Why are Republicans Wrong about Everything?

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pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Jul 22, 2014 - 08:30am PT
Locker Medusa into politics!

nice..
dirtbag

climber
Jul 22, 2014 - 08:42am PT
What do you guys seriously propose as an alternative?
Norton

Social climber
the Wastelands
Jul 22, 2014 - 08:51am PT

tax cuts
HighTraverse

Trad climber
Bay Area
Jul 22, 2014 - 11:41am PT
correction
more tax cuts
jammer

climber
Jul 22, 2014 - 12:14pm PT
additional correction
and coincident massive increases in military spending and a plan to place the blame for the resulting budgetary deficit elsewhere.
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jul 22, 2014 - 12:33pm PT
Because half witted republicant's never lift a finger for their fellow man...
But therein lies the rub... Republicans are not fellow nor are they man....



 So I guess this would be a piece of evidence that the shitty f*#king ideas of republicans are just wrong... Trickle-down economics may sound impressive to the uneducated and ill-informed... but the opposite proves to work demonstrably better.
crankster

Trad climber
Jul 22, 2014 - 01:42pm PT
Credit: crankster
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jul 22, 2014 - 01:53pm PT
^^^^^ Keeper ^^^^^

+1
Sketch

Trad climber
H-ville
Jul 23, 2014 - 02:48pm PT
Looks like most Americans aren't too polarized.

Are the Supertopo political hacks an aberration?

July 18, 2014, 01:00 pm
Polarization is not driven by the people
By Steven Kull

The persistent gridlock in Congress on a wide-range of pressing problems, cries out for explanation. A common answer is that members of Congress are simply reflecting their own constituents in a country deeply divided between “red” and “blue” districts, polarized on the issues that Congress is failing to face. This seems intuitively valid given that we are supposed to be a democracy.

But empirical data tell a very different story. The constituencies that members of Congress are supposed to represent are actually quite similar.

A recent study by Voice of the People and the Program for Public Consultation, affiliated with the University of Maryland, sought to find out how often most people in red districts (represented by a Republican) disagreed with those in blue districts (represented by a Democrat) on questions about what the government should do. The answer was: not very often.

The study analyzed 388 poll questions that asked what the government should do in regard to a wide range of policy issues, including hot button issues like healthcare, immigration and abortion. These came from numerous sources including the National Election Studies, Pew, major media outlets, and others. Respondents were divided based on whether they lived in blue or red districts. In a small minority of cases data was only available to allow the division into red or blue states.

If the polarization in Congress is driven by polarization between the constituencies they represent you would expect the majorities or pluralities in red and blue districts and states to be at odds with each other quite often. But the number of cases in which this was the case was just 14 out of the 388 questions—less than 4 percent of the time.

For an overwhelming 69 percent of survey questions there were no statistically significant differences in the responses. In most of the rest of the cases, there were differences in the size of the majorities, but they still came out on the same side of the issue.

The few cases for which there was a red-blue polarization were in response to topics you would expect—primarily homosexuality, abortion, and gun control. But even on these issues there were other questions in which such differences were not found.

But wait, haven’t there been some recent studies showing marked polarization between Republicans and Democrats?

Pew recently released a study comparing Republicans and Democrats and found a trend toward greater polarization on broad ideological questions. Social scientists for some decades have bewailed the fact that citizens seemed fairly mixed up about what they were supposed to think. So the big news was that for the first time in two decades of polling on these questions, more than half of Republicans were taking clearly conservative position and Democrats clearly liberal ones. This is all part of the process of that has been called “the big sort.”

So how big of an ideological difference are we talking about here? The standard that Pew used was that, in response to 10 questions, if Republicans took the conservative position for three more questions than they took the liberal position, they qualified as at least mostly conservative. How many Republicans crossed this threshold? A relatively modest 53 percent. Democrats who met this standard on the liberal side were a similarly modest 56 percent.

And even if this sorting is going on in relation to broad ideological questions it does not mean that there is all that much polarization on questions that ask more specifically what the government should do.

The Pew study found substantial partisan convergence on policy questions, even on abortion and gun control. When they presented a broad question on these issues majorities of Republicans and Democrats did diverge. But when they followed up with a question that asked for a more specific policy recommendation, majorities on both sides moved toward more moderate positions that were barely distinguishable. The numbers holding fast to the clearly polarized positions were small minorities—tails on a fairly normal curve.

So what then is driving the polarization? If you ask the American people, they do not think they are the problem, but rather competing special interests that are pouring ever-growing amounts of money into the political process and deploying ballooning numbers of lobbyists. They see members of Congress raising increasing amounts of money and making commitments that make them more inflexible in their positions. Since many of these influence-buying interests are at odds with each other, Americans do not find it all that mysterious how Congress ends up in gridlock.

Most Americans reject the idea this is a natural feature of the democratic process. They believe that if members of Congress were to listen more closely to the people they are supposed to represent, they would be more apt to find common ground.

Research says they are right.

Kull is president of Voice Of the People, a non-partisan, not-for-profit organization that uses innovative methods and technology to give the American people a more effective voice in the policymaking process.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/politics/212491-polarization-is-not-driven-by-the-people#ixzz38KYL8HZC
Follow us: @thehill on Twitter | TheHill on Facebook
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jul 24, 2014 - 04:29pm PT
Looks like most Americans aren't too polarized.

Are the Supertopo political hacks an aberration?

 waiting on a point....
Norton

Social climber
the Wastelands
Jul 24, 2014 - 04:45pm PT
Looks like most Americans aren't too polarized.

really, then why do Americans vote so diametrically opposed?
jammer

climber
Jul 24, 2014 - 06:21pm PT
^^^

And who the f*#k is Congress sticking up for exactly?
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jul 24, 2014 - 06:43pm PT
What's the problem with the right wing today?

Something tells me that this anecdotal study tells me all I need to know about how the entire right-wing/religious cultists suffers (we all really suffer seeing how the rest of us need to put up with this type of human non-human) from their less than perfect upbringing.



Could it be that they don't know the difference between what we all experience and what these individuals make up in their own heads?



jammer - Would I be speaking out of turn if I mention the upper 1% here? I hear congress using words like "the American people" when they speak... but their actions while on the job leave much to be desired...

I suppose republicans could start coming to terms with the fact that they are not going to be able to make Obama's presidency a one term presidency like they promised the day that Obama was elected by the American Citizens.....
Sadly, it will likely be mostly me a a few others out here in the wild telling historians how these pathetic congressional whores did their jobs.

HighDesertDJ

Trad climber
Jul 24, 2014 - 06:47pm PT
Governor Sam Brownback (R-Kansas), after passing his "Red State" model of economic growth which involved cutting taxes to create the fabled economic utopia that Republicans have long held will follow, is getting browbeaten now that his state is suffering a huge budget deficit (but...but...tax cuts pay for themselves!) and job growth that lags behind the national average. How bad has it gotten? So bad that some Republicans are actually endorsing a Democrat for Governor.

http://www.npr.org/2014/07/24/334481326/a-strange-political-dustup-clouds-kansas-governors-future

Kansas's Republican Gov. Sam Brownback is locked in an unexpectedly tough re-election battle for doing exactly what he said he would do — cut taxes.

Citing mounting evidence that those tax cuts are creating a budget crisis – not stimulating the Kansas economy as promised — some in the state's moderate Republican establishment recently did the unthinkable: endorse a Democrat for governor.

That's not only endangering Brownback's re-election hopes, it's also tarnishing his plans to turn one of the reddest of red states into a national model...

..."The tax cuts that Kansas implemented a couple of years ago and took effect at the beginning of 2013 were one of the biggest state tax cuts in history," he explains. "And now a number of other states are pointing to Kansas as a model for how you can use very large tax cuts to promote economic growth."

But so far, Leachman says, following Kansas's lead may not be a good idea. The tax cuts haven't generated anything close to the economic "shot of adrenaline" that Gov. Brownback promised.

"There is no evidence of any boost to the state's economy," he says. "Kansas's job growth since the tax cuts took effect is actually a little slower than job growth has been nationally."
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jul 24, 2014 - 06:51pm PT
For the 54,854th post I would say that the answer to your question is.....YES!
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jul 24, 2014 - 06:54pm PT
Yeah, but facts have a liberal bias doncha know
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jul 24, 2014 - 06:58pm PT
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jul 24, 2014 - 07:02pm PT
How bad has it gotten? So bad that some Republicans are actually endorsing a Democrat for Governor.

 I believe that one day this cat will be out of the bag.... when everyone see that the myth of the National Republican party platform doesn't work.... not in the national arena... not in the state arena... not in the individual arena...

one day....
Dave Kos

Social climber
Temecula
Jul 24, 2014 - 07:06pm PT
TGT's cartoon is good.

It perfectly illustrates how today's hysterical Republicans believe that the Fox News outrage de jour is a "crisis" on the scale of the Civil War.

TYRANNY! TYRANNY! TYRANNY!!

BENGHAAAAAZZZZZIIIIIIIIIIII!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jul 24, 2014 - 07:14pm PT
POTUS Denies woman timely reproductive healthcare!

http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Woman-in-Labor-Unable-to-Cross-Los-Angeles-Street-to-Hospital-Because-of-President-Obama-Motorcade-268427662.html


Now if she was in front of a Planed Parenthood facility, that might have been a different story.
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