Why are Republicans Wrong about Everything?

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Messages 39821 - 39840 of total 54851 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 11, 2012 - 11:13pm PT
Maybe they can escape to Mexico, they have great Free Enterprise down there, and No Socialism like the rest of the free World, like Canada and Europe
philo

Trad climber
Is that light the end of the tunnel or a train?
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:22pm PT
Need help packing tEEEEEgEEEEEtEEEEE?
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:37pm PT
Indeed! To quote Riley Wyna:

40,000 posts on why FOX new and Teabaggers are antiamerican idiots.
Praise jesus




and some understanding as to how Republicans make "Dumb Decisions."


Dilbert.
Dilbert.
Credit: Fritz
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 11, 2012 - 11:41pm PT
Jim DeMint will make $1 million a year heading up a Right Wing Propaganda Institute
Rush makes $30 Million a Year
Hannity $6 Million

Excel at being a lying propagandist for the Republican mafia, and you can will become rich beyond your dreams
philo

Trad climber
Is that light the end of the tunnel or a train?
Dec 11, 2012 - 11:44pm PT
http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2012/12/11/1314731/new-jersey-gop-congressman-sandy-disaster-relief-is-wasteful-spending/

As New Jersey continues to suffer from extensive damage left in the wake of Hurricane Sandy at the end of October, Rep. Scott Garrett (R-NJ) is poised to veto $60 million in federal aid meant to help his own constituents recover and rebuild.
Sandy’s devastation of the New Jersey shoreline was estimated to cost the state at least $29.4 billion. Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ) said the proposed $60.4 million in federal aid would cover the state’s damages. Garrett, however, suggested to CNBC host and fellow New Jersey resident Jim Cramer that he might deny his home state these much-needed funds, claiming he is concerned about “accountability” for “wasteful spending.”
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Dec 12, 2012 - 01:24am PT
Dr. F. is now #40,000 and #40,001. Sorry, Karl - you were briefly #40,000, but have been demoted to #39,999. But think of the 9s and upside-down 6s.
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Dec 12, 2012 - 01:31am PT
http://samuel-warde.com/2012/12/gov-jan-brewer-punches-a-reporter/

i wouldn't vote for this awful pig of a woman if she was the last person on earth
what the hell is wrong with arizona
Karl Baba

Trad climber
Yosemite, Ca
Dec 12, 2012 - 02:04am PT
Dr. F. is now #40,000 and #40,001. Sorry, Karl - you were briefly #40,000, but have been demoted to #39,999. But think of the 9s and upside-down 6s.

I just needed my 15 minutes of fame. I can die now in peace

Peace

Karl
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Dec 12, 2012 - 08:01am PT
Right to work is simply another Republican ploy to silence opposition from the workers - voters who vote Democrat....Why is it constitutional for corporations to contribute wasteful amounts of bribe money to our lawmakers and unconstitutional for union workers to donate a mere pittance from their pay checks ...? The Republican party is desperate and knows they are losing ground with their narrow agenda of government for the rich leading to a new level of cynicisim and regressive lawmaking...
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Dec 12, 2012 - 08:36am PT
i wouldn't vote for this awful pig of a woman if she was the last person on earth
what the hell is wrong with arizona

She said, "I probably don't believe it is man made..."

WTF does that mean? She's about as smart as a bag of hammers.
Riley Wyna

Trad climber
A crack near you
Dec 12, 2012 - 10:11am PT
. Right to work is simply another Republican ploy to silence opposition from the workers - voters who vote Democrat....Why is it constitutional for corporations to contribute wasteful amounts of bribe money to our lawmakers and unconstitutional for union workers to donate a mere pittance from their pay checks ...? The Republican party is desperate and knows they are losing ground with their narrow agenda of government for the rich leading to a new level of cynicisim and regressive lawmaking...


I think we all have to realise that there is no republican party anymore - in that sense there is nothing to win or lose anymore.
But in the sense that the the republican party is now corporate, foreign and mulitnational power they still win everyday - they are winning on every level and they never give up.

It's like outward skin of the Republican party is still there but underneath all that is left is a turning and frothing body of maggots. A body taken over by its alien hosts.


What is occuring is very very very very very serious.
Increasing industrializarion, environmental destruction, corporate oligarchy power, and decreasing workers rights and weakening governments all over the globe.
This is a mess - its not an exaggeration to say we are headed for another dark ages and there wont be f*#k all left after this one.
Norton

Social climber
the Wastelands
Dec 12, 2012 - 10:33am PT
Johnny
Right to work is simply another Republican ploy to silence opposition from the workers - voters who vote Democrat....Why is it constitutional for corporations to contribute wasteful amounts of bribe money to our lawmakers and unconstitutional for union workers to donate a mere pittance from their pay checks ...? The Republican party is desperate and knows they are losing ground with their narrow agenda of government for the rich leading to a new level of cynicisim and regressive lawmaking...
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Dec 12, 2012 - 10:43am PT
Donald Trump - perhaps the most perfect posterchild for Right wing entitlement!

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/12/11/why-drinking-glenfiddich-is-calculated-to-annoy-donald-trump/


When giving that annual gift of Single Malt, this year make sure it is Glennfidich. In fact lets all go way out of our way to buy in by the crate, case or barrel this year.
Dave Kos

Trad climber
Temecula
Dec 12, 2012 - 10:44am PT
Here's a contest that Romney didn't lose:

Lie of the Year: the Romney campaign's ad on Jeeps made in China

http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2012/dec/12/lie-year-2012-Romney-Jeeps-China/

Bob D'A

Trad climber
Taos, NM
Dec 12, 2012 - 11:11am PT
Obama will go down as one of our greatest presidents...rebuilding the country, destroying the current republican party and finally giving equal rights to gays and women.
Ken M

Mountain climber
Los Angeles, Ca
Dec 12, 2012 - 04:34pm PT
Republican nightmare:

Credit: Ken M
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Dec 12, 2012 - 10:24pm PT
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 12, 2012 - 10:45pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.
jstan

climber
Dec 12, 2012 - 11:11pm PT
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/09/business/getting-to-yes-offers-clues-to-fiscal-talks.html?src=recg


In Talks, G.O.P. May Have to Just Say Yes
By ROBERT H. FRANK
Published: December 8, 2012

IN their book, “Getting to Yes,” Roger Fisher and William Ury introduce what may be the most important concept in the theory of negotiations: the best alternative to a negotiated agreement, or Batna. Knowing your true Batna — and your adversary’s — is critical in bargaining. A vivid example from the entertainment world illustrates the concept and offers some useful hints about how the current fiscal negotiations in Washington are likely to unfold.

The Warner Brothers 1999 hit comedy “Analyze This” portrays a mob boss (Robert De Niro) and his psychiatrist (Billy Crystal), who share a passion for the recordings of Tony Bennett. With the film almost completed — and with Mr. Bennett already an integral part of the plot — the studio finally got around to approaching the crooner with an offer of $15,000 to sing “I’ve Got the World on a String” in the movie’s closing scene. But as Danny Bennett, the singer’s son and business manager, later explained, the executives made a fatal mistake by not scheduling this conversation sooner: “Hey, they shot the whole film around Tony being the end gag and they’re offering me $15,000?”

Had studio officials made their offer at the outset, they would have had much more leverage. If the Bennetts demanded an unreasonable sum, the filmmakers could have rewritten the script and used some other singer. At the 11th hour, however, Warner Brothers’ best alternative to a negotiated agreement was to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars reshooting the film. In the end, the studio paid Tony Bennett $200,000 for a brief cameo appearance.

A similar logic is shaping the current negotiations between President Obama and Congressional Republicans. The Republicans want to keep everyone’s tax rates the same while raising revenue by closing tax loopholes yet unspecified. The president, for his part, wants to restore the 39.6 percent top tax rate for families earning more than $250,000, while maintaining current rates for everyone else. But with the Bush tax cuts scheduled to expire at year’s end, the Republicans face a hurdle similar to the one that confronted Warner Brothers.

In the earlier instance, both sides knew that failure to reach agreement would be far more costly to Warner Brothers than to Tony Bennett. Here as well, both sides know that failure to reach agreement before January will be much more costly to the Republican negotiators than to the president. That’s because expiration of the Bush tax cuts lets Mr. Obama confront the Republicans with an extremely unpalatable choice.

If the year ends without a deal, tax rates for everyone automatically revert to those in effect when President Bill Clinton left office. Neither side wants that to happen, but if it does, the president has a strong hand to play. On Day 1 of the new Congressional session, he could propose legislation that would restore the Bush tax cuts for families with incomes under $250,000. Republicans could then vote in favor, in which case the president gets exactly what he had hoped for; or they could vote against, in which case they will have blocked a reduction in almost every voter’s tax rates. They may wish that these weren’t the alternatives they face, but both sides know that many Republicans would find the second option politically untenable.

That realization appears to have led some Republicans to resurrect their time-honored claim that because many top earners own small businesses, higher top tax rates would severely compromise job creation. But that argument flies in the face of the basic cost-benefit test that governs rational hiring decisions. As every economics textbook on the subject makes clear, a business will hire additional workers whenever, and only whenever, their contribution to the bottom line promises to exceed their pay. If that criterion is satisfied, hiring makes economic sense, no matter how poor the business owner might be. And if it isn’t, no hiring will occur, even if the owner is a billionaire.

An awareness of the weakness of their negotiating position may also explain recent Republican attempts to portray the impasse in Washington as a fiscal cliff that poses an unthinkable disaster for the nation. But as Jonathan Chait of New York magazine has argued, the fiscal cliff is a bad metaphor for the situation we are facing. Because middle-class tax rates would be unlikely to remain higher for long, they would have little impact on overall spending. And as the president would tell voters, even that limited impact can be avoided by making the middle-class tax cuts retroactive to Jan. 1.

THE same goes for so-called sequestration — the across-the-board spending cuts to defense and other non-entitlement spending that automatically start to occur after Jan. 1 in the absence of a budget deal. As both sides recognize, blanket cuts are a terrible way to reduce government spending. But here, too, getting to year’s end without an agreement would strengthen the president’s hand.

Government programs exist because at least some constituents want them, which makes even wasteful ones extremely difficult to cut. Both parties could curry favor by embracing proposals to restore money for the programs that voters value most, and the president could delay cuts while Congress was debating those proposals.

In short, the nation faces not a fiscal cliff, but rather a gentle fiscal slope.

Getting to January without a deal would cause anxiety that everyone wants to avoid — especially Republicans, since opinion polls suggest that most voters will blame them if negotiations break down. But the president and Republicans would prefer to reach agreement now on whatever they would be willing to agree to after new year.

Let’s hope they move rapidly. Any such agreement, however, will be heavily shaped by knowledge of what would otherwise happen after Jan. 1. As Mr. Fisher and Mr. Ury wrote, Batna is the only standard that can protect negotiators from accepting terms that are too unfavorable and from rejecting terms it would be in their interest to accept.

Some have likened today’s negotiations to a game of chicken, in which the loser is whichever of two cars on a head-on collision course swerves first. But that metaphor isn’t instructive without some additional texture: if Republicans are driving a Chevy Spark, the president is driving a Mack truck.
healyje

Trad climber
Portland, Oregon
Dec 12, 2012 - 11:37pm PT
It's a pretty simple deal - democrats are all about increased taxes and have no trouble laying out what increases they want to see. Republicans are all about spending cuts but are unwilling or unable to state exactly and specifically what cuts they want.
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