Why are Republicans Wrong about Everything?

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 48161 - 48180 of total 52610 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Dr. F.

Trad climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 19, 2013 - 05:16pm PT
Wow
what a broad range of opinions

I want to ask sketch, how do you vote?
by party or issues?
If issue, what Issues?
dirtbag

climber
Nov 19, 2013 - 06:03pm PT
I want to ask sketch, how do you vote?
by party or issues?
If issue, what Issues?

He votes for the guy who's white, christian, straight, thumps the bible, and has fascist tendencies.
jghedge

climber
Nov 19, 2013 - 06:17pm PT
Hahahaha, let's take bigotry to it's "logical" extreme, shall we?


Oklahoma Drops National Guard Benefits For ALL Couples To Avoid Serving Same-Sex Couples

http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2013/11/19/2970531/oklahoma-national-guard/


Got it? NOBODY gets marital status benefits in the OK NG now. Nobody.

The last, desperate, dying throes of a once-great party.


"This decision directly contradicts an order from Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordering states to provide same-sex couples with the federal benefits they deserve under the law. All married couples will now have to travel to one of the five federal facilities in Oklahoma to apply for benefits.

"Incidentally, the state’s facilities were built almost entirely with federal funds and 90 percent of the Oklahoma Military Department — which includes the National Guard — is funded by the federal government."


HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!




Idiot repub hypocrites will never learn.







Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Nov 19, 2013 - 10:46pm PT
That's right Wade. (whom I don't know, except that he is a friend of BLaw's and that's good enough for me)

you are full of sh#t Shack( whom I don't know, except that he is a friend of BLaw's and that's good enough for me)

hope we can disagree over beers sometime, Cheers.

Credit: no problem
rSin

Trad climber
calif
Nov 20, 2013 - 03:42am PT
what a scumbag!

speaking of filth, check out this as#@&%e

Hawaii State Rep. Tom Brower recently bragged about how he was destroying shopping carts, used by homeless people, with a sledgehammer.

Rep. Brower did not explain how destroying shopping carts would reduce homelessness in the state, but did seem to get some personal satisfaction (video below).





http://www.opposingviews.com/i/politics/hawaii-state-rep-tom-brower-uses-sledgehammer-destroy-homeless-people-s-possessions-video?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+opposingviews%2Fmain+%28Opposing+Views+-+Issues%2C+Experts%2C+Answers%29
Sketch

Trad climber
Langley, VA
Nov 20, 2013 - 04:36am PT
I want to ask sketch, how do you vote?
by party or issues?
If issue, what Issues?

A combination of the two.

For incumbents, I look at their voting record.

It's probably been 10 years since I voted Republican any DC position.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Nov 20, 2013 - 05:03am PT
Oh no..! Another libertarian that supports the Republican Party...
Sketch

Trad climber
Langley, VA
Nov 20, 2013 - 05:41am PT
Fifty Years - What a difference

Last night, I watched a program on the civil rights movement, highlighting 1940-1966. Seeing how Blacks were treated before and during the movement was very disturbing. It's hard to fathom what was considered acceptable behavior back then.

Some footage that disgusted and impressed the hell out of me involved a black man, sitting at a lunch counter, surrounded by white men. One man was flicking cigar ashes in the black man's hair. Another man said "why don't we send all these niggas back to Africa. They were all yelling at him. The reasons for my disgust are obvious. What impressed me is the black man just took it. It was an exceptional example of passive resistance, which was critical to the movement's success.

The entire program was impressive. Here, you have 20% of the population, who are second class citizens. They adopted a difficult (arguably the only possible) approach. Stuck with it. Took their losses. And caused dramatic change. It's all very inspiring.

On a separate subject, Friday is the 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination. He's been getting a fair amount of coverage, lately. Two parts of his Presidency stand out to me. In his inaugural address, he says "Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country." It was a call to action for Americans to selflessly contribute to the greater good. Our current zeitgeist seems to include a far different mentality. In essence, people think it's the government's responsibility to fix their problems. This kind of thinking has become mainstream.

The other Kennedy event that stands out for me is his handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis. He drew a line in the sand and told the Soviets not to cross it. He changed the course of history.

I look at what was happening 50 years ago, compare it to America today and conclude that the strength of our character can't hold a candle to that of fifty years ago.
dirtbag

climber
Nov 20, 2013 - 06:46am PT
Hahaha...Pope Francis sticks it to Palin and Buchanan.

“What does Palin know about leadership?” Francis wondered. “This is a woman who couldn’t even make it through one term as governor of Alaska before resigning, and who, let’s be honest, was probably the worst vice presidential nominee in American history.”

Francis also questioned Palin’s grasp of religious tenets. “I’m not convinced she knows the first thing about the Bible,” Francis wrote. “In fact, I’m not even confident that she knows how to read.”





http://www.newslo.com/pope/?fb_action_ids=10201784284121317&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=[1406493622921799]&action_type_map=[%22og.likes%22]&action_ref_map=[]
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Nov 20, 2013 - 07:00am PT
I'm beginning to like this Pope.

In essence, people think it's the government's responsibility to fix their problems. This kind of thinking has become mainstream.

That is certainly how Wall Street thinks, isn't it? Privatize profits, socialize the losses. And yet people somehow want to transfer that thinking to the people who have been getting f*#ked over by Wall Street and their Republican stooges for the last generation. That's the GOP for you, always blaming the victim.
Sketch

Trad climber
Langley, VA
Nov 20, 2013 - 07:02am PT

I'm sure some gullible half-wits thought that story was true.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Nov 20, 2013 - 07:22am PT
Shack Handsome comes on this site every year or two to bellyache about guns and taxes. Nevada will do that to a man, it seems.

Shack Handsome used to be a climber and he posted climbing content. Ah.... those were the days; Californian content, I believe. But he fell under the spell of a mad desert prophet and disappeared into the Wasteland.

You should look him up Ron, lift a few mugs of milk of magnesia!

DMT
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Nov 20, 2013 - 07:45am PT
Yes, they are wrong:

House Republicans this week are pushing several scary, little-reported, so-called energy security bills that they say will “get the government out of the way of progress,” but that critics say, more convincingly, will "allow oil and gas companies to drill wherever and wherever they want." The GOP measures would speed up permits for oil and gas drilling on federal lands, mandate a quarter of federal acreage be available for leasing, effectively bar federal regulation of fracking, and charge anyone who doesn't like any of this a $5,000 protesting "fee." The measures likely won't go far. But given there's still no Planet B, be a little afraid anyway.
-Abby Zimet
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Nov 20, 2013 - 07:48am PT
Obama has approved much gas/oil exploration on private lands and under his watch those permits have increased... His only reductions were to govt land permits..
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Nov 20, 2013 - 07:58am PT
Ron, let me get this straight. This is your brother you're talking about here?

Damm good shot with that set up! Dropped him in his tracks.


I get it, you're just joking around. Hahahahahaha





(You're a sick fuk.)
k-man

Gym climber
SCruz
Nov 20, 2013 - 08:02am PT
Indeed Ron, the reason that we're not importing as much oil as previous years, and that Obama can brag about the nation's increase in oil production is not, in my book, good news.

See the Climate Change thread for more on this ...
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Relic MilkEye and grandpoobah of HBRKRNH
Nov 20, 2013 - 08:05am PT
well as the climate concerns the whole globe and not just america and that if we dont use OUR OWN, we use someone elses oil , imho, i think its FAR BETTER that we use our own oil. Less wars - less bombings- less involvement with the ME is a win win win win win win win..Screw OPEC.


edit: Just think of the money we would have for healthcare of we werent giving it away to countries that now only provide about 18% of our oil..



edit Gary,, what does the pope think about blatant lying by a president? Not that i give two squirts what the pope thinks.
jghedge

climber
Nov 20, 2013 - 08:34am PT


"The other Kennedy event that stands out for me is his handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis. He drew a line in the sand and told the Soviets not to cross it. He changed the course of history."


Kennedy made a deal with Khrushchev to pull our nukes, aimed at Moscow, out of Turkey and Italy, which was what started the Cuban Missile Crisis in the first place, in return for Russia removing theirs from Cuba. In fact we crossed the Russian's line, and Kennedy backed down.
rSin

Trad climber
calif
Nov 20, 2013 - 09:15am PT
a line in the sand?!??!


what ignorance!!!

kennedy called up the soviets and told big K that "if you dont tell anyone I will pull my missles out of europle if you will pull your missles out of cuba... and your allowed to keep your 40,000 battle hardened shock troops there WITH their TACTICAL NUKES"






By David Atkins

The Terrifying Future Envisioned By Libertarians

What a libertarian Social Darwinist paradise would look like.



November 18, 2013 |


I've written often before about how much of the war between the American left and right is essentially the building of sand castles in the face of the oncoming tide of globalization, deskilling and mechanization of the workforce accompanied by catastrophic climate change. Much of what constitutes public policy battles in this country are fought between the one-percenters simply trying to loot what's left before it all crashes and burns, and neoliberals desperately trying to pump up asset prices and force everyone into engineering programs to disguise the destruction the of the regular wage economy. The far right and progressive left, meanwhile, are each trying to bring back the social and economic norms of the 1950s and late 1960s, respectively, in efforts of utter futility.

It's rare to find columnists who are asking themselves the right questions. It's rarer still to find ones who have the right answers. But it's when conservatives and libertarians ask the right questions and come up with their honest responses that we see the crippling danger of allowing them anywhere near the levers of power. Consider the example of Tyler Cowen, conservative/libertarian economist and pundit, writing in POLITICO Magazine, celebrating a future in which a few technically skilled "economic winners" in cities will lord it over a mass of rubes left behind in an era of mass mechanization:




Less acknowledged, perhaps, is what all this technological change portends: nothing short of a new political order. The productivity gains, the medical advances, the workplace reorganizations and the myriad other upheavals that will define the coming automation age will create new economic winners and losers; it will reorient our demographics; and undoubtedly, it will transform what we demand from our government.

The rise of the machines builds on deeper economic trends that are already roiling American society, including stagnant growth since 2001 and a greater openness to trade and foreign outsourcing. But it’s the rapid increase in machines’ ability to substitute for intelligent human labor that presages the greater disruption. We’re on the verge of having computer systems that understand the entirety of human “natural language,” a problem that was considered a very tough one only a few years ago. We’re close to the point when we can fit the (articulable) knowledge of the entire world into the palm of our hands. Self-driving cars are making their way onto streets in California and Nevada. Whether you are a factory worker or an accountant, a waitress or a doctor, this is the wave that will lift you or dump you.
He's right about this. As I have written, soon the machines will come for the doctors and lawyers, too. My prediction is that there will be a collective hysteria in elite circles once white collar jobs fall prey to mechanization and deskilling as blue collar jobs have done, and that in turn will necessitate a rethinking of the social contract after a period of intense political acrimony.

Cowen sees it similarly, but instead of a rethinking of the social contract, he sees a glorious libertarian Social Darwinist paradise:


The rise of intelligent machines will spawn new ideologies along with the new economy it is creating. Think of it as a kind of digital social Darwinism, with clear winners and losers: Those with the talent and skills to work seamlessly with technology and compete in the global marketplace are increasingly rewarded, while those whose jobs can just as easily be done by foreigners, robots or a few thousand lines of code suffer accordingly. This split is already evident in the data: The median male salary in the United States was higher in 1969 than it is today. Middle-class manufacturing jobs have been going away due to a mix of automation and trade, and they are not being replaced. The most lucrative college majors are in the technical fields, such as engineering. The winners are doing much better than ever before, but many others are standing still or even seeing wage declines.

These trends will only accelerate in the years to come, rewriting America’s social contract in the process. We will move from a society based on the pretense that everyone is given a decent standard of living to one in which people are expected to fend for themselves. I imagine a world in which, say, 10 to 15 percent of the citizenry (or more, in due time) is extremely wealthy and has fantastically comfortable and stimulating lives, equivalent to those of current-day millionaires, albeit with better health care.

Much of the rest of the country will have stagnant or maybe even falling wages in dollar terms, but they will also have a lot more opportunities for cheap fun and cheap education. Many of these people will live quite well—especially those who have the discipline to benefit from all the free or nearly free services that modern technology makes available. Others will fall by the wayside.

The slogan “We are the 85 percent!” probably won’t sound as compelling as the Occupy Wall Street version. It will become increasingly common to invoke “meritocracy” as a response to income inequality—whether you call it an explanation, a justification or an excuse is up to you. Since the self-motivated will find it easier to succeed than ever before, a new tier of people from poor and underprivileged backgrounds will claw their way to the top—Horatio Algers for the automation age.

This new digital meritocracy will prove self-reinforcing. Worthy individuals will rise from poverty on a regular basis, but that will only make it easier to ignore those left behind. The wealthy class will grow larger over time, and more influential. And the increasingly libertarian values of the wealthy will shape the public debate, strengthening the upper class’s grip on the commanding heights of the economy and society, and pulling policy in their favor.

You might think the 85 percent would rise up in protest. Many commentators, influenced by widening income inequality and the Occupy Wall Street and Tea Party movements, are predicting exactly that scenario: an America torn by unrest and maybe even political violence. I do think we’ll see some outbursts of trouble, but in the long run the picture will be fairly calm and indeed downright ordinary. Expect a society that will be more conservative, both politically and in the more literal sense of that term.
Cowen goes on to argue that all the poors will simply fight and eat each other rather than focus their gaze on the 1%, and that a new dawn of libertarianism tingned with slight neoliberalism will rise in America's technocratic urban centers. It's well worth reading his piece in full to appreciate the giddiness with which he anticipates this Malthusian nightmare.

I don't, however, think it will end that way. The history of middle class societies that lose their footing in an age of mass inequality and labor destabilization suggests that a more progressive social contract will emerge under the threat of revolution. The other, only slightly less likely possibility is a fascist regime that attempts to lay all the blame on "The Other". A slow, comfortable descent into class-based Social Darwinism seems less likely than either option, though it's certainly possible.

But these are indeed the questions we will be compelled to answer. The fact that we will have to confront this decision one way or another makes it hard to take seriously the massive fights over, say, Obamacare. In 15 years a natural unemployment rate of 15% accompanied by unimaginable devastation due to climate change will necessitate the sorts of programs, solutions and political turmoil that will render most of today's arguments utterly obsolete.

The future will belong to those who prepare public policy for that eventuality, and who work to put politicians in power who are ready to enact that policy when the time comes, and when the demographics of the nation have altered enough to make it possible.

Whatever happens, the libertarian fairy dreams of men like Tyler Cowen must not be allowed to become realities.

Ricky

climber
Sometimes LA
Nov 20, 2013 - 09:17am PT

Putting the party back into the Tea Party.

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/muckraker/rep-radel-invited-an-undercover-cop-to-his-house-to-do-coke
Messages 48161 - 48180 of total 52610 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews