"StoneMaster Stories" (Part 6) the epic continues

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WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Original Post - Mar 10, 2006 - 01:41pm PT
We continue onward with the epic saga “StoneMaster Stories” (Part 6)

Part 5 can be found here, with the links to all the previous parts going back to the original start by John Long

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=161148&f=0&b=0

===

Last Post by John Long in Part 5 was;

Hades. Oh, yes. I was unaware that Darrel and Kevin had freed the first pitch and when we first did it I was psyched. It used to have some pretty sketchy run outs off a fixed blade but Johnny Woodward installed a bolt and now it's pretty safe. That firsst lead is one of the best pitches (5.12-)at Suicide, and really long. Once you know the sequence it's far easier but that traversing bit is tricky to dick first try. It's also very unusual climbing for Suicide--not thin hold stuff but strange cross countering and Gastoning off rounded shite.

The next pitch is sequency, real thin and almost impossible to keep your feet on the holds. There's a grim high step over a small ceiling that I bashed my shin on about 20 times. Above, it's grim to clip the last protection bolt and get set up on two sidepull dimes, then huck a big mo out right to a two finger scallop, stick it, and fire through. I went up there two or three times and the last time linked all the moves but had to hang on the last bolt. Finally I returned with DB and got it, probably because I knew every crystal on that thing and also, we were bouldering a ton out at Roubidoux during that period. We were happy about our performance because we never top roped it or frigged around much. From the start we tried it from the bottom.

A year or so later Skinner rolls into town and immdeiately raps down from the top and starts hanging and working out the moves on a TR. At that time (1980??) I thought it was needless and silly to use such a tactic on that route. Plus, he totally avoided the first pitch--coming down from the top like that--and the first lead is the best one, just not the hardest one.

We never really believed Skinner cleanly linked all those moves on the last pitch. One or two hangs on one or the other of those bolts and it's not the same fandango at all. It pissed us off because we'd put all this effort into doing it ground up and totally clean--no hanging or tensioning or anything.

Gotta wonder if that route sees any traffic these days. Crime if it don't, since that first pitch is spectuaular. The second pitch is basically a 30-foot, Roubidoux boulder problem.

JL
=

bvb response;

the very first time mike paul and i went to santee (we hitchiked all the way ther form,, this would have been sometime in the winter or spring of '73, shockly was there and he gave us the tour.

ran into him there (santee) again, winter before last, over christmas vacation. we got to talking and it's amazing how different the place looks now. housing and development right up to the boulders, the high school, all the graffiti....in '73 the place seemed like a wilderness area!

yeah, i remember when fraud spinner wrote up his ascent of hades as "an easy afternoon at 5.12c"

others who witnessed the "ascent" reported that our hero didn't do his momma proud and that he'd used every base trick in a cheat's repertoire to frig his way up the thing.

hangdogging at suicide???? jesus wept.
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 10, 2006 - 02:34pm PT
Largo, quite the 30' bouldering problem! Hearing your recollections of Hades was cool. The South Face was always special. I gotta run for the week-end, when I get back I'll throw out a little more history on some of the South Face activities. You made me remember some really good climbing.
Dimes

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Mar 10, 2006 - 03:05pm PT
Hades and the Knockin on Heavens Door see virtually no traffic. Free climbing the first pitch of Hades with Hensel was great fun. We would typically be the only ones over at the South Face, or the entire rock for that matter. Usually went up in winter when the rock was cooler. Climbed up and down trying to place blades and RP's. Several falls were taken in the process. The bolt really isn't necessary although I am sure it would make it easier and less work to lead. Also,it is not in the best place.
The Knockin pitch has still not had a second lead to my knowledge. Mank pin in the expanding flake that held a few 20 footers actually fell out on it's own at one point. Hey Master, those were the best of times, eh.
Dimes

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Mar 10, 2006 - 03:25pm PT
Woodson locals, what's up with the name-Lie Detector on the back side of Robbins Crack? Oh ya onsighted it @ 11+
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 10, 2006 - 03:33pm PT
as with the "you shouldn't make the ladies cry, roy" story, i will draw the curtian of charity across the origens of the name.....




.....until such time as i am lit up on whisky, dancing on the countertops of your swank digs, at which time ALL WILL BE REVEALED!!!

[CUE EVIL LAUGHTER] HAHAHAHAHAAAHAHAAA!!!!!
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 10, 2006 - 04:38pm PT
Back in Part 5, 'twas written (below where it should not have been):

Hashbro:
We met Shockley and Largo on our first ever trip to Stoney Point on one of the first boulders encountered. Our little group of Orange County teenage craggers were blown away when the real big boys took us for a tour through the boulders on that day in 1972 (or maybe 1973). Bacher had not yet discovered cragging so guys like Dick, Largo and Bob Kamps had the run of the place back then.

Bongs did not exist, so Largo took repeated hits off of a re-smoked (and resin soaked) joint that he had stashed in his pants. I quite clearly remember that neither of the rock stars had a chalk bag; instead leaving a partially used block of gymnastic chalk at the base of whatever problem they chose to impress us on.

Dick's flowing (ballet-dancer) style, his methodical and intentional motions on the rock were contrasted by John's intense and explosive dyno moves this way and that. We had never seen such experise on the rock before and it was inspirational!

Our three greenhorns hooked upward aghast at what we saw. We were also pretty excited that these two Stonemasters took the time to nurture us with new techniques and vision we had never experienced before.

Early memmories...


Hey, yeah! No chalkbags Back In The Day. ...carried pristine blocks of calcium carbonate in plastic bags. (Did they have ziplocks then?) Just another part of the stalling tactic, right up there with the cleaning of the boots and the smoking breaks. Guys would stand around and slowly rub the block across each tip, one at a time. The extra digital massage helped, plus you had the perfect thing to chalk each of the minute crystals and highlight each key divot. Carefully replace the block in the bag, and step on up!
Grug

Trad climber
Golden, Colorado
Mar 10, 2006 - 05:19pm PT
Dimes. As I recall (or not) Rick Piggot did the first ascent after someone else (could it be Henry Barber?) claimed they did it - hence, Lie Detector.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 10, 2006 - 06:58pm PT
that's a LIE! that's a godammned LIE!!!!!
Grug

Trad climber
Golden, Colorado
Mar 10, 2006 - 07:25pm PT
Hey bvb ...at worst its a false memory!
Dimes

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Mar 10, 2006 - 09:22pm PT
bvb did henry lie about climbing that?
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Mar 11, 2006 - 12:09am PT
Ziplock bags (ZLBs)?

'In 1964, Glad Corporation introduced the "Ziplock" method as an improvement on the traditional baggie which had been developed by Mobile Oil Company in 1958.'

so you might have used them in the 70's... they are older then most of the people who post on this site.
Grug

Trad climber
Golden, Colorado
Mar 11, 2006 - 04:30pm PT
Ed, are you telling me to zip it?
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 11, 2006 - 04:31pm PT
Ob: Zip-locks... Good. Those memories are correct! (Phew.) Before the advent of chalkbags, guys kept their blocks of chalk still wrapped in the white paper that they came in, and stashed it in a plastic bag. Kept those blocks wrapped like a dead fish. It was hard to prevent the blocks from getting crushed in the rucksacks. And chalk was pretty-much a bouldering-only behavior until the early Seventies.

Quite controversial, chalk. ...ran across a HUGE headline in one of the early Mountain Magazines that shows how things have changed since 1976: "Top Yosemite climb done without chalk!" (Erickson & Higbee's early free attempt of The NW Face on Half Dome.) "'The theory that chalk is needed in Yosemite is as full of holes as a Swiss cheese,' he commented." (As Bugs Bunny would say, "What a maroon!")

Here's one of those pesky California chalk abusers, now. (Well... Then.)

bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 11, 2006 - 04:48pm PT
Tobin and Mike on Insomnia ! From Clmbing magazine, Winter 73 - 74 ...

Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 11, 2006 - 07:25pm PT
Here’s me looking at that dumb ass photo again. It still won’t go away after almost 30 years.

Hopefully I can look at this dumb ass photo in another 30

You guys are digging them up, just wait I’ll get even. You’ll see

Tar, probably should have posted this on your Mussy thread. Hair line look a little familiar?

Still pesky though!
WBraun

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 11, 2006 - 07:30pm PT
Proves right here that the soul is eternal and the body (dress) changes.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 11, 2006 - 08:03pm PT
Oh my god, who is that old guy? Certainly not an ex-surfer from Newport.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 11, 2006 - 08:59pm PT
the view from strawberry valley......same as it ever was, same as it ever was.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 11, 2006 - 09:29pm PT
always did think it a bit funny those boys split Insomnia into two very short pitches, instead of the one classic pitch. Mike also appears to be (mistakenly?) liebacking, instead accessing the bomber handjams.

Live and learn.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 11, 2006 - 10:18pm PT
Does anyone still make 'butt bags' ?
Tan Slacks

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Mar 11, 2006 - 10:37pm PT
from the FISH catalog

Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Mar 11, 2006 - 11:27pm PT
Careful who you call old there, Hashbro. Mike’s a year younger than me. For all you cheeky youngsters like Hashbro, I pass on this bit of advice from a wise Scottish climber, Tom Patey:

Live it up,
Fill your cup
And sow your wild oats while you may,
For the toothless old tykes of tomorrow
Were the Tigers of Yesterday.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 11, 2006 - 11:28pm PT
To Honor Inspiration--

In Honor of the Stonemasters and the Poway Mtn. Boys.

The following article from Summit Dec. ’73 was from my first climbing periodical I ever purchased. Only 75-cents, what a deal, very affordable even for a 10 year old. Fate would have it that within the pages of this classic issue would be the article “The View from Strawberry Valley” by Mark Miller.

My inspiration . . .

1970 Saw the movie “Solo” by Mike Hoover at the Ski Chalet in Point Loma. Little League never held the same intensity for me after that. That movie blew me away – wow.

1971 Cub Scouts
1972 Family moved to Poway and I started scrambling and climbing big rocks in Garden Road area and on Twin Peaks Mtn. near our house.

1973 Boy Scouts, Troop 608, never made it past Tenderfoot (pretty lazy when it came to merit badges), but I never missed a back packing trip (frustrated climber). Summer of ’73 took Geography of CA for summer school that my 5th grade teacher taught prior to attending middle school. I was bouldering all over Twin Peaks Mtn. by this time. The objective at the end of the class, before the end of summer, was to do Whitney via the tourist trail. The class did a training back pack trip that summer of ’73 out of Humber Park heading to the summit of San Jacinto, a class of about 24 students made-up of primarily 10 – 12 year olds. We heard voices on the rocks of Tahquitz and Suicide Rock. I sat there watching trying to figure out where they were coming from. Many of us made the summit of Whitney. Bought my first “Summit” climbing periodical. Sat there reading it cover to cover in my sixth grade class, especially during sex ed. Fascinated by the article written by Mark Miller.

Asked my teacher Mrs. Bunshaft (not her real name), what the meaning of this one route called “Fallatio” in the article meant. It was a teachable moment. (OK, I made this last part up. But I would have liked to have asked her had I a clue then. She was very pretty and hormones were raging.)

1974 More Scouts and lots of trips. My father, older sister and I, took the Sierra Club course “Basic Mountaineering” and finally learned to use the rope, some of the gear, and how to belay out in the boulder fields of Jacumba. I read the little red book produced by the San Diego Chapter of the Sierra Club over and over again.

1975 Finally a few friends and I, when we could convince our parents to drive us there, started going to Mt. Woodson. I would never be the same. I blame the Stonemasters for inspiration and the Poway Mtn. Boys for all the brilliant climbing I witnessed and occasionally emulated.











healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Mar 11, 2006 - 11:33pm PT
And a few of you tykes-that-were are showing that not all tigers lay down and die quietly before taking a bite or two out of the young ones. That and the young only get to be tigers by surviving the claws left on the rock by those that came before them. The ones that linger should still be treated with respect and caution.

[That roof is the spitting image of one in So. Ill. called "Fear of Flying"]
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 11, 2006 - 11:43pm PT
Well said Grippy (Rockamazzo). I don't really think ya all are old, just wise. I quite remember that you, Mikeand my elders taught me everything I learned at the crags and beyond.

Thanks, by the way, for Annabelle!

Hey Klimmer, thanks for the Summit mag article; it was my first climbing text and really motivated myself and the bros to get out to Ilywild for our own fun, and maybe a bit of sandbagging by the Stonemasters.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 12, 2006 - 01:54am PT
Hey Spence, this ones for you.

Annabel right, from an old surfer


I wish I had shots of the direct, it was harder than Gil’s Nemesis tower
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 12, 2006 - 02:11am PT
swear to god, this pic of tobin drilling on season's end still makes my heart race.

last time i was at suicide was a sunny mid-winter day in 91 or 92, me and the wife went up and did pink royd, down and out, and valhalla. only peeps at the crag, perfect bluebird day, cool but not cold and the edges felt SO crisp and the friction SO good...gotta go back...

Gnat Arson

climber
Mar 12, 2006 - 02:23am PT
Klimmer says: "1973 Boy Scouts, Troop 608"

Whoa, I was in Pack 608, but it was the Cub Scouts. We lived in the Green Valley area of Poway from 1959-66. There were fun boulders in our back yard consisting of the highly coveted Woodson Granodiorite. Difficult with PF Flyers.

Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Mar 12, 2006 - 12:28pm PT
Hashbro had me scratching my head over the reference to “Annabelle Overhang”. Thanks, Mike for clearing that up. When I saw the picture, it brought back all the moves, as well as the fine- sandpaper feel of SoCal gritstone.

I have a vivid memory of Matt Cox bouldering at Pirate’s Cove. A couple had set out their beach towel and chairs with their backs to the entrance of the big overhang where City Ordinance crack is. Matt starts climbing in the cave way behind the couple and works his way up the overhang onto the vertical face above. Suddenly he falls from about 20 feet up. The result is a spectacular, sandy crash landing right next to, I mean within inches, of the couple’s beach towel. Matt brushes the sand off and walks away without a word, leaving the couple wondering how it came to be raining men at CDM.

Spencer-Can’t agree that Henry Barber was “spanked” at Pirate’s Cove as mentioned upthread. It’s true he didn’t fire off many problems, but most of those sandy gems took a lot of time to figure out in the first place. Like Gramicci, the part I remember best about Henry’s visit was that none of us had ever thought to lengthen the cave problems through the use of sit starts way back in the caves. Henry asked me if anyone had ever started deep in the waist-high cave to the right of the stairs and when I said no, his eyes lit up. He immediately crawled back into the cave, sat down and started bouldering out. Fortunately for local pride, Henry wasn’t able to do that day what later became Diamond Man (because it added a series of hard moves to the existing Iron Man Traverse) but he opened our eyes to new possibilities. I, for one, was impressed with this small example of Henry’s great creativity as a climber.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 12, 2006 - 02:38pm PT
Ricky,

Memories sure do get fuzzy as at least 30 years have passed since Henry's visit to Pirate's cove. It is absolutely true that Henry did in fact pionmeer the numerous sit starts at the "Beach." He actually did kick ass that day and massively impressed us all.

I believe our (as inexperienced 16 year olds)Matt and I somehow though Henry would flash all of our test-peices. We hadn't figured out that local knowledge of Beta, sequence and subtleties have a huge influence in completion problems. When Henry did not flash (or if my memory serves me right, he could not do)the Hinge. We wondered how this, the world's "best" climber would flounder on our well worked out locals problem.

After years of sandbagging and being sandbagged we understood that local knowledge is 90% of getting up stuff like that. Hence we developed a massive respect for the flash over all other styles of climbing.

Ya all were our teachers and grand masters of such ethos.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 12, 2006 - 03:19pm PT
Thanks for the image Mike. Yeah I quite recall the Annabelle direct problem, and the numerous kinda long sand falls many of us took figuring it out. Also remember the "face" to the left of the cave and the technicals moves there.

Returning to check all those problems out in recent years had me gagging though. The current condition of the problems sure did not match my memories as greasy holds, lots of trash and sandy eyes were the norm. I recently heard they outlawed bouldering there as well.

And by the way Mike, thanks for all of those gusseted crotches!
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 12, 2006 - 04:07pm PT
Anyone seen Hot Henry chew a wine glass?
It's quite a parlor trick.
'Real hardd too debunk it!

He didn't actualy eat the whole goblet, but started right in on a fresh glass from our cupboard and took 3-4 good, seemingly well masticated bites. He stared right at us, chomping away.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 12, 2006 - 07:14pm PT
Anyone got a photo of Diamondman? (Or even Ironman?) That was just a classic Beach test piece...

Ricky will remember the extensive work we did on getting the right sequence for Diamondman... At one point, we unlaced our boots, and tied a 1" loop in the center of the lace. Then we'd relace the boot. As I remember, we'd actually hook that loop of lace over a little horn so that the first moves off the sand would rely on this shoe hanging from the horn! Never seen anything like that, before or since.

That hook didn't last too long, as we all eventually worked-out a more traditional sequence without the boot foolery.
Blinny

Trad climber
NorthWestMontana
Mar 12, 2006 - 07:44pm PT
Gramicci

I know the feeling of the receding hairline.

Perhaps this will help...

Mark

hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 12, 2006 - 08:51pm PT
Rob,

I believe Craig Fry had a bunch of good beach images including Diamondman and Ironman. I also remember using the shoelace loop for a few of those sit ("Yabo") starts as well.

And then there was the famous City Ordinace crack andf of course the highball "Brain" at the far end.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 12, 2006 - 09:06pm PT
I made a special trip down to the Beach just to do the Brain. The City Ordinance Crack was tricky but the Brain was the shizat so far as excitement. Gotta wonder if anyone ever fell off those routes, which were not only sandy, but loose as well.

There was another classic problem called "Big Ricky," named after graffiti ground into the soft rock. We accused our own Ricky A. of scribing said graffiti, since "Big Ricky" was Ricky A's problem. And a good one, as I remember. There was also that crack (left of the stairs) that exited onto a highball face on sandy flutes that felt like soap. Don't fall . . .

It was all good.

JL
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 12, 2006 - 10:33pm PT
Hey Mark! Where did you find my hair piece?

I lost it about 20 years ago…it does help thanks.


The BRAIN! More like a solo at 50 feet than a highball Before any of you could climb there you had to be briefed on how pull on those fins, any other pressure than pulling straight out would break them off. It was for your own safety it could have been ugly if that happened to you on the BRAIN! Couldn’t climb for 3 days after a rain either, for fear of breaking off a crucial hold on any of the problems.(sorry, I meant to say solutions Robs)

I’ve got more great shots, city ord, the Nose, topping out on Anna, blindfolded on the hinge…kidding, never took a photo of that. None of the traverses though, weren’t very photogenic I guess, being so close to the ground.

One tourist encounter was pretty funny. Rick I think you were there. This black couple comes up kind of checking out the scene. I jump up on to the hinge for the 8 thousandth time and the guy asked What’s that guy doin, Rick says climbin…I’m just topping out and the guy says “that aint climbin that’s dancin” Rick says yeah its in our blood.

Thought the guy was going to drop everything and start bouldering with us.

Yeah bouldering at the beach, the conditions had to be just right. Always a big surprise if that last hold was covered in sand, thank god the landings were decent. You wouldn’t believe how much school I ditched during the week to go there. Always had it to myself.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 13, 2006 - 12:42pm PT
Yeah, Mike. You may never live down that Mountain Magazine fandom rag photo. And since Gramicci sounds pretty darned Italian to me, here's another photo you certainly may never live down either!



No wonder Graham could boldly boulder... Check out the size of those hands!

And thanks for all those crochety gussets, too, Big Guy. Hugs and kisses.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 13, 2006 - 02:40pm PT
OMG! Largo called me about this didn’t quite catch what he was talking about until now!

Too funny Robs!


Thanks for covering the fig by the way
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 13, 2006 - 03:17pm PT
Hey, MG and other Beach regulars. Did many folks actually climb the Brain and some of those other highball dandies? The first time I climbd the Brain I immediately got in my car and drove off at about 100 mph, thinking I'd gotten away with murder. It's hard to imgine those beach highballs ever being popular, though locals can get really dialed in on stuff. I remeber your boots were like 25 feet above the sand on some of those problems--or am I imagining things?

And what about some of those high balls on the little-known Buffalo Chip? Ricky took me there once and I felt lucky to survive that place as well.

JL
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 13, 2006 - 03:57pm PT
Damn Buffalo Chip, L believe Randy brought me there. From our perspective the place looked like an errosive pile of dog sh#t. But then back then we thought the same about Smith Rock and Pinnacles. Now we know so much more (or do we?).

The Brain, I think Matt and I did it with you Mike. I do reort of remember the sandy and dirty top-out that made ya wonder about surviving the 50 foot groundfall onto the sand.

It was so fun feeling immortal, back then.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 13, 2006 - 06:15pm PT
The Brain wasn’t one that got done much. I may have only done 3 times can’t even remember if it was difficult or not but that wasn’t important. It was the shear excitement of venturing into your own grey matter and those undulating flutes and fins that made up the feature. I think, at one time every regular felt compelled to sac up to it for his own excursion in to the unknown. Would love to see a picture of it today. There was some other high stuff far right of City ord, probably what you’re remembering JL.

Buffalo chip... That was something out of King Solomon’s mines, a real diamond in the rough. There was this arête on the lower left side that was a thrill ride. The stiffest thing I did there was to its right, an overhanging headwall. Never could repeat it after one fluke day doing it, Then of course stopped going. Never did help though, getting chased off by the Private Irvine land co. police. I bet I couldn’t even find that thing now, if it even still exists and as the Kings mines are, it may now just be a Legend.

I should try and get Steve West to post up he may have some other info or a shot or two.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 14, 2006 - 11:16am PT
This guy leans over to me during choir rehearsal and says, "Psst... Know anyone who wants my old scanner? It only does two slides at a time." So, I am now in posession of an old HP ScanJet. (Thank Gawd this didn't fall into the wrong hands! Can you imagine this being given to Tarbuster?!)

Time to try it out...

From very old 35mm slides that I found in an abandoned carousel in the closet, here are two shots that probably need some explanation. Both are from bouldering at Baldy, taken probably in the late Seventies (or sometime shortly after 1981, maybe). As has been noted earlier, this was a favorite haunt of the Uplandish sect of the Stonemasters. The first is the backside of B Boulder, and Gramicci needs to tell the tale of the ropeless, onsight of the right-side problem. Notice the clean, padless landings!



This second shot is from Hussle Patterns--also at Baldy. A charming little solution that Harrison and I stitched together (over many days of doing piecework) back in 1978. Sweatshop conditions, too. The slide is under-exposed, because it's pretty hard to get good lighting even on the brightest sunny days back in that canyon. Right to left, only; this is one of the cruxy sections with the improbable heel-hooking. ...never been done left-to-right to my knowledge. (And not for want of trying!)



(Bump.)

wildone

climber
right near the beach, boyeee (lord have mercy)
Mar 14, 2006 - 11:34am PT
wish i had a scanner
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 14, 2006 - 12:39pm PT
Did someone say scanner?
Robs?
I'm on my own mad dash, down and out in Mussy Alley, with a pretty kick butt gem of a scanner. It does slides, negatives, lies, cheats, the whole shebang. Paired with my upgraded $25 a year photobucket account, I'm on a Bender for sure. This unit cost about $300. 'Been so busy crankin'out BS on it, I don't even know who makes it...

I'll soon post up a picture of Bachar climbing rare Santee Ice...
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
St. Louis
Mar 14, 2006 - 05:34pm PT
This is getting dangerously close to the bottom of the page. That simply can't happen....

BUMP
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 14, 2006 - 05:35pm PT
Shoes of choice: RDs, RRs, PAs, EBs and TSs (tennis shoes):



Doing Masterlock on Borson's Wall, Mt. Rubidoux, circa mid- to late Seventies. Stonemasters, all.
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
Mar 14, 2006 - 06:11pm PT
The Buffalo Chip......I have had similiar experiences (John Long) on the Buffalo Chip.......I was a student at U.C.Irivine, and the Buffalo Chip is a giant dilrt-clod by Urbanus Square off of McCarther in Irvine/Newport Beach.......I feel off a bulge section of rock there and got one of the works climbing cuts I've ever recieved on my leg there..a gash that took months to heal and left an ugly scar for about 20 years on my leg......I used to solo up this dirt chimney and pull on river rock glued in place with mud..(I know how to have fun!).....but, unfortunately, the Buffalo Chip got buried by bulldoziers to put in a housing development....thrown out, so to speek, like an old newspaper...it probably had 5 or so climbs on it.....maybe 35-40 high......(higher than you would like to fall...). I was sad to see the thing buried......for I probably went there 25 times...(Way more than anyone should ever admit to......). Sort of like losing a childhood favorite toy, or a 18 year old dog/cat family pet......
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 14, 2006 - 06:25pm PT
My first visit to "the Chip" was with Mike. The problems on the left side were both super hard and way off the deck (brush and rubble and the obligatory remants of underwear attesting to teenage sex). It lay all but hidden in a small ravine.

Buffalo Chip was such an appropriate name, it looked like a giant bovine patty turned on its side. As Todd relates, it now lies under about 50 feet of fill upon which have sprouted townhouses or some such structures.

It still lives on in our memories and route info can be found in old copies of the Hunk Guide to Orange County -- the "hunks" were not the likes of Gramicci or Bachar, but the assorted piles of shitty local rock which (with the exception of The Beach) were the desperate fare of rock starved OC climbers.

Would love to see a photo of the Chip if anyone has one.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 14, 2006 - 07:32pm PT
Classic photo of Rubidoux days Rob. I seem to recognize the pair of skinny legs as Dave Evans, and the other two fellas could be any number of folks.

Any ideas who they were?
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 14, 2006 - 09:25pm PT
...can't be certain, Spencer. That's either DE or Kevin Powell. I'm guessing that's Charles Cole in the TSs. Is that Craig Fry back there maybe?

Please advise.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 14, 2006 - 10:14pm PT
Yes Rob,

the haircuts do suggest that Charles is en route, Dave is observing and a possible Matt Cox is consulting.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 14, 2006 - 11:49pm PT
It really saddens me to hear of the demise of a natural occurrence such as the chip. And for what, town homes that probably go for 2 million each, even sharing a thin wall between them.

Doesn’t sound worth it to me I had some priceless experiences there. Can’t say I had sex though like some could. Bet they sure miss it too.

I’d like to see some pictures also. I have a good one in my mind but can’t guarantee how long that will last. Todd mentioning the chimney helped spark a good visual. With all the photos I have I can’t believe I don’t have one of The BC down in OC.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 15, 2006 - 12:33am PT
Bachar,
Ahead of his Time.
Leashless at Santee.

Yup.
Soul on Ice.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 15, 2006 - 12:44am PT
Tar, Looks like that could be the Weeping wall, you think?


Since we are on the bouldering path in this chapter thought I would move it off to Colorado.

Enjoyed this one great summer there once. I was staying in Eldorado springs with Dave Brasheres in some loft apartment he had. John Bachar and John Long were also there living out of there cars and such. This one particular day we all decided to drive up to Horse tooth Reservoir in Fort Collins for a little bouldering tour. Dave Knew the place pretty well and was keen to show us the Classics like the eliminators and other Gill routes. Great stuff there and I will piece a few shots out one at a time.

Here’s one of Largo on a particular high one I was too close to get the ground in the shot another six feet lower. If any you guys know the problem let us know.





bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 15, 2006 - 12:52am PT
Tarbustin' - those are the same threads I used to wear! Chouinard cord knickers - bring 'em back!

Is that me?

Lee Vinning?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:01am PT
Shawn Curtis Took That Photo of You JB.
At,
At Santee.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:05am PT
Ice at Santee? Alzheimers? Where is Shawn these days?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:06am PT
Thats a cool Largo Shot.
I think its just a warm up boulder HighBall thing.
I bet you could dial in the saturation on that photo Mike.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:07am PT
He went away, RIP
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:09am PT
Shawn Passed Bra.
Just Last Year.
I Think I might get some of his photos and post them.
Maybe that picture of Santee, well, I think you blew my cover...
It might be a bit North of Santee...

Shawn said that was your first day on Ice.
I've asked you about it.
You said the Leashless thing didn't feel right, Like when you placed screws, you planted an ax, let go to fiddle and said to the ax "OK, Stay..."

Well Ya, Lee Vining.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:29am PT
That's right! My first day on ice! - at June Lake roadside ice falls. Almost killed myself that day.

RIP shawn
Sioux Juan

Big Wall climber
Costa Mexico
Mar 15, 2006 - 07:20am PT
The buffalo chip is still there just look to the other side of the road.
Leroy

climber
Mar 15, 2006 - 07:33am PT
I thought Mike Paul did the first of the Lie Detector.Anyways,I remember doing an early ascent with awell known local,who said ,I believe what I see and I saw u do it and I know I did it.Dont think Barber ever said he did it.Although he did make a good effort Barefoot.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 15, 2006 - 11:10am PT
A study in contrasts...

The best rock and the worst:



On the left, we have the first pitch of Flying Circus at Tahquitz. Probably taken on the second weekend of work, since there is already a fixed line and clipped jumars waiting to go up to the second bolt above the hard aid. Note the use of dual 9mm ropes--that trick we picked up from the Brits to reduce friction on indirect leads. Aug, 1978.

And, on the right, we have compelling evidence why so few Stonemasters have converted to Islam and moved to Saudi Arabia! The horrible Jurassic limestone/mud on the Escarpment on the outskirts of Riyadh. 25 miles of this junk! And I don't think I ever saw a single hunk of granite in the whole fricking Kingdom! Hooked up there with a British Expat (another desperate and frustrated climber) to go looking for lines. Both of us are in the picture, and the belay ledge I'm standing on fell off from beneath my second, once I got to the summit. A first (and last) ascent. 1980.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 15, 2006 - 11:47am PT
“Thats a cool Largo Shot.
I think its just a warm up boulder HighBall thing.”


May have been a warm a up but after that they warmed up on this one.

Here’s Bachar making a quick move left…and yes he did reach it.






John has always been the boot designer, this was when he was freelancing for NIKE® one of the early uses of bold colors and coordinating as well.

Regarding the Buffalo Chip, what they do, move it? People camp out in trees to save them, anyone ever do that on a bolder out of curiosity?

Barefoot Barber…never could quite get that. As it was pointed earlier those guys in Dresden only did it be cause they had to. That’s like entering a car race on foot,

Robs, Crazy shot in Arabia! Double ropes is the only way to climb for me. A lot of benefits when the pro isn’t the best too.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 15, 2006 - 12:04pm PT
Nick Badyrka and I witnessed Hot Henry leading several Eldorado testpeices shoeless during 1978 Colorado trip.

With such inspiration we brought the technique home to Idyllwild and did shoeless ascents of routes like Hot Buttered Rump and a few others I cannot remember.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 15, 2006 - 12:28pm PT
Hey, MG-

That shot of JB with the striped rugby shirt is on the Left Eliminator, which is somewhat of a highball problem when you did it sans cord. Bachar had been there a year before I visited with Richard Harrison, and JB gave us the tour--the Mental Block, Eliminators, all the classic Gill stuff. We never used a rope--never even thought about it--on any of that stuff. This added a certain flair to doing those problems. Later I returned with Dan Michaels and when he busted out the rope we thought he was kidding.

Remember how JB used to do all those laps on the Torture Chamber? That guy's pain threshold was incredible. Down in that area was Borgman's Bulge, which was harder for me than the Eliminators and the stuff on the Mental Block because I weighted so fricking much and that high left hold on Borgman's was so tiny. Took me like 10 tries to get that thing.

That was a blast -- 30 years ago!

JL

de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:07pm PT
I used to go to the Buffalo Chip at lunch from Corona Del Mar High School (class of '75). One time I was over there by myself and pitched off the top of the bulge problem (broken hold, of course). It was a bad landing and I lay there with the wind knocked out of me and literally seeing stars. Took at least 15 minutes just to get off the ground, ouch.

I think it's still there, you could see it from the road as of a few years ago. I'll drive by soon and eyeball it.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:24pm PT
Dave,

Might you recall carrying me down from Suicide at the end of our winter hitchhiking "vacation" in Illywild? Nex time you run away from home, take a car.

The football knob kinda hurt the first time.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:32pm PT
Dave, Bring a camera with you

JL - I think they call it bouldering because you do it without a rope?... Were we wrong?

Although when you do stuff like solo Insomia,(yikes)you don't call it bouldering.

Am I confusing anyone else besides me?
Sioux Juan

Big Wall climber
Costa Mexico
Mar 15, 2006 - 01:52pm PT
Yes the buffalo chip is still there! over grown and coverd with spider webs. If you don't want to drive out there ? just look at a map? they built bonita canyon dr. north of it, before it was off ford rd.

when they built the park they pushed 5 feet of dirt at it's base so it's not so groovy. Randy go check it out?
little has changed Dave
de eee

Mountain climber
Tustin
Mar 15, 2006 - 02:03pm PT
Yes Spencer, I do remember! I "ran away" after some big fight with my mom and we hitched to Humber. You took a nasty fall on Valhalla and sprained your ankle. Luckily Roy Naaz (Derek Starr) was there and helped me carry you down (mostly on his back). Didn't we get a ride part way back with the lovely Debbie Winter from LA? Then your mom came out, picked us up and drove us home from a hospital(?). She commented on a film a friend of yours had made called...."Mediocrity" as we passed the endless housing tracts in Anaheim that are even more endless now.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 15, 2006 - 02:09pm PT
The Chip Lives!?

I'll have to check it out. But filling in the bottom 5 feet would change it considerably.

Perhaps i will take the digital camera (chalk bag and shoes) and post a shot if this is true.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 15, 2006 - 02:26pm PT
Dude, you've GOT to go get a pic of the Buf Chip. That's as classic of a junker as we've ever climbed upon. Must see to believe.

JL
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 15, 2006 - 03:22pm PT
When I hear them calling that somebody's falling
I'm always the first to react
I shout to the man "Just hang on if you can
While I get my camera unpacked".
You've seen the wild hare in the gulleys
His antics are wholly absurd
Compared to the sight and the poetry in flight
Of man taking wing like a bird.

--The Manchester Delinquent's Song, Tom Patey

Now, guys... Some of you are waxing rhapsodical about something that was The One True Hunk™! Graham and I went there and probably did the firsts on that left-side arete. 'Twas such a farce, that I only went back there maybe once more. And, by that time, Mike had ripped-off the key chunk on the face so that was deemed a gonner. Never went back, for very good reason. "...maybe 35-40 high..." is just a bit of an exaggeration don't ya think? Buffalo Chip, indeed.

Somebody go get us a picture, pronto. That way, the rest of us won't need to bother to do the inspection ourselves. (Me? I'm waxing lackadaisical!)

(Those in favor of electing Randy to do it, say "aye". Nay? The ayes have it... So moved.)
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 15, 2006 - 11:18pm PT
Oh, this is just great...

Now not only am I waiting on Gramicci to cough up Exhibit "R" but I'm also waiting on Randy to produce a photo of the Buffalo Chip. Double the fun...
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Mar 16, 2006 - 10:32am PT
I refuse to believe what I am reading above. Pirate’s Cove allegedly “closed” by the authorities? Preposterous. The “city ordinance” which gave City Ordinance Crack its name belatedly enforced to prevent climbing at the beach? Absurd. The Buffalo Chip, first described in the rare and collectible first edition of the Hunk Guide to Orange County, buried or blasted? Not likely.

Not with Randy Vogel living a few miles down the road! I know Randy Vogel. Randy Vogel is a friend of mine. No one has done more than Randy to keep climbing areas open, as one of the founders of the Access Fund and veteran of numerous brawls with authorities over climbing rights. Randy is a champion street fighter for climbing access and would not let some petty bureaucrat proclaim that one of Randy’s backyard climbing spots is now off limits for climbers, no matter how insignificant or squalid the area. The Randy I know would have rallied the local climbers to the barricades before the next city council meeting, had the authorities really attempted such a foolish thing.

On second thought maybe the Buffalo Chip is not worth the effort, but certainly Pirate’s Cove is, just for the principle if nothing else!

Randy, say it ain’t so?
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 16, 2006 - 12:26pm PT
But Ricky, you didn't tell us about "Big Ricky???" Surely one of your very own beach classics.

JL
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 16, 2006 - 12:26pm PT
But Ricky, you didn't tell us about "Big Ricky???" Surely one of your very own beach classics.

JL
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 16, 2006 - 12:31pm PT
This is my interpretation of the law here.

Clearly the ordinance makes NO mention of climbing. Although it does state no jumping. So I would venture to say if you fell off you could be in violation of the City Ordinance no. 725 and hence the law. They would have to prove intent to jump though. You would have a good argument that the crack was too greasy or your chalk bag was closed or your butt was hanging out too far. I would ask to judged by a jury of my peers. That way I would win for sure







The flood water pants were standard issue when the tide was coming in at CDM.

Oh, this is just great...

Now not only am I waiting on Gramicci to cough up Exhibit "R" but I'm also waiting on Randy to produce a photo of the Buffalo Chip. Double the fun..


henny, With all the recent Beta on how to find the buffalo chip I’d have better luck with that photo.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 16, 2006 - 12:40pm PT
Gramicci: "I would ask to judged by a jury of my peers."

Yep. Your butt is hanging out too far.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 16, 2006 - 12:46pm PT
Yeah, and if I wasn’t wearing mighty tighty whiteies my crack would have been hanging out too!
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 16, 2006 - 12:55pm PT
Ricky,

I'm sure Randy would have promptly answered your queries regarding a possible closure at Pirates Cove, but he is busily out trying to get photos of the Buffalo Chip in the pouring rain and snow.

Besides which, he know he must pick his "battles" and is spending his legal resources fighting the Bush administration's attempts to gut our civil rights and environmental laws, sell off all of our public lands to the highest bidders and finally close areas of great cultural, scenic and recreational values like Pirates Cove.

Isn't that right Randy?
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 16, 2006 - 01:21pm PT
OK Hashbro, lets not get political here... Regardless of whether you're right or wrong...

Muir: Good one! Judged and convicted!

Randy out in the rain and snow? Are we talking about the same Randy? Let me guess, it's also -30 degrees, the winds are 150 mph, and the roads are covered with black ice. And he has to walk there and back shoeless, without sun glasses, and wearing shorts. POOR Randy! !NOT! The only "battle" I need him to fight is to make sure he gets the picture in focus. I'm not really that concerned about the climatic conditions that he might encounter while performing his appointed task.

Randy: Dude, we're still waitin' for that picture... Seeing as how I've never been there, I'm not sure the Buffalo Chip really exists... Need a picture as proof positive...
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 16, 2006 - 01:33pm PT
Henny said: "it's also -30 degrees, the winds are 150 mph, and the roads are covered with black ice.

Oh, riiiiight! Next, Tarbuster will have us believing that Vogel is heading to Buffalo Chip with crampons for the winter front-pointing excursion... JPEG, JPEG!

(And, Randy, while you're down there, stop by and pick up a photo of The Brain. Mine's gone, and I need a refresher.)
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 16, 2006 - 02:41pm PT
OK, its 11:37 a.m. Given the demand that either I or Gramicci actually produce a promised photo, I am taking a little Lunch Break in a few and will crawl on my hands and knees (maybe not)in the harsh current weather conditions (mid 60s) to the former site of The Chip and document my finds with the trusty digital camera.

If I locate it quickly, I might spin to The Beach and provide a recent snapshot. Stay tuned.
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 16, 2006 - 03:02pm PT
Yes!!! Go, Randy, go! You're obviously our last great hope for a picture. We're with ya bud!
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 16, 2006 - 03:22pm PT
Daryl,

I know we all do get more conservative with age. I sure hope that for you it is your manefesting in increased leading security, and not becoming active in the local republican party.

Let's NOT get political.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Mar 16, 2006 - 05:42pm PT
OK, I've posted photos and my scouting report on a new thread so as not to clutter this one up too much:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=167704&f=0&b=0#msg167704

Wish I'd had brought my shoes and chalk bag as the Beach was in prime condition (though Iron man cave area was a bit greasy).
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 16, 2006 - 06:28pm PT
Good job, Randy! Looks like the weather conditions were extreme indeed! (Goaded? Who would've done such a thing? Robs???)

OK, I admit the Chip really does exist, even though I've never been there. But then again, now I'm really glad I haven't been there.

Spencer: Sorry, I should have let your post go without comment. You have every right to voice your opinions. If I really wanted to avoid a political debate I should have refrained from saying anything.

Can Bush and his policies be defended? There is a good reason his popularity is at an all time low. But this does not imply that I think everything/anything conservative is bad. Nor do I think everything/anything liberal is bad. I try to do what I think is best, given who I am and what I believe, regardless of party lines.

Once again, I apologize. Enough said. Lets get back to the climbing...
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 16, 2006 - 06:57pm PT
Wow,
Political poultry. My favorite.
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 16, 2006 - 07:04pm PT
F you Bolton. With both barrels! Watch it boy, or I'll claw you to death with my talons. You ever seen a pissed chicken in action? Not a pretty sight.
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 16, 2006 - 07:22pm PT
Dear Chicken,

Who is the Biologist here? Hmmm? You? No. Me.
For the umpteenth time, chickens don't have talons. They have toenails (claws), toes, and soft, mushy, sad little feet. A perfect match for their soft, mushy, sad little brains. Questions?

Hugs and kisses,

Bob
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 16, 2006 - 07:43pm PT
Dear Bob,

The brain stuff I can take. But the feet, now you've gone too far. My full name is Chicken HAWK. Big, sharp talons. Big, sharp beak. Don't force me to use 'em on you, sweetie pie!
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 16, 2006 - 07:45pm PT
Okay, seeing as how everybody seems to be here, maybe you all can help me remember something. First, I'll tell you what I do remember. Then you can help me with what I don't remember.

One sunny summer day at Suicide, I think circa 75/76, Kevin and I were at the base of New Gen getting ready to take a run on it. About the time we were ready to start the first pitch we heard voices around the corner by the base of the Pirate. Now normally we wouldn't have given this a second thought, but this time there were several distinctly female voices in the group. Given the timeframe when this occured, the female voices caught our attention and we decided to wait until we saw who was coming. Moments later Tobin, followed by three stark raving bikini top clad beauties, and several stonemasters, came into sight. The entire party promptly proceeds to set up camp at the base of Insomnia. The first thing that we noticed (okay, the second) was that the young ladies seemed to be totally hanging on everything that Tobin said or did. And to make things even more confusing, they obviously weren't climbers.
Tobin proceeded to lead Insomnia, and this simply served to seemingly impress the girls even more. Once he had brought up the first stonemaster, Tobin disappeared for a moment, then came back and stood at the lip where he could watch the next stonemaster run the Insomnia toprope. As he stood at the lip watching Tobin was casually talking to the young ladies. Suddenly, Tobin windmilled his arms once or twice and fell off the top. Only to be caught by the slack he had secretly tied into the system. Now the girls were really impressed. After the last stonemaster had finished the toprope, they, and Tobin with his harem in tow, headed off.

Seems Tobin was one smooth dude. In more ways than one.

To this day, neither Kevin nor I can remember who any of the other stonemasters were. Perhaps we were blinded by all the extreme scenery that was wandering around. Who knows.

Anyway, do any of you recollect being there when this incident occured? For some reason, I want to say that one face I remember through the haze was Randy, but that could be wrong. ??? And maybe someone could also clarify where the harem of non-climbers came from?
rbolton

Social climber
The home for...
Mar 16, 2006 - 08:22pm PT
Dear Roaster,

Who you fooling? Your FULL name is Gallus Domesticus. I'm guessing we should classify your variety as Dorking. Just a hunch. We'll serve you up at the new restaurant in town. El pollo antiguo. Served in dweezel sauce.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 16, 2006 - 08:22pm PT
henny, I wish I could say I can’t believe this without photographic proof. But I may have heard tale of this actually happening. From the sound of it I sure would have loved to have been there too.
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 16, 2006 - 08:30pm PT
You'd think (considering the circumstances) that Largo was there.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 16, 2006 - 08:31pm PT
OK. For the record, I want to attest that I wasn't in that Tobin parade! (I'm sure I wouldn't have forgotten that.) And, Mr. Hawk, I'll hazard a guess that not many other Stonemasters were there, otherwise that story would have been legend! Great tale, though.

So... While we await the return of Mr. Vogel LLP, our intrepid voyager to the Bison Turd with indisputable digital evidence, here's a literary diversion:


Front and back cover of the famous guidebook that rocked the world.



and the seldom-seen inside cover of the Hunk Guide. (Good likeness of the Vogel, donchathink?)

Smuggled, at great risk to life and limb by Comrade Bolton, from deep behind the Orange Curtain.
henny

Social climber
The Past
Mar 16, 2006 - 08:56pm PT
Robs: look back upstream. Seems Randy made it back alive. Pictures and all. He posted a link, in case you missed it.

Bolton: One of the most horrific experiences of my life was sitting in a restaurant with Eppy and having him order a chicken salad sandwich. Downright terrifying...

hashbro: Cool. And no, I don't remember Largo being there.

Mike, Robs: Tis an honest to God tale. With very little embellishment, I might add. Powell can vouch.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 16, 2006 - 09:11pm PT
Yeah, I missed it... Just got home and was too busy scanning the life out of Randy's intellectual property. Nice work, Mr. Vogel. And, yeah, that Brain is/was way seriously dangerous.

You guys ought to get a job, or something. Way too much time on your hands!
hashbro

Trad climber
Not in Southern California
Mar 16, 2006 - 09:11pm PT
Incredible find among the archives Rob (notice I deleted the S).

Randy has been publishing for quite a long time!
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 17, 2006 - 01:07pm PT
Also found while rummaging through the archives...

This detail is from a slide taken on the top of the Captain in September, 1974. We had just toped-out on the Salathé. The route had been blazing hot the first day or two, but got increasingly cool as we got higher. So hot, that we almost bailed from 1,100'! Alan Bartlett, Dominque Thomas and I were suprised (stunned) to be met by two friends that we never expected. And they brought along fresh honeydew melon! Plus, they helped us haul The Pig back down via the Falls Trail! (Walking out in PAs is a thing to be forgotten!)

Pictured, from left to right, Gunnar Swanson, Alan Bartlett, Jim Hoagland, Robs Muir and Dominique Thomas. Of interest here is the image of Hoagland; I think this is the only photo I have of one of the very first Stonemasters.



No one seems to know the whereabouts of Hoagland. Rumor is that he might be working in petroleum exploration in Thailand, Indonesia or summat...
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Mar 17, 2006 - 01:13pm PT
Randy, thanks. I will sleep a little better tonight knowing the Buffalo Chip is intact and that climbing freedom is still on the march (ascent?) at Pirates Cove. “Groundless” was nice.

JL, I needed help to remember Anabelle Overhang and it was one of the “plums”. Someone will have to refresh my memory with Big Ricky; I’m drawing a blank. I am digging through some slides and did find a shot or two of Bachar on Diamond Man, Gramicci on the balancey mantle to top out Anabelle and the less steep, but still challenging Italian Face. Will try to post them.

Mike-That trip to Colorado where you met up with Bachar and JL for bouldering must have been in 1976 or 77? Would have liked to have seen those sessions when the A Team of California bouldering visited Colorado. I remember having Mark Wilford show me around Horsetooth in 1978. I wouldn’t commit to the Left Eliminator move that Bachar is doing in the picture. Maybe I’ll borrow a couple of jumbo 12” pads and give it another look this summer.

Robs, Hope you didn’t damage one of the few remaining Hunk Guides in order to scan it. You get that thing signed by the author and I expect Chessler would pay a small fortune for it, or just laugh at you. Regardless, the text is priceless.

Henny- wasn’t present, but I seem to recall someone else telling me that story about Tobin, Bullwinkle maybe?
Dimes

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Mar 18, 2006 - 12:26am PT
Well, I can vouch for the "Chicken's" story about the "harem" I distinctly remember them. Very distinctly! As for the other stonemasters, no recollection. I think Tobin's stunt of pretending to fall of the top messed up my mind and gave me selective memory. Luckily it was for the things most desireable.
Dimes

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Mar 18, 2006 - 12:30am PT
Henny, tell us stories behind some of the route names at Suicide i.e. The Great Pretender, Untickable, Someone Your'e Not, etc.
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 18, 2006 - 09:26am PT
Rick, might have been 77 and as more comes back to me it was in the Fall. I remember spending a wild Halloween 21st birthday in boulder. Dave and I were out all night hitting every bar in a big way. Some girl named Christina even married me that night, I think Brashears preformed the ceremony.

Back to Horsetooth, here’s another shot. We even put up a problem or two of our own. Bachar had every Chick Corea album so the music was always in your head. So after one of those songs I called this one “Movement of Heavy Metal” with its super long dyno





bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 18, 2006 - 11:40am PT
Graham - nice shot...I remember that problem - I got some photos of you on it as well (somewhere). cool.

Largo - I just "discovered" Gill's website (via Curt, Gill's bouldering buddy) - very cool. I ripped off this photo from the site (thanks John for posting it!). Remember that day in Lost Canyon? Juggernaut, Penny Ante, new problems...check Gill's hat on the boulder...



Gill photo ( www.johngill.net )
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 18, 2006 - 03:43pm PT
Dress-whites:



On The Flakes, July 1978. Charles Cole, en belay. And, Gramicci, that might be my butt hanging out too far, but you be the judge.
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 18, 2006 - 11:59pm PT
Largo - check this photo from Gill's site (www.johngill.net - killer site - thanks again John!) ...same day as that other photo above... a really good day. Thanks to you for calling him up and gettng me out there...

"Gee Largo, how are we gonna' find Gill"



"Ho man, we'll just find him in the phone book and call him man"






Largo at 185 lb (maybe 200 lb?) .... cheers, jb
Penny Ante boulder, Gill photo
Watusi

Social climber
Joshua Tree, CA
Mar 19, 2006 - 02:09am PT
Awesome stuff here mates!!!
Gramicci

Social climber
Ventura
Mar 19, 2006 - 02:26am PT
JB- killer shots!
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 19, 2006 - 02:32am PT
Gimme some bass...Watusi! I got a sax line for you...

Good rock, huh?
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Mar 19, 2006 - 12:15pm PT
Watusi!
Check Your Email, Bra.
marty(r)

climber
beneath the valley of ultravegans
Mar 19, 2006 - 12:44pm PT
Gramicci, Largo, Bachar,
So at what point did the StoneMaster lightning bolt show up (and stay) on Big Columbia?
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 19, 2006 - 01:29pm PT
I put it there right off the bat when we started working on the problem. The name stuck right away - from the Hendrix song 'Midnight Lightning' (oh so frightening...).
Plus we felt like our chances of making it were about the same as a lightning stike happening exactly at midnight (close to zero!)....it all just kinda fit together.
Largo

Sport climber
Venice, Ca
Mar 19, 2006 - 02:13pm PT
Hey, JB--

That was a great tour Gill took us on. I especially liked the white hat. Nice touch by a super nice guy.

But I doubt I only weighted 185 back in then. Probably more like 2 bills.

Remember those couple of problems we found while hiking out? We couldn't do them (too tired) but they would have gone with some work. I hear the entire area has been closed down. Bummer. Those were great problems and a fine area.

We sure did a lot of driving back then just to go bouldering. Got by via good jazz and staunch pipeloads.

JL
bachar

Trad climber
Mammoth Lakes, CA
Mar 19, 2006 - 02:37pm PT
Yeah, that place is amazing. I remember we were working out pretty hard back then - you were about the buffest I ever remember - I edited the 185lb. by the way...

You had that VW bug that you used to beat the hell out of. We drove up to Gill's house and then went to McDonald's with him for a Big Mac before heading out to the Lost Canyon...can't make up sh#t like that.

He was up here last summer...first time I'd talked to him since that day! He still looks pretty damn strong too....cheers, jb
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 20, 2006 - 11:44am PT
Damn. Here we are in Part 6, which should probably become Part Seven pretty soon now, and STILL no Exhibit R! Gramicci!
Brick

Social climber
SF, CA
Mar 20, 2006 - 03:54pm PT
bump

once a thread drifts to page 2, it's over
Sewellymon

climber
.....in a single wide......
Mar 20, 2006 - 04:03pm PT
Largo's whisky of choice

Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 21, 2006 - 02:02am PT
Must . . . not . . . let . . . it . . . fall . . . away . . .

Uuuuuhhhhh!

Lifting it back to the top.

Hey the Mussy Neb thread is now into part VII, what's up with that?

Shouldn't this thread soon be into part VII?
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Mar 21, 2006 - 12:03pm PT
yeah, those knuckleheads keeping that mussy thread alive are a pretty competative bunch, i tell ya.

"hey man, lets drag race the stonemasters thread...!"

buncha crackhead post whores is what they are. shameless, indeed. no respect whatsoever for sacred bandwidth.
rmuir

Social climber
the Time Before the Rocks Cooled.
Mar 21, 2006 - 12:39pm PT
And speaking of Knuckleheads... It is time to move along now, to Part 7 of this nostalgia fest(er).

Don't post here. Move along to:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.html?topic_id=169730&f=0&b=0

Got it? Good.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Nov 5, 2012 - 11:18pm PT
bump
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Mar 16, 2013 - 01:15am PT
bump
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