The Skydiving and Aviation Related Photo Thread! (OT)

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Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 30, 2013 - 12:06pm PT
Wow, BASE. Thanks a lot for sharing some tales on this thread. Awesome stuff. Those pictures are classic to the extreme.

That shot of the Wonderhog (used to say the wonder was for "wonder if it's going to open this time") is super hard core.

I started jumping in the early 90s, and my jumpmaster Hank Winig was one of the early adopters of BASE. Back then they were doing direct-bag jumps out at Lake Powell, all kinds of crazy stuff using XL Clouds, Pegasus, anything that had 7 cells.
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Apr 30, 2013 - 12:26pm PT
I opened up Lake Powell. Carl Boenish found it and did a few static line jumps off of a little cliff, but we went there later on and opened up the big cliff next door. We spent a full week and did over 100 jumps between 4 of us.

Direct bag is lame. It is an easy way to get numbers. That's all. You might as well be a sack of sh#t. Sorry, that is just how we felt when Mark Hewitt went out to a little bridge and did almost twenty direct bags so that he could beat out Phil Smith with the most jumps in the world.

Phil was scouting and doing new objects. I think the number of objects matters more than the number of jumps. I know that there is at least one guy at the Potato Bridge who has a thousand or some crazy number of jumps.

We always thought that slider up and long delays was much cooler than 1 second delays (no offense, Hank). Now with wing suits, I just cry that I missed it.

Here is a shot of the first jumps at Lake Powell. I'm the low guy on the round. You could really burn it down with a round.

Yeah, we were naked...
Yeah, we were naked...
Credit: BASE104
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 30, 2013 - 12:37pm PT
No offense taken, BASE. Hank moved away from the DB stuff pretty quick, and had a good time on a lot of other objects. His main love was CRW, and he was on the Diamond Quest team for a few years. Fun times, packing for those guys.

Oldest rig I currently have in storage is a dual roundy. Crossbow container, Pioneer 28 main and a Featherlite 22 reserve. Still in great shape.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 30, 2013 - 12:56pm PT
I'm not trolling - was there 'base' before Sylvester?

ps
Vegas, I've had a B-17 fly over me twice this week!
Yesterday it went right over my house at 1000' AGL! But it was foggy
so I could only sort of see it. Ohhh, but that music!
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Apr 30, 2013 - 04:10pm PT
There were a couple of guys who jumped El Cap with rounds way back in the day. They ragdolled around and got pretty banged up. From what I know, this was the first Valley BASE jump. Sylvester did it with skis, and then famously skied off of Asgard in the scene that supposedly resurrected the James Bond films from their slow death.

If you haven't seen that scene, well, it rules. He was jumping a round Piglet with the Union Jack on it.

I don't know if anyone knows what a Piglet is, but it was a smallish round that had a bunch of vents and stuff in it. Phil Smith had a light weight one built out of F-111 fabric, and I used to jump the snot out of that sucker on jumps where the landing was good..overhanging cliffs. It opened soooo evenly every time that I would burn it down very low. I later took to taking my reserve (a preserve III) out and jumping it, as you can see in that Lake Powell shot above.

You can't do much more than a three second delay on a square without a slider without risking blowing it up. The rounds fit that 4-6 second delay range very well. I did a whole bunch of jumps on rounds.

I even saw George Roso jump a Para Commander (the popular round until squares came along) off of the big cliff at Powell.

If anyone knows anything about a Para Commander, you will realize that BASE jumping one off of a 600 cliff was pretty out there. I saw it happen, though. He found the canopy in a pile of old stuff under the rigger's table at the dropzone, free to whoever wanted to make a car cover.

Those old parachutes were incredibly bulky. The lines were huge, the fabric was heavy. A 25 or 30 lb weight was not uncommon.

There was a period just before square reserves showed up where everyone had 9 cell skydiving mains and round reserves. We would use those round reserves for certain jumps. nobody does this anymore, but they worked great. The openings were incredibly predictable. It wasn't legal to sneak it back into your container, but a couple of us did it. by that time, the round reserves would pack down to a tiny size and you could stand up a landing sometimes. The idea was to pull so low that you would land before hitting the object. It worked very well.

They landed too hard for buildings. They were best with sandy or water landing spots.
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Apr 30, 2013 - 04:15pm PT
Sheet base! PC 1 and 2s were the stuff bitd! Way bettr that surplus 28' rounds with the TU mods. But,, did he base jump that pc with a SLEEVE!???
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Apr 30, 2013 - 04:24pm PT
I meant Hankster. He has been doing too many short delays. As an aging fart, long delay terminal flights are the best. When you see people tossing their pilot chutes right at exit, those kind of suck.

I wish that I could convert some old VHS to CD and post them up. I've got a copy of John Hoover flying through a window in L.A. he came back out and spun in on top of a 2 story building. Unhurt other than a zillion stitches.

Hank Caylor has the all time best building strike story in the history of BASE. He flew through a window into a room, took the elevator down in a bloody mess, and was later caught. The way he tells it is sooo funny. I need to meet Hank some day. I am a big fan!

This is one of the funniest interviews that you will ever seen. The Taco's own Hankster..

I have to admit that we could do most things drunk as well....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQe3kqTYW4c
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Apr 30, 2013 - 04:26pm PT
Not a sleeve. We would just flake the rounds and put a rubber band over the vent hole at the top.

The rounds that I used were fine and other people used them. But yep. I witnessed (now Doctor) George Roso jump a PC off of a 600 foot cliff. If it had sniveled he would have gotten mangled, even in water.

It wasn't me, but I witnessed it.
JayMark

Social climber
Oxnard, CA
Apr 30, 2013 - 04:43pm PT
Base, the Strato Star was my first square too. I weighed about 175 then and that being a 5 cell really went upwind great. You had to really stick the landing though or you could just drill yourself in to the ground :) I liked mine though, until I blew the front lines off opening at too fast a speed. I went to the Cloud after that and missed the great upwind approaches. I still have the Star and the Cloud as I've been away from jumping for some time now. Great to read your posts. Thanks.

JEM
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Apr 30, 2013 - 04:47pm PT
What a great thread. Thanks all.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 30, 2013 - 04:49pm PT
Yeah, Base, I've heard Rick's stories first-hand.
I bet you didn't know he was into cross-dressing. ;-)

Credit: Reilly
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
May 3, 2013 - 09:53pm PT
About that Solar Plane...

http://grist.org/list/watch-a-solar-plane-fly-across-america/?utm_campaign=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&kmi=robbertken2008%40mac.com&km_subscriber-email=1&km_subscriber-daily=1

 There is a video of the action as its happening…. They are on-board, and announcing while this is going. Supposed to be landing the plane around midnight Mountain Time…..

I just watched an explanation of how they figured out the waste problem of a flight of this type with a plane of this type….


Slow and steady wins the race….
Tfish

Trad climber
La Crescenta, CA
May 3, 2013 - 11:53pm PT
Fun jump from last week
Bat Hanging at Taft
Bat Hanging at Taft
Credit: Tfish
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - May 4, 2013 - 02:25am PT
Nice shot T! It's been a long time since I pulled that move. Classic shot at a VERY classic DZ! Taft was one of the first DZs in the state.
TomCochrane

Trad climber
Santa Cruz Mountains and Monterey Bay
May 4, 2013 - 03:02am PT
Strato Star main, a wonderhog container

i started out with a double-L, then a TU, then a ParaCommander, then Papillon, then a Strato Star, then a Cloud, currently a Diablo
climbski2

Mountain climber
Anchorage AK, Reno NV
May 4, 2013 - 12:30pm PT
Flight in the last operational B-24 with one of the original pilots.

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
May 4, 2013 - 12:52pm PT
Tfish, what the hell is on the underside of the Cessna's wing?
And I hope you had sunscreen on yer bare arms!

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

A very sad accident this week - it seems that upon takeoff the load in this
747 shifted rearwards causing an unrecoverable stall.

BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
May 4, 2013 - 06:10pm PT
JayMark,

Cool! Somebody knows what I'm yacking about. The Sratostar was a pretty pathetic parachute, but prior to that, everyone was jumping rounds with big belly mounted reserves.

The Para Commander came out and that sucker was so full of vent holes that it boggled the mind. It did have some forward speed, so you could target a landing spot. Nothing like a square.

Yeah, JM. My buddy John Hoover jumped a StratoCloud. Those were actually good BASE canopies other than the pack weight. I can't even remember my first real rig. I don't recognize that first El Cap route to be my real rig, because it had so many steering line entanglements. I cut it up and used it for stuff. It was total junk. 3 malfunctions in 25 jumps (luckily none on that El Cap jump).

Malfunctions used to be fairly common. Later in my jumping career, the skydiving canopies got better and better. This was all prior to the first BASE specific canopies. The market used to be so tiny. At one point I was in the top 10 in the world with 100 BASE jumps.

By the time I had a Sabre, gear was super good. Sabre's were super fast and you could jump a tiny one. What ended my BASE career was jumping a 1500 foot antenna with the Sabre, because I was too lazy to get my BASE rig together. I opened off heading and flew through the wires.

I landed and was pretty freaked out. My son was about 2 years old, so I hung it up. Never did another one. Skydiving went out the window shortly afterwards. Too much money if you have a family to take care of.

All in all, I'm happy with my choices. My son is in college, handsome like his mother, (who is smoking hot), making good grades and is generally a good person. That is a chore worth nigh anything. No regrets.

Damn. I can't think of the name. Everyone was jumping 220 sq ft seven cells fairly rapidly. Nine cells came out very quickly, but they were too hot for BASE. One guy had a Unit, one friend had a Pegasus, Ravens were good when they finally came out. For the life of me I can't remember the model of that rainbow canopy above, and it was a very popular paraflite model.

The way that we used to pick BASE canopies was skydiving. Some parachutes just wouldn't open straight, or had line twists, or a slow snivel on the opening. Then we would nab that one canopy and use it for BASE. It sounds sort of primeval these days, but back then the quality control was so poor that a certain model could have great ones and shitty ones.

I got that rainbow rig above from a dead guy's estate. He was kinda reckless and inexperienced. He had a malfunction and cut away too low. His reserve was barely out of the container, and he landed kind of on his ass and backwards, so it had these eternal grass stains on the pin flap and the inside of the container.

It was brand new, man. The rigger sewed it back up in 30 minutes and then I skydived and BASE'd the sh#t out of it.

Some people were freaked a little about the death rig, but it was super cheap, modern for the time, and I always had this reply to questions about its history:

"What are the odds of it happening twice on the same rig?"

Then I became a horrible low pull artist and got banned from a few DZ's for a while.
JayMark

Social climber
Oxnard, CA
May 4, 2013 - 08:04pm PT
Base104,

That all sounds so familiar. I started in '63 on a Double-L also and then modified a 28 round in to a 7 panel TU. Before I got the Strato Star I was jumping a Thunderbow Piggyback. That thing was a load. I was a Navy rigger in those days back in '64-68. Home DZ was Arvin til 67 and then Calif. City and finally Taft. Many trips to Elsinore and Perris Valley followed. No base jumps though. It's fun to hear about your experiences. We probably know a lot of the same jumpers, although maybe frequented different DZ's. Hottest canopy I jumped was the Moriah or something like that, again an early 7 cell from the '80s.

Did you know Spike Yarder, Spikes Beech ? We lost it in the '80s in a crash on take off at Taft. The have a reunion up there at Taft occasionally. Those were the days, much like the 70's in climbing.
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Topic Author's Reply - May 4, 2013 - 09:57pm PT
Reilly,

As soon as I saw the video and read about the manifest that was my guess. That was a sad deal for sure. Nasty video of what a full blown stall at low altitude looks like.
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