must've migrated north and showed up dinged, yellowed, and under $100 at a shop. Gave it some new glass and a new look. Got some good rides on that board, hope it's in better hands now.
o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Feb 2, 2014 - 05:43pm PT
O Man,
funny, your Halfstep story was very familiar to me. Turns out you'd posted it before- it's buried back in the 500s.
Your stories, updates, and photos are much appreciated.
drljefe, I was afraid of that but I posted it any way needing to share some climbing. Somethings that happened this week have me very introspective lately mainly the passing of Mark Hesse.
Dude I am sorry that you're feeling ill. I hope you're better soon.
Thanks again for yet another great post!
RP3

Big Wall climber
Sonora
Feb 3, 2014 - 10:09am PT
From a trip over the holidays to Baja:

Credit: RP3
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Feb 3, 2014 - 10:41pm PT
¿Punta Camalu?

Was the road f*#ked up at Salsipuedes yet?
RP3

Big Wall climber
Sonora
Feb 4, 2014 - 03:00am PT
If I told ya, I'd have to kill ya! It is deep south of El Rosario.

When we drove past Salsipuedes, the road was just starting to fail. There was a 1-2' scarp you had to drive over and then up again. The Mexican transit folks were trying to pave over the whole mess. The entire thing collapsed a few days later:

http://www.sandiego6.com/story/toll-road-collapses-in-tijuana-ensenada-20131229

To drive back we had to cut inland on the non-toll road. I had never been this way before and I may take it in the future...
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Feb 4, 2014 - 03:29am PT
You may HAVE to drive that way!
bust out more pics!

Edit
Bottom of the page Buttons shot
Bolster photo
Bolster photo
Credit: drljefe
So sick.
o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Feb 4, 2014 - 04:14pm PT
The awesome link below was sent to me on facebook by trundlebum.
Yet another dynamic force taken by cancer.
I thought it worthy of sharing with you.
Rell Sun "Queen of Makaha Heart of the Sea" <br/>
Photo from "Surfers Jour...
Rell Sun "Queen of Makaha Heart of the Sea"
Photo from "Surfers Journal"
Credit: o-man
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hU1ogqBhNdI#t=25
brotherbbock

Trad climber
Alta Loma, CA
Feb 4, 2014 - 05:10pm PT
^^^^^^^Makaha.


Saying Mahaha to a local there might get you punched in the face.
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