Pearl Harbor remembered 70th anniversary!

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Messages 161 - 175 of total 175 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
xCon

Social climber
909
Dec 6, 2017 - 01:46pm PT
well lets see

the us sailed a fleet on Chinese rivers for over half of the 19th century to help the british enforce harsh terms of the opium wars settling

all the while we pumped japan into an imperial juggernaut

in 1895 Treaty of Shimonoseki cuts korea off from china for the Japanese to go marching in

more decades of pumping japan war machine as it cut korea to ribbons

then they rolled into china

not before china gave support for us troops invading Siberia of course

can you believe more than three years passed after the rape of nanking before America got around to cutting off war materials for japan?

we wernt at all bothered by the massacre

it was preventing our markets from expanding into the new territories and their taking of Vietnam from the French that did it finally

Winemaker

Sport climber
Yakima, WA
Dec 6, 2017 - 01:53pm PT
My father had joined the Marines before the war started and was stationed in Pearl when the attack happened; he ended up fighting all over the Pacific. He was a radio operator so avoided most of the nasty stuff, but refused to talk about his experiences; the only thing he told us was it was awful to be strafed. He hated fireworks. After his discharge in the Pacific he returned to New Zealand, where he had met my mother while on leave; he told her if he lived he'd be back and here I and my brothers are. He made a map tracing all the places he'd been in the Pacific during the war.
I guess I'm lucky to be here!
I guess I'm lucky to be here!
Credit: Winemaker

He was going to be in Washington in 2008 with a (small) group of other surviving Pearl Harbor soldiers for a memorial, but unfortunately fell off a ladder in his garage and landed on his back/head on the concrete floor, which was fatal.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 6, 2017 - 01:55pm PT
xCon, your points are taken and deserve cred.

However, I don't think this is the right venue to begin a debate on the policies that led up to the attack, so please don't.

Thank you.

And Winemaker, we're sure glad you're lucky to be here, too, as are we all!
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Dec 6, 2017 - 02:22pm PT
I don't think this is the right venue to begin a debate on the policies that led up to the attack, so please don't.

Thank you.

+1
Well said my friend.


Nice share winemaker.
TFPU
Tad

USS Arizona
USS Arizona
Credit: T Hocking
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Dec 6, 2017 - 03:24pm PT
Winemaker.... Your dad got around.

Be proud, he lived through the hell on earth that was the Pacific War.

Those Marines, and there was not a lot of them, paid a big price for all of US.



Winemaker

Sport climber
Yakima, WA
Dec 6, 2017 - 04:02pm PT
I hope this isn't boring people, but I was just re-reading the history my father included along with the map and thought some of you might be interested. He was in some of the most intense fighting in the Pacific, including Guadalcanal. Here is a short excerpt from his writing, with names partially blocked for privacy. They were the great generation.
Credit: Winemaker
Credit: Winemaker
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 6, 2017 - 04:02pm PT
And Tad, thanks for that illuminating photo.

I never did understand the situation vis-a-vis the ship's alignment/position with the memorial; but, man oh man, that's as clear as...Plexiglas.
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Dec 6, 2017 - 04:44pm PT
Winemaker..... not boring at all.

TFPU.

My Father-in-Law, Big Bill Seeley, was drafted into the Army in 1940. He was trained in Artillery but ended up in New Guinea. His small unit worked with the natives, teaching them how to work Japanese firearms. Then they paid these bad ass headhunters for Japanese Ears.... in cash and stuff.

He would talk about what went down. Mostly nothing was his report. He says he shot his rifle very rarely and his most scared moment was when a giant spider jumped on his face. He said in the four years he was in NG he never got leave and almost never got "real food" or a Movie or a beer or anything.

When he was discharged in Sept 45, in San Francisco, his biggest shock was that a hamburger cost $.25!

Bill and I got along just fine but I was never able to get him out camping..... he just told me. "I don't need to do that anymore"
He passed away in 1986. I do miss him.

When I was young I never had any appreciation for these men/women, Vietnam had soured me and caused me to hate almost everything military. I now realize that without the sacrifices they made we would be in a completely different world. I also realize that I was full of sh%T back then.


Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Dec 6, 2017 - 09:15pm PT
Pearl Harbor was a tragedy and a significant event for the US, though I always felt like it was overhyped compared to greater sacrifices made after the war started. Guy mentioned the Marines in the Pacific. Absolute hell for those guys, and it was wasn't a surprise attack. Peleliu, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, Wake Island, etc. Most of them had plenty of time to think about what a horror show they were wading into, and they did it anyways. And then there was Europe...
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 6, 2017 - 09:24pm PT
A toast to Eugene Sledge, USMC, and his companions--Peleliu and Okinawa.

3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division (K/3/5)

Credit: mouse from merced
T Hocking

Trad climber
Redding, Ca
Dec 7, 2017 - 06:21am PT
Remembering those that made the ultimate sacrifice,
Semper Fidelis

Credit: T Hocking

Credit: T Hocking

Credit: T Hocking
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Dec 7, 2017 - 06:41pm PT
I posted about my Step Dad's brother, my uncle by proxy, back in the 2011 anniversary. Time to bring him back into the thread.

His Congressional Medal of Honor citation:

"For conspicuous devotion to duty and extraordinary courage and complete disregard of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, by Japanese forces on 7 December 1941. When it was seen that the U.S.S. Oklahoma was going to capsize and the order was given to abandon ship, Ens. Flaherty remained in a turret, holding a flashlight so the remainder of the turret crew could see to escape, thereby sacrificing his own life."

Credit: US Navy

In 1943 an Edsall class Destroyer Escort, a ship designed for anti submarine warfare, was commissioned with the name USS Flaherty. At the very end of the war with Germany, a time when any more loss of life on the sea was useless, Flaherty and a sister ship were on patrol off the coast of Greenland. U-Boats made their way through these waters on their way south to attack American shipping. Flaherty's sister ship was torpedoed and sank. They picked up three of the crew and went hunting for the U-Boat. After a lengthy pursuit they found her with sonar, attacked with depth charges, and forced the damaged sub to surface where she was summarily torn apart with gunfire.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Dec 7, 2017 - 06:49pm PT
Wow... thanks for the remembrance. True heroism can happen with a flashligh in hand as well as a gun.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Dec 7, 2017 - 07:24pm PT
Brothers in Arms

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/national/world-war-two-letters/?utm_term=.3dd21b075d9e&wpisrc=al_special_report__alert-world--alert-national&wpmk=1

Credit: guido
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Dec 7, 2017 - 07:31pm PT
Francis was not the only one. I've tried to find out if they worked together in the same turret, or if they were called to heroism with no knowledge of what the other was doing.

Seaman First Class James Ward citation:

"The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Seaman First Class James Richard Ward, United States Navy, for conspicuous devotion to duty, extraordinary courage and complete disregard of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, by Japanese forces on 7 December 1941. When it was seen that the USS OKLAHOMA (BB-37) was going to capsize and the order was given to abandon ship, Seaman First Class Ward remained in a turret holding a flashlight so the remainder of the turret crew could see to escape, thereby sacrificing his own life."

I'm not sure of the exact number, but one of these big turrets was crewed by about 40 men. A fair number of lives to save.
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