What is "Mind?"

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High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 09:07am PT
Ouch!

Only after you do "the harder work" regarding R=E/I in non-ohmic pn devices, lol!

.....

"The urge for retribution... seems to depend upon (1) our not seeing the underlying causes of human behavior, (2) our innate impulses and sentiments (in this case, relative to others)."

doubtful...

Seriously, now, where is EdH coming from, how could he find fault with such a simple, largely noncontroversial statement put forth mostly for context. Weird.

.....

Better: Don't critique me, I'm just a climber. Much more interesting would be your critique of Sam Harris ala his "Illusion of Free Will" online lecture. I'd esp enjoy it if you'd articulate it in non-energy physics terms, btw, too. I'm sure I speak for many... that would be interesting. There could be some great insight there (one way or another).
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Aug 19, 2014 - 09:17am PT
silly me...

...you seemed to take some offense that your "knowledge" of electronics was questioned. Maybe you could explain what a pn junction is, and how it works? and the number of times you've used it in circuits you've designed.

but yes, you don't seem to be very deep. Maybe that's just my impression, but your understanding appears to be gleaned from a myriad of books in the popular literature authored by "significant" people who you quote with the intent of transferring their authority to your arguments.

but do carry on (you will, no doubt).
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 09:21am PT
Yes, silly you. Electronics is not your wheelhouse, Ed. With all due respect. I used to manage an electronics design lab, I've wired up pn junctions manifested in diodes, transistors, ICs measured in hundreds of hours. Your way over your head on this one, trust me. :)

No, I freely acknowledged earlier on in my response to you concerning Ohm's Law (which, btw, wasn't even the core pt of the discussion) that the latter (the term) might have a textbook definition that differs from a more loose practical lab definition (where it's synonymous with I=E/R) which holds for pn junctions, incandescent lamps, etc. btw.

Your correcting me regarding "Ohm's Law" was akin to a noob climber correcting Largo calling nuts "wires." Or a noob skier correcting a more experienced skier calling moguls "bumps."

Sorry for the dust-up, it's all pretty trivial actually. I must be bored this hour, huh? :)

but do carry on (you will, no doubt).

Don't we all, lol!

.....

Still, upon re-read, how could EdH respond with "doubtful" to such a straight-forward statement regarding "urge for retribution." Surprising is all.

And of course the impulses or sentiments I mentioned would be the result of evolutionary game theory (in part, in terms of tit for tat, etc.).
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 19, 2014 - 09:37am PT
Found it after googling "neuronal weather pattern" a phrase Harris used in his "free will" lecture on YouTube that caught my ear because I too in past times had referred to / conceived of brain states (brain circuitry states) as similar to "weather" states in their causal automaticity.

Ms. Margo is a textbook example of somebody who misunderstands science and/or the language of science (and thus Harris too) concerning an extremely complex / delicate and tricky subject due to inexperience or uneducation.

----


As he's worked overtime to establish, on the one had, Fruity conflates and dumbs down the process to the few catagories he understands, then accuses others of not grasping the fine nuances of his reasoning.

Anyone who has done brain mapping with EEGs or qEEG can tell you that measuring an electrical signal is going to look like a storm. But what's lost on Fruity is that the storm and being sentient of that storm (content, qualia, etc.) are not selfsame. This might seem like a needless distinction till we realize much of the scientif heavy lifting involves discovering and isolating the componests of some thing or phenomenon and investigating it in depth by all and every means. When we give sentience - as opposed to content ("brain circuitry states" in Fruitcake's wonkly language) - short shrift, we end up with vapid statements like, "sentience is what the brain does."

Imagine saying that gravity is what an avalanche does, and leaving it at that - and calling that science.

As Ed has mentioned, when pressed, or looked at with any acuity, Fruity's "science" is merely a fool's platform for him to pimp simplistic half-truths as facile, self evident "science," while publically bungholing his boytoy, Samuel Harris.

At least attempt to add something NEW to the conversation, as opposed to just griniding on the same old bone al la Abrahamic religion.

JL



High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 09:39am PT
Hey, welcome back, Ol Fluffer! Come to think of it, why don't you take over for Fruitcake, he's had enough.

But in doing so, just remember... your issues are with science (not Harris or Fruitcake). Chow time.

All hail the EEG!!
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 19, 2014 - 11:16am PT
I haven't been involved in brain mapping stuff since the 1990s but modern neurofeedback - a biofeedback model that that uses real-time displays of brain activity — while it used to use mostly electroencephalography (EEG), has gone on to employ hemoencephalography (HEG) or functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI) as modalities to teach self-regulation of brain function. I mentioned EEG only as an example of "storm" style electrical output, not as a modern example of NF.

PET scans and all sorts of other devices are used in this work provided one has access to the gear, which in many cases is extremely expensive. Curiously enough, while micro investigations are turning up new info per the brain by the day, the business of consciousness, which many believe is a more global brain phenomenon, might well be better understood or at least measured by way of coherence and other brain markers first explored with the old EEGs. An EEG machine is really just an amplifier (artifact used to be a big problem, now largely solved). It's what modern software can do with the amplified measurements that determine how relevant and cutting edge the work really is. What makes the EEG an interesting tool is that it doesn't render a static picture, but rather charts the process in real time. And since brain process is dynamic, dynamic measuring devices are a boon.

JL
jgill

Boulder climber
Colorado
Aug 19, 2014 - 12:11pm PT
The urge for retribution... seems to depend upon (1) our not seeing the underlying causes of human behavior, (2) our innate impulses and sentiments (in this case, relative to others)

. . . doubtful, probably more to do with the Nash equilibrium in such a "game" where "tit-for-tat" is the winning longterm strategy


Crowd-sourcing the points of equilibrium? Curious statement, but thought provoking.

High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 12:15pm PT
Jan, you might find this interesting...

http://www.theminimalists.com/sam/

"In our culture, spirituality seems to be synonymous with faith, so much so that it’s hard to untangle the term and use it in any other context. And yet you do so masterfully, taking a rational approach to spiritual life..."

re: spirituality

"This was one of those rare instances in which the right words simply don’t exist in English. Many of my fellow scientists object to the term “spirituality”— because it has been so often associated with a belief in immaterial souls or spirits, magic, and so forth."

"In evolutionary terms, we’re probably lucky that we’re not more miserable than we are. After all, our genes haven’t been sculpted with our subjective well-being in mind."

"Thinking is so useful that we are probably wired to do it continuously. Unfortunately, much of what we think about makes us miserable."

"Millions of years of hominid evolution have not prepared us for Instagram." lol!

"Mindfulness is an extremely useful tool for kids—just teaching them to be aware of their emotions is an important step toward basic sanity."

"Your mind is all you truly have. So it makes sense to train it."
MH2

climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 01:14pm PT


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/14/science/our-microbiome-may-be-looking-out-for-itself.html



Ngarlu
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Maestro, Ecosystem Ministry, Fatcrackistan
Aug 19, 2014 - 01:18pm PT
^^^^ That sweet acidophiles may just be sweet on YOU.

DMT

We've been looking outward, upward, inward and elseward, for god. Shoulda been looking through a microscope?

Is life really just the replication machine for the DNA virus?
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Aug 19, 2014 - 01:25pm PT
Your way over your head on this one, trust me. :)

well, nice you were a technician... I used to design computers and high bandwidth data acquisition systems for high energy physics experiments, and taught classes on electronic design for physicists...

but I can see how it could be over my head. maybe I forgot it all...
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Aug 19, 2014 - 01:25pm PT

we might not just be a pimple on the ass of the universe, that pimple on our ass might actually be an apt Swiftian metaphor...

isn't that a quote from the movie Animal House?
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Aug 19, 2014 - 01:58pm PT

from the nytimes link,

Perhaps, he suggests, the certain kinds of bacteria that thrive on chocolate are coaxing us to feed them.

The implications of this are HUGE, and they make sense.

my daughters whole class are hooked on this new snackfood called Takki's. i'd even say addicted. i can't swallow one, they are disgusting!

It would behoove food company's to know of "addictive ingredients"! It's true that they already use some, like MSG.

it would be a better world if we could come up with a anti-nicotine and anti -alcohol bacteria! Do away with those addictions, PLEASE!!
BLUEBLOCR

Social climber
joshua tree
Aug 19, 2014 - 02:11pm PT

"Thinking is so useful that we are probably wired to do it continuously. Unfortunately, much of what we think about makes us miserable."


More to the truth, we are hardwired to learn! We are learning machines!

When we're open to learn is when we're the most happiest.
High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 02:15pm PT
well, nice you were a technician...

This is hilarious, lol!

I used to design computers and high bandwidth data acquisition systems for high energy physics experiments, and taught classes on electronic design for physicists...

Well then, you should know where I'm coming from, lol! Why would you choose to quibble over I=E/R in a post concerning simple scientific truths?

I suppose for the same reason you quibble over causality or causation. Or scientific "truths".

Don't get me wrong, there's a place for quibbling. One of my favorite expressions is, "The Devil's in the details." But you sometimes seem to do it in the weirdest of places (e.g., out of context) is all.

taught classes on electronic design

Okay, I'll call. Imagine a simple circuit, three components is all apart from the wiring. We have a six volt dc source supplying current to a resistor in series with and LED (your non-ohmic pn device!). Let's say the function of this simple circuit is just to test drive the LED. So far so good? Now the voltage drop across the 200 ohm resistor is 4 volts. What's going on across and through the LED?

Don't quibble with ground loops or resistance in the wiring or high energy physics equations here, just tell me in practical terms and language what characterizes the LED in the ON state?

If you're game.
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 19, 2014 - 02:22pm PT
Management types produce nothing.
---


This assumes that only the component parts of an operation are real and valuable - a spectacular piece of blarney that has occasioned some of the greatest blunders imaginable since without an executive agency keeping track of things and making decisions and course corrections, the airplane is flying blind.

Case in point: the situation in my adopted home of Venezuela. Former president General Hugo Chavez nationalized the power company and went through the executive staff and asked everyone, basically, what they produced. Strategic planners where sh#t-canned on the spot because they clearly didn't make or produce anything at all. The were, in Chavez's mind, so many haut bourgeoisie fakers, scamming the proletariat who as we all know, "produce" all the goods.

Couple years later, the real workers built a huge power plant in Cumana, but when it came time to hook it up to the power grid, there were no towers built or cables strung because that was not the job of those producing the power plant, and the strategic planners who normally oversaw and managed those operations had all been fired.

When we work off a strictly mechanical model, a model that supposedly directs itself, sans executive (sentient) oversight, we eventually start floundering. Simple as that.

JL
Largo

Sport climber
The Big Wide Open Face
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 19, 2014 - 03:14pm PT
No one is arguing that management, per se, is completely useless. Just that ML is a little full of himself thinking that they're somehow indispensable. The fact is, most small businesses do damn well without them, and today's unemployment lines have managers outnumbering engineers 100 to 1, if not more. There's a reason for that.
----


I think that anyone married to a reductionistic, bottom-up view of reality is bound to believe that the more toward the bottom we go, the more "real" and indispensable we get. Imagine applying this model to the military. Since the Generals don't do any of the real fighting, we can dump them straight off. And then all the way down the line to the genuine ranks of privates and PFCs, who do all the heavy lifting. We'll just let them run things.

Conversely, socialism is a political and economic structure that tries to place all currency on the "workers," but in actual practice, every state agency invariably ends up ridiculously top heavy with the vast amount of people only acting like they are working. For example, the old oil and gas operations in Venezuela used to be run by X amount of people costing X amount of dollars. Now they employ X times 3 people, work at only half the efficiency, and at five times the cost.

What is required is a balanced attack. Too much top end and you become profligate and inefficient. Too little low end and the whole thing gets chaotic and disorganized and can't course correct.

JL
Ward Trotter

Trad climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 04:11pm PT
I would agree that the orthodox managerial model, broadly defined, is rapidly becoming a flagrant anachronism , be it government or business or organizations in general. The clearest and obvious exception is in the conduct of war by the military. Yet even with war there are notorious examples of them more often being fought , especially since WW2, in atrociously inept ways ,thoroughly underscoring the failure of strictly managerial approaches to its proper execution . War in general is pretty simple, sort of like boxing : the restrictions of which is to obey a few fundamental rules but otherwise the object is to beat the holy crap out of the other guy ---or don't get in the ring at all.

Managers are outside of the ring. They derive there raison d'être when systems become so complex --- like war--- that a "broad picture" approach becomes inclusively mandatory. This is fine and usually works quite well only up to a certain level--- beyond which the "managers" are so outside of the ring that they lose all sense of causative reality. An egregious example of this negative principle are wars fought by politicians --- literally and figuratively thousands of miles from the battlefield.

The reason I used the word "anachronism" in the above is to draw attention to the fact that technology has produced a world in which information has been "liberated" and decentralized.
The "broad picture" can usually now be discerned by everyone in an organization, once they are given free access to relevant information. Part of the reason why exclusively rigid hierarchical systems flourished in bygone times is attributable to the centralized hoarding of information.

I'm not suggesting here that management per se is now dispensable --- only that it is rapidly transforming. The old model is outside of the boxing ring and has become passé. Those still espousing it have given up the fight. An obvious symptom of their disaffection takes the form of a bitter rejection of the outside world for not seeing what brilliant managers they really are.They are down and out for the count.



High Fructose Corn Spirit

Gym climber
Aug 19, 2014 - 04:32pm PT
Where's Ed? I'm waiting for my non-ohmic pn analysis. ;)
Jan

Mountain climber
Colorado, Nepal & Okinawa
Aug 19, 2014 - 05:48pm PT
Unfortunately, academia has not signed on to the new management model. I would say we are where Detroit was in the 1970's. College presidents make hundreds of thousands of dollars and every year more layers of middle managers are added, yet the people who actually produce, the instructors and researchers, make a pittance and have less and less say in education. Tuition goes up and up but mostly to management salaries.
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