The Very Large Trout Lover's Thread (ot)

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Messages 1801 - 1820 of total 1912 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Sep 13, 2017 - 03:51pm PT
why wouldn't you use the loop for regular size flies (12-16) if you use it for midges and streamers? What's the drawback?

Edit: found it in my app listed as the non-slip mono. Usually the Grog app lists disadvantages but it doesn't have any for this so I'm wondering why I shouldn't always use this or the Duncan loop?


Edit 2: Sorry about stepping on your question and bumping it back a page Guy, someone please advise who knows about that stuff!
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Sep 13, 2017 - 03:59pm PT
Stimbo...... thanks for the lesson.

Back in the Midwest, we would go for Northern Pike. They liked the shallow water in the weeds.... toss out a live chub and keep your eyes peeled for the tell tale wake a pike would make... and get ready.

That Lefty Knott.... thats the one The Chief showed me... for nyphing, he says it lets the little bugger "move like its natural"


That picture of a fly with a line tied to the hook. Thats sort of different, what do you call that?


EDIT: Limping... no worries.
ruppell

climber
Sep 13, 2017 - 06:11pm PT
Lots of good stuff on knots the last few posts. I'm a knot geek and have been for years. For a static loop I use the Rapala knot. It's easy to tie, has a high breaking strength and is bomber. For all other line to tackle connections I use a double improved cinch knot if I can. Sometimes with really small sizes it's hard to get the tippet through the eye twice but I always try. Having two loops through the eye helps spread the load when you hook up. It also makes it more resistant to fraying if the eye has any imperfect edges.

As far as spitting on the line, it does help dress it better but the real advantage is absorbing heat. Mono is easy to heat up and weaken. By lubing the line you keep it cooler.

I've landed a lot of big fish on light tackle. I've also lost a lot of big fish. If the fish shakes the hook, wraps me around a log, or spools me I can live with it. The fish won fair and square. If the fish gets off and all I have left it a broken knot, I'm pissed. It was my job to make sure that knot was good. I failed. I re-tie after every hook up. I hate loosing fish. lol
rurprider

Trad climber
Mt. Rubidoux
Sep 13, 2017 - 06:27pm PT
Muskellunge, now there's a fish...Northern Pike are minnows by comparison.
BG

Trad climber
JTree & Idyllwild
Sep 13, 2017 - 06:40pm PT
For loop knots, I concur with Stimbo, the Non-Slip Mono Loop is definatley the strongest.

For non-loop knots I go with the Orvis knot- stronger by far than the clinch knot.

limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Sep 13, 2017 - 07:00pm PT
Why not always use a loop knot?
Stimbo

Trad climber
Crowley Lake
Sep 13, 2017 - 07:25pm PT
Why not always use a loop knot?

You could, but for me at least the loop knot takes a little more time to tie and requires a little more dexterity especially with the smaller tippet sizes. If I am nymphing, I will tie the first fly on with a clinch knot, then the dropper with a loop because I want that tiny, bottom fly to have a little more "action." In a two fly rig, once you tie on an additional bug to the hook bend, you lose the advantage of the loop knot as the second fly pulls down on the first. I go with the clinch because it is fast and holds well. With swinging flies for steelhead, the loop is the only way to go. As I think I mentioned, a lot of it is just personal preference and confidence. I am not saying my methodology is the best, but rather it is what I am used to. I can tie a clinch knot in my sleep in a matter of seconds and I know it will hold. The line will usually break or a hook will bend before the knot fails. I think of the clinch, improved clinch, Orvis, etc.. as good, utilitarian knots and the non-slip loop as a specialty knot.
micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
Sep 13, 2017 - 09:46pm PT
OK this thread just gets better every week. Since there has been some talk about knots, I would love some input on my inability to land large fish over the past couple trips.

I have spent my life in the high country hooking up very small trout and have never had anything heavier than say a quarter pound on my line until the past year. This past weekend on the East Walker I lost FIVE TOTAL TROUT that were fully on my line and being reeled in with confidence. The first one was an absolute monster after a several minute battle. That one I at least got to my thighs and was fussing with him before I could get the beast into my net. He flopped off and swam away and was so spent he just sat there for a while on the far side of the river. Largest trout I have ever had on my line. The sadness, grief and loss was profound

The Second third fourth and fifth however were very nice large trout. Really big in my book and quite heavy on the line. Probably around 17-19 inches..... two rainbows, two browns. Two of them went airborne at one point and I could see the entire fish dolphining up-and-down as I brought them in. Neither of these were "bites." I had each of them on for at least 10-15 seconds. Rod up high, stripping in line with my left hand, good tension on the rod. Full on fighting mode bringing them in. Both of them got off about half way from where they hit to where I was standing. Again. Sadness and shock.

Any ideas without seeing me in person as to what I might be doing wrong? Like I said. I have zero experience with fighting large fish ( other than bass on big crank baits with trebble hooks which is no big deal) but these were really big and I would've loved to have landed one of them.

Help me VLTLT..... you're my only hope.

East Walker.  Friday night
East Walker. Friday night
Credit: micronut
briham89

Big Wall climber
santa cruz, ca
Sep 13, 2017 - 10:31pm PT
Help me VLTLT..... you're my only hope.



How high (fast) was the water you were fishing? Were you fishing barbless hooks? What position was the rod in, in relation to the fish and your body when you lost them? Were you pulling in line hard because you were excited with the toad on the end?

All just talking points, I don't really know why :)

limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Sep 13, 2017 - 10:45pm PT
I haven't landed enough large fish to earn the right to give advice, but my percentages improved drastically when I started getting fish onto my reel instead of stripping and giving out line by hand.

As soon as a fish of size is on and the hook is set I slap the bottom of my reel towards me as fast as possible until all the line at my feet is in and the line is taught. Imagine spinning a bicycle wheel by hand by swatting it.

Of all the tips I've got from people who catch big fish, I think that one helped me the most.

briham89

Big Wall climber
santa cruz, ca
Sep 13, 2017 - 10:51pm PT
^That is good advice. Although I have landed a steelhead on the fly without going to the reel....once. Too excited to think.
BG

Trad climber
JTree & Idyllwild
Sep 13, 2017 - 11:10pm PT
Micronut, I've lost so many monsters it really doesn't bother me that much anymore when it happens, it's part of the game. The way I look at it, you either have a really good hookset, or not. Sometimes what I'll do is set the hook a second time, once the fish stops going crazy.

Get 'em on the reel and let the drag work the fish before you start trying to pull 'em in.

If a fish jumps, bow to the fish (give it slack). If you're fishing a river, look for an area of soft water where it will be easiest to land, then point your rod downstream and toward your shoreline as you guide it there.

It's best to have a strategy and plan for it. If you're fishing for really big fish, it's not worth wasting time at a spot where you know you won't be able to land 'em.

For the really big ones it's best to have someone net it for you.

drF

Trad climber
usa
Sep 13, 2017 - 11:19pm PT
The Tug is the drug.

No more no less

K.I.S.S
Stimbo

Trad climber
Crowley Lake
Sep 14, 2017 - 08:21am PT
What Bob said....

Micronut, I will add to what has already been mentioned, which has been spot on advice. With barbless hooks, keeping tension to the fish is paramount. That said, even if you do everything correctly, sometimes they come "unbuttoned." If you get your hookup at the bottom of a swing, you are counting your lucky stars that they grab the fly well. Each section of a river may be unique with current speed and water clarity, use the heaviest tippet you think you can get away with. Your rod angle is super important as you want the rod to absorb the current and head shakes, not the line. And here is something to add to that, as the fish gets closer (not quite within net range), if you maintain a high rod tip, you start lifting the trout's head out of the water. They freak out at this point. Instead, lay your rod over, more parallel to the water. You can still maintain a good rod angle and keep the fish under the film. Then, at the last possible second, once you think the trout has tired, lift the fish head by raising the rod tip as you pull it into the net, pointing your reel away from you. As Bob said, having a second person with a net is the way to go.
guyman

Social climber
Moorpark, CA.
Sep 14, 2017 - 08:43am PT
Thanks for the good advise, all.

I hope to put some of those tips to good use ASAP.


Muskellunge, now there's a fish...Northern Pike are minnows by comparison.

RR.... when we would go for N. Pike... my friend packed a .22 pistol! and a yard stick.... when we would get the sucker next to the canoe... measure it... if greater than 36".. shoot it in the head, then bring it on board. I was raised on Trout fishing that was a whole new deal for me. My Midwest friends always spoke in awe about the fabled Muskie.



micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
Sep 14, 2017 - 09:27am PT
Man what good advice guys. I've been making some fundamental mistakes now that I hear your input. I need to get back out there!
BG

Trad climber
JTree & Idyllwild
Sep 14, 2017 - 10:09am PT
Well-hooked brown from the East Walker that didn't get away
Well-hooked brown from the East Walker that didn't get away
Credit: BG
WTF

climber
Sep 14, 2017 - 12:36pm PT
All good advice here. So a rig I use often to nymph is set up like this.

I tie a triple surgeons knot leaving a 12 to 18 inch drop on it. I then tie the heavier of the two flies to the end of this tippet. I then take a piece of tippet and tie a double overhand above the surgeons knot and leave a 6 to 8 inch tail on it. I then tie the smaller of two flies to that. The double overhand makes a 90 degree above the surgeons knot keeping that fly away from the drop.

It does on ocasion get twisted around the drop but it is easily unwound. So if you use this method check it for wrapping around the drop. I have yet to have it cut through the upper tippet above the surgeons.

Blood knots are great I tie the triple surgeons or perhaps it's called the perfect because if you only do two wraps the tippet comes off at an angle. With the triple it comes together straight in line with the upper line.


Stimbo

Trad climber
Crowley Lake
Sep 14, 2017 - 08:37pm PT
And..... ACTION!

micronut

Trad climber
Fresno/Clovis, ca
Sep 15, 2017 - 07:39am PT
Now THATS how you land a fish! Calm, collected, smooth and steady. Super cool.
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