Classical Music Appreciation Thread

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apogee

climber
Topic Author's Original Post - Apr 5, 2011 - 02:46am PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aztB7E1Wjbs
apogee

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 5, 2011 - 03:09am PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGFRTEjQ048&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9-57l6sbxQ&feature=related

Some consider Sarah Chang to be the 'Celine Dion' of classical, but this piece nearly brings me to tears every time. Just a dork, I guess.
apogee

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 5, 2011 - 03:35am PT
Holst
Jupiter, Bringer of Jollity
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6NopU9K_8M
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Apr 5, 2011 - 03:44am PT
At this late hour all I can contribute is my thanks. My younger daughter is a violinist, and we were lucky enough to get front-row seats for a concert with Sarah Chang playing the Bruch violin concerto. Needless to say, it was a real treat.

I'm still holding out hope for my daughter and I playing either the Brahms Third Sonata or Beethovern's Kruetzer Sonata together, but she's concentrating on composition in grad school, so that hope is fading. I'm practicing the piano parts nonetheless.

Thanks again.

John

Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 5, 2011 - 03:56am PT
Nice stuff. I appreciate Classical Music.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Apr 5, 2011 - 04:02am PT
Brahms, Ein deutches Requiem Op. 45

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAnUk6MxXQ0

UC Davis Symphony Orchestra and University and Alumni Chorus.

My younger daughter is playing violin, but is right behind the conductor, so she's hard to see. My older daughter is in the front row of the alto section. Needless to say, we were there.

I'd sung this a few years earlier in Fresno. It's wonderful to sing, but according to my younger daughter, somewhat boring to play.

John
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Apr 5, 2011 - 04:06am PT
Verdi Requiem

UC Davis Symphony Orchestra, and University and Alumni Chorus

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsZEv7kAllo&feature=relmfu

This was my older daughter's freshman year. She is in the front row of the altos and visible behind the bass soloist, particularly in the later part of the Requiem.

John
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:10pm PT
You're a lucky man, John. I hope you get to perform with your daughter, that would be too cool.

My gf and I saw Sarah Chang a couple of years ago perform the Mendelssohn concerto. Paramedics were called into the hall to work on some poor guy. We're not sure if it was the concerto or her gown that did him in. Could have been either. She is not popular with the classical music set. They don't seem to like success for some reason.

I've watched this video a few times lately of Yuja Wang playing Scarlatti. I wasn't a Yuja fan until I saw this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9tdcr0SbwA

Nice legs, too.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHO4Ucw9zL4
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:16pm PT
Rach's #3, finest piano composition ever put to paper. Separates the gifted from the average.

But Chopin, Brahms, Mozart, Scriabin, and even Satie are good piano stuff.
eKat

climber
http://www.ecokath.com/
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:17pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDFOtLzl3So&feature=fvwrel

Give me a Baroque cello concerto anyday! (I know - not "Classical" - but who's nitpickin'?)

:-)

eKat
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:18pm PT
Vladimir Horowitz, greatest ivory tickler to ever breathe air on Terra Firma.
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:28pm PT
Got to meet Vladimir Ashkenazy and Andre Watts many years ago when they participated in a piano recital series in Carmel. Vlato is a diminutive man, shorter by inches than me and I'm 5'7", but his hands were bigger than mine, and as a pianist and piano music composer myself, I salivated in envy when I shook that little man's massive hands.

Andre Watts had long fingers and powerful hands, too, but his handshake was amazingly gentle.

Both pianists played Chopin-only programs, and their individual interpretive styles were quite distinct. Vlato came through in that typical Russian flavor, whereas Watts imbued his Chopin interpretation with a modern flavor, almost a Gershwinesque coloring.
Jeremy

Social climber
Albuquerque, NM
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:30pm PT
Don't like it.

I'd rather watch COPS.

Bad Boys Bad Boys!
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:53pm PT
eKat, nice choice. Me likey baroque, too.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFdbQtu2A4Q
eKat

climber
http://www.ecokath.com/
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:55pm PT
eKat, nice choice. Me likey baroque, too.

WOW. . . that one you posted is really, really good!

TFPU!

eKat
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 6, 2011 - 01:56pm PT
I shoulda brought my vinyl of Shostakovich playing some of his own preludes to the Josh get-down.
Pretty sure that woulda brought the house down.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Apr 6, 2011 - 02:07pm PT
Andre Watts had long fingers and powerful hands, too, but his handshake was amazingly gentle.

I, too, got to shake the hand of Andre Watts, and I agree -- although I think both of us were being restrained because he didn't want to hurt me, and I didn't want to be the guy who ruined the career of Andre Watts!

Because I'm a keyboardist and a vocalist, my recorded music tends to gravitate toward those media. I love baroque, but the real treasures in my collection (all vinyl) cover a broader period: the Schnabel recordings of the 32 Beethoven sonatas, Wanda Landowska and Albert Schweitzer playing Bach, and Rachmaninov playing his own preludes.

John
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 6, 2011 - 08:00pm PT
I've been lucky enough to see Yefim Bronfman perform Tchaichovsky and Bartok. He's the best I've ever heard live. His encores are even better. He's good with Rachmaninoff, too.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bh_09qSKNBs
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Apr 6, 2011 - 08:06pm PT
I shoulda brought my vinyl of Shostakovich playing some of his own preludes to the Josh get-down.
Pretty sure that woulda brought the house down.

That's one I need to hear.
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Apr 6, 2011 - 08:40pm PT
Yeah, Watts' hands were to be envied. I was allowed to attend the post-recital backstage gatherings because the couple who sponsored the series were friends of mine. When I walked up to Andre all I could say as I took his hands in mine -- we grabbed one another's left and right hands -- was "Thank you for keeping THE MUSIC alive."

That was quite a series. Besides Watts and Ashkenazy there was George Bolet (RIP), Nelson Friere, and John O'Conor. Doesn't get much better than that for a piano series.

It was O'Conor who informed me that it was his ancestral countryman John Field who invented the nocturne, not Chopin as a lot of people believe. Of course Chopin took that form to perfection with quantity, but it was an Irishman who invented it.

Ever have the pleasure to see/hear Rudolph Serkin (RIP) perform? I saw him mid-1980s at Davies in SF. My seats were up close so my new bride at the time and I were able to see him mouthing his fingering. His mouth moved in silence the whole time he played.

I've managed to see most of my musical icons perform live -- irrespective of genre -- but the one of all others I never got to see was Vlato Horowitz. He was generally regarded to have been the greatest pianist to have ever lived, and I don't doubt that. His infallible perfection and interpretive genius simply has no peer.

If you want to hear the finest performance of Rach's #3 try to find the recording of Horowitz with Eugene Ormandy conducting the NY Phil. You think the gods have come to earth! Genius stacked upon genius upon genius.

I own several different recordings of Rach #3 by various pianists and orchestras, and if you are in touch with the nuances of interpretation and the precision of rendering, the difference between all the other recordings and that by Vlato screams at you.

Yeah, I'm biased, just a bit.
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 6, 2011 - 09:20pm PT
Vladimir Horowitz:
"There are three kinds of pianists: Jewish pianists, homosexual pianists, and bad pianists."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qq7ncjhSqtk
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Apr 6, 2011 - 10:05pm PT
That's ironically hilarious given that Vlato was a Russian homosexual Jew!

There is a huge amount of deliberate humor in that statement you quoted. Vlato was a genius of immense magnitude so he would not have been oblivious to the implications of that statement. And in his youth he was known to be quite the flashy party animal. He was the toast of upper society and he played it well.

I believe it was Steinbeck who wrote that the more profound the intellect the more pronounced the paradoxes.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 6, 2011 - 11:19pm PT
I think of the many delightful evenings I've spent in a hall the single
greatest was a recital by Ashkenazy of a program wholly devoted to Scriabin.
It was like Brubeck arranged by Bach or vice versa. OK, maybe
a little over the top, but that's kinda my take on Scriabin and I'm
stickin' to it. :-)
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Apr 6, 2011 - 11:47pm PT
The Irish master Barry Douglas did a recital of Scriabin Etudes in LA at Ambassador College backwhen their wonderful hall was open to such events. Those pieces are real "knuckle breakers" and he just hit one home run after another.

For Chopin I really like Ivo Pogorellich.

Bach on piano is of course wrong, but if it must be done then Glen Gould did it best.

On harpsichord? Gustav Leonhardt

On Organ? McNeil Robinson

I have really been enjoying Jeno Jando's Beethoven sonatas. New life into old chestnuts.
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 7, 2011 - 12:11am PT
Speaking of new life into old chestnuts, I'm really starting to like Paul Hindemith. Sort of a 20th Century Bach. Like this fugue (who writes fugues anymore?):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTpAIEp6DUo
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Apr 7, 2011 - 12:35am PT
Check out "Symphonic Metamorphosis on a theme by Carl Maria Von Weber" by Paul Hindemith.

True genius.

There is a great recording out there by Chicago Symphony with I think Reiner.
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 7, 2011 - 12:11pm PT
If Amazon has it, I'll get it. Recordings of his work aren't easy to come by, for sure.

BITD, when I was sick, I'd read books. Now I cruise ST. Yikes!

Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Apr 7, 2011 - 12:23pm PT
Wow. I just looked on Amazon and did not find the old Chicago recording. Bummer.

I'd be tempted to go with the Bernstein / Israel Phil recording. Their recording of Rite of Spring is insane!
Gunkie

Trad climber
East Coast US
Apr 7, 2011 - 12:31pm PT
My favorite, single movement (info grabbed from Wikipedia) : Ottorino Respighi -- Pines of Rome (Italian Pini di Roma), 4th movement, The Pines of the Appian Way (I pini della Via Appia)... the big crescendo!

Sound:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pines_of_the_Appian_way.ogg


And my personal Mt. Everest as a trumpet player and the sole reason I bought a Schilke P5-4 piccolo trumpet years ago (and to make money playing weddings...), Brandenburg Concerto No 2:

1st movement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1ddHxGl9_8
3rd movement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLsNzCx1ots&feature=related (the hard one)
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Apr 7, 2011 - 12:33pm PT
Let's not forget Frank Zappa in this thread. Here's the Ensemble Modern doing the Yellow Shark (Dog Breath Variations)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gr3y2MUdq7U
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 7, 2011 - 12:51pm PT
Gunkie, that's crazy good. The Band that Stands!

More Bach, the Little Fugue:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmSaRsAzV4c
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 7, 2011 - 01:04pm PT
can't say, did you see the LA Phil perform Yellow Shark last year?
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Apr 7, 2011 - 01:07pm PT
No I didn't and never knew it was happening, geez my loss. Now I'm totally bummed. If I woulda, coulda, shoulda known I woulda, coulda, shoulda gone.
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 7, 2011 - 01:12pm PT
Same here, was not able to make it. :-(
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Apr 7, 2011 - 02:29pm PT
Gunkie you are a trumpet player?

I played for a living in NYC until I moved to CA in the early 80's. Went to Manhattan School of Music 1972-76.

That Schilke picollo is the best. I still have a Schilke large bore C trumpet, tuning bell deal made of beryllium alloy. Unlike the beautiful picollo, that thing was designed to deafen everyone in front of you...

Funny, when I arrived in LA there was a big musicians strike on, the best players in town were doing weddings. Yamaha dx7 came out about then too. I saw the writing annd shifted into technical studio work which was a great decision for me.
Gunkie

Trad climber
East Coast US
Apr 7, 2011 - 04:09pm PT
Gunkie you are a trumpet player?

I played for a living in NYC until I moved to CA in the early 80's. Went to Manhattan School of Music 1972-76.

That Schilke picollo is the best. I still have a Schilke large bore C trumpet, tuning bell deal made of beryllium alloy. Unlike the beautiful picollo, that thing was designed to deafen everyone in front of you...

Funny, when I arrived in LA there was a big musicians strike on, the best players in town were doing weddings. Yamaha dx7 came out about then too. I saw the writing annd shifted into technical studio work which was a great decision for me.


A lot of good trumpet players in LA. It's a bastion for studio players.

I went to HS just outside of the city and played professionally with the local 806 (or was it the 608?). My teacher was a star student with Maruice Andre' at the Paris Conservatory and he was also a studio musician (William Teubner) in NYC. I actually got past my first round audition at Julliard, but started getting cold feet looking down the barrel of a professional music performance career. I saw dads having to do gigs on Friday and Saturday and Sundays. Was pure fun and good money for a 17 year-old, but seemed terrible for a 40-something year-old. And I heard all of the grumblings from these guys.

So I went to a large state school with lots of options with a music performance grant/scholie and matriculated into electrical engineering after the first semester. Sat 2nd chair in the school orchestra as a freshman to senior Jeff Curnow, who is currently 2nd chair in the Philly Orchestra. That pissed off a bunch of people, one of whom ended up playing my wedding :)

Sadly, I don't play as much as I'd like to these days. It is mandated that my three kids play trumpet or move into the playhouse out back. However, they don't appreciate my trumpet playing pedigree and rarely listen to any of my instruction.

I love tuning bell horns. Had a Bach (from when they were good horns) Eb/D with a tuning bell but sold it after finishing my undergrad. The funds helped augment the $55 I had in the bank. I've been toying with the idea of going Yamaha for my next Eb/D...
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Apr 7, 2011 - 04:26pm PT
I have a Yamaha E flat/D. Love that horn and highly recommend it.

I used to serenade climbers at The Gunks, this pic is from about 1979...

1980. Trumpet calls at The Gunks...
1980. Trumpet calls at The Gunks...
Credit: Julie Lazar photo
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Aug 27, 2011 - 07:51pm PT
Bump.
Gary

climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Aug 27, 2011 - 08:20pm PT
Went to the Hollywood bowl a couple of times this summer. One was an all Mozart program. Gil Shaham is insane on the violin. It was an excellent evening. The wine was very good.

Oh, and my girlfriend made eye contact and got a wave from the Dude!
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
USA Carson city Nev.
Aug 27, 2011 - 08:55pm PT
if you listen to this one, the rythm is pure classical.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfmT9bgXhdg

;)
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Aug 27, 2011 - 09:01pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvWUnX2_22c&feature=related
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Aug 27, 2011 - 09:02pm PT
if you listen to this one, the rythm is pure classical.

WHOA!

NICE!

TFPU!
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 27, 2011 - 09:32pm PT
bump.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oA0kXDMKiLg
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 27, 2011 - 09:40pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WvfoFTSk3c
JOEY.F

Gym climber
It's not rocket surgery
Aug 27, 2011 - 09:46pm PT
My favorite recording of my favorite symphony:
Credit: JOEY.F
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Aug 27, 2011 - 09:52pm PT
Steve Morse doing J.S.Bach:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2flR-0QhkE

I've always loved this tune, and I try to whistle it when I fly kites ( of course, I always screw it up, I'm no Steve Morse ).
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 27, 2011 - 09:59pm PT
From "Richter - the Enigma". Britten & Richter playing 2 pianos. Then Richter talking about Shostakovich & Oistrakh

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VoDOajJk-Q
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Aug 27, 2011 - 11:23pm PT
I happen to be somewhat eclectic in my musical tastes, and even though I play a bit of trumpet and euphonium I really love piano works. Some of my personal faves: J.S. Bach "Goldberg Variations" as performed by Glenn Gould, and almost all of Beethoven's piano sonatas. Another work I dearly love is ther Pachebel "canon" played on either flute or violin. James Galloway plays it beautifully on flute.
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
Aug 27, 2011 - 11:31pm PT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjRxLY_hD1U

Kurt Rodarmer on Richard Schneider's guitars - Goldberg Variations.

:-)
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Aug 27, 2011 - 11:46pm PT

Glenn Gould, Goldberg Variations. . .1981. . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gv94m_S3QDo
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 28, 2011 - 01:41pm PT
Although his 1981 Goldberg variations video is fantastic, I've always preferred the simplicity of Gould's 1955 recording.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQoK0Pwams4

Here's yet another version by the great piano hooligan Glenn Gould:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LTY7MLuzC8
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Aug 28, 2011 - 01:47pm PT

Selfish Man-- I guess it's personal, but I can't tell you how
many times I've played Gould's 1981 recording--I all but wore out
my vinyl copy, and my CD will probably need replacement one of these days--
I think it's incomparable.
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Aug 28, 2011 - 01:57pm PT
My CD of Gould's "Goldberg Variations" is the 1981 performance!

Has anyone else seen the movie "Vitus?" Teo Ghiorghiu performs the variations (in part); not bad for a then-twelve year old prodigy!
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 28, 2011 - 02:11pm PT
SteveW,

Gould's 1955 vs. 1981 recording could easily create a controversy more powerful than Wings of Steel :)

Here's Maria Yudina's version:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1hs2OLIzYE

I guess she's not very well known in the US as she had never traveled outside her country... Remarkable personality and an amazing artist. She was comrade Stalin's favorite musician, too, which is likely the reason someone with her views could survive at all
apogee

climber
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 10, 2012 - 07:59pm PT
RIP: Alexis Weissenberg

Alexis Weissenberg, who has died aged 82, was a reclusive pianist who, more than almost any classical musician, was capable of polarising critical opinion.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/9005891/Alexis-Weissenberg.html


Just listened to a striking remembrance about this brilliant pianist- this was my first exposure to him...I'd be very interested in hearing other impressions of his works...
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 10, 2012 - 08:10pm PT
Broke,
"Vitus" is a great movie! Plus it's got airplanes! That was some impressive
playing for a 12 year old!


Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Jan 10, 2012 - 10:20pm PT
Reilly-

Teo has lots of recordings on You Tube--too many to list here. Yep! I liked the Pilatus PC-6, too. Nothing quite like having 1100 horsepower in a light airplane
rrider

climber
Mckinleyville, Ca
Jan 10, 2012 - 11:26pm PT
richter: pictures at an exhibition (in 4 separate youtube parts)

http://youtu.be/ohpVs7eaFB0
http://youtu.be/6C0iasbIQk0
http://youtu.be/IRdXsvTbkpE
http://youtu.be/47L3lrE3l0o

sorry if someone maybe already put this up
mongrel

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
Jan 11, 2012 - 12:11am PT
Well, so many interesting posts I couldn't resist weighing in. But I would beg to differ about the recordings of some pieces that I personally prefer:

For Bach on the piano, Rosalyn Tureck is far superior to Glenn Gould, much better pacing, sense of the interior of the musical lines, and way better touch; on harpsichord, not so clear but I'm partial to the DGG Ralph Kirkpatrick recordings. On organ, there is no contest: Helmut Walcha; blind since birth or childhood but the definitive Bach organist of the modern era.

For Chopin, the incomparably superior recordings were made by Dinu Lipatti decades ago. He only made a few recordings then up and died on us. Unfortunately the fidelity is not great, but the piano comes through well anyway. Horowitz's former piano teacher said even he should hide his recordings in shame in comparison to Lipatti. That's saying something!

I wonder if the trumpeters who have posted here could express opinion about a remarkable player and recording I heard recently in transit somewhere: Michael Haydn trumpet concerto played by Hakan Hagegard. I was beyond stunned by the gorgeous tone he managed, at soft or at most mezza voce volume level, in incredibly high tessitura in a slow tempo movement. I totally could not believe it. And it did not seem to be some mini trumpet or clarino pitched at D or higher. Sounded like a standard Bb or C trumpet in tone. Beautiful.

JEleazarian, how wonderful to attend these great performances with your daughters performing! Wow. Cool posts. There was another fabulous Verdi Requiem at UC Davis this last fall, Sacramento Chorus (whatever their exact name is). I was hugely impressed. Soloists were excellent too especially the soprano who sang with total abandon and commitment all night, like a 5.12X lead, and pulled it off perfectly.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 11, 2012 - 01:03am PT
Be sure you sit down while you read this from "The Economist":

Fiddling with the mind

Old, expensive violins are not always better than new, cheap ones

Jan 7th 2012 | from the print edition

THOUGH individual tastes do differ, the market for art suggests that those who have money generally agree on what is best. The recent authentication of a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, for example, magically added several zeroes to the value of a work that had not, physically, changed in any way. Nor is this mere affectation. In the world of wine (regarded as an art form by at least some connoisseurs), being told the price of a bottle affects a drinker’s appreciation of the liquid in the glass in ways that can be detected by a brain scanner.

It seems, now, that the same phenomenon applies to music. For serious players of stringed instruments the products of three great violin-makers of Cremona, Nicolo Amati, Giuseppe Guarneri and Antonio Stradivari, have ruled the roost since the 17th century. Their sound in the hands of a master is revered. They sell for millions. And no modern imitation, the story goes, comes close. Unfortunately, however, for those experts who think their judgment unclouded by the Cremonese instruments’ reputations, Claudia Fritz of the University of Paris VI and Joseph Curtin, an American violin-maker, have just applied the rigorous standards of science to the matter. Their conclusion, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is that the creations of Cremona are no better than modern instruments, and are sometimes worse.

Unlike previous “blind” trials of violins, in which an instrument’s identity was concealed from the audience but not from the player himself (and which have indeed suggested that modern instruments are often as good as old ones), the one organised by Dr Fritz and Mr Curtin sought to discover the unbiased opinion of the men and women who actually wield the bow. They and their colleagues therefore attended the Eighth International Violin Competition of Indianapolis, held in September 2010, which gathering provided both a sample of testable instruments and a pool of suitable volunteers to play them.

Exactly which instruments were tested remains a secret. That was a condition of the loans, in order that an adverse opinion should not affect a fiddle’s market value. There were, however, six of them: two Stradivarii and a Guarnerius (all from the 18th century), and three modern violins made to Cremonese patterns.

A total of 21 volunteers—participants in the competition, judges and members of the local symphony orchestra—were asked to put the instruments through their paces. The catch was that they had to do so in a darkened room while wearing welders’ goggles, so that they could not see them clearly, and that the chin-rest of each violin had been dabbed with perfume, lest the smell of the wood or the varnish give the game away.

There were two tests: a series of pairwise comparisons between old and new instruments that allowed a player one minute to try out each instrument, and a comparison between all six, in which the player was allowed to play whatever he wanted for however long he wanted, subject to a total time-limit of 20 minutes.

In the pairwise test (in which players were not told that each pair contained both an old and a new instrument, and in which the order of presentation was randomised), five of the violins did more-or-less equally well, but the sixth was consistently rejected. That sixth, unfortunately for the reputation of Cremona, was a Strad.

In the freeplay test, a more subtle approach was possible. Players rated the six instruments using four subjective qualities that are common terms of the violinist’s art: playability, projection, tone colours and response. The best in each category scored one point, the worst minus one, and the rest zero. Players were also asked which violin they would like to take home, given the chance.

In this case, two of the new violins comprehensively beat the old ones, while the third more or less matched them (see chart). The most popular take-home instrument was also a new one: eight of the 21 volunteers chose it, and three others rated it a close second. Not surprisingly, the least popular instrument in the second test was the Stradivarius that did badly in the first.

The upshot was that, from the players’ point of view, the modern violins in the study were as good as, and often better than, their 18th-century forebears. Since Dr Fritz estimates the combined value of the three forebears in her experiment as $10m, and the combined value of the three modern instruments as around $100,000, that is quite a significant observation.

Human nature being what it is, this result will probably have little effect in the saleroom: the glamour of Cremona will take more than one such result to dispel it. But it does suggest that young players who cannot afford a Strad should not despair. If they end up with a cheaper, modern copy instead, they might actually be better off.

from the print edition | Science and technology


Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Jan 11, 2012 - 11:12pm PT
Bumpity bump!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jan 23, 2012 - 02:17pm PT
Jean Sibelius





Urizen

Ice climber
Berkeley, CA
Jan 23, 2012 - 02:37pm PT
Reilly,

Really interesting article, thanks. Unfortunately it's only suggestive, not conclusive. It doesn't mention, for instance, whether the test players used the same bow, their own bow, or what. And bows make a huge difference. Also, as with guitars, the choice of strings and the set-up of the instrument are extremely influential. Chances are that any of the older violins, such as the dud Strad, have had, during the last 300 years, new nuts, new bridges more or less competently cut, new soundposts more or less skillfully set, fingerboards shaved, etc. So the sound and playability of the instruments are just as likely to have been affected by their treatment by previous owners and their luthiers as by the skill of the original builder or the quality of the materials used. Too, all hollow-body stringed instruments seem to benefit from being played rather than stored, and this test, since it had to conceal the provenance, doesn't address the influence, if any, of this circumstance.
Sparky

Trad climber
vagabond movin on
Jan 23, 2012 - 03:15pm PT
Mahler's Symphony #3 with maestro Claudio Abbado conducting the Lucerne Festival Orchestra. No one alive today can interpret Mahler as well as Abbado. If you have a 5.1 set-up, this is a must have:

http://www.amazon.com/Claudio-Abbado-Mahler-Symphony-Blu-ray/dp/B002P9K9SM/ref=sr_1_34?ie=UTF8&qid=1327349500&sr=8-34
Gary

climber
That Long Black Cloud Is Coming Down
Jan 23, 2012 - 03:50pm PT
My gf and I have a subscription to a Casual Fridays series with the LA Phil. We got the cheapest seats possible at Disney Hall, up in the balcony, but they're pretty good seats actually.

Last Friday was Symphony 1 by Gustav Mahler. I'm not much of a critic, but like Supreme Court justices, I know the goods when I hear them. It was captivating, the third movement especially.

The Friday Casual series is casual. The orchestra comes out in street clothes. The program is shortened, and after the concert, you can mingle and drink with the musicians and also there's a question and answer session with the conductor, featured soloist if there is one, and random members of the band.

Dudamel is the real thing. He's crazy about music.
Urizen

Ice climber
Berkeley, CA
Jan 23, 2012 - 04:07pm PT
In spite of my distaste for the airport departure area architecture of the Disney Concert Hall lobbies, and the superfluous wedding cakery of its exterior, I will readily admit that the auditorium itself is a masterpiece--not just in terms of its use of materials and acoustics, but in its democratic design. There are no aristocratic private boxes, and there are no bad seats. I've been in the back row of the top balcony and wanted for nothing. This is a testament to some rare vision on the part of the directors of the organization, as are the crossover shows and the hiring of relatively young and untested conductors. Saw Gustavo D. and the SFO play the complete "Firebird" a few years ago. Sensational; one of the best concerts I've ever heard them give--and a free demonstration of incredibly nuanced but unmannered conducting at the same time.
mongrel

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
Jan 23, 2012 - 05:00pm PT
Regarding the item in the Economist, I sent this to my brother who is a violinist and violist and he responded that "Word is that about 20% of Strads are practically playable. The others are compromised by age and modification. I have a 2007 violin that in most concert situations outplays my precious 1818 Thier. The Thier has a much deeper, intricate and more intimate sound, appropriate for smaller audiences. The fresh fiddle kicks butt in a bigger situation."

So, not only are there the issues raised by Urizen, but also the selection of the individual instruments that were used, and the setting - one wonders how the results would compare if they did exactly the same testing in various different rooms and halls? Anyway, unequivocally it would appear that, like even the great wines, a significant proportion of the product is not better after a long period of time, but instead deteriorates into poor playability or drinkability.

+1 on the comments on the Disney Center acoustics and approach.
Gary

climber
That Long Black Cloud Is Coming Down
Jan 23, 2012 - 05:40pm PT
What's interesting about Disney is while the acoustics for music are great, speech is incredibly garbled in that hall. At the Q + A sessions, it's very difficult to understand what's being said, especially if a heavy accent is involved.
Urizen

Ice climber
Berkeley, CA
Jan 23, 2012 - 06:27pm PT
Gary,

I was fortunate to hear a noted acoustical consultant address this issue in the context of some other performance and worship venues. Basically, as I recall, the ideal reverberation time for sustained sounds like musical instruments or operatic-style vocalizing is different from what is desirable for clearly comprehensible speech. DCH, as an orchestra hall and not a multi-media performance space, was likely optimized for the former.
Gary

climber
That Long Black Cloud Is Coming Down
Jan 23, 2012 - 08:52pm PT
I hope opera will be OK there. We have tickets for Don Giovanni.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jan 23, 2012 - 08:55pm PT
Gary, better check yer tickets as LA Opera still uses the Dorothy Chandler.
I gave up my season tickets though when opera became de rigueur with LA's
petit bourgeoisie. Apparently they didn't get the memo that talking during
the performance is not considered good manners. And don't get me started
on the velcro bino cases, the thumbing through the program, and the un-stifled coughing.
Gary

climber
That Long Black Cloud Is Coming Down
Jan 23, 2012 - 09:03pm PT
That's correct, but this is being put on by the Phil. Peter Sellars has something to do with it, methinks.
http://www.laphil.com/tickets/performance-detail.cfm?id=4753

Fortunately, this is not at the Chandler. That balcony is a real pit.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 16, 2012 - 03:46pm PT
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jul 16, 2012 - 05:40pm PT
This number's stood the test of time:

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 16, 2012 - 07:43pm PT
I heard Brahm's "Academic Festival Overture" for the umpteenth time squared
the other day and it continued to play in my head for days afterwards.
Do I need to seek help? I guess it isn't Brahm's fault though as now I
have Rameau looping. Oh well, at least it isn't Lady Gaga.
Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Jul 16, 2012 - 11:25pm PT
I happen to like the Academic Festival Overture, even though Brahms wrote it as something of a joke; it's primarily German University drinking songs nicely orchestrated!
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jul 17, 2012 - 12:01am PT
Ah, Rodger, methinks it's something about sharing a pint, eh?

hee hee hee. . .
I kind of like his Variations on a Theme by Hayden. . .
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Jul 17, 2012 - 12:13am PT
Check out KQMC out of Hawthorne Nevada...Top 40 classical with this fruit cake DJ named the Captain...The music is very good and the Captain is a total crack up...I can only get reception from Navy Beach on Mono Lake...RJ
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Jul 17, 2012 - 01:08am PT


I like the way he plucks the strings with the keys.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 30, 2012 - 02:28pm PT
David Oistrakh. A true artist.


In my view he makes music, very much the same way Sonny Boy Williamson does when playing Bye Bye Bird in this example:


They are music when playing.

Or movement music the way these four climbers can climb when they are in the flow zone.



RIP Patrick Berhault.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 30, 2012 - 02:40pm PT
So how shameless is John Williams?
He should be cut up and used as chum.



Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 30, 2012 - 02:53pm PT
Hehe... even ...om-pa-pa... has got it's place.
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Jul 30, 2012 - 03:35pm PT


Barbarian

Trad climber
New and Bionic too!
Jul 30, 2012 - 05:07pm PT
Classical music rocks!!! I absolutely love it!!!

Now a disclaimer: My dad loved classical. He listened to it every chance he got. He especially loved opera. I, on the other hand, was a child of the 60's and early 70's. Airplane, CSNY, the Dead, Hendrix, Byrds, Eagles, etc. - those were where my tastes settled. I turned off that classical every chsance I got. Dad died before I matured enough to understand classical music. I missed out on a chance to share something truly wonderful.

Fast forward 30 years: My children are musicians. They all play piano. One also plays guitar and a bit of sax; another plays viola, the last plays violin, bass violin, electric bass, guitar, and anything else he can get his hands on.
I've been fortunate enough to see one of my children play at Carnegie Hall. Last month I saw the youngest (14 year old) play at Disney Hall. I marvel at he sound in those great halls, perfect for music, but terrible for the spoken word.
I have to thank Patty Scialfa for my love and understanding of classical music. She covered a country song that opened my eyes and ears to understand classical. It was a roundabout trip, but worth it!!!
ninjakait

Trad climber
a place where friction routes have velcro
Jul 31, 2012 - 03:19am PT


The first time I beat my Dad in chess this was on the record player; yes a vinyl, I know, ancient. :)
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Jul 31, 2012 - 08:38am PT
Richter plays my favorite Haydn:


This is great desert driving music. This and Blue Oyster Cult.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 31, 2012 - 08:51am PT
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Jul 31, 2012 - 09:57am PT


selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Jul 31, 2012 - 10:08am PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 31, 2012 - 04:13pm PT
The Deer's Cry


Adagio for Strings
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Aug 1, 2012 - 12:31am PT
Old school:
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 1, 2012 - 12:05pm PT
some more old school...

HuecoRat

Trad climber
NJ
Aug 1, 2012 - 12:13pm PT
You guys have to check out the Berlin Philharmonic's "Digital Concert Hall." Their website is truly amazing. For about $13 you get a 48 hour pass that allows you to watch anby concert from over 140 in the archive. You can search by composer, conductor, soloist, etc. The quality is outstanding and the video editing is terrific (not like PBS where you hear an oboe solo but watch the timpanist counting rests). Of special note are last year's performance of Mahler 3, and Radek Baborak playing the Gliere concerto. Check it out! www.digitalconcerthall.com
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Aug 2, 2012 - 12:47am PT
New school:
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Aug 2, 2012 - 12:53am PT
I am very lucky to have the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra nearby. They are truly world-class symphony musicians. It takes us only a two hours to drive to Heinz Symphony Hall. We have been getting season tickets for the past 5 years - 8th row, dead center, in the orchestra section.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Aug 2, 2012 - 05:19am PT

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Aug 2, 2012 - 01:14pm PT
Sagebrusher

Sport climber
Iowa
Aug 2, 2012 - 05:04pm PT
Insanity....



One of my favorite Rachmaninov pieces...

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 2, 2012 - 05:35pm PT
Marlow,

Kempf playing the 5th concerto and Haskil's Mozart concerto are such wonderful finds...

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 2, 2012 - 05:46pm PT
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Aug 2, 2012 - 08:28pm PT
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Aug 2, 2012 - 10:11pm PT
Gary, I wish I had more to contribute (or better ways to contribute), but my analog to digital apparatus is malfunctioning. I especially appreciated that Richter/Haydn. I think the Haydn piano sonatas deserve much more attention. Horowitz was one of the few "big name" pianists who included a lot of Haydn's solo piano music in his concerts.

My personal favorite recording is of Horowitz playing the E major (Hob. XVI: 52) from a 1951 Carnegie Hall recital. I have it on a 1979 RCA Red Seal recording with his marvelous rendition of "Pictures at an Exhibition."
I have the Mussorgsky music for piano, but the Horowitz version is so much more pianistic and expressive. At least that's my story about why my playing of "Pictures" doesn't sound so hot, and I'm sticking to it.

As luck would have it, I was playing the piano as a substitute for our organist in church last Sunday, and played the first movement of Haydn's C Major Sonata (Hob. XVI: 50) as a prelude to the worship service. I was actually thinking of you because I played the Prelude & Fugue No. 6 from Book II of the Well-Tempered Clavier for an offeratory, and the Gigue from the English Suite No. 5 as a postlude. My wife and daughter didn't like the offeratory, though, because they thought an offeratory should be more sedate. Personally, I see no reason why offeratories should be soporific. What's wrong with lively praise to God?

Anyway, thanks to all of you for posting up.

John

Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Aug 2, 2012 - 10:37pm PT
John, I've got to get to your church! What can be wrong with Bach in church? My first piano teacher was a very religious girl, and she was Bach obsessed, mostly due to Bach's piety. I've started too late to ever be able to play anything from the WTC, except the Prelude in C Major. You are fortunate to have had the chance to learn, and wise to have taken that chance and go with it.

I'm just learning about Haydn, and I like him more and more. This sounds like a lot of fun to play:


OK, back to my own piano work.
Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Aug 10, 2012 - 02:01pm PT
More Old School, very Old School!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Aug 15, 2012 - 12:00pm PT

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 24, 2012 - 04:12pm PT
and more old school! I remember being in awe when those recordings were discovered 20 or so years ago

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 24, 2012 - 04:22pm PT
RIP Ruggiero Ricci
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 24, 2012 - 10:06pm PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Aug 25, 2012 - 12:26pm PT


Edited: Mouse. Merveilleux - ear candy.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Aug 26, 2012 - 02:09am PT
This is every bit as good as I say it is because I have been listening to this piece for years and never tire of it. Midori, violin;Nobuko Imai, viola; and Christopher Eschenbach conducting the NDR Sinfonieorchester.



I will say the same for this old chestnut by Smetana: I never tire of listening to The Moldau. This recording was done in 1951. It uses a different approach than modern arrangements use, in that the initial bars, the soft flutes representing the springs, are more easily heard and you don't have to raise the volume to catch it, than lower it to listen to the rest. Weiner Philharmoniker, Wilhelm Furtwangler, conducting.



This is the first piece of classical music I bothered to play for myself besides Peter and the Wolf. My Grandad had a 78 rpm recording, two sides. I was allowed to keep it.

Ed Itt: I fell asleep listening to Sinfonia last night.

gary: Old'uns like this Padiddly one have a deep mellow tone all their own.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Aug 26, 2012 - 11:47pm PT
Somewhere in Norway (maybe Tromso), the late 40s or early 50s.
Somewhere in Norway (maybe Tromso), the late 40s or early 50s.
Credit: RD Gallery
Barcarolle/Offenbach


This work reminds me that life is beautiful.

For instance:

In West Spitsbergen they had from July to September to enjoy the sun and have supplies delivered by boat, in an article in the NG, 8/28, 'A Woman's Winter on Spitsbergen.'
or
'By the end of 1874 Smetana had become completely deaf...'
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Aug 29, 2012 - 06:10pm PT
This is such a fine thread. I really appreciate the taste of my fellow Taconians!

My daily dose of Telemann. There's enough of it, Lord knows!

Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Aug 29, 2012 - 06:34pm PT
This is a positively GREAT thread!

Some of my all-time favorites:

Pachabel, Canon. Played on the flute by Sir James Galway

Mozart, Gran Partita; Neville Marriner and St Martin in the Fields.

Almost ALL the baroque trumpet concerti. Yes, Telemann included.

Bach: almost everything, but esp. the Cello suites.
Kalimon

Trad climber
Ridgway, CO
Aug 29, 2012 - 09:47pm PT
Ana Vidovik, a true goddess . . . thanks Gary.
Timid TopRope

Social climber
'used to be Paradise, CA
Aug 29, 2012 - 10:48pm PT
Christian Tetzlaff is pretty amazing. Good story on him in last week's New Yorker.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Aug 29, 2012 - 11:01pm PT

I just heard Berlioz' Symphonie Fantastique and it was wonderful!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
merced, california
Aug 30, 2012 - 02:14am PT
This thread is giving me the deepest kind of pleasure.

I have listened almost exclusively to classical since 1998, the year Liz passed. We listened to PHC on Saturdays, if we were together, and I heard some classical and operatic works, but not nearly enough. Our TV got the work-out, not my ears. After she passed and the house was quiet, I turned to the Sacramento classical station, which broadcasts from Groveland on FM, so I had my fill of classical all night long, if I wanted. Fresno is blessed with a good FM station that plays lots of it, also.

What a pleasure it is, though, to share thoughts of this music, rather than having to remain silent. It is a refuge from the sturm und drang of some of these ST threads.

And it has a basis in climbing history. Chuck Pratt, I suppose, would be mildly supportive. One wonders, too, what Royal might think.
Royal Robbins on the FA Mozart Wall, Sentinel
Royal Robbins on the FA Mozart Wall, Sentinel
Credit: Tom Frost (TY)

I wanted to find a video of Horowitz playing a particular Chopin polonaise, but no luck.

Instead, here is one of the best playing another polonaise. He is E. Kissin, and for what my two pennies are worth, I think his style is what one could describe as musical. I hope you turn up your volume control a little, because he plays very softly and you don't want to spoil the first listening by having to "fiddle." :)


Brokedownclimber

Trad climber
Douglas, WY
Aug 30, 2012 - 10:20am PT
Any opinions here on violinists? I happen to favor Joshua Bell; his recording of the Brahms violin concerto is particularly outstanding, as is his Paganini First violin concerto. His tone quality is outstanding, and never wiry.
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 30, 2012 - 11:22am PT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Aug 30, 2012 - 12:49pm PT
I liked that!

Full orchestra and modern recording by the spouse of Andre Previn.
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 30, 2012 - 07:58pm PT





selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 30, 2012 - 08:29pm PT
Urizen

Ice climber
Berkeley, CA
Aug 30, 2012 - 09:58pm PT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Aug 31, 2012 - 12:40am PT
Selfish Man, I was wondering if GG would show up...thx.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Aug 31, 2012 - 03:26pm PT
I got a call last night from my younger daughter, a violinist and grad student (in composition) in Illinois -- "Start practicing, Dad, because I'm learning the Brahms Second Violin Sonata." Now if I can scrape up enough money to get my piano tuned (and a couple of strings replaced), we may have something to post here around Christmas time.

John
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 1, 2012 - 09:25am PT
September already!

Good morning, Taco.

I bring you a gentle awakening.



And this is one of the most remarkable assemblies I have ever witnessed.



Here is another. A gathering of goblets.



Enjoy your coffee...
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Sep 1, 2012 - 09:39pm PT
I think it's time for more Victor Borge

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 7, 2012 - 08:24am PT
Die aria!!!

A-ha-ha-ha!!!

She's gonna die!!!

Oh, Jupiter!!!

It's too funny!!!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 7, 2012 - 08:42am PT
Brubeck/Bach, eh?

Reilly's enthusiasm.

Good to the last frickin' drop.

I, too, like Ashkenazy and Scriabin needs more listening.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 7, 2012 - 09:13am PT
You have been such a wonderfully attentive audience, here is a Borge bonus.

Gary

climber
"My god - it's full of stars!"
Sep 7, 2012 - 11:04am PT
John, get that piano tuned!

selfish man, thanks for posting the Gould and Golschmann. Golschmann doesn't have much fame or reknown, but I like his style with baroque. He and Gould seem to be on the same wavelength when it comes to Bach. Golschmann's sound is very crisp. Bernstein, in comparison, seems muddy when he conducts these Bach keyboard concertos.



Somebody asked about violinists. After seeing him twice, Gil Shaham strikes me as one of the best. He plays with an evident joy. When he plays with Dudamel the enthusiasm level overwhelms the crowd.

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Sep 8, 2012 - 08:32pm PT
83 year old Horowitz plays Scriabin's etude in his (one and only) concert in Moscow:



he meets Scriabin's daughter and tells her that he used to play for her father

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 11, 2012 - 10:38am PT


This one's for our own Gypsy Flores and the Gypsy in all of us.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 11, 2012 - 11:16am PT
Having indulged in my own Scottish Fantasies...
Credit: Reilly




I find I myself partial to Bruch's. If the four minutes of the third movement
don't tug at yer heart strings then you don't have one.
(I've only included the third and fourth here)


Holy jeebus, what a mensch that dood is, no?
But I do like my Itzakh Perlman version too.
The performance obviously was not in LA - nobody clapped between the movements.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Sep 11, 2012 - 11:36am PT

John Murphy: Sunshine (Adagio In D Minor)
Gary

Social climber
Monza by the streetlight
Sep 14, 2012 - 12:15am PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Sep 19, 2012 - 04:05pm PT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 6, 2012 - 01:18pm PT
Synthesia seems to lack soul. It's just not music. It's nice. It's interesting.
It's just not feeling the music.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 11, 2012 - 07:14am PT
It's Illya Kuryakin, aka Ducky Mallard, aka David McCallum.

His father was a first chair violinist, his mother a cellist. His interests musically, well, he's f___ing Ducky, after all! Read the review below for some nice, fluffy journalistic reviewing in the old school. Same with the music. It swings like 1966. The year I graduated h.s. and into the Bay Area music scene, and Illya with his Nehru jacket were being shut down by incoming flowers.


The Edge is DMC's most well-known musical composition now intro and riff to Dr. Dre's The Next Episode, OK?

Fine little fusion version.

Words and music by David McCallum on Insomnia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_McCallum


Oh, look at that. The same issue, April 29, 1966, (35 cents) as the review of McCallum (titled 'McCallum and the Woodwinds') and A Bit More of Me, his second LP, also containd an article on the last night of the Old Metropolitan Opera. Gee.

I think I'm passing on typing the article out. If you want to read it, it won't change your LIFE if you can't locate it. You can buy the mag from me, or look for your own. You'll never get Julie Christie away from me!

"What makes the album exciting are the classic overtones soaring above the driving beat in almost every number....an unusual combination of reed instruments...what we've come to know as the Big Beat..one of the freshest LPs to make the rounds in months." Fluffy, in a enthusiastic way. He likes.

And Life Magazine's normal Oh-So-Generic-Style prognostication, part of standard mainstream reviews half the time (fluff): "McCallum's climb from bit player to teen-age idol in less than a year stunned the TV trade. With his album aalready in the Top Forty ("kiss of death") and with musical capability to match his hefty Nielsen, he may repeat the feat in the pop field."

The last article in this vintage Life is the national break-out piece on Cesar Chavez. And Julie Christe, of course.

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Oct 16, 2012 - 07:56pm PT
The ominous "military" symphony of Haydn is only a paper tiger, the melody belies it's nickname.

Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Oct 19, 2012 - 10:00am PT
I like Haydn's attitude. He was a plucky lad.

Wednesday, went and saw Andras Schiff play Book I of the Well Tempered Clavier. The acoustics at Disney Hall are superb. It was too expensive to sit where we sat, but I noticed he changed the fingering on the Prelude in C Major from what he'd indicated in the Henle Edition!

It's amazing work. The preludes are little jewels thrown out to clear the palate in between the massively engineered structures of the fugues.

Book II next Wednesday.

Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Nov 4, 2012 - 11:29pm PT
Extreme old school. This is an amazing good rendition:
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Nov 4, 2012 - 11:45pm PT
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Nov 4, 2012 - 11:52pm PT


selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Nov 9, 2012 - 11:12am PT
to continue on the very old school theme....

steveA

Trad climber
bedford,massachusetts
Nov 9, 2012 - 11:19am PT
I have loved classical music since I was about 5 years old.

If I had it all over again: I think that a composers life would be great.
Notice how many musicians and composers live a long life.

Ludwig is still my favorite!

( Thanks Marlow: John Murphy is new to me--thanks for posting )
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Nov 9, 2012 - 08:40pm PT
two Horowitz recordings that blew me away, sometime in the 80's



Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Dec 3, 2012 - 03:43pm PT
Jean Sibelius - Karelia

 Intermezzo I


 Ballade 2


 Alla Marcia 3
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Dec 4, 2012 - 05:30pm PT
Arvo Pärt - De Profundis
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jan 29, 2013 - 02:46pm PT
Hans Christian Lumbye-Copenhagener: Jernbane damp galopp
jogill

climber
Colorado
Jan 29, 2013 - 02:52pm PT


This fellow is magnificent.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jan 30, 2013 - 12:50pm PT
Jogill: Great acting, great voice - magnificent.

Something else: Bach - Wilhelm Kempff (1955) - Siciliano from Flute Sonata No 2 in E flat major, BWV1031
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Jan 30, 2013 - 11:43pm PT
I like Guilini and Kempf was one of the best. At a meet and greet with the LA Phil a violinist still had awe in her voice when she talked about playing for Giulini.

Friday we will see the Joffrey Ballet's recreation of the original Rite of Sping. It's gonna be great.



Edit: I like the old school stuff. We were THAT close to having a recording by Liszt. Just missed it.
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Feb 4, 2013 - 01:28pm PT
The Rite was awesome. For once being high in the balcony was a plus. Nobody was nodding off during this, it was really thrilling. I only regret we didn't get tickets for another night.
HuecoRat

Trad climber
NJ
Feb 4, 2013 - 03:50pm PT
Just went to Carnegie Hall to hear my eldest son playing first horn on the Firebird with the Oberlin Conservatory Orchestra. Awesome!
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Feb 4, 2013 - 03:55pm PT
YAY, Hueco!

Astonishing!

JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Feb 4, 2013 - 04:20pm PT
Very cool, Hueco!

John
Fossil climber

Trad climber
Atlin, B. C.
Feb 4, 2013 - 04:41pm PT
The original post - rehearsal of Brahms Second symphony - that was great. Had to go put the CD on the sound system. It was what we were rehearsing when I joined the U of Pacific Conservatory Orchestra and I’ve loved it ever since. Being a trombonist (then) it was especially rewarding to build toward that great, triumphal final chord, which was cut off here. It has been decades - hell, half a century plus - since I was part of such an ensemble, and I still miss it.

Another nice thing, brief as it was, was watching musicians which were all business and didn’t bob around like they were having seizures. Seems to have become the style these days that everybody who can afford to move their instruments much “interprets” their musicianship with so much body English that the whole orchestra appears to be squirming. Worst offenders - the violins and small woodwinds. Watched an oboist with the Berlin Phiharmonic lurching about with such ecstatic, egotistic abandon that if he’d hit his knee he’d have driven that double reed right through his palate. And I have to admit, I sort of wished he would. The music was good, though, with eyes closed.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Feb 5, 2013 - 01:10pm PT
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Feb 5, 2013 - 01:16pm PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Feb 5, 2013 - 01:23pm PT
Trombone: Christian Lindberg playfully playing Csardas
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Feb 25, 2013 - 04:19pm PT
A beautiful piece.
Gary

Social climber
Right outside of Delacroix
Apr 4, 2013 - 10:43pm PT
Virgil Thomson had this idea of musical portraits. People would sit for their portraits as Thomson would compose them. Interesting stuff.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 4, 2013 - 10:57pm PT
Original "Tea party" music (Tax protest)



Translation here

http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV212-Eng3P.htm

And I'll bet you thought the old Lutheran only wrote church music.

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 9, 2013 - 12:36am PT
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 10, 2013 - 03:57pm PT
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 16, 2013 - 06:46pm PT
My piano teacher had her senior recital last Sunday. She did very well, but she really nailed this:


It was spectacular in every sense of the word. (you gotta love the look on Horowitz's face as he walks off stage)
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Apr 16, 2013 - 07:15pm PT
I may have posted it before but here is a different version, from his concert in Russia.

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Apr 16, 2013 - 07:39pm PT
a couple of clips of Heinrich Neuhaus, an incredible musician and likely the greatest teacher of the piano. His students include, among many others, Sviatoslav Richter and Emil' Gilels





Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 16, 2013 - 11:57pm PT
The old school pianists really had something going on.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 17, 2013 - 12:59am PT
Yes, plus they didn't indulge in mini-skirts and over-the-top theatrics.
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Apr 17, 2013 - 08:47pm PT
the fact that no new Richters, Horowitz's or Gould's seem to have appeared in the last few decades (at least to my knowledge) must be indicative of something, but I'm not sure what it is... The dominance of Lang Lang's, on the other hand, is not entirely surprising
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 17, 2013 - 08:59pm PT
I aver that Ashkenazy is the last truly great and he hasn't performed
for quite a while.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Apr 18, 2013 - 01:55am PT
the fact that no new Richters, Horowitz's or Gould's seem to have appeared in the last few decades (at least to my knowledge) must be indicative of something, but I'm not sure what it is... The dominance of Lang Lang's, on the other hand, is not entirely surprising

I think it indicates a triumph of "contemporary" (in the musical criticism sense) taste over Romantic taste in the conservatories. Horowitz and, to a certain extent, Richter (and certianly Arthur Rubinstein) were throwbacks to Romanticism in an age of modernism.

I think someone like Maurizio Pollini has all the technical equipment of any of the great pianists of the past, including Horowitz, and pianists of my generation idolize him as a technical superman. I personally find his recordings quite good, particularly his late Beethoven. His recording of the fugue of the Hammerklavier is the best I've heard.

Overall, though, he doesn't dazzle the way the Romantic virtuousi did. As an example, his recordings of the Brahms piano concerti are technically fabulous, but they just don't deliver the emotional punch of a Rubinstein or Rudolph Serkin.

Ultimately, though, it simply demonstrates why we call the opposite of classical music popular music.

John
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Apr 18, 2013 - 09:49am PT
the fact that no new Richters, Horowitz's or Gould's seem to have appeared in the last few decades (at least to my knowledge) must be indicative of something, but I'm not sure what it is...

Get thee to see Yefim Bronfman. And Yuja Wang is destined for greatness. It'll be interesting to see her mature as a musician.
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Apr 18, 2013 - 11:23am PT
a typical "modern version":


"old version" played by the author himself:


which one is more "romantic"? I find it hard to believe that the change in the taste is all there is to it. In terms of "athletic performance" (i.e. notes per second) no one I know today comes even remotely close to Rachmaninov, Hoffman, Backhaus or Richter. And the reason why we hear fewer wrong notes today is mostly because fewer risks are taken. No one plays the Liszt sonata at this tempo anymore!



Although Horowitz, Rachmaninov or Hoffman are viewed as romantics, to me their playing had the lucidity and the momentum that lack in today's overly sentimental way of playing romantic music (such as the above recording by Kissin)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Apr 18, 2013 - 02:10pm PT
Milada Šubrtová - "Měsíčku na nebi hlubokém" - Rusalka - Dvorak
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Apr 18, 2013 - 02:13pm PT
And the reason why we hear fewer wrong notes today is mostly because fewer risks are taken. No one plays the Liszt sonata at this tempo anymore!

I agree with the thrust of what you say, particularly the lack of risk in modern recordings and concerts. The pursuit of "perfection," usually interpreted as no technical mistakes, has diminished the art of the piano. I don't think that's all, though.

Ironically, my best illustration isn't a romantic piece at all. If you compare the Schnabel recordings of the Hammerklavier with that of Pollini, for example, the two take exactly the same tempi for the fugue (as does Eschenbach in his sensational DGG recording of about 1970). Kempff, in contrast, is a bit slower (quarter = ca. 128 rather than the Beethoven-indicated 144 at which the others play). Kempff and Pollini play equally clearly, but the faster pace of Pollini doesn't seem that fast because it's so perfect.

As an unraveling of the fugue, I have never heard another recording that matches Pollini's. Nonetheless, the emotional effect of Schnabel's reading, particularly when the main subject returns in the chaos of the inverted subject, is overwhelmingly climactic, and the piece seems startling, even to 21st century ears. Rachmaninoff also aimed every piece for what he called "the point." Pollini's playing is so uniformly unerring that it's hard to feel a point.

My personal favorite piece for solo piano, the Beethoven Op. 111 Sonata, is another illustration of what Schnabel had that modern pianists don't. The crescendo and diminuendo in the double trill in the last movement is much greater in Schnabel than in the modern readings, and it creates an effect of such profound tranquility as to seem to suspend time itself. I try to emulate Schnabel when I play (I've played that Sonata for 42 years, and still don't tire of it), but seldom succeed. Schnabel seemed to be able to do that sort of thing naturally.

I think the training of modern pianists makes them lost in romantic, or really any greatly expressive, literature. It's rather like a leader who's only used bolt protection on sport climbs taking on his or her first difficult lead without bolt protection. Placing removable gear is a different skill from doing hard moves, and even though their technical ability to move upward may be superb, the comfort level of needing different protection hampers the fluidity of movement.

Of course, playing is art, not science (despite my collection of piano technique books that try to analyze the science of playing), so even if my analysis were close, I know it's not universally true. In the meantime, I'll continue to enjoy hearing others play, playing myself, and reading what my fellow ST posters think. Thanks.

John
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Apr 18, 2013 - 03:29pm PT
now I need to find Pollini's recording of Hammerklavier and compare it with Schanel. I always felt that Pollini's versions of op. 109 and 110 are quite possibly the greatest I've heard..

in the meantime, another clip...

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Apr 19, 2013 - 12:14am PT
ok, I've found Pollini's recording... It's absolutely superb.

On the topic of Hammerklavier, here's another clip :)

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
May 6, 2013 - 08:12pm PT
and another recording of comrad Stalin's favorite musician
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 6, 2013 - 08:46pm PT
Nice Bach
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 10, 2013 - 12:20am PT
Another Russian and Bach:
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
May 10, 2013 - 02:03am PT


Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 10, 2013 - 06:53pm PT
Never enough Bach
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
May 10, 2013 - 06:56pm PT
classical in nature and study, i give one of the worlds greatest guitarists EVER. Mr Steve Howe.






just the first 4:36 of it will convince..;-)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
May 11, 2013 - 04:46pm PT
Dennis Johnson - November
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 23, 2013 - 12:27am PT
Since it's Wagner's birthday, give or take, here's one Nazi conducting another:
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 23, 2013 - 12:30am PT
Ron, I'll see your Steve Howe and raise you Ana Vidovic:
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
May 23, 2013 - 04:14pm PT
Thanks for the Richter clip, Selfish Man. The recapitulation had the same excitement that Schnabel's recording had, and the tempi Richter used in the introduction between the adagio and the fugue were just the way I like them (Pollini is neither mysterious enough in the largo sections nor excited enough in the other sections for my taste), although I still think no one plays the fugue itself better.

More importantly, it might finally eradicate "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" theme from my mind. Yesterday, I needed to rescue my 101-year-old mother from her automatic sprinkler system, which wouldn't turn off electronically, and I've had the "Sorcerer's Apprentice" theme on my mind since.

I even played my favorite Beethoven Sonata, the Op. 111, last night on the piano, in the hope that the Arietta would replace Sorcerer. No luck. Hopefully, my mind will be churning the Hammerklavier fugue theme for awhile now. If not, I may need to resort to the nuclear weapon of mind-numbing tunes -- "It's a Small World."

John
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 30, 2013 - 11:34pm PT
If not, I may need to resort to the nuclear weapon of mind-numbing tunes -- "It's a Small World."

Don't do it, John! Try this:
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
May 31, 2013 - 11:28am PT
JE on Pollini:
His recording of the fugue of the Hammerklavier is the best I've heard.

Have you heard Rudolf Serkin play this? I'll leave discussion of relative technical capabilities to others, but to me the way Serkin plays it is how I imagine Beethoven hearing it in his mind as he created it. Technique is fine, but without the fire and passion, without the willingness to take chances and be sometimes wrong, technique is all that's left. And technique, by itself, conveys little of what is in the music.


JE again:
As an example, his recordings of the Brahms piano concerti are technically fabulous, but they just don't deliver the emotional punch of a Rubinstein or Rudolph Serkin.

Or Gilels. His recordings of both of the Brahms concerti were so burned into my brain that I could call them up any time. Just imagine what cruising through immaculate sparkling powder between monster granite walls on Baffin Island was like with that ringing in my head.

(I also once saved Gilels' bacon in an emergency, but that's a different story.)
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
May 31, 2013 - 12:40pm PT
Salve Regina

 Medieval Chant of the Templars. Era of the Crusades.: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=IoSuyUFiEYo

 Scarlatti: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=uF5azK7whIU

 Arvo Pärt: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=f1CNNf9iU9Y
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
May 31, 2013 - 01:54pm PT
(I also once saved Gilel's bacon in an emergency, but that's a different story.)

I'd love to hear that story, Ghost! I bought the Gilels/Szell recording of Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto in 1971, and it remains my favorite. The sophistication and clarity of his playing -- particularly of the cadenza in the first movement, but really all the way through -- was just a delight. It certainly must have amazed people to hear him say "Wait till you hear Richter!"

I also have to confess that Rudolph Serkin is really the reason I have never been able to get Beethoven out of my daily playing. In 1970, I heard his recording of the Moonlight, Pathetique and Appassionata. I had never heard the Appassionata before, and it completely mesmerized me. I doubt that a day has gone by since when I haven't played at least some Beethoven when I have access to a piano (i.e., I'm not traveling or in the mountains).

Incidentally, a year or two after that, Peter Serkin made a recording of the Hammerklavier that was sensational. Teach your children well . . .

John
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jun 3, 2013 - 10:49pm PT
(I also once saved Gilels' bacon in an emergency, but that's a different story.)

I'd love to hear that story, Ghost!

It was sometime in the late 1970s I think. Emil Gilels was playing in Vancouver, where I lived, and I had tickets. This guy was, in my mind, the best piano player in the galaxy, so I was pretty stoked. But the recital kind of sucked.

Okay, so Gilels playing badly was still better than most of what passed for classical pianism, but still...

On the other hand, it was only because of me that he was playing at all that night.

I'd made an appointment to let my dentist torture me that morning, but not long after I sat down in the waiting room Jim (the dentist) came out and said "I've got a favor to ask."

Wtf? "What? You want me to be the guinea pig for some new procedure?"

"No, but I wonder if you'd mind waiting half an hour or so while I deal with an emergency."

Of course I said that was fine. Anyone who has had a dental emergency would willingly wait half a day if that would help someone in a similar situation. And a couple of minutes later two people walked in. One sort of in charge, the other obviously in serious hell and barely functioning as a human. And the sufferer looked vaguely familiar...

It took me a minute to correlate the red hair with the B&W photos I'd seen, but then light bulb switched on and I knew who I'd given up my half hour for.

No wonder he wasn't in top form that night.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Jun 4, 2013 - 02:28am PT
Great story, Ghost!

John
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Jun 4, 2013 - 09:18am PT
There is a fantastic classical station out of Hawthorne Nevada called KQMC....The DJ is a complete nut job , hilarious and goes by the name of the Captain...The music comes in loud and clear at Navy Beach and makes a great back drop for paddling on the goddess Mono....
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jun 4, 2013 - 09:28am PT
rotten,
i had a college professor called captain.
he was a scottish sailor, a drunk sporting
a stolen soul.

he and i became good friends over the years of my studies.
he failed to pass me in my capstone class
soley on his intuition (no grades were issued in that class)
postponing my graduation and
earning potential for 365 days.
(classes were only offered every other semester)
i didn't hold it against him.

he told me, later,
that i was the best student he'd ever had the pleasure to teach.
he knew that i lived under the interstate among
transient friends.

he knew that his bottle of scotch landed me in jail
on the day of our last final exam...

he made us call him captain
because he had sailed around the world solo
with his cases of scotch and
then accidentally burned up and down his boat
in the final port....

i lost touch with professor steward.
i wouldn't be suprised if he
landed a gig spinning classical vinyl on air in rural nevada...

it's romantic to think so, anyway.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jun 7, 2013 - 11:20pm PT
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Jun 8, 2013 - 12:14am PT
Norwegian..This captain has no scottish accent but rumors of a mythical Walker Lake serpent , Cecil , are similar to a scottish sea monster named Lochness....The high school mascot is a Serpent and Hawthorne Nev. , like the Capt. , can be a real blast...
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 12, 2013 - 12:20pm PT
The Captain is a gas. I enjoy KQMC when I get a chance.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jun 12, 2013 - 11:00pm PT
There are more than a few discussions in this thread about which acclaimed performer gives the best account of which acclaimed piece by which acclaimed composer. But just as the best rock'n'roll or jazz you ever heard was in a bar somewhere, on a night when god touched the musicians in a band you'd never heard of, so it is with classical music.

Sure, Richter and Serkin were both stellar in this or that Beethoven sonata, and Milstein vs Vengerov, and the Emerson vs the Tokyo quartet, and this famous orchestra vs that one, etc etc etc, but some of the best performances of classical music I've heard are by people I'd never heard of.

Maybe they only reached that level once, or maybe they were always that good, but just never made it in the classical music business, or whatever. But like that jazz quintet in the southside dive you stumbled into one night, they had a transcendent hour when the tape was running.

So, I'd love to know what you can recommend in this vein. I'll start with a CD I picked up in a moment of silliness, but which is now my gold standard for violin-and-piano. Partly it's because the playing is superb, but also because, unlike most violin/piano performances, this isn't a hot-shot violinist in the foreground with some Fred on piano in the background, or even a "first among equals" thing. This is just two musicians. Rachel Barton playing the fiddle and Patrick Sinozich playing the piano. Who knew?

The picture below is the CD cover. Tacky to the Max. Ditto for the stupid "concept." I have no idea why I bought it. Perhaps there were drugs involved. I really don't remember. But the music...

Wins the Pulitzer Prize for "Worst CD Art Of The Decade"
Wins the Pulitzer Prize for "Worst CD Art Of The Decade"
Credit: Ghost


If you can't find it on amazon.com, I can burn it for you.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 12, 2013 - 11:38pm PT
Is this the chick?
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jun 25, 2013 - 03:10pm PT
Alice Mary Smith
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 17, 2013 - 01:08pm PT
And then there's all the jokes about viola players...

The hiatus is over, Phono McBono fans.



I like these teeny tiny notes!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Sep 18, 2013 - 04:10pm PT
Purcell - March / Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary (Funeral Sentences) Z. 860



'When I Am Laid in Earth...'
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Sep 18, 2013 - 05:33pm PT
Mouse,

Thanks for the post up of Schnabel playing the first movement of Op. 111. I learned that sonata 42 years ago, and still love playing it. It remains my favorite piece in my repertoire.

I remember when I was working on the second movement, a grad student stopped by in the practice room I was using. I was struggling with a very wide double trill for the right hand, and questioned whether the movement was playable for me. His response has stuck with me, because he said, essentially, "Just remember. You're trying to learn the greatest piece ever written for solo piano. That alone is worth the effort." I treated it like a hard boulder problem, and eventually got it, but it is not a piece I could have gotten through sight reading.

I have a basic rule with that Sonata, though. I don't play or even practice the first movement unless I have enough time to play the second. The turmoil of the first movement needs its antidote in the profound tranquility of the second. For those unfamiliar with this sonata, it has only two real movements, following the one-page Maestoso introduction, and they contrast on every possible level. Anton Rubinstein opined that humanity wasn't worthy of the second movement. I wonder if Beethoven could have conceived of it if he could still hear.

There's a second reality for me with that Sonata. I do not start practicing or playing it until I'm done with everything else on the piano, because nothing can follow it. Once I finish playing it, I'm done playing the piano. Beethoven wrote no more piano sonatas after Op. 111, and I think he did so deliberately. It remained his last word on the subject.

Thanks again.

John
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Sep 18, 2013 - 05:37pm PT
John,

Nice post.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Oct 28, 2013 - 12:52pm PT
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Oct 28, 2013 - 01:22pm PT
Ghost, too true. Many great musicians don't make it to the big stage for
any number of reasons, the ability to play being the least of them. My friend,
Almer Imamovic, is a case in point. While studying with Pepe Romero at the
USC Thornton School he was on the fast track to the big time - doing well
at comps, etc. Then he made a conscious decision to follow his passion which
was to make music, particularly with his wife Jessica, a flautist he met
while they were at L'Ecole Normale in Paris. Now they have a thriving duo
thang going playing adaptations of the classics mixed in with his treatments
of Balkan folk music. He still does his solo classical gigs, mainly in
Europe, but their duo, Almanova, is his main focus.

It is hard to get them over for dinner much any more but it is something
special to get him lubed up and turn him loose on my wife's guitar. He'll
sit here and seamlessly riff Bach, Jobim, Metallica, whatever you shout at him.
The dude's a monster and drop dead funny.

Concierto de Aranjuez:


Almanova:


Almanova website - buy 'em up! Click on the link just to hear Jessica knock it dead.
Almanova
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Oct 28, 2013 - 01:45pm PT
Gary. . . STEALIN' IT!

TFPU!
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 28, 2013 - 03:49pm PT

Peter Hurford - J.S. Bach - Toccata & Fugue in D minor
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Oct 28, 2013 - 03:54pm PT
Great find, Gary!

John
RtM

climber
DHS
Oct 28, 2013 - 04:27pm PT
In my younger days I played classical piano for a good decade and a half before putting it on the back burner for 20 years or so. I have actually been playing again for about 3 weeks now!!


I kinda just skimmed over the thread, but I was surprised to not see anything on Chopin. I has always been my understanding that Chopin is considered the greatest piano composer. A common phrase I hear is that "Chopin is the soul of the piano", and I have always agreed with this. Of all the works from my old repertoire; Bach, Rachmaninov, Scriabin, Debussy, Liszt, Chopin, etc..; Chopin would always get me going the most, and usually would also be the most difficult to execute.

Anyhoo, just wanted to give a shout out to the man! Now, time to go bang on some keys.


BTW, I am neither gay, jewish or, well, I used to be pretty good!
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Oct 28, 2013 - 04:37pm PT
RtM,

My wife got me several pads titled "Chopin Liszt," showing caricatures of Frederic and Franz carrying paper shopping bags filled with groceries. Sad to say, I don't know where I put the last of them.

While I play some of both -- what pianist can resist? -- I'm not sure whether it's a matter of Beethoven fitting my hands or my soul or both, but his Sonatas just seem to require less effort and give greater satisfaction. I have to play the Fantasy-Impromptu, though, because that is one of my wife's favorites. Well, I like it a lot too.

As far as the pre-twentieth century composer requiring the greatest effot, though, Brahms gives me the most trouble. I love (and love to play) his music, but it always requires a lot more effort than I would expect just looking at the music.

John
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 28, 2013 - 04:37pm PT

Ashkenazy plays Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 2nd. mov Adagio. Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Sir Georg Solti.
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Oct 28, 2013 - 09:08pm PT
Ok. A few memorable Chopin performances:





selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Oct 28, 2013 - 09:29pm PT
and more



RtM

climber
DHS
Oct 29, 2013 - 11:44am PT
Fantasie Impromptu, nice! I haven't heard that one in a long time. That one was on the first Chopin cassette that I owned - Vladimir Ashkenazy(sp?), had the Impromptus, Fantasie, Barcarolle, Berceuse - that cassette changed my whole world.

My wife's fav is Clair De Lune, Debussy - of course. Trying to piece that one back together now.

I'll have to give Brahms a closer look, thanks!
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Oct 29, 2013 - 02:31pm PT
My wife's fav is Clair De Lune, Debussy - of course.

It turns out I heard my wife-to-be play Clair de Lune 48 years ago in a piano recital. My sister and I were there because we both had good friends playing in that recital. After I married my wife (30 years less 23 days ago, but who's counting?), I saw her program from that recital and realized I was there. Once I saw the program, I remembered her playing as well, although I didn't see her again for almost 20 years.

Sad to say, she quit her lessons shortly after that recital. We used to play some duets when we were first married, but she hasn't really played in at least a couple of decades now. Since 1990 we've owned two pianos, with me holding out hope that either my wife or one of my daughters would like to play two-piano duets with me. No dice. At least my older daughter plays for enjoyment, and even attempted Clair de Lune. Unfortunately, the key signature daunted her.

My younger daughter is getting her master's degree in composition, so she uses a piano to sound out what she's written on occasion, but doesn't play except if absolutely necessary. My bottom line: when my older daughter gets married this April, my vertical piano will go with her, at least for now.

Oh well, at least my wife enjoys it when I play Clair de Lune.

John

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Oct 29, 2013 - 02:44pm PT
Oh well, at least my wife enjoys it when I play Clair de Lune.

It looks like I'll have to wait until retirement to tackle that one and the Girl with the Flaxen Hair. I have the same key signature issue! It'll take lots of time on the bench.

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Oct 31, 2013 - 03:27pm PT
Sibelius: The Swan of Tuonela
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Nov 12, 2013 - 12:33pm PT
Leinsdorf breaks the news of the Kennedy Assassination

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Nov 18, 2013 - 06:20pm PT
Can you read the score in the sky?  These are not swans, but something...
Can you read the score in the sky? These are not swans, but something else.
Credit: mouse from merced
More Swanage.



Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Nov 26, 2013 - 01:09pm PT

Beethoven - Ferenc Fricsay & BPO (1958) Symphonie n°9 op 125 en ré mineur
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 3, 2013 - 07:22pm PT
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 3, 2013 - 10:01pm PT
It's SO easy to post up a work that's taken a lifetime to get to know, let alone a whole raft of them buggers.

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 5, 2013 - 04:01pm PT
Nice stuff, mighty Mouse. Saturday I'll be at the Colburn School and hear Ray Ushikubo play the Heroic Polonaise. The kid will be something someday.



Ray had a growth spurt over the summer and can reach the pedals without standing up now.
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Dec 5, 2013 - 04:05pm PT
Ksolem

Trad climber
Monrovia, California
Dec 5, 2013 - 04:24pm PT
I've been a fan of Irish pianist Barry Douglas ever since I saw him play a brilliant and daring program here in L.A. in 1991. He was at the time, the only non-Russian to win the Tchaikovsky competition other than Van Cliburn. Here's an excerpt from the 1st movt. of Tchaikovsky's 1st Piano Concerto with the Taiwan Symphony recorded last year...


selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Dec 5, 2013 - 05:23pm PT
that Arrau recording is incredible
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 11, 2013 - 01:26pm PT
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Dec 11, 2013 - 01:29pm PT
I always felt the last movement of the Bartok Fourth Quartet should be subtitled "Congregational Meeting," because that was usually one's impression in my church. Times have changed, and the congregation mellowed, so now I think I can subtitle it "Partners' Meeting" from my days as a law firm partner.

John
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 11, 2013 - 03:32pm PT
Ha! It doesn't strike me as congregational! I do like working my way through Mikrokosmos

I'm in a Russian mood today.


Heard Charles Dutoit conduct this with the LA Phil last year. It was maybe the best musical performance I've heard. It was enthralling.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 11, 2013 - 07:40pm PT
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Dec 11, 2013 - 09:43pm PT
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 11, 2013 - 11:03pm PT
My head is spinning after following that score. Truly, voicing is what separates the men from the boys in the piano world.

More Russians?

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Dec 11, 2013 - 11:34pm PT
more on a russian theme...
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 12, 2013 - 10:28am PT
Bravo! Encore!
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 30, 2013 - 02:13am PT
Paul O'Dette / Francesco Da Milano / Fantasia 33
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jy6CfW95r2U

Raoul O'Dead/ Il Divino / Fantasay Hey There 28
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jy6CfW95r2U

Ron Carter (yeah, Ron Carter!) / Meets Doc Bach
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3UgY3biZPo
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Dec 30, 2013 - 06:28am PT
european jazz trio ~

grieg: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caUqhn45NX4

handel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFvqpeP3Dmw

chopin: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFari4Q1GMY

debussy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byiQ--DuM3Y
Eclipze

Trad climber
Morris Plains / Givat Haim Ichud Israel
Dec 30, 2013 - 12:10pm PT
I love the emotion able to be garnered from the music especially with today's garbage pop music where everyone is electronically pitch perfect to listen and experience to music in its purest form is a real treat. For people my age most are into modern music but I was raised on blues jazz and classical music along with the Stones and Chili Peppers. It just stuck. Haven't had the chance to see an Orchestra besides the one that toured with Peter Gabriel which was the best concert I've ever been to, but I mean to once I finish this rotation overseas
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Dec 30, 2013 - 12:30pm PT
Thanks for adding the deBussy. The rest really shone!
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Dec 30, 2013 - 02:04pm PT
That Carter recording was a hoot.

One of the greatest American composers. His works are rarely performed. He's American and 20th century, so his music doesn't stand a chance.
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Jan 16, 2014 - 06:14am PT
richie beirach trio ~

satie: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRCggIuHwdI

bach: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsqFGytxUzo
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Jan 16, 2014 - 06:46am PT
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Jan 16, 2014 - 07:07am PT
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Jan 16, 2014 - 07:16am PT
2nd movement


and 3rd
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jan 16, 2014 - 07:25am PT
danza de la feeray
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Jan 19, 2014 - 10:50am PT
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 7, 2014 - 06:36am PT
i am a gentleman.
and i have a fantasy.
.

i am common,
and i don't mind fanfare.



when i'm around,
the sheep may safely graze,
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Feb 7, 2014 - 06:52am PT
saw Mahler's 7th Symphony last night

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Feb 7, 2014 - 05:04pm PT
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Feb 7, 2014 - 05:28pm PT
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Feb 7, 2014 - 05:47pm PT

mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Feb 7, 2014 - 08:54pm PT
A brief musical delight.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 8, 2014 - 08:08am PT
those norwegians
sure can blow pipe,
and strike string,

Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 8, 2014 - 08:10am PT
awesome, anita.

i love seeing symphonies live.
i'm not often brought to tears,
but i admit that the live presentation
often invites me moist eyes.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 10, 2014 - 08:35am PT
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 12, 2014 - 07:14am PT
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Feb 12, 2014 - 07:23am PT
nice stuff
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 12, 2014 - 10:24am PT
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Feb 12, 2014 - 12:16pm PT
Any other opera queens here? I miss Luciano. Technically Placido is great
but Luciano just worked my heart more.

And will we ever see the likes of Maria again? Yes, a lot of great singers
since her but, again, nobody could emote like her. I suppose it helped that
she lived her life like a tragic heroine. The modern greats like Fleming
are just too mentally healthy.
moosedrool

climber
Stair climber, lost, far away from Poland
Feb 12, 2014 - 12:28pm PT
When I was growing up in Poland, we had just one radio station. They played ONLY clasical music. After listening to it for some 20 years I developed a fobia. That's right, I can't stand Chopin and just hate Mozart.

There are some pieces by Bach and Czajkowski I like, but that's pretty much it.

I remember the day I heard Blues for the first time. I was 17 or 18. It was on on Radio Luxemburg. I loved it and I still do.

Andrzej
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 23, 2014 - 09:06am PT
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Feb 27, 2014 - 03:45am PT
f*#king ditty,

Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:02am PT
this morning the wind, outside is howling
through the sugarpines.

so i donned an el cap knitted by mrs. crawford (paul's mom)
and an old puffy jacket that i scored at the thrift store,
and took a walk thru the forest.

the damn moon, pretty as she ever was, totalled my vision,
though it impeded my sight,
thus i had to navigate the cluttered forest
via memory, and i cheated a little
by following the dog.

it was cool and when i got back to the yard
i began yarding up my 1" line, just to see
where my muscle mass added up and
i made it about 2/3 height, the rope is
a wee bit damp from the recent precip,
and for some reason it was spinning me
madly so i down-yarded and then summed up
the experience with a bach piece,
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Mar 12, 2014 - 08:21am PT
Morten Lauridsen--Lux Aeterna

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OixdHp5_7ug
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 19, 2014 - 02:26am PT
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Mar 25, 2014 - 05:58am PT
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Mar 25, 2014 - 08:48am PT
I LOVE THIS THREAD!

Thanks, apogee, for starting it!

xo

K
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Apr 22, 2014 - 11:02am PT
classical music is a vibrating mirror
just shy of shattering
as it welcomes the inquisitive
glance of those befuddled scuttlers
whimming about.

rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
Apr 26, 2014 - 10:37pm PT
My daughter playing Haydn Sonata in D

John M

climber
Apr 26, 2014 - 11:24pm PT
very nice Rob. You must be a proud father.
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
May 1, 2014 - 05:50pm PT
Rich,

That was wonderful!!! Bravo.

You must be so proud of her. She is just a chip off the old block. When you climbed, you looked always in such control--your daughter didn't even looked stressed, and played in such control.
I have loved classical music since the age of five.

Check out this piece, which has become my favorite piece of music:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZX5wXVY-Ks
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 1, 2014 - 06:15pm PT
rgold, she did that just terrifically. She's very good. Nice recording as well.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Maestro, Ecosystem Ministry, Fatcrackistan
May 1, 2014 - 06:18pm PT
Wow Rich. Did the postman ring twice or something (haha!) :D

Beautiful!

DMT
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
May 1, 2014 - 07:24pm PT
Thanks for the post, Richie! I think the Haydn Sonatas don't get nearly the attention they deserve. Although Horowitz included them in his repertoire, there weren't too many "name" pianists playing them for way too many years.

That Sonata was my introduction as a pianist to Haydn's music, though I don't think I played it with the verve Sarah showed.

Well done, Daddy and daughter!

John
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
May 2, 2014 - 07:38am PT
rgold, that's a wonderful video. wow, your daughter almost looks like a young martha argerich ;)

Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
May 2, 2014 - 02:21pm PT
Not sure if he is considered classical, but do any of you appreciate and enjoy Phillip Glass? Saw him in concert and it was a trip....

Loved this movie, however, the trailer does not do it justice...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PirH8PADDgQ

Attending this in 2009, simply amazing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8R-MUFAE5U

rgold

Trad climber
Poughkeepsie, NY
May 2, 2014 - 09:33pm PT
Classical music is food for the soul, but there is the issue of food for the stomach as well. What's a girl gonna do? With apologies for thread impurity, here is one answer.

http://stevefuller.tv/video/verizon/verizon_popup.html

Ok, sorry about that...back to your regularly-scheduled Rachmaninoff...

Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
May 3, 2014 - 03:36am PT
Rgold

Wow... how your daughter can play... great musicality and authority... back to Haydn...
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
May 3, 2014 - 05:11pm PT
Ah....Rachmaninoff, wonderful!!!!
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
May 4, 2014 - 10:23am PT
the finale always gives me goosebumps
(Saint Saens Symphony #3)

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 8, 2014 - 02:05pm PT
Sitting here in cube land indexing and uploading old fieldbooks allows me time to listen to youtube music videos while working. Today I ran across this guy, and he's becoming a real favorite.
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
May 8, 2014 - 02:09pm PT
Nice
I was listening to the Nocturnes played by Ashkenazy this past weekend.
Really sublime.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 8, 2014 - 03:31pm PT
They are nice, and Ashkenazy has it happening. I wish I could play one.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
May 8, 2014 - 06:45pm PT
Credit: NYer
Credit: NYer
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
May 13, 2014 - 10:43am PT
second movement at 16:30
one of my faves

hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
May 13, 2014 - 11:57am PT
almost qualifies ...

jami sieber ~ dancing backwards: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MASWVQj0HeM



probably doesn't ...

long past gone: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4tEhqQGTBs

maenam: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kWo8N4QNXM
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 13, 2014 - 11:29pm PT
I like the old guys, they weren't slaves to anyone.
selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
May 14, 2014 - 12:09am PT
that was a very unique version of la Campanella...


when old guys were young (ish):

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
May 14, 2014 - 11:49am PT
Very nice clip, SM. Stalin must have hated that one.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 4, 2014 - 10:22am PT
Think like Denk
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jun 11, 2014 - 06:22am PT
empty word introduction.
now for the main attraction,

anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Jun 11, 2014 - 06:53am PT
very nice
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 11, 2014 - 07:46am PT
Conductor Rafael Fruehbeck de Burgos has died in Pamplona. He's made many visits to Los Angeles over the years. He was a terrific musician, his concerts were most enjoyable. My g/f and I would try to make his shows whenever possible. He always produced a terrific sound.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jun 14, 2014 - 02:32pm PT
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Jun 16, 2014 - 05:28am PT
astor piazolla ~ oblivion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AT1IivIQYSw

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jun 18, 2014 - 11:56am PT
^^ Terrific
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jul 1, 2014 - 08:39pm PT
vv Terrific

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 1, 2014 - 09:07pm PT
I guess this should go on the Bird thread but the other night my #1 and I were having din-din in the mezquita and I had Bruch's Violin Concerto on. I swear to Allah that Mr and Mrs Black
Phoebe were sitting on the roof rapt. When it finished they went about their business of ridding
our yard of flying pests.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jul 17, 2014 - 08:46am PT
I first heard this live, performed by a conservatory student. He did a great job, and it's become a favorite. And this is a cool video, to boot.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 17, 2014 - 08:48am PT
BTW, Lorin Maazel passed the other day.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 17, 2014 - 08:51am PT

Lorin Maazel in Memoriam (06.03.1930-13.07.2014)

"Adagietto" from Symphony No 5 by Gustav Mahler
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Jul 19, 2014 - 03:07am PT
John Field forever...nocturnes playlist.
John Field nocturnes are sweet.
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 19, 2014 - 11:18am PT

Mischa Maisky - Bach Cello Suite No.1 in G
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jul 19, 2014 - 11:20am PT

Seeli Toivio and Kalle Toivio - Franz Liszt - Liebestraum cello and piano

eKat

Trad climber
Jul 19, 2014 - 11:31am PT
^ ^ ^ ^ Boy, would I like to know the story behind that particular cello. Its tone is just perfect!
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jul 31, 2014 - 01:47pm PT
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Jul 31, 2014 - 02:33pm PT
Thanks for the Ives post, Gary. I've never sung any of his solos, but I've sung a couple of his songs for chorus, and I found them surprisingly accessible, in contrast to, say, his solo piano works. "The Circus Band" I particularly enjoyed. The last time through has a fraternity drinking song as a descant. I wish we had recorded it. Here's a You Tube link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGHi4WWreOw

I know you tube has a version of "the Circus Band" for baritone solo as well, so there's hope for me, but I like the chorus version so much better.

John
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Jul 31, 2014 - 05:49pm PT
Hey, John, that's good. I like 20th century American music. It's so...America! I wish folks would program William Grant Still more often. I like his music and his story.

I just finished up a huge mind-f*#k of a listening session: Leonard Bernstein's Charles Eliot Norton lectures from Harvard. He used Ive's The Unanswered Question to bring together his thoughts on universal music and linguistics and how it all relates to what he termed a "crisis" in modern music. Fascinating, but very heavy.

Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jul 31, 2014 - 07:58pm PT
Speaking of Leonard Bernstein, grab your DVD of "West Side Story" and throw it on the system with the sound coming through your #1 amp and speakers.
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Jul 31, 2014 - 11:44pm PT
Cool, Gary! Back in the early-mid 1960's, when we had one (black and white) TV, my whole family used to gather in the living room and listen to Bernstein's children's concerts with the NY Phil.

John
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Aug 1, 2014 - 07:17am PT
Ghost, my DVD of "West Side Story"? HaHaHaHa!
Mine is on a wax cylinder, don't ya know?
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Aug 2, 2014 - 06:33am PT
the bees,



anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Aug 18, 2014 - 05:38pm PT
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Aug 18, 2014 - 07:46pm PT
Ah, Mahler, the end of the beginning.
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Aug 19, 2014 - 06:45pm PT
are you hating on Mahler, Gary?
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Aug 19, 2014 - 07:00pm PT
are you hating on Mahler, Gary?

Not at all. He was the end of the beginning. The line that started with Bach and went through Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, Chopin, and Wagner culminated with Mahler.

He took all that tonality could offer to the limit. Just look at the size of the orchestras needed to play his symphonies. There was no place to go but to Schoenberg.

Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Aug 19, 2014 - 07:05pm PT
anita514

Gym climber
Great White North
Aug 19, 2014 - 07:14pm PT
you lost me, Gary.
I just heard that sh#t on a TV commercial.
Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Aug 19, 2014 - 07:41pm PT
You just heard Schoenberg on a TV commercial?
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Aug 23, 2014 - 02:30am PT
mark o'conner ~ poem for carlita: http://youtu.be/Fhb5jdZ0uTQ

Gary

Social climber
Desolation Basin, Calif.
Aug 26, 2014 - 05:49am PT
^^ Just heard that on the radio yesterday. It's some great stuff.

More of the end of the beginning:

selfish man

Gym climber
Austin, TX
Aug 28, 2014 - 06:09pm PT
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Sep 12, 2014 - 04:50am PT
my neighbors are having
steamy cups on their porch
and something belligerent
caught the corner of their
gaze and turning my way
they spied me through the
cabin glass warping inward
to this piece.
awe shucks, how do i ever explain myself.


mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 12, 2014 - 05:27am PT
pretty well, actually, amigo.

u must undersand that i don't dig copland cuz he don't swing that well like a bag of sand will when ur on stage tappin' out a rhythym to some really cool old modernist like moncada

and u look up and here it comes

dang

sandbagged again...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Sep 13, 2014 - 12:07pm PT

Christina Pluhar/Pozzi L'Arpeggiata - Cantata sopra il Passacaglio
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Sep 15, 2014 - 01:35pm PT

Liona Boyd - Gymnopédie #1 (Eric Satie)
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