Nepal Appreciation Thread: You been there? Stories/photos!

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micronut

Trad climber
Topic Author's Original Post - Dec 1, 2011 - 10:57am PT
There have been a couple threads here over the years about Nepal, the Himalaya and other goings on in this amazing place. I just wanted to share some photography from our trips there and share the stoke with others who have been there.

So chime in with photos, stories, word or whatever. May the magic of this wonderful land and its people inspire you. I hope to return again some day.

The Big One.
The Big One.
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
The temple at Swayambunath
The temple at Swayambunath
Credit: micronut
self explanatory.  Walking for your daily water is something most of u...
self explanatory. Walking for your daily water is something most of us cannot imagine. Let alone at six years old.
Credit: micronut
Penny for her thoughts....
Penny for her thoughts....
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
View from Nagarkot.
View from Nagarkot.
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Tea-Time at sunrise.  The mighty Himal wakes in front of our eyes.  Gl...
Tea-Time at sunrise. The mighty Himal wakes in front of our eyes. Glad you were there to share it with, Shep.
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
mmmmmmm....A bit ....earthy....
mmmmmmm....A bit ....earthy....
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
I'll post up some captions soon. But most of these shots speak for themselves....
Norwegian

Trad climber
Placerville, California
Dec 1, 2011 - 11:00am PT
the sun be my judge,
i haven't set foot beyond
the you es of a.

i named both my daughters after himalayan peaks,
with hopes that
hardship is all of our to inherit.

annapurna.
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian

makalu.
Credit: Barry Bishop
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Dec 1, 2011 - 12:01pm PT

Amazing how it's changed in less than 30 years.

Lukla. The most dangerous airport in the world.

1983 - dirt
Lukla 1983 while still a dirt strip
Lukla 1983 while still a dirt strip
Credit: Daniel Kubas-Meyer

2007 - paved (around 2001 IIRC)
Lukla 2007
Lukla 2007
Credit: John Duffield

In 1983, you either walked around K-du or Rickshaw. Now, it's chock-a-block with cars. The smog is awful.

The swinging bridges are much sturdier now as well.

So, one day, I was the most famous guy in the Khumbu. Going down to one of those swinging bridges on switchbacks on both sides, were dozens of trekkers. I get on the bridge and I feel more vibration than I would generate myself. I'd just walked past a Yak and I realized - in a micro-second - it was chasing me across the Bridge. No time to turn and verify it, just run like crazy across the bridge and fling myself over to the side at the feet of a couple of companions - who thought it was hilarious.

That night, it was the talk of every teahouse within a one day radius. Dozens of people had seen it. Rarely happens. Yaks are pretty tame.
Banquo

climber
Morgan Hill, CA (Mo' Hill)
Dec 1, 2011 - 12:37pm PT
I was there in 81 and 84. I remember they didn't have metal detectors in the airport so when leaving the country I was frisked. They found my bundle of cash and travelers checks in my pants but didn't ask to see it after I told them it was my money although it could have been drugs or a bomb for all they knew. They also found my swiss army knife which they wouldn't allow me to carry onto the plane. They said I could put the knife into my checked pack so, unattended by anyone, I walked out across the tarmac to the airplane, found my pack and put the knife into it. It didn't seem like very effective security to me.
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Dec 1, 2011 - 01:54pm PT
I also had a run-in with my SWAK in 2007. I'd packed my daybag to go hiking - forgetting the intervening flight via Lukla. There were three levels of security. The bag went through the X-Ray, np. Then there was that place at the terminal exit where they do the Males and Females separately and I was searched - again, np. At the aircraft, there was someone who asked if I had a knife or lighter. I realized I had both those things.

I sent my guide back for the SWAK. The lighter wasn't worth it.

Two years ago in the Indian Himalaya, I was privileged to share a flight from Leh with the Da Lai Lama. Security was the tightest I've seen. Zero carry-on. No coats. Nothing. You could check up to ten bags but nothing in the cabin.
Stewart Johnson

climber
lake forest
Dec 1, 2011 - 05:03pm PT
ed webster on ama dablam
ed webster on ama dablam
Credit: Stewart Johnson
nepal is my second home.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 1, 2011 - 05:17pm PT
I've enjoyed two 16 day treks with friends in Nepal. Everest Area in 2005 and Mustang in 2008.

The locals certainly add to the enjoyment of the journey, but some of the largest mountains in the world are eye candy: far better, than a photo can ever share.

Yummy!
Yummy!
Credit: Fritz
Of course: a chocolate croissant and hot beverage at 12,000 Ft., after 14 days trekking, is also memorable.

A family whose children befriended us, and showed the way to an obscur...
A family whose children befriended us, and showed the way to an obscure monastery. I still owe them a copy of this photo. (the whitey people in the photo: are not part of the family.)
Credit: Fritz

Sherpa children munching on dried fruit we shared.
Sherpa children munching on dried fruit we shared.
Credit: Fritz


Sherpa woman with a load of dried dung, and a few twigs.
Sherpa woman with a load of dried dung, and a few twigs.
Credit: Fritz

The "gravel-crusher" at a rock-quarry above Namche Bazaar.
The "gravel-crusher" at a rock-quarry above Namche Bazaar.
Credit: Fritz


OK mountains.

View from Gokyo Ri at about 17,800 Ft. 15 miles across to Everest & Lh...
View from Gokyo Ri at about 17,800 Ft. 15 miles across to Everest & Lhotse to the right.
Credit: Fritz

Gyachang Kang, 7952m, 26,089 Ft.,  from Gokyo Ri.  15th highest peak i...
Gyachang Kang, 7952m, 26,089 Ft., from Gokyo Ri. 15th highest peak in the world.
Credit: Fritz

And how could I neglect the "pointy Mountain:" Ama Dablin.

Credit: Fritz

Ama Dablin.   You could easily-see climbers on the right-side hanging ...
Ama Dablin. You could easily-see climbers on the right-side hanging glacier route, with binocs.
Credit: Fritz
Mattq331

Mountain climber
Boulder/UK
Dec 1, 2011 - 07:18pm PT
Absolutely love Nepal!

Was there in 1996 on a climbing trip. We were on Hiunchuli in the Annapurna Sanctuary:
The dizzying sights and sounds of Kathmandu.
The dizzying sights and sounds of Kathmandu.
Credit: Freddie Snalam
The Ups and Downs of getting to the mountains
The Ups and Downs of getting to the mountains
Credit: Freddie Snalam
Tea House catering!
Tea House catering!
Credit: Freddie Snalam
Travel thousands of miles to wallow in the snow!
Travel thousands of miles to wallow in the snow!
Credit: Freddie Snalam

Now, 15 years later I'm going back, this time with my wife and kids (13, 15) to trek into the Khumbu. My eldest was just 3 months old when I left to Nepal the first time - but it struck me that trekking in Nepal was something the whole family would enjoy. In 2 weeks time we'll be testing my theory!

Matt
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Dec 1, 2011 - 07:28pm PT
Despites the hardships, I spent the best years of my life in Nepal and many of my closest friends are still there. It's always interesting for me to see how others not as immersed in the culture as I am perceive it.

Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 1, 2011 - 07:28pm PT
Matt: Love your drawings.

Enjoy Nepal.

Kathmandu is still: a zoo!

(a very interesting zoo, however)!!
salad

climber
Escondido
Dec 1, 2011 - 08:35pm PT
not quite in the same league, but i was once there too!









(Nilgiri)









Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 1, 2011 - 09:14pm PT
Anyone enjoying this thread?

Let us know?

Post your thoughts &/or photos.

I have lots more photos, but if they are not of interest?

Have a nice day.




Namche Bazaar street.
Namche Bazaar street.
Credit: Fritz

Sunset over small (19,000 Ft.) mountain, from above Namche Bazaar.
Sunset over small (19,000 Ft.) mountain, from above Namche Bazaar.
Credit: Fritz
Mark Rodell

Trad climber
Bangkok
Dec 2, 2011 - 12:09am PT
Appreciate Nepal...Well yea. I was lucky enough to snag a job teaching there. It was a U.S.I.S. gig so the pay was okay. Lived there about three years and got in a lot of trips into the mts. Problem was living in Kathmandu, a very dirty place and I was sick too often. Moved to Bangkok and have taken many trips back to Nepal since then.

One thing I learned was that the off season was a great time to trek. Monsoon in the Everest Area...very few tourists. Wake early and plan that the rains would come early afternoon.

Took my Thai wife into te Jomsom/Mustang gateway area one January. When we signed the park enterance register there were only six other parties on the trail. During peak season there'd be hundreds of groups. Cold but weather held and so very nice.

Less popular area like Langtang, very cool. Get off trail and speak a bit of the language or hire a good guide and the hospitality blooms. My guide, who I used often, knew local edible plants and we took off trail a lot. We also sought out obscure temples.

Appreciate Nepal. Yep...so Fritz post up pics. I am away from home and cling to this place for sanity.
mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Dec 2, 2011 - 12:37am PT
We needed a guide from Nepal to get us to the top of this rock.
Credit: mcreel

bonus question: where are we?
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Dec 2, 2011 - 12:46am PT
Cool thread. I would if I could...

and Fritz, post more pics.
mcreel

climber
Barcelona
Dec 2, 2011 - 02:26am PT
This fellow is also a river guide:
Credit: mcreel
local

Social climber
eldorado springs
Dec 2, 2011 - 07:04am PT
The photo labeled Cho Oyu up-thread is actually Gyachang Kang, 7952m, just east of Cho Oyu.
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Dec 2, 2011 - 07:09am PT
Gonna guess those are the Terai.

I like Gokyo, as well, the ridge overlooking the Glacier that feeds the Ganges. Much less traveled than the EBC Corridor.

From the Lakes of Gokyo
From the Lakes of Gokyo
Credit: John Duffield



John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Dec 2, 2011 - 07:34am PT
I've got dozens of pix of the crazy crap around Thamel etc.

Temple
Temple
Credit: John Duffield

A holy man
A holy man
Credit: John Duffield
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 2, 2011 - 07:59am PT
Local: Thanks for the correction, re your comment-

The photo labeled Cho Oyu up-thread is actually Gyachang Kang, 7952m, just east of Cho Oyu.

I found the image in the batch I took from Gokyo Ri, thought it might be Cho Oyu, then looked on Google for Cho Oyu and found a similar photo.

Here is a great photo from this site:

http://www.himalaya-info.org/nepal-flug.htm:

That explains my confusion. (click on image to enlarge)

Credit: Fritz


Here is a photo I took of Cho Oyu, from just below Goyko.

Cho Oyu  26,906 Ft.
Cho Oyu 26,906 Ft.
Credit: Fritz


Holy Schist! There are a lot of mountains in there!
micronut

Trad climber
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 2, 2011 - 08:01am PT
Ahhh Thamel. I still love it in all its insanity and filth and tourisimo. Here's two different shots. One on your typical day, all the husstle and busstle of a touristy day on the streets,
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
Credit: micronut
And a starkly different day a in 2010. Maoists had taken over the area, burning storefronts, beating people up and traveling in thug packs that would pull folks out of their vehicles and pummel them. A bigger version of the "strikes" that happen weekly. It was super spooky. A ghost town. We had to travel that day to speak in a little chuch ten miles away. We rented bikes and rode back streets, fearful of getting mobbed. My wife was a champ and rode like a madwoman while fires burned in the streets. One of the more intense days of my life.
my wife trying to hustle us up some wheels so we could get outta town.
my wife trying to hustle us up some wheels so we could get outta town.
Credit: micronut

I'd love to dig beneath some of the the tourist ideals of Nepal and hear a bit from those who have spent some real time there. Its a real mess when you peel back the wallpaper. We've done three humanitarian/churchplanting trips in the last two years. The life in the villages is not good, and the maoists are really mucking things up, not to mention the current power struggle in "parliament". In my opinion, hope lies in the young generation and in those with a vision for restoring Nepal to its roots.
Powder

Trad climber
SF Bay Area
Dec 2, 2011 - 08:10am PT
*reading this thread and enjoying the photos...especially those of mountains!*

Thanks for sharing!

Branscomb

Trad climber
Lander, WY
Dec 2, 2011 - 08:22am PT
I've been there a lot, starting in 1979. Took the bus from Bodnath to Kathmandu with a couple of French freaks. We rode most of the way on the roof of the bus because everyone else had eaten the slop at the Raksal border post and were lining the inside with vomit. Coming into Kathmandu in the evening with the mountains in the distance. I thought they were clouds they were so high and then I realized, those are mountains.

I trekked to Muktinath by myself in December. Thought I would go over the Thorung La but too cold and too much snow. Saw the Miracle of the Fire and the Water. Pretty cool. Cold wind from Tibet on the Kali Gandaki. Rested a bit. Living in Pig Alley two doors down from the Chi and Pie. Befriended some Nepalese freaks. One night we got stoned on their Hashish in the back of the Chi and Pie. Like the locals anywhere, they kept the good stuff for themselves. I realized I couldn't remember how to get back to my room. They had a good laugh and then took me home, put me to bed. Sweet people.

Trekked into Everest from Lamu Sangu, 40 days, by myself. First day was trudging up the hill out of Lamu Sangu, man comes up to me in the forest, asks me to come to his place and have some tea. Follow him down through the terraced fields. Feeling something strange. At his house, a woman washing dishes. Won't look at me. Another man, sharpening a kukuri. Looks at me out of the corner of his eye, sly. The man who brought me there looks off over the valley, won't speak to me. Weird vibs. Darkness. I grap my pack and start back up the hill as fast as possible. He chases after me, yelling to come back. I throw rocks at him and he leaves off. I get up to the top of the hill later to a tea stall. The owner asks me if I am alone. Asks me if I had seen anyone else. I told him my story. He tells me I was very lucky. A British couple had been robbed and the man murdered in the same place the week before. I give him a description of the people and continue on.

Two weeks later I'm at Lobuche, 14000 feet last stop to Base Camp. Stay with an old Tibetan woman in what turns out is a hut for porters going back and forth the Everest. I'm the only one there. The first night we're sitting across the fire from each other. She hands me a big bowl of rice and greens. As I'm chowing down I look over the rim of my bowl. She's staring at me like Yamantaka, wrathful deity. Who the f*#k are you and what the f*#k are you doing here, boy? You should be over in the other huts with the trekkers. I give her a huge Tibetan tongue out of mouth greeting full of rice. She nearly falls in the fire laughing. She tells every porter in the days after about me. We get along wonderfully.

Luck out and see Everest without cloud from Kala Pattar. Get to Base Camp. Huge scenery. Obviously massive avalanches roaring up there, so lost in the landscape not even ice dust is visible.

Go back to Tengboche. Meet a couple of Swiss freaks who tell me to go up to Gorkyo. A sherpani and her child up there herding yaks. Place to stay. No other westerners. Cross to Phorche and go all day alone to Machaarma. Stay with the middle sister that night. She sings as the star light and night wind seep through the unchinked stone wall. Next day I get to Gorkyo. Pema Sherpani and Zangmu, her daughter and 6 yaks. The eldest sister gets the highest job. Next day with the sky tin pan and the wind building, I go to a dark rock across the glacier from Cho Oyu. Fall asleep and dream, so tired. Crawl acros the snow in the building storm in places, make it back for a two day full tilt snow storm in the hut. When it's over, it's clear, but chest deep snow. No worries, someone will break the trail in in a day or two. Climb the Kala Pattar there. Better view, can see the North Face of Everest from there. Next day, Pema's husband breaks trail in with two yaks. He's been on Everest with the Japanese at 24,000ft. Heard through the Sherpa grapevine there was some Westerner with his wife in Gorkyo. He had descended from 24,000ft after the storm, walked in one day what had taken me 4 days to hike, picked up the yaks in Machaarma, and came up. Everything cool. Nothing going on. I retire to the moraine on the Ngozumpa for the afternoon with Zangmu while they get reacquainted. Leave the next day.

Hook up with the Swiss for the trek out to Lamu Sangu. Trek of the poor. None of us, the two Swiss, me, a Dutch freak and an German, can afford the Lukla cop-out. Catch Hepatitis A on the way out. Hot season coming on. So sick I wake up one morning and think if I don't get out, I'll go home in a box. Get a flight to Dehli and then London and finally LA. Had lost 40 pounds and a bit yellow. Got to visit Room 13 in LAX while they tore everything apart. Thought they had a hot one. I've given everything away before I'd left. My parents thought I was still in Asia. When I walked up the driveway to their house in Placerville, my father didn't recognize me. Took me a few months to get well.

Went back several years later, 1985 I think, with Kristi. We spent four months travelling through China and Tibet. Had to walk into Nepal in monsoon. Roads washed out. Walking across the border into Nepal, children laughing. We remarked to each other that it was the first time we'd heard laughter in 4 months of China. So much for the People's Revolution. Got to Kathmandu and ate for a week, four meals a day. And Nescafe: yea! Trekked into Langtang at the end of monsoon. Have a wonderful picture of Kristi taken from the window of our hotel room in Trisuli Bazaar before starting the trek. She's washing her face in the water pump by the road. She had her trekking dress on and there are a dozen ragged little kids standing in front of her staring at her intently while she washes her face. Warmup hike, lots of leeches. At the end of the valley, we both felt very weird vibs, like there was something there that didn't want us there. We felt it at the same time. Best to not ignore such things, especially when in parallel. Jumped up and headed back to the cheese factory hastily.

Went back to the big city, regroup. Fly into the Arun River to avoid the Falcipuram malaria down lower. STOL flight into a dirt field. Cross the Arun on a huge steel suspension bridge. Sleep that night on the porch of a Rai village as it pours rain. BonPo shaman in the middle of the night passes through, blowing his counch and blessing the Hindus. All the books say we can't do this without porters, guides. We'll get lost. We take a tent, a few days emergency food and a kerosene stove. Go for it. Fantastic trek over to the Everest region, over three passes over 11,000 feet in rhododendron cloud forest in bloom in the fog. See two other Westerners in those 10 days. Full days of hiking between villages. Lost a couple of times, but figure it out. The last day, trail fades to a steep slab falling into a raging post monsoon torrent, no holds. We friction across with our packs. No mistakes or die. 10 days back to the Arun. We make it. Go to Base Camp, Gorkyo, the Kala Pattars. Pema Sherpani still herding yaks at Gorkyo. She recognizes me when we walk in the door. Mr. Bob. Zangmu is in Kathmandu in school. Doing well. Not so nice now, many of these westerners. Some leave without paying. So little money to them, but to us, it's a lot. Why do they do that? And they demand things, more food like in Namche, pancakes and omelettes. They get angry if she runs out. Not very nice. Trek out to Jiri and the new roadhead by ourselves. Everyone has money now. They can fly from Lukla. We just want to make it last a little longer.

Haven't been back since. Sounds like so many people now. Maybe Kathmandu would like to visit, but the trekking, prefer to remember it like then.

John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Dec 2, 2011 - 08:25am PT


The Mountains.

Nepal is all about the Mountains.

Thamserku
Thamserku
Credit: John Duffield
micronut

Trad climber
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 2, 2011 - 08:47am PT
Branscomb,
AMAZING stories....a real Friday morning treat here at work. The one about the murderers gave me chills. What a formative time in your life. Nobody can ever steal those moments. How cool. Thank you for sharing.

Its amazing how this place can form a youthful mind body and soul.
micronut

Trad climber
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 2, 2011 - 08:48am PT
Mattq331. Wonderful artwork bro.

Fritz, Thanks for sharing.
Jim Leininger

Trad climber
tucson, az
Dec 2, 2011 - 01:19pm PT
Been there 2X, in 2000 and in 2008... It is a magical place once you get up into the Khumbu region... The people, places and sights are all amazing... Hope to go back, possibly in 2013 to take my oldest granddaughter, or maybe even both of them...
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 2, 2011 - 01:50pm PT
WOW! Thanks everyone, for more great photos, and Branscomb-----glad you survived your memorable journeys in Nepal.

Here's some more favorites from my 2005 trip with friends up towards Everest.

Snake Charmers in Kathmandu.  (tourist-inspired)!
Snake Charmers in Kathmandu. (tourist-inspired)!
Credit: Fritz

Temple monkey in Kathmandu.   You do not want to cross the monkeys.  T...
Temple monkey in Kathmandu. You do not want to cross the monkeys. They have Huge fangs!
Credit: Fritz

Temple monkeys.  The small ones are pretty cute.
Temple monkeys. The small ones are pretty cute.
Credit: Fritz

The woman at center: is "annointing Lord Shiva's Lingam."   <br/>
Suddenly...
The woman at center: is "annointing Lord Shiva's Lingam."
Suddenly-----I knew I was not in Idaho anymore.
Credit: Fritz

Two roosters "cock-fighting" along the trail from Lukla to Namche Baza...
Two roosters "cock-fighting" along the trail from Lukla to Namche Bazaar. The fight was not staged for anyone: it was a true local "turf-war."
Credit: Fritz

Looking down at Namche Bazaar on our return trip.   Stein & I joked th...
Looking down at Namche Bazaar on our return trip. Stein & I joked that we needed to "rope-up" for the straight-down to town trail at lower left of the photo.
Credit: Fritz

Prayer Stone and Stein just above Namche.
Prayer Stone and Stein just above Namche.
Credit: Fritz

Tibetan Traders at market day in Namche.  They bring cheap Chinese goo...
Tibetan Traders at market day in Namche. They bring cheap Chinese goods in on yaks, over an 18,000 Ft. pass. Rumor had it that the army had shut the trade down for a while, since some were suspected of smuggling in arms for Maoists.
Credit: Fritz

Yaks above Namche.
Yaks above Namche.
Credit: Fritz

Loc Pa & Stein.   As we walked by her shop, she ran out and grabed him...
Loc Pa & Stein. As we walked by her shop, she ran out and grabed him and announced: "My boyfriend is back." Stein had made friends with her a few years previously, and of course had bought stuff in her store. I met her & her husband--& bought stuff.
Credit: Fritz

Breakfast at 5 degrees F. at 14,000 Ft.
Breakfast at 5 degrees F. at 14,000 Ft.
Credit: Fritz

Just below Pangboche, from inside a shrine the trail goes through.
Just below Pangboche, from inside a shrine the trail goes through.
Credit: Fritz

Rules for the clueless tourists at the monastery at Tengboche.
Rules for the clueless tourists at the monastery at Tengboche.
Credit: Fritz





Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 2, 2011 - 09:04pm PT
Mustang Nepal 2008

Photo of friends & 8,091 metres &#40;26,545 ft&#41; Annapurna I <br/>
from...
Photo of friends & 8,091 metres (26,545 ft) Annapurna I
from the north side.
Credit: Fritz
Saugy

Mountain climber
BC
Dec 2, 2011 - 09:54pm PT
From our first day in the hills of Nepal - 2007
From our first day in the hills of Nepal - 2007
Credit: Saugy
sempervirens

climber
Dec 3, 2011 - 01:09pm PT
In '85 I crossed the border into Nepal from India. I was on an all day bus ride from Varanassi. The bus stopped many times for chai, probably at the tea stands that give a kick back to the bus driver. But you might as well drink a sweet chai and smoke out with the Euro freaks. By the time we arrived at the border, late in the evening, I was more than sufficiently stoned.

The Nepali customs agent asked me a few polite questions, I mumbled some answers. Then with a smile he asked, "Are you carrying anything illegal?, Do you have any hashish?". At that moment I remembered the 10-gram finger of hash in my front pants pocket. My face must've gone white; I was still new to Asia; my mouth dropped open. He laughed heartily, stamped my passport and sent me on.

I walked to Everest Base Camp from Jiri and back. There were much less trekkers below Namche Bazaar. I recommend the walk rather than a flight to or from Lukla.

The grandeur of the Himalaya is exceeded only by that of the Himalayan people.

See the link below about an American guy who started an orphanage and rescued trafficked children in Khatmandu. Yes he has a book. Even after following the Greg Mortensen affair I choose to believe this guy.

http://www.nextgenerationnepal.org/
sandstone conglomerate

climber
sharon conglomerate central
Dec 3, 2011 - 01:14pm PT
Great thread, keep the pics coming. Vicarious living through excellent photography.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 3, 2011 - 09:09pm PT
Mustang is close to still being a 16th century Tibetan Kingdom.

Ain't enough tourists to change it----yet.

Credit: Fritz
micronut

Trad climber
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 5, 2011 - 04:56pm PT
Photo bump.
Took this shot at sunrise.  Not even sure what it is....Gauri Sankar m...
Took this shot at sunrise. Not even sure what it is....Gauri Sankar maybe?
Credit: micronut

One of my favorite moments from our last trip.
One of my favorite moments from our last trip.
Credit: micronut

Kathmandu from the air
Kathmandu from the air
Credit: micronut

A lifetime of objectives....
A lifetime of objectives....
Credit: micronut

Big.  We worked for a week in the shadow of this thing.
Big. We worked for a week in the shadow of this thing.
Credit: micronut
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Dec 5, 2011 - 05:21pm PT
Wonderful photos everyone. It looks like you were all there in the fall. Either that or you had much better weather than I did.

I was there in the Spring of '92. I remember being all excited the night before we flew out of Bangkok, thinking I would get these outrageous views of the peaks. Visibility was so poor because of the haze you could only see a few miles.

Spent a few days in Kathmandu and then did the Annapurna Circuit over the following three weeks. The Thorang La (17,700') is still my altitude record. Took massive amounts of slides, none of which I've digitized, so I've got nothing to share (yet). I'm from LA and did the hike while the entire Rodney King/LA riot thing took place and was blithely unaware of it until we hiked out to Pohkara. I no longer knew the day of the week, etc. When we found a guest house in Pohkara, right on the lake, I remember asking the guy working there what day of the week it was. He shrugged. He didn't know but could find out if I wanted.

I still regret not going to Mustang while I had the chance. I'm really tempted to go back when my kids get older but afraid that I'll be disappointed by some of the changes. I hear you can now drive all the way to either Jomson or Manang now.
Truthdweller

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Dec 5, 2011 - 05:45pm PT
Jan '89...

Credit: Truthdweller

Credit: Truthdweller

Credit: Truthdweller

Credit: Truthdweller

Truthdweller

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Dec 5, 2011 - 05:51pm PT
Credit: Truthdweller

Credit: Truthdweller

Credit: Truthdweller

Credit: Truthdweller
Scole

Trad climber
San Diego
Dec 5, 2011 - 05:57pm PT
Here are a few shots from two different trips
Credit: Scole
Looking down Khumbu from 21,000' on Ama Dablam
Looking down Khumbu from 21,000' on Ama Dablam
Credit: Scole
View from the top
View from the top
Credit: Scole
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 5, 2011 - 07:43pm PT
More great photos & stories from everyone. Thank you for taking the time to post those photos.

Access into Mustang is limited, and trekking companies have to pay higher fees.

1. In 1968 I read a great adventure book by one of the first westerners to visit Mustang (in the U of Idaho library). I thought Mustang seemed "too cool" and I mentally vowed to visit there someday. (Mustang the Forbidden Kingdom, Michel Peissel 1967).


2. In Jan. 2008, I was invited to go on a 16 day Mustang trek by a high school friend that I had done my 2005 Nepal trek with.

Eight of the eleven trekkers on the trip would be friends. The trekking company owners were Idaho friends, and have a awesome Nepali trekking organization. How could I refuse?


1960's Mustang map, with the route of my 16 day hike in blue with arro...
1960's Mustang map, with the route of my 16 day hike in blue with arrows.
Credit: Fritz


After a few days in urban Nepal: day one of the trekking trip we flew a twin-prop plane into the small town of Jomoson at 8,900 ft.


From there we did horse-supported hiking for the next 16 days. Each day we tent camped, rose at 6:30 AM, packed all, but what we might need for the next 12 hours, of gear into individual dry or duffle bags for horses to carry, had breakfast, and hit the trail by 8:00 AM.

Fritz in camp.
Fritz in camp.
Credit: Fritz

YakDonalds at the end of first night trek.   There are lots of tourist...
YakDonalds at the end of first night trek. There are lots of tourist spots the first day, since both the Annapurna Circuit, and Mustang Treks: share the first days hike.
Credit: Fritz

Caves.  Mustang has a huge number of caves that date back to early Bud...
Caves. Mustang has a huge number of caves that date back to early Buddist history.
Credit: Fritz

Fall harvest in a Buckwheat? field.  Down low, the terrain is very ari...
Fall harvest in a Buckwheat? field. Down low, the terrain is very arid along the Kali Gandaki River: which drains the Mustang plateau.
Credit: Fritz

Outside a monastery.
Outside a monastery.
Credit: Fritz





Banquo

climber
Morgan Hill, CA (Mo' Hill)
Dec 6, 2011 - 07:51am PT
December 1981
December 1981
Credit: Banquo
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 6, 2011 - 08:11pm PT
Mustang is a finger of Nepal that juts northward onto the Tibetan plateau. It mostly sets north of the Himalayan Mountains and is very dry, since the mountains block storm systems.

Every day, at about noon, the south wind starts up and blows hard until sundown. This is due to warm jungle air from the south rising and blowing up the Kali Gandaki River valley.

We all got real tired of the afternoon wind-storms.
One of many windy afternoons, and 12,000 Ft. passes.
One of many windy afternoons, and 12,000 Ft. passes.
Credit: Fritz



Mustang is a very arid environment and has been grazed heavily by sheep, goats, and yaks for thousands of year. In most areas only well defended
spiny plants survive. Peissel's 1967 book mentioned that only nobles had any trees.

A pleasant surprise for me was that native trees are being
propagated; and most villages with streams had a lot of trees.

Credit: Fritz

After our second day we camped nights between 12,000 & 12,500 Ft. elevation and crossed at least one, usually two, 13,500 to 14,000 ft.
passes every day. Low temps for trip were low 20's F. and it got into the 50's or 60's almost every day.

Our head Sherpa making friends with a group of women hauling Buckwheat...
Our head Sherpa making friends with a group of women hauling Buckwheat shocks up to the 1/2 mile away threshing area.
Credit: Fritz

Pete offering to help.
Pete offering to help.
Credit: Fritz
Pete helping the locals-----they were very amused.
Pete helping the locals-----they were very amused.
Credit: Fritz

Some of Nepal reminded us of parts of southern Utah and Nevada.  Howev...
Some of Nepal reminded us of parts of southern Utah and Nevada. However when you see the high mountains or the Buddhist shrines you quickly realize Mustang is a very unusual setting. "Toto, I don't think we're in Utah anymore!"


Credit: Fritz

Nicest dog I saw.  Most dogs are kept chained as watchdogs, and act th...
Nicest dog I saw. Most dogs are kept chained as watchdogs, and act their part.
Credit: Fritz

Every stone wall in Mustang has ancient and interesting rocks.
Every stone wall in Mustang has ancient and interesting rocks.
Credit: Fritz

These children had learned to "work the tourists."
These children had learned to "work the tourists."
Credit: Fritz

Camp at 12,500 ft. near Dhakmar.  Large tent was our cold weather dinn...
Camp at 12,500 ft. near Dhakmar. Large tent was our cold weather dinning and recreation hall. Peak with sunrise, in background is one of those that separate Mustang from Tibet. Just a "little" peak at 19,000 + Ft.


Credit: Fritz

The Maoists have left their imprint, even in the Kingdom of Mustang.  ...
The Maoists have left their imprint, even in the Kingdom of Mustang. The concrete "water-station" predates the paint, and has nothing to do with the Maoists.
Credit: Fritz

Buddhist "Chorlton" along the way.
Buddhist "Chorlton" along the way.
Credit: Fritz

Loom in a small village.   The locals make wonderful rugs with Tibetan...
Loom in a small village. The locals make wonderful rugs with Tibetan Buddhist motifs.
Credit: Fritz

The capital of Mustang, Lo Manthang, is a walled city that is little c...
The capital of Mustang, Lo Manthang, is a walled city that is little changed since it was founded in about 1440. Currently has a population of about 2,000 people.

First fortress at top-left of photo.



Credit: Fritz


Mustang has a rich history as a trading center between India & Tibet. The kingdom was first united in the late 1300's by the legendary King Ame Pal.

His descendents still had the title of King and ruled Mustang for the Nepal government, until the new democratic government of Nepal took over civil administration of Mustang October 2008. One of the highlights of our 2008 trip was having formal tea in the palace with the newly ex-King Jigme Palbar Bista,and his son. Most all the locals still consider him King, and his son will soon replace him as the new non-King.



The population of Mustang are ethnic Tibetans, and various sects of Tibetan Buddhists have both active and deserted monasteries and shrines in every part of Mustang.

Traditionally, the second son of each family becomes a Buddhist Monk.

The oldest monastery we visited dates to about 800 AD.

Stay tuned for more adventures in Mustang!


Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Dec 6, 2011 - 08:23pm PT
Thanks Fritz! I've never been to Mustang. Actually I've never been west of Kathmandu just north and east to the Sikkimese border and down to the Terai to the jungle parks and Lumbini.

I've seen lots of photos of Mustang and read about it but somehow your short description really helped orient it for me in both time and space.
wbw

Trad climber
'cross the great divide
Dec 6, 2011 - 08:39pm PT
Some of these photos are really amazing.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Dec 7, 2011 - 04:17am PT
Good news for the Nepalese Tourism Industry


KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) The United States says it has canceled a warning issued against travel to Nepal earlier this year because of the improved political situation in the Himalayan nation.

The U.S. Department of State says it believes the conditions in Nepal have changed considerably over the past year, incidents of political violence and the threat to U.S. citizens have significantly decreased and the political situation is stabilizing.

Nepal is trying to recover from the years of communist insurgency that ended in 2006 only to be followed by political instability. Recent agreements between the political parties have given hope that things would return to normal in Nepal.

Hundreds of thousands of tourists come to Nepal every year to see or trek the Himalayan peaks.

http://news.yahoo.com/us-cancels-nepal-travel-warning-080312171.html
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Dec 7, 2011 - 06:33am PT
I too, tried to "help the locals". Thing was a 100kg sack of cement. Didn't even get it up.

Trying to get a load on at 3500 Meters.
Trying to get a load on at 3500 Meters.
Credit: Eric
micronut

Trad climber
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 7, 2011 - 07:37am PT
SCole,
Thanks for posting up that photo from the top of Ama Dablam. Well done man. You have any other photos of the route?

Fritz,
That photo on the grass with the kids looks like its straight outta Moab.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 7, 2011 - 08:35pm PT
Chinese tractor & trailer moving folks south for the winter from Lo Ma...
Chinese tractor & trailer moving folks south for the winter from Lo Manthang. A lot of folks move to lower elevations for the winter.
Credit: Fritz
Here are some more Mustang, Nepal photos.

We spent two days in Lo Manthang, the 15th century walled Buddhist Fort-City that sets in an irrigated desert at 12,400 Ft.

Having read the Peissel book about how it looked in 1967: pre-treker, I could appreciate there were changes, but it still functions as a "living city."

When we were there at the end of Oct. 2008, there might have been 30 tourists in the city, and the streets were generally deserted. It does have electricity, but we were spared the agony of "internet email kiosks."

One of my friends on the trip had donated generously to the American Himalayan Foundation. As a result, we had been assigned a guide, who spoke great English, was a relative of the King, and was in all ways: a wonderful person to show us around the city.

By the way!! I did get to see the results of some of that donated money building schools and restoring historical sites in Mustang.

Main street, with open sewer &#40;smelled fine&#41; and Buddhist Monk.
Main street, with open sewer (smelled fine) and Buddhist Monk.
Credit: Fritz

The woman that regulated the stove that provides hot water for tourist...
The woman that regulated the stove that provides hot water for tourist showers.
Credit: Fritz

View from the top of a Buddhist temple north to the original hill-fort...
View from the top of a Buddhist temple north to the original hill-fort that predates the city.
Credit: Fritz

Wooden ceramonial daggers in the small museum that is part of a large ...
Wooden ceramonial daggers in the small museum that is part of a large and active Buddhist monastery.
Credit: Fritz

Student monks.  They start early, but also used to be the only class t...
Student monks. They start early, but also used to be the only class that received schooling.
Credit: Fritz

One of the very few cats I saw.  I spoke to it in friendly American ca...
One of the very few cats I saw. I spoke to it in friendly American cat-dialect----and it went up the wall.

The cats are un-approachable and the dogs are trained to rip your leg off.
Credit: Fritz


A merchant & Stein.  She announced she was moving to Kathmandu for the...
A merchant & Stein. She announced she was moving to Kathmandu for the winter.
Credit: Fritz


After our two days in the city, we cleared town and headed south. There is an actual road that enters Mustang from Chinese Tibet, connects to Lo Manthang, and then continues a few miles south, before ending in a series of "wash-outs."

There are fears that this road will someday connect to decent roads to the south, and enable "tour-buses" to access Mustang from Nepal. Don't lose sleep over it. It is more likely that there will be "tour-buses" from Tibet.

Yak & herder.
Yak & herder.
Credit: Fritz


More Mustang tomorrow!




Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Dec 7, 2011 - 09:03pm PT
I don't know how widely the movie Himalaya was shown in the U.S. but if you haven't seen it, you should. It's fiction, filmed in Mustang and nearby areas, and very true to Himalayan life. There is a separate CD of the sound track I have also, with authentic Tibetan music and singing done with modern instruments.

The old man who is the star of the movie is a celebrity among local mountain people in Nepal. They all recognize him and play the video and soundtrack in their homes. I got to see him and his family when they attended a large Buddhist religious service in Kathmandu a few years ago.

It's true that everyone who lives at high altitude who has relatives or who can afford to go to Kathmandu for the winter, does. Other than the weather, this is also because month long Buddhist rituals and teachings are given in the winter in Kathmandu, Lumbini, the Nepalese birthplace of Buddha, and his place of enlightenment, Bodhgaya, in India.


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&field-keywords=Himalaya&x=16&y=17
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 7, 2011 - 09:31pm PT
Jan: Thanks for your input. I have seen & enjoyed the movie. It seemed very authentic.

I agree that folks at elevation in Nepal want to move lower for the winter. I didn't know many went to Kathmandu. Makes sense to me, but it would take weeks to walk out to a Nepalese road from Mustang.

Pokara is the nearest city, but is about a two-week hike. Wintering there could be pleasant.
Machapuchare from Pokara.
Machapuchare from Pokara.
Credit: Fritz
Scole

Trad climber
San Diego
Dec 8, 2011 - 07:34am PT
As requested, a few pics from Ama Dablam:
Credit: Scole
Credit: Scole
Rescue on S.W. ridge
Rescue on S.W. ridge
Credit: Scole
Jason Keith S.W. Ridge of Ama Dablam
Jason Keith S.W. Ridge of Ama Dablam
Credit: Scole
Fat Dad

Trad climber
Los Angeles, CA
Dec 8, 2011 - 12:51pm PT
Wonderful shots of Mustang. Thanks for posting.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 8, 2011 - 07:26pm PT
More Mustang! The big mountain view & more exotic adventure part tonight: FOR SURE!

Grey: our token "strong young buck," descending "ball-bearing" gravel ...
Grey: our token "strong young buck," descending "ball-bearing" gravel at high-speed, toward the distant Kali Gandaki River.
Credit: Fritz

Women washing some kind of grain?? in the milky glacial waters of the ...
Women washing some kind of grain?? in the milky glacial waters of the Kali Gandaki.
Credit: Fritz

Much of Mustang is composed of layers of soft sedimentary rock. The various streams and daily windstorms have eroded it into scenic cliffs that often contain man-made caves. The caves date from very ancient to medieval times and are generally inaccessible. Some still have Buddhist shrines inside and have been maintained as holy sites by local villagers.

Early Buddhist caves in cliffs.
Early Buddhist caves in cliffs.
Credit: Fritz

Yara Gaon, looking west.
Yara Gaon, looking west.
Credit: Fritz

We camped above a small town, and then hiked up to a protected Buddhist Cave Site the next day.

Credit: Fritz
Luri Gompa. A steep trail leads up to the structure and caves that enter the rock above it, with a Buddhist shrine and wall paintings in the caves.

Inside Luri Gompa.  Visitors are not allowed to take photos, and the p...
Inside Luri Gompa. Visitors are not allowed to take photos, and the policy is enforced by a Buddhist monk that escorts all tourists.
Photo is from the Internet.
Credit: Fritz

SW view of erorsion in the soft-rock from Luri Gompa.  The rock is tec...
SW view of erorsion in the soft-rock from Luri Gompa. The rock is technically "Conglomerate." Absolutely terrifying to try to climb on it.
Credit: Fritz

Next day we hiked back down to the Kali Gandaki, forded it, and again climbed up out of the deep canyon to the west-side plateau, and Mustang's second-largest city: Tsarang.

Looking down the Kali Gandaki valley, with a glimpse of the top of Dha...
Looking down the Kali Gandaki valley, with a glimpse of the top of Dhaulagiri 26,795 ft. 7th. highest mountain in the world.
Credit: Fritz
Stein at right, and Fritz enjoying a little glacial water in the Kali ...
Stein at right, and Fritz enjoying a little glacial water in the Kali Gandaki.

(I hope it washed my sins away, along with my toe-jam.)
Credit: Fritz

Monastery.
Monastery.
Credit: Fritz

Buddhist Monastery at Tsarang. While we were there 12-14 monks were doing afternoon prayers. They did loud quick chanting of prayers with bass drums for cadence. Every now and then they would clash cymbals or blow tones on 3' long prayer horns. They do this morning and evening for several hours.

Opposite the large and well maintained Monastery: is the old, and un-occupied: "Royal Palace."
The old Royal Palace.  It needs saving.
The old Royal Palace. It needs saving.
Credit: Fritz

A Buddhist monk toured us through the the multi-story & charming structure. It will need huge sums of money to keep it from just collapsing one of these days.

The monk then showed us various old and rare artifacts in the museum.
Ancient painting in the old Royal palace.
Ancient painting in the old Royal palace.
Credit: Fritz

We then headed south again, on different trails and visited another protected Buddhist Cave two days later.

A typical point in a day.  Some folks try to figure out: "where the he...
A typical point in a day. Some folks try to figure out: "where the hell are we, & where the hell are we going next??" while others catch a nap.
Credit: Fritz

This is supposedly the longest "Prayer Wall" in Nepal.
This is supposedly the longest "Prayer Wall" in Nepal.
Credit: Fritz

Credit: Fritz

Prayer Walls (Mani Walls) The longest prayer wall in Nepal sets in a scenic valley in Mustang. Buddhist legend says it is built over the intestines of the giant demon that was slain a few miles away. The blood of the demon is visible in stains on the nearby hills. This wall stretches for about 1/4 mile. The lower level is painted to match the cliffs in background and the upper level is all carved stones with prayers

Carved prayer &#40;Mani&#41; stones enbedded in the wall.  Some are so...
Carved prayer (Mani) stones enbedded in the wall. Some are so ancient, that the carved script & figures have been eroded off them.
Credit: Fritz

OK! Enough for tonight. I'll get to photos of Annapurna & Dhauligiri tommorrow for sure. Unless Stein & Chris show up for an Lunar Eclipse party?
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 15, 2011 - 08:21pm PT
Back to my 2008 Mustang Nepal Trip.

Great to have friends visit, but it just plays hell with my secret life as a Super-Topo Posteur.

Hopefully, I will get to the "big mountains" tonight----but it was a 16 day trek.

We visited another "off the beaten path" Buddhist Cave/shrine/monastery: Chungsi Cave on our way out. It was a long hike down, rarely traveled trails and the a long climb out to another 13,000' plus pass.

Entrance to Chungsi Cave.  Off season, and no Buddhist monks around.
Entrance to Chungsi Cave. Off season, and no Buddhist monks around.
Credit: Fritz

The next 13,500' pass & Chris, Stein, & Fritz posing.  High-school cli...
The next 13,500' pass & Chris, Stein, & Fritz posing. High-school climbing buddies still going----kinda strong.
Credit: Fritz



Large birds (the birders in our group said probably Himalayan Griffins) at the same pass. They have up to a 10 Ft. wingspan.
Credit: Fritz

We then spent a couple days hiking back down to the Kali Gandaki River, crossed it and then headed east up a side canyon that would (with a pass) connect us to Muktinath: one of the key stops on the "Annapurna Circuit" treking trip.
Ponies fording the Kali Gandaki.  We had a suspension bridge, just ups...
Ponies fording the Kali Gandaki. We had a suspension bridge, just upstream.
Credit: Fritz

Along the way we enjoyed an evening above a rarely visited village, with sructures somewhat different than others we had seen in Nepal.
Credit: Fritz
Credit: Fritz

Credit: Fritz


Next day: we were rewarded with great views of the 7th highest mountain in the world: Dhaulagiri,26,795 ft.
Dhaulagiri, north-side view.
Dhaulagiri, north-side view.
Credit: Fritz
and 10th highest mountain Annapurna I at 26,545 Ft.
Annapurna 1 from the north-side.  The French first-ascent team climbed...
Annapurna 1 from the north-side. The French first-ascent team climbed this side.
Credit: Fritz

We spent the night on the edge of Muktinath, stared wide-eyed at the hippie-trekers, and snuck hot-showers at a guest-house. We were not quite ready for civilization.
Sharing some Pringles with a "cow-mootch" at 12,000 Ft. by Muktinath
Sharing some Pringles with a "cow-mootch" at 12,000 Ft. by Muktinath
Credit: Fritz

Dhaulagiri at sunrise from 12,000' camp.
Dhaulagiri at sunrise from 12,000' camp.
Credit: Fritz

After that, we avoided the trekker hordes (for a while), with one more high pass and one more obscure side-canyon: then hiked the windy-dusty trail/road back to the airport and a guest-house night in Jomson.

Fritz on the final pass with Dhaulagiri in background.
Fritz on the final pass with Dhaulagiri in background.
Credit: Fritz
Seashells in sedimentary rock.  Lots of seashells in Mustang.   The lo...
Seashells in sedimentary rock. Lots of seashells in Mustang. The locals like to sell them to the tourists too. No problem: there is an eons-long supply eroding out of soft-rock.
Credit: Fritz

Ripple-marks on a 70 degree wall.  Best ripple-marks I've ever seen.
Ripple-marks on a 70 degree wall. Best ripple-marks I've ever seen.
Credit: Fritz
Lizard on the last day.  About a 12" zard.  Not many reptiles in Musta...
Lizard on the last day. About a 12" zard. Not many reptiles in Mustang. Never saw a snake.
Credit: Fritz

Jomosom airport, 8,900 ft.  Peak in background to east: is &#40;I thin...
Jomosom airport, 8,900 ft. Peak in background to east: is (I think??) Nilgiri North 23,300 ft.
Credit: Fritz

SE Face of Dhauligiri: from our plane on a flight down the Kali Gandak...
SE Face of Dhauligiri: from our plane on a flight down the Kali Gandaki River, after taking off from Jomson.

The steep-glacier is the route the ill-fated American Expedition, that got avalanced off the mountain: took up to the face that avalanched.
Credit: Fritz








Delhi Dog

climber
Good Question...
Dec 15, 2011 - 09:19pm PT
Great share folks!
Mustang is very high on my list...maybe in the new year.

Easier to post this;
http://www.chriskemperphotography.com/Travel/Nepal/14321946_zFqb9W#835647534_js8dZ

for me.

Love Nepal!

cheers
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 16, 2011 - 07:22am PT
Nepal cat-bump!
Credit: Fritz
Jonny D

Social climber
Fanta Se, NM
Dec 16, 2011 - 09:11am PT
my favorite thread about my favorite place!
John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Dec 16, 2011 - 09:20am PT
Note the 6 pointed star on the Helicopter wreck outside the Everest Museum. I didn't notice that it was a fake Russian Star,until much later.

photo not found
Missing photo ID#229751
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 16, 2011 - 09:22pm PT
An alternative to the Friday night cow-flop threads.

Annapurna South: from the last pass our group went over, on our way so...
Annapurna South: from the last pass our group went over, on our way south.
Credit: Fritz
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 18, 2011 - 09:08pm PT
Credit: Fritz

Mustang rocks.
Mattq331

Mountain climber
Boulder/UK
Jan 16, 2012 - 07:43pm PT
Nepal - still as beautiful, nutty, and downright inspiring.

Yup - those monkeys at The Temple sure know a few tricks. They also kn...
Yup - those monkeys at The Temple sure know a few tricks. They also know how to extract any food items from your baggage. Be warned.
Credit: Mattq331
Take teenagers to Nepal - and this is what you get. Goofing off at Ten...
Take teenagers to Nepal - and this is what you get. Goofing off at Tengboche.
Credit: Mattq331
Interesting clouds.
Interesting clouds.
Credit: Mattq331
Xmas Eve 2011.
Xmas Eve 2011.
Credit: Mattq331
Sigh. Travel 10,000 miles. Hike for 12 days to the back of beyond... a...
Sigh. Travel 10,000 miles. Hike for 12 days to the back of beyond... and this. Tebowing reaches new depths (or heights).
Credit: Mattq331
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 16, 2012 - 09:54pm PT
Mattq331: Please!

Do not post any more Photoshoped photos. like your "Mia culpa"Everest photo.
Credit: Fritz

I think photos like that: remove any credibility from your other posts.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jun 4, 2013 - 08:23pm PT
I found this fine Nepal adventure thread again in the:

Thread appreciation thread!

Bump!
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Jun 4, 2013 - 10:51pm PT
Thanks Fritz for the bump, missed a lot the first time around. The images of those living there and their immediate context are incredible. Please post up some more people!
c_vultaggio

Trad climber
new york
Jun 5, 2013 - 07:56am PT
one of my better blog entries from Nepal:

http://chrisvultaggio.com/wordpress/?p=420

up to camp 1
up to camp 1
Credit: c_vultaggio

local faces
local faces
Credit: c_vultaggio

Manju River
Manju River
Credit: c_vultaggio

Above Namche
Above Namche
Credit: c_vultaggio

Heading to Lukla - we took this plane and a few months later it crashe...
Heading to Lukla - we took this plane and a few months later it crashed killing nearly everyone on board.
Credit: c_vultaggio

on Ama Dablam
on Ama Dablam
Credit: c_vultaggio

Credit: c_vultaggio

Credit: c_vultaggio

base camp
base camp
Credit: c_vultaggio

Tree and Ama Dablam from Tengboche
Tree and Ama Dablam from Tengboche
Credit: c_vultaggio
McCfly

climber
Jun 5, 2013 - 08:17am PT
Great thread,,

spent hours looking it over last night.

steve shea

climber
Jun 5, 2013 - 08:27am PT
Saw a celestial burial, visited Milarepas Cave, cremated a lama who died in an avalanche, extracted a fallen yak from a crevasse at 20,000' then had sherpa yak stew for three weeks at ABC, spent more time in Tibet than I could have hoped for with entry from Nepal, spent time with Messner after his run across the Himal, spent a lot of time with Hillary for an interview, got to visit Tibetan villagers who had never seen westerners, generally had the time of my life each visit, and did some fine climbing too. Too many stories to list but that is why you go.
martygarrison

Trad climber
Washington DC
Jun 5, 2013 - 08:28am PT
Thoron La Pass 17,700' with a special friend Carol Harris. 1979


Credit: martygarrison
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