Alpine butterfly Appreciation thread

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Messages 1 - 15 of total 15 in this topic
thekidcormier

Trad climber
squamish, b.c.
Topic Author's Original Post - Nov 12, 2011 - 02:55pm PT
Gee willarkers the alpine butterfly is absolutely swell, just started using it this year for when the anchors are set back and will create rope drag and make communication more difficult, you simply clip the rope through the anchors and walk back to the edge and tie an alpine butterfly and voila you're already tied in to your multi directional anchor with out the rope running over the top egde!

Also I've just been learning on the taco how to build sick anchors using the ABF, what a shweet knot!

-Luke
Mark Hudon

Trad climber
Hood River, OR
Nov 12, 2011 - 03:01pm PT
On walls at least, aside from my tie-in knot, it's the only knot I use!
Adamame

climber
Santa Cruz
Nov 12, 2011 - 03:01pm PT
I love using it to tie in the Haul bag when on walls. Easy to tie and untie and it comes in handy when you need to lower the bags out (especially when some one is riding the pig in a party of three.)
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Nov 12, 2011 - 04:02pm PT
Credit: Willoughby

Oeneis chryxus; only flies in odd numbered years in the Sierra. Okay, so it's an "Arctic," but are we gonna split hairs here?
cintune

climber
Midvale School for the Gifted
Nov 12, 2011 - 05:38pm PT
'cause it's recommended for clipping into a conga line on a glacier.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Nov 12, 2011 - 07:47pm PT
I found one of those once at about 12,000 Ft. in the Wind Rivers.

Credit: Fritz



It didn't look happy, so I tucked it inside my shirt and took it back down to the meadow we were camped in.

I then placed it carefully on a flower to thaw out.






Unfortunatly, it ended up in the "glop" that night.
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Nov 12, 2011 - 08:06pm PT
Nice knot.


Tortoiseshell - Yosemite Alpine


Shasta Blue

http://www.nps.gov/yose/naturescience/butterflies.htm
xtrmecat

Big Wall climber
Kalispell, Montanagonia
Nov 12, 2011 - 09:15pm PT
I am with Mark on the it is really the only other knott I use on a wall.

Let me add another plus for the great and mighty alpine butterfly. I solo with a soloist a lot, free and aid. I used to tie my backups with a clove, and every couple of pitches, sometimes on even one, I used to get twists in the rope and caused feeding issues. I thought that was just normal, and when free sometimes at very poor times, the twist would prevent easy forward progress. It was a tip from none other than ten page Pete, aka PTPP, to use the alpine butterfly. Wouldn't you know that on the first outing trying it, no snarls or kinky stuff.

Just thought it was the greatest simple fix out there. I now insist on using it for almost everything when climbing, safe, fast, easily tied and untied, even when hand usage is very limited.

Burly Bob
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Nov 13, 2011 - 01:29pm PT
I've always known the knot as the "butterfly" but learned it as a mid-rope tie-in used mostly in glacier and snow travel, so the "Alpine" was mostly implied when I thought about the knot....

...I learned the knot in the second edition of Mountaineering, Freedom of the Hills and I've used it most recently on cragging days when a two rope "top rope" is being done, to avoid the problem with the belayer passing the knot if the climber ties into the rope end. This is a situation where you might rappel off something and want to TR some other thing... just tie in to the rope on the ground and drag a tail up, the tie-in knot: butterfly.

Alpine butterflies I tend to think along these lines:


a denizen of Yosemite Valley...


on the Dana Glacier trail...




on the Dana Plateau



Tuolumne Climber

climber
Nov 13, 2011 - 01:40pm PT
Nice bugs.
Concho

Mountain climber
Vancouver, BC
Nov 14, 2011 - 04:14pm PT
This is my favorite way to tie the Alpine Butterfly Knot
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeKLU_6NLv4
'Pass the Pitons' Pete

Big Wall climber
like Ontario, Canada, eh?
Aug 12, 2014 - 06:52pm PT
Hey there, say.,..

Best knot on a wall. Replaces eight on a bight. Easier to untie and stronger.

There is a Better Way to tie it round your hand than that video, however.
DaveyTree

Trad climber
Fresno
Aug 12, 2014 - 11:12pm PT
Useful knot for sure.

Explain ABF

Nice pics. I actually have a collection. So pretty.
thebravecowboy

climber
in the face of the fury of the funk
Aug 12, 2014 - 11:24pm PT
Shit!  Izzat a bluetailey checkerspotz?  Ohmykarma!
Shit! Izzat a bluetailey checkerspotz? Ohmykarma!
Credit: thebravecowboy

Aaaaandddd I feel horrible.
rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Aug 13, 2014 - 09:11am PT
...just started using it this year for when the anchors are set back and will create rope drag and make communication more difficult, you simply clip the rope through the anchors and walk back to the edge and tie an alpine butterfly and voila you're already tied in to your multi directional anchor with out the rope running over the top edge!

Not to quibble, but this has nothing to do with the butterfly knot, any knot will make this system work in exactly the same way.

I know how to tie a whole lot of knots, including quite a few not typically used by climbers, but I've never found anything to be better and more versatile than the clove hitch. That said, if a knot is going to be weighted heavily for a long time, the clove hitch can tighten and be hard to release, and the butterfly is certainly a better option than a figure eight, which is even worse to untie. But for this application, a bowline on a bight might be even better.

The one place I use a butterlfly is for anchoring with the rope (no cordelette) when I want to have a power point, eg as in



The butterly is useful here because it gets loaded both up and down and is well-configured for those stresses.
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