Glenn Tempest portrait gallery of Aussie climbs and climbers

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Messages 21 - 38 of total 38 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Jun 6, 2015 - 12:04pm PT
Seeing the pictures of Dennis Kemp reminded me of the fun we had climbing together in Yosemite in the early 80's. He would bring a pair of binoculars when climbing on the Apron. He was always scanning the terrain from the stances and got exited when I found a fixed pin (or a bolt?) that he never knew existed. I believe the Myers Apron topo was largely Dennis' work.
The following year I met some Brits at Devil's Tower and mentioned that I had been climbing with a retired Welsh schoolteacher in Yosemite ( without mentioning his name). They said "Oh you know Dennis? He lives down the road from us"
Avery

climber
NZ
Jun 6, 2015 - 03:32pm PT
A truly mind-blowing link, MMCC. Love your third post!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 6, 2015 - 08:27pm PT
This is a fat slice of pie indeed!
MMCC

climber
New Zealand
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 7, 2015 - 12:03am PT
I'm done posting in this sh#t hole but it's nice to see this thread get a bit more life. A good friend of mine was at Araps when the Kemp thing went down, sad business all round.

Advance Australia fair...
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Jun 7, 2015 - 12:11am PT

Fantastic time portrait with a fair share of hilarity... TFPU!
Avery

climber
NZ
Jun 7, 2015 - 05:49am PT
Hey MMCC, there's always room for a quality climbing thread. Wallowing through the sh#t-hole (to use your apt description) is the price we pay for the few quality climbing threads, that some how, manage to navigate there way through the copious nonsense that permeates this forum.
jaaan

Trad climber
Chamonix, France
Jun 7, 2015 - 06:11am PT
Seeing the pictures of Dennis Kemp reminded me

Sorry to hijack. Here's an unfortunately rather poor picture of Dennis taken some time in 1986ish, I think. Do any of you down-under climbers know what route/crag this is? Dennis is the lower climber, I'm the higher one. I don't know who took the photo so I can't even locate it that way. It looks more Blue Mountains to me but I only remember seeing Dennis around Arapiles/Grampians.

Credit: jaaan

If I remember correctly Dennis compiled a huge gallery of climber's portraits, himself. Whenever he met a new person he'd take a portrait. Anyone know what happened to it?
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jun 7, 2015 - 12:06pm PT
I noticed that Greg Child has a brother in one of the photos. Any stories or news about him?
AP

Trad climber
Calgary
Jun 7, 2015 - 07:48pm PT
Maybe its time for a Dennis thread. He must have climbed with thousands over the years and was very well liked. I was sad to hear about his accident years ago.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Dec 6, 2018 - 04:11pm PT
Well past time to bump this rogues gallery thread again.
ionlyski

Trad climber
Polebridge, Montana
Dec 6, 2018 - 04:58pm PT
Yes Glenn Tempest. And John Ewbank. Two more names I was trying to remember. I highly recommend anybody even thinking about going to Australia to do so. The climbing areas are beautiful, not crowded, spicey climbs and great camping.

Arne
perswig

climber
Dec 6, 2018 - 05:16pm PT
Great photos!

Dale
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Dec 6, 2018 - 06:40pm PT
While John Ewbank does not appear in any of the photos in Glenn Tempest's gallery, he has been mentioned a few times in this thread, and he was not only a big player in the Australian climbing scene, he was also a gifted writer.

When he died a few years ago, I posted this, in his memory...

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=2292864&msg=2292864#msg2292864

ecdh

climber
the east
Dec 6, 2018 - 07:34pm PT
My dad climbed with Ewbank, the gnarly blue mountains scene. Joe Friend too, who seems to have been scuttled from the history a bit. A bit before most of those shots.

Can't help but think much has been lost in au climbing since those days, the punkish, earthy, rascal quality replaced by students hangdogging bolts.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Dec 6, 2018 - 08:06pm PT
Promethean to pusillanimous- Say it ain't so, Joe.
ecdh

climber
the east
Dec 6, 2018 - 08:10pm PT
Yeah, could be that. Word is some of his left wing ideas didn't go down well with others. Moved stateside I hear?
ionlyski

Trad climber
Polebridge, Montana
Dec 7, 2018 - 04:30am PT
Can't help but think much has been lost in au climbing since those days, the punkish, earthy, rascal quality replaced by students hangdogging bolts

I'm not so sure about that. In fact nowhere else retains so much of the same, slow and lazy pace of being way out there that I know of. The climbs have not changed, sport climbing means you might get a manky old carrot bolt or two, if you have the right hanger in yer chalk bag. Run out climbing and real, down to earth, colorful characters. Many of the faces you see in these photos you will bump into still at the crags. I met many of them, guide book authors, route pioneers and others who became fast friends, if only for the duration of my trip. Climbers move from area to area depending on the season, seemingly together, as you keep bumping into friends and acquaintances all over the country.

I'm sure there are all kinds of exceptions to my experiences and certain areas of course have changed, some more modern sport areas sprouting up and new generations all the time, but I can't think still of a more cohesive climbing community as a whole.

Go to Australia. Go not less than 3 months at the minimum. You will thank yourself for the slow pace of life and an incredible experience.

Arne

edit-re-reading your comment, I don't argue with much lost, for sure; the same can be said for everywhere that experienced a unique culture for the period. Another name not mentioned or shown much in Glenn's photos is Greg Child who also became a Statesman, living in the US now for nearly 30 years I think.

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Dec 7, 2018 - 08:11am PT
This is a good conversation.

It was that punkish, earthy, rascal quality that enamored me of the Australians who visited here in the early 80s.

Speaking purely of stateside climbers, the punkish, earthy, rascal quality gets resurrected throughout the decades in pockets of succeeding generations of climbers. To find it, it helps to be young and plugged in. Being older, one just needs to be observant and know where to look
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