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Messages 4721 - 4740 of total 7735 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
MH2

climber
Jan 5, 2013 - 12:25am PT
Check with Perry sometime. Once I pulled from my collection of cliche, "Back when dinosaurs walked the Earth..." and Perry said, "Dinosaurs do walk the Earth." He may have been referring to those Lost Worlds across the river.
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Jan 5, 2013 - 12:43am PT
I spent more than a few evenings at the Eatons Wall in the 1990s with other West Van/North Shore climbers who were too poor or otherwise unable to go to the Edge. I recall it being pretty crimpy. Tendinitis special.

There is an awesome offwidth between two of the concrete pillars that I once managed to get about 5 feet off the ground on before slowly oozing down and gobying up my thigh something fierce. Guy I believe went up and down it in his ginch.

The mall security was some 90 yr old guy with an electriccart and it was always a battle when climbing there to see which would stop us first - cold and overcrimped fingers or mall grandpa yelling "You damn kids get off my wall!"
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Jan 5, 2013 - 03:27am PT
Glen - Is this the same Phyl Munday photo that you have? I think it made the rounds of the local alpine inteligentsia so I now have it via my mom and dad.

Bruce, your photo is the famous one the Mundays took from the NW summit looking at the main peak. I think at that point they must have known they were never going to get up it.

My photo is taken from Mt Munday, with the first really good view they had of Wadd and the Tiedeman peaks. It's in Culbert's guide, one of the fold-out glossy photos; that photo was reproduced from mine.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Jan 5, 2013 - 03:31am PT
Tricouni do you know anything about this film footage?

Harry, fascinating that you guys looked at the house when it came on the market. It was indeed at 373 Tempe Crescent, as Tami noted. I believe but am not certain that the film footage is either in the Provincial Archives (Victoria) or with the Mundays' great-niece who lives in Washington.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Jan 5, 2013 - 03:51am PT
Thats so interesting that you guys were all over the touch and goes before even thinking about the chief. you guys were so summit oriented eh? There really seemed to be a distinct cultural separation between the mountaineers and the "rock gymnasts" as G W Young and all the brits and earo's were going on about back then. How did Beckey fit in?

Bruce, yes we (me, Culbert, my brother Bob, our circle of friends) were summit-oriented: we liked things with tops. Hence the T>, the Acrophobes, Trestle Tower in Cheakamus Canyon, miscellaneous rotting (and not) towers in the interior of the province, the Moles, and so forth. The T> have tops to them, some of them not easy to reach.

MH2: lovely, moody photo of the Castle that you posted!

Bruce, in Vancouver in the early 1960s there wasn't really a gap between the "rock gymnasts" and the mountaineers, partly because rock climbers were few and far between (Les Macdonald, Joe Turley, possibly Dick Willmott, and (to some extent) Hank Mather). Everyone else hiked (not necessarily summit-oriented) or climbed summits, hard or easy according to their abilities and tastes. Ex-Brits like Ashlyn Armour-Brown and Hamish Mutch were both highly competent mountaineers and rock climbers, better on the rocks than most of the home-grown crowd.

Jim Baldwin went on a few BCMC trips and did a few things with Dick Culbert, but was mainly a rock climber. Ed Cooper was competent at both (and was to some extent part of the Beckey group). Fred, of course, did both. He was the mainstay of the early climbs at Leavenworth, starting in the late 1940s, in the Peshastins and Castle Rock. But even Fred and Pete Schoening were succeptible to "summit fever." How else to explain why hard-to-reach Tumwater Tower and Chumstick Snag were among the earliest acents in the Leavenworth area? Fred liked obscure, backwater pinnacles as much as anyone.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Jan 5, 2013 - 04:03pm PT
Guy I believe went up and down it in his ginch.


Omigawd that is sooooooooooooooo Guy E.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jan 5, 2013 - 04:25pm PT
Tricouni,

Coincidentally, Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival's mailing address is 373 Tempe Crescent. Maybe they know about the film footage.
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Jan 6, 2013 - 12:36am PT
BK sighting.


Health hazard 12d
Health hazard 12d
Credit: RyanD
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 6, 2013 - 12:40am PT
12d? Heath hazard at penny lane?
brownie

Trad climber
squamish
Jan 6, 2013 - 01:32am PT
12D!?!?
Relic

Social climber
Vancouver, BC
Jan 6, 2013 - 01:35am PT
Health Hazard 10a/14d R/X/yur gonna die
harryhotdog

Social climber
north vancouver, B.C.
Jan 6, 2013 - 02:23am PT
Fred, of course, did both. He was the mainstay of the early climbs at Leavenworth, starting in the late 1940s, in the Peshastins and Castle Rock. But even Fred and Pete Schoening were succeptible to "summit fever." How else to explain why hard-to-reach Tumwater Tower and Chumstick Snag were among the earliest acents in the Leavenworth area? Fred liked obscure, backwater pinnacles as much as anyone.

Unidentified climber, Fred and Pete Schoening
Unidentified climber, Fred and Pete Schoening
Credit: unknown
I could not find a date associated with either pic. Any car experts out there?
Credit: Blackbird
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 6, 2013 - 02:34am PT
The car looks like very late forties into very early fifties. I'm not sure of the make and I am too buzzed to go look it up. The car looks new. It could be as early as '48.

Hey Anders did you ever talk to Claunch? If you need more help getting the old guy to talk to you, let me know. The best way might be to see him personally.
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Jan 6, 2013 - 04:07am PT
Brownie sighting.

Left Rib V6
Left Rib V6
Credit: RyanD
Relic

Social climber
Vancouver, BC
Jan 6, 2013 - 10:10am PT
Cleft Bib is V17. Brownie is doing it wrong.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Jan 6, 2013 - 02:23pm PT
Harry: I know nothing about cars. But in the photo, left to right: Don WIlde, Fred Beckey, Pete Schoening. Phot by Fred.

Pete Schoening climbed extensively with Fred and others in the Cashmere Crags from 1948 to 1951; Dick Wilde did a few trips, too. The trio in the photo did one only climb together that I can track down: April Fools Tower on April 1, 1951. In other versions of this photo, there's plenty of snow nearby, so early spring seems about right. My best guess is that the photo is spring, 1951.
Big Mike

Trad climber
BC
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 6, 2013 - 02:52pm PT
Thanks Glenn and all. There is nothing better than opening my favorite thread and finding another gold nugget of history!!
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Jan 6, 2013 - 02:58pm PT
Health hazard 12d

Well not to quibble but actually it felt more like 13a
RyanD

climber
Squamish
Jan 6, 2013 - 03:18pm PT
Well the way you did that sit down start in the cave below with the overhead dbl heel hooks Before dynoing to what is normally the starting foothold at the lip seemed much more difficult than the reg way I've seen it done. Once you held the swing I knew it was at least 12+ but was only guessing, my bad- I'll edit the photo & upgrade it later. Just trying to stick with the consensus of handout grades at the bluffs, sorry for the sandbaggerry.


Hey Tricouni, awesome tower tales here, did u guys ever make your way up any of the ones in marble canyon? I always wondered the history on those & if they have seen many ascents, I'm sure they are choss but still quite striking formations.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Jan 6, 2013 - 03:37pm PT
Ryan: The big pinnacle in Marble Canyon, Chimney Rock, was climbed in 1957 by Hank Mather & Elfrida Pigou; this was probably the first route in Marble Canyon. It was done a few years later by Dick Culbert and (if memory serves) John Owen and once in a while since them. (It's got a summit, hence the attraction.) I never climbed it.

Dick and I did Schism Rock between Clinton and the Fraser in early 1964. I don't think it's had a repeat ascent, but Robin Barley has recently been developing various routes on the crags nearby. Rock is limestone, much as in Marble Canyon. Route is more or less up the centre edge between sun and shadow. Barley says the wall on the other side of the tower looks excellent. Rock here and in Marble Canyon is not choss, but it's not Squamish, either. Different rock, different styles.
Schism Rock, just above the Canoe Creek road.
Schism Rock, just above the Canoe Creek road.
Credit: Tricouni

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