Why are Republicans Wrong about Everything?

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jghedge

climber
Apr 1, 2013 - 05:46pm PT
^^^^^

Got any climbing vids of yourself, TGT?

Wagering that they'd make Obama look like LeBron
Ricky

climber
Sometimes LA
Apr 1, 2013 - 05:58pm PT

190 back to the pipe yet?
Dave Kos

Social climber
Temecula
Apr 1, 2013 - 06:45pm PT
BENGHAZI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 1, 2013 - 06:55pm PT
Well Dave,, Obama also promised "transparency" .. Benghazi hasnt been transparent to say the least. Why havent we heard from a single survivor?

They have fed gag orders thats why..

And why the gag orders?? you tell me.
monolith

climber
SF bay area
Apr 1, 2013 - 06:58pm PT
Er, um, cuz they are CIA.

Please, please, put me on TV, then send me out on a mission.
jghedge

climber
Apr 1, 2013 - 08:16pm PT
"And why the gag orders?? you tell me."

Weren't you just blathering on about loyalty oaths?

I know people with security clearances at Northrup, McDonald Douglas, Raytheon, TRW etc who can't talk about what they do

The CIA is orders of magnitude higher on the...


Oh wait, I'm trying to explain common sense to Rong


Never mind



Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Apr 1, 2013 - 08:22pm PT
A black man—Barack Obama—sits in the Oval Office. A black woman—Oprah Winfrey—joins Warren Buffett and Bill Gates on the Forbes magazine list of richest individuals in the world. A black couple—Jay-Z and Beyonce—own a basketball team and buy an $80,000 diamond-encrusted Barbie doll for their one-year-old daughter. With such examples of impressive success and vulgar excess it’s easy to think that America’s long history of racial inequality has come to an end.

But then along comes a Brandeis University study showing that even as racial inequalities in terms of education and income have narrowed, the gap in wealth between black and white families has dramatically widened. Between 1985 and 2009, the gap in wealth between white and black families nearly tripled. It may be tempting to imagine that poor choices or lack of a work ethic can explain the disparity, but the study found that for the most part, the wealth gap is not the result of differences in education, diligence, or lifestyle. Instead, inheritance, financial support from wealthy family members, and early homeownership in predominantly white neighborhoods make the difference.

Much of the wealth gap is due to residential segregation. Non-white neighborhoods have lower home values. For decades, government policy at the local, state, and federal level either enforced racial segregation or else encouraged it. By the time the federal government finally stopped encouraging segregation, in the 1950s, the damage was done. Despite decades of fair housing laws, audits still find discrimination in lending and insurance, and too many real estate agents quietly steer prospective buyers to neighborhoods based on race. The Brandeis study found that disparities in home equity account for almost 30 percent of the wealth gap.

The effects of segregation are compounded by the disparity between what white and black families can offer their offspring in financial support. The study found that “because whites are far more able to give inheritances or family assistance for down payments due to historical wealth accumulation, white families buy homes and start acquiring equity an average of eight years earlier than black families.” In addition, “larger up-front payments by white homeowners lower interest rates and lending costs.”

The wealth gap shows us how long-ago injustices still affect society today. Thanks to civil rights laws and improved racial attitudes, the income gap between black and whites with similar levels of education has narrowed (although similar levels of education still yield more wealth for white families). But the wealth gap reflects disparities that are generations old. Civil rights laws and the decline of racism have not—and cannot—narrow this gap. Meanwhile, market forces have compounded it, much in the way the interest rate multiplies the value of a long-held investment. To put it another way, even if two snowballs are rolling down a hill at the same speed, the one that started larger will accumulate much more snow.

The authors of the Brandeis study write that the racial wealth gap is the civil rights issue of the 21st century. In a sense, they’re right. But, unlike government-enforced segregation and overt discrimination, the wealth gap cannot be fixed with civil rights laws prohibiting discrimination. After all, the wealthy white parents who pay their kid’s way through medical school or help her buy her first house aren’t discriminating against black Americans; they’re helping their kid in a way that anyone would if they could. The law can’t do much about the factors that contribute to neighborhood segregation, either. The current patterns of segregation have been around since the Jim Crow era, and they are maintained in part by the preferences of people of all races for culturally similar neighbors and in part by subtle discrimination in selling and lending—the type of discrimination that is hardest to spot and to stop.

Of course, the most direct response to the wealth gap would be a policy of reparations. But reparations are politically and practically infeasible, however just they might be in theory. Statistics can reveal a societal injustice like the wealth gap, but they give us no idea of precisely which individuals have suffered the injustice, much less which have unjustly benefited. And as a political matter, redistribution of wealth should be determined by need, not according to injuries suffered long ago by people long dead. Few Americans would support the payment of reparations to Jay-Z or Beyonce, even if their ancestors were slaves or sharecroppers.

Finally, as with so many of today’s injustices, the problem of the wealth gap involves more than just race. The gap in wealth between the wealthiest and poorest Americans, regardless of race, has widened dramatically in recent years. Blacks are disproportionately poor because of racial injustice, past and present. At the same time, if we go from group level down to an individual level, poor whites with few job prospects and no inherited wealth face many of the same challenges as poor blacks with few job prospects and no inherited wealth. All are prey to a winner-take-all economy in which the gap that separates an investment banker—or Oprah, Jay-Z, and Beyonce—from an hourly employee at Wal-Mart keeps growing. Perhaps, therefore, the civil rights movement of the 21st century started with Occupy Wall Street.

Richard Thompson Ford is professor of law at Stanford University and author of Rights Gone Wrong: How Law Corrupts the Struggle for Equality and The Race Card: How Bluffing About Bias Makes Race Relations Worse.

http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/2013/04/01/did-civil-rights-not-happen/ideas/nexus/?
Dave Kos

Social climber
Temecula
Apr 1, 2013 - 08:42pm PT
A black couple—Jay-Z and Beyonce—own a basketball team and buy an $80,000 diamond-encrusted Barbie doll for their one-year-old daughter.

[...] the gap in wealth between black and white families has dramatically widened.

And of course the solution is to deny my half-white/half-asian children college admissions in favor of someone else, simply because of the color of their skin.

cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Apr 2, 2013 - 10:58am PT
Stockman's call: Get out of market now

http://money.msn.com/top-stocks/post.aspx?post=2a56547b-d2c0-48c8-989d-745fbd26ed2a

Market indicator favored by Buffett flashes red

http://money.msn.com/top-stocks/post.aspx?post=6e412c88-ac19-4bf5-b27d-15219b9e56d0
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 2, 2013 - 11:09am PT
Mono,, many of those survivors were simply GS govt employees ,, NOT CIA.... try again...
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 2, 2013 - 01:36pm PT
What witnesses at Benghazi?

Even if there were some, what would they be covering up and not talking about?

Oh, yah, now I remember, they are covering up the things that Fox News and some wack jobs Made Up, Obama won't release the thing that they know he is hiding,
Too bad McCain has already been burned at the stake for his epic fail after he found out that it was all made up, I wonder when rong will get the message, probably never, he will just keep harping on it as it makes him more and more like an idiot

rong, it's hard to release information about cover ups and conspiracies that Don't exist

the hook in your mouth must hurt with all that constant pulling
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:07pm PT
And of course the solution is to deny my half-white/half-asian children college admissions in favor of someone else, simply because of the color of their skin.

Dave,

The implicit fact in your statement should cause us more shame. In California in particular, the minority most discriminated against historically remains east Asians. The Japanese internment was only one of many racist actions against Asians. They were preceded by anti-Chinese laws, and a host of other outrageous, hate-inspired, laws, customs and actions.

I suspect it surprised few of us that when we removed race as an admission criterion for the University of California, Asian enrollment increased substantially at all of the most prestigious U.C. campuses. In other words, until we explicitly removed race as an admissions criterion, we continued our governmental discrimination against Asians -- and almost no one seems embarrassed by that.

Then again, maybe it shows that those whom the government tries to help would do best to shun that help!

John

monolith

climber
SF bay area
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:08pm PT
Anderson and his exaggerated declarations is laughable.

It was a CIA organized rescue, from a CIA safehouse. No gov employee is going to go to the media to talk about what happened so some wingnut like your self can stop whining about it.

Only security personnel were rescued from the diplomatic site. They lose their jobs if they go to the media.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:31pm PT
You sound much like Nixons staff Mono..

Must burn ya a little to know i predicted every damm thing that took place - the day after the attacks.

Local officials involved- yup
co-ordinated attack and NOTHING to do with some jack wagon vid? YUP While some here were yammering on about that video at the same time.
Then,, Billary took the fall- as also predicted. Never mind a son of a freind of mine that was an officer on a fast team fairly close by that situation that WOULD have been there long before 7 hours was up..That whole scene wreeaks to high heaven. Just like finnacning BOTH sides of the Israeli/Syria shyt. Our foreign policies are a nightmare embarassment.



monolith

climber
SF bay area
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:41pm PT
Nice to see Benghazi Ron is back. YeeeeHawwww!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:44pm PT
i dont forget the bushobama crap.. Nor have i fogotten FDR and what he did.
monolith

climber
SF bay area
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:46pm PT
Did FDR piss you off? He was a socialist you know.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:47pm PT
Do yur own research , youll figure it out im sure..
monolith

climber
SF bay area
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:48pm PT
Please tell us what you think. No amount of research could ever find that out.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 2, 2013 - 02:53pm PT
please deposit 69.95 to my pay pal account, will send info.


meanwhile:



The United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday signed off on a sweeping, first-of-its-kind treaty to regulate the international arms trade, brushing aside worries from U.S. gun rights advocates that the pact could lead to a national firearms registry and disrupt the American gun market.

The long-debated U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) requires countries to regulate and control the export of weaponry such as battle tanks, combat vehicles and aircraft and attack helicopters, as well as parts and ammunition for such weapons. It also provides that signatories will not violate arms embargoes, international treaties regarding illicit trafficking, or sell weaponry to a countries for genocide, crimes against humanity or other war crimes.

With the Obama administration supporting the final treaty draft, the General Assembly vote was 154 to 3, with 23 abstentions.

American gun rights activists, though, insist the treaty is riddled with loopholes and is unworkable in part because it includes “small arms and light weapons” in its list of weaponry subject to international regulations. They do not trust U.N. assertions that the pact is meant to regulate only cross-border trade and would have no impact on domestic U.S. laws and markets.

Critics of the treaty were heartened by the U.S. Senate’s resistance to ratifying the document, assuming President Obama sent it to the chamber for ratification. In its budget debate late last month, the Senate approved a nonbinding amendment opposing the treaty offered by Sen. James M. Inhofe, Oklahoma Republican, with eight Democrats joining all 45 Republicans backing the amendment.

“The Senate has already gone on record in stating that an Arms Trade Treaty has no hope, especially if it does not specifically protect the individual right to bear arms and American sovereignty,” Sen. Thad Cochran, a Mississippi Republican who backed Mr. Inhofe’s motion, said in a statement. “It would be pointless for the president to sign such a treaty and expect the Senate to go along. We won’t ratify it.”

Despite the Senate vote, numerous groups have pressured President Obama to support the treaty, and Amnesty International hailed Tuesday’s vote.

“The voices of reason triumphed over skeptics, treaty opponents and dealers in death to establish a revolutionary treaty that constitutes a major step toward keeping assault rifles, rocket-propelled grenades and other weapons out of the hands of despots and warlords who use them to kill and maim civilians, recruit child soldiers and commit other serious abuses,” said Frank Jannuzi, deputy executive director of Amnesty International USA.

The American Bar Association also released a white paper arguing that the treaty would not affect Second Amendment rights.

General Assembly President Vuk Jeremic said Tuesday that the lack of a regulatory framework on the import and transfer of conventional arms “has made a daunting contribution to ongoing conflict, regional instabilities, displacement of peoples, terrorism and transnational organized crime.”

“Whatever the outcome of today’s meeting, for a treaty to be effective, we will need to keep working together to fulfill its goals,” he said.

Under the treaty, countries must also consider whether weapons would be used to violate international humanitarian or human rights laws, facilitate acts of terrorism or organized crime.

Proponents had hoped that the treaty could be ratified by acclamation at a final negotiating conference last week, but Syria, Iran and North Korea objected.

The final vote Tuesday was 154 countries in favor, three against, and 23 abstaining.

Some abstaining countries, like India and Egypt, felt the treaty did not go far enough on its language regarding terrorism and human rights.
© Copyright 2013 The Washington Times, LLC





Fairly OBVIOUS why the Senate REJECTED that absurd treaty..THE LAST THING ON EARTH is countries like Iran, Egpyt or anywhere else having anything to do with whom America trades arms with.
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