Rock Climbers naturally love to collect Rocks

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Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Original Post - Jan 24, 2011 - 10:44pm PT
I've been collecting since I was wee boy,
and now have an extensive collection

I like all rocks, but have specialized in collecting Crystals
I have found a lot of great things, and continue to collect
But my finest collection is of rocks I bought at Rock Shows over the years
I only collect non-cut, or non-polished crystals
Here is sampling

Please Post your stuff
I know Russ collects, maybe we can get him to post

I won the OC County Fair 1st Place for ALL Collections with this display, all natural
Minature Gem Crystals
Credit: Dr. F.

Here are some shelfs of the display cases
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.

Me and my wife found these great quartz crystals, that some say, is very near Joshua Tree
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 24, 2011 - 10:50pm PT
Me and my wife just got back from Quartzite last weekend
we bought some stuff

But was mostly excited about the petrified wood we found, about 100 lbs of nice pieces
also nice Jasper/agate pebbles, that are naturally polished

The pebbles are interesting, because they come out of the earth already polished, meaning that they must have been polished before the time the wood was being petrified

Interesting indeed
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 24, 2011 - 11:01pm PT
Another place we go to collect is just off the 15, past Barstow
My wife goes crazy, there is just too much great stuff, and she fills buckets of it, and I have to haul it back to the truck
we sell this stuff, for cactus collectors to stage their plants with, $1.50lb

I usually go for a long hike checking out other things around, and then fill a bucket or two
These are the chunks of jasper you pick up
wind polished, (actually sand blown by the wind)
Credit: Dr. F.
Captain...or Skully

climber
leading the away team, but not in a red shirt!
Jan 24, 2011 - 11:04pm PT
Minerals has some amazing piles of rocks. He would, though, huh?;-)


I just make rock gardens.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 24, 2011 - 11:21pm PT
Thanks, Craig!

What scale are those photos at? Maybe you should include a ruler or Swiss army knife of something?

I guess it must be illegal to collect rocks in parks, at least for non-scientific purposes. Greg?
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 24, 2011 - 11:22pm PT
Dr. F:

Very nice crystals!

Do you go to the Tucson Gem & Mineral show in Feb?

There are some huge and fine crystals on display there!

Heidi, with a "nice-size" quartz crystal.
Heidi, with a "nice-size" quartz crystal.
Credit: Fritz


Heidi & I got in trouble at the show, in 2007, trying to get much closer to a very large Brazilian Quartz crystal.

Here's the story! (from an earlier email to my pal Stein)



Dear Stein:

We did attempt to summit a large quartz crystal, but -------"the pooch was screwed in the attempt!"

I didn't want to write about it------since it was personally embarrassing to me----but since you both ask and accuse


The natives were suspicious of us after we took the pictures. The crystals were of course, guarded closely by jealous Brazilians----hunky brutes, with biceps and dark oily skin tones----and hair---lots of hair.

I believe they thought the crystals would fetch a higher price if their tops were not covered with: cairns, bolts, summit registers, and rappel slings. Perhaps they even hoped to auction them to some pervert who would actually purchase virgin crystals to have his way with.

The largest quartz crystal, with another giant one behind.
The largest quartz crystal, with another giant one behind.
Credit: Fritz

Heidi and I moved to one side of the largest crystal. After a quick examination I realized the only alternative to a shoulder stand was to shuck my shoes and socks to attempt the French "en Ungle" (with toenails) technique.

While Heidi (clever lass) converted my shoe laces to rappel slings, and spliced our belts and pack straps, along with some plastic garbage bags together to make a serviceable rope -----I carefully examined the hidden North Face of the crystal for micro-ledges.

Fritz: confronted by the guard.
Fritz: confronted by the guard.
Credit: Fritz


At that moment: the largest guard confronted me!! I have no doubt that his right hand held a hidden knife.

He snarled in broken Spanish----"hombre! Usted chinga con el crystal-----me tene su cojones e tu mujar!"

I took that as a vile threat to two things that I cherish the most.

The assault was ended and we retreated---glad to be still in one piece.

Count it as the first back-off of 2007 --------if you must.

Fritz
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 24, 2011 - 11:24pm PT
I should do a lot of things
but forgot the ruler

the Joshua crystals are about 2-3 inches in front
the single, 4 inches
Jingy

climber
Somewhere out there
Jan 24, 2011 - 11:24pm PT
But its a crime to take rock out of a state/national park......


WTF*#k



Laugh Out Louda
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 24, 2011 - 11:28pm PT
I have gone to the Tuscon show three times
but am now on self imposed exile from it
It's too big, there is way too much, I spend my meager cash in the first 15 minutes, and then just drool the next two days

so now I only go to small shows, there was a show in Costa Mesa

I spend my cash on cactus now, I've shifted to living gems




Those are some splendid giants you are climbing on
kinnikinik

Trad climber
B.C.
Jan 24, 2011 - 11:29pm PT
Credit: kinnikinik
Captain...or Skully

climber
leading the away team, but not in a red shirt!
Jan 24, 2011 - 11:32pm PT
Beware, Kinnikinik!
You might set off a mystical chain reaction of incredible proportions!
Yeesh.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 24, 2011 - 11:35pm PT
Top shelf!
Credit: Dr. F.

Jar Collection
Credit: Dr. F.
Our Insurance Company made us get a High Tech security system
so we have no worries
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Jan 24, 2011 - 11:38pm PT
Dr. F - those are really really beautiful! Your home must be a scrumptious visual bonanza.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 25, 2011 - 12:04am PT
LEB! I had no doubt you would turn up here!

Mine's bigger than yours!
Credit: Fritz
S.Leeper

Social climber
Ft. Useless, Virginia
Jan 25, 2011 - 12:12am PT
Did you see the natgeo show on this amazing crystal cave in Mexico?

Credit: natgeo channel
locker

Social climber
Jan 25, 2011 - 12:17am PT




LOL!!!... @ Fritz...


"GUD" one!!!...

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 12:19am PT
LEB, I got 1000s of F-ing Crystals
I doubt you have one larger than my largest
but please post, and we can take a look at it
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 12:20am PT
Quartz Crystal Case
Credit: Dr. F.
Anastasia

climber
hanging from a crimp and crying for my mama.
Jan 25, 2011 - 12:23am PT
Dr. F, Those are beautiful! Thanks for sharing... Makes me wonder how many beautiful things I've been passing without noticing.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 12:27am PT
I understand everything there is to know about crystals
Well not really, but I know a lot

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 12:31am PT
I was a mystic New Age spiritual hippy
and was totally into crystal power
but in the end, I didn't feel it enough to call it real

I know all about what you are talking about

I don't hold on to the myths about crystals as facts

So LEB, you are wrong once again
Delhi Dog

climber
Good Question...
Jan 25, 2011 - 12:34am PT
That ain't LEB...
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 25, 2011 - 01:28am PT
I can also ID almost any mineral

C'mon Dr.F,

There are over 4000+ minerals now known and more to follow, especially ET minerals from other planetary bodies different from Earth.

Some minerals are so hard to ID that the normal simple mineralogy tests won't do it. It takes optical mineralogy along with EMP analysis to do it. Some rocks are really hard to ID, it takes elemental whole rock oxides and trace element ICP-MS geochemistry analysis to do it.

I'm into elements, minerals, and rocks. In that order. I'm working on putting my own Periodic Table together ala Theo Gray, http://periodictable.com/. Awesome book by the way.

The minerals that interest me the most are those that demonstrate natural crystal form and are choice type specimens, and for a kicker are also fluorescent and/or phosphorescent. Brilliant color so bright and unreal that it can't be duplicated properly in film or CCD. They emit light rather than reflect light when excited by UV.

Then there are the ET native elements, minerals, and rocks via meteorites. Very, very cool, and out of this World. I also have a fragment of a Lunar meteorite, and also a fragment of a Mars meteorite, as well as Asteroid 4 Vesta.


The family and I will probably get out to Tucson this year. Great show.

Calcite, Mexico




Halite, Salton Sea, (this collecting site is now exhausted)



Geronimo Mine, AZ



Classic Fluorescent minerals from Franklin, NJ









Campo del Cielo meteorite, Argentina









Sikhote-Alin Meteorite, Russia







Jesus in a meteorite beats everything, even toast!

















(Dr. F, you have a very fine collection. Good job. Nice :-))
Salamanizer

Trad climber
The land of Fruits & Nuts!
Jan 25, 2011 - 02:17am PT
I'm not seeing Jesus there???

I'm liking everyone's collections. I have a collection of my own. Basically stuff I've found that is unique, but I have no idea what minerals they are.

Speaking of Geodes up thread. Anyone ever climb through the giant geodes on Temple Crag if you vear just off route of Dark Star? 15ft diameter geodes with 6 to 8in crystals all throughout. Very cool!
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Jan 25, 2011 - 03:09am PT
Nice photos everyone. Dr. F or his wife have a really good eye for displaying their specimens. My father was a geologist so I grew up with rocks and mineral specimens all over the house and have a few here of my own. And of course I disagree with Dr. F about what else they can be used for.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 25, 2011 - 03:14am PT
Yes, not everyone sees Jesus in my meteorite. But many do, including me. :-)


Anyone ever climb through the giant geodes on Temple Crag if you vear just off route of Dark Star? 15ft diameter geodes with 6 to 8in crystals all throughout. Very cool!



Is that like the all famous "Gold Room" in a mine of Bodie? The legends abound, but was it real? Did it really exist? Wouldn't there be images of it?




The largest Gold Crystalline Nugget from the Mother Lode of California . . .





http://www.ironstonevineyards.com/index.cfm?method=pages.showPage&pageid=eb225bb7-c901-5124-349a-bbf48cd11ef3


The focal point of Ironstone's Heritage Museum is the largest Crystalline Gold Leaf specimen in the world. Weighing forty-four pounds, this specimen of gold was discovered in 1992 by the Sonora Mining Company, on Christmas Day, just fifteen miles from its current home at Ironstone. Crystalline Gold is one of the most rare and precious natural gold formations consisting of gold that has been deposited in layers between quartz, clay, maraposite, decomposed shale and pyrite.

The “Gold Pocket”, as it has come to be known, is 98 percent pure, making it a specimen of exceedingly high quality and value. Sixty-three pounds before preparation, it spent almost a year in an acid bath washing away most of the surrounding matrix to ultimately reveal the forty-four pound specimen that is on display at the winery.
GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Jan 25, 2011 - 03:27am PT
Accountants naturally love to get f*#ked by Horses
Spider Savage

Mountain climber
SoCal
Jan 25, 2011 - 10:05am PT
Common stones are my delight.

I collect stones by location rather than quality: Great Pyramid, The Wailing Wall of Jerusalem, The Colosseum of Rome, various summits.

Some of the washes off the I15/I70 are really amazing places to see wonderful common stones.

When on park land it's best to catch and release.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 25, 2011 - 10:20am PT

Jesus in a meteorite beats everything, even toast!


Milktoast says you haven't beat ME yet.


Hey Homer
You're no Jesus
Yeah, you're no f*#king Elvis
Don't turn off the TV yet baby
Homer's got to step down, step down

DMT
Jaybro

Social climber
Wolf City, Wyoming
Jan 25, 2011 - 10:25am PT
Got any fossils? Especially Trilobites?
and yes, petrified wood does count, Photos?
Wolframite?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 11:05am PT
I had to limit my collections
so do not collect fossils, or meteorites
yet I a lot of both

as far as fossils go
I love Pet wood, and collect all kinds of it, and go to special areas in search of it
I have a special love for opalized Shells, and wood
I will post photos later, gotta go to work

Wolframite?
yes
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 11:09am PT
Klimmer
4000+ minerals Yes
Maybe I can ID them from my many years in College Mineralogy classes
Does that sound OK for You, or do you think I am lying
okie

Trad climber
San Leandro, Ca
Jan 25, 2011 - 11:30am PT
The official "state rock" of California is serpentine (not the magnificient granite). At least that's what a fancy sign at an East Bay Regional Park informed me. I don't get it. Is there more of that stuff? Or has our government been hijacked by the serpentine special interest lobby?
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Jan 25, 2011 - 11:37am PT
Cool stuff Doc F !

Too funny that LEB invaded your thread, and she's got a bigger crystal than you do! Not only that but she's got a soul attachment to it.

Dude, how can you top that?
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 25, 2011 - 11:38am PT
Granite is common place. Serpentine is not. Both speak of the forces that formed California. Very hard to find this stuff other than on the margins of the west coast, though it does occur in Maryland and some other locations.

Some idiot of a state legislator, Gloria Romero, was trying to have it removed as state rock and may have succeeded - the annoying this is this was done to help a class action lawsuit team underscore the so-called high risk of asbestos fibers that are common in serpentine rocks. The idea is to be able to say to the jury that California FINALLY recognized the danger and removed the rock from the list, a day late and billions of dollars short.

http://articles.sfgate.com/2010-07-16/news/21985506_1_asbestos-disease-awareness-organization-linda-reinstein-mesothelioma

DMT
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 25, 2011 - 12:04pm PT
I bet he was!

I know they were trying to make another run at this but since it is merely a cynical effort by a team of class action lawyers to bolster their case through a bought and paid for state legislator, I think it failed. There is hope for sanity yet?

Some opponents have accused trial lawyers of pushing Romero's plan so they can pursue a whole new type of lawsuit by plaintiffs alleging their health was damaged when they were exposed to naturally occurring asbestos in serpentine found on property throughout the Sierra Nevada foothills and 42 of California's 58 counties.

according to the official state site

http://www.library.ca.gov/history/symbols.html#Heading15

California has a greater number of minerals and a wider variety of rock types than does any other state. Serpentine, a shiny, green and blue rock found throughout California, was named the official State Rock in 1965. It contains the state's principal deposits of chromite, magnesite, and cinnabar. California was the first state to designate a State Rock.

California still has its serpentinite. Though Arnie probably furloughed the web master so this could be old news.

But passing a law that would aid lawyers in their efforts to SUE THE STATE for billions, is pretty f*#king stupid.

DMT
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 25, 2011 - 01:46pm PT
Klimmer
4000+ minerals Yes
Maybe I can ID them from my many years in College Mineralogy classes
Does that sound OK for You, or do you think I am lying



Dr. F,

I'm not bagging on you. I believe you.

Just a little humility is all I ask. How many new minerals do we add each year? Then there are ET minerals that are very rare and throw the full-time mineralogists and professionals even for a loop. Hence, the use of optical mineralogy techniques and Electron Microprobe analysis (EMPA).

What happens when you come upon a new mineral that hasn't ever been IDed before? You ID it and name it of course. That must be the dream of each mineralogist no doubt.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 25, 2011 - 02:58pm PT
Ok, here are a few questions:

1) Name the CA State Official Mineral

2) Name the CA State Official Rock (already mentioned)

3) Name the CA State Official Gemstone

4) Name the CA State Official Fossil



5) Bonus question: What local in CA has the greatest number of found minerals? Hint: Even the "StoneMasters" might get this . . .
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 25, 2011 - 03:02pm PT
1) Name the CA State Official Mineral

2) Name the CA State Official Rock (already mentioned)

3) Name the CA State Official Gemstone

4) Name the CA State Official Fossil



5) Bonus question: What local in CA has the greatest number of found minerals? Hint: Even the "StoneMasters" might get this . . .

1. gold
2. already mentioned
3. benetoite - discussed recently re New Idria and San Benito mtn.
4. Saber toothed tiger

5. Hmmmmm, Riverside? (seems like I should know this one)

DMT
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 25, 2011 - 03:52pm PT
Ok, yes, easy I know.


Riverside, is correct. However, what is the site local?
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 25, 2011 - 03:58pm PT
Thank you for all the nice photos of rock and crystals! Very fun. Maybe Minerals will chime in?

As for the state rock, well, perhaps the name serpentinite inspired the wriggling?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 06:41pm PT
Well I'm back
Crestmore Quarry

Of course I can't ID all 4000
If LEB, or Skip, or anyone else on ST showed me a mineral, I could Probably ID it
and of course rocks are different, since there are 10 types of granite, and ten types of andesite, those are a lot tougher to ID

I have worked at Crestmore, testing air pollution a bunch of times and found some cool stuff
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 06:57pm PT
I hope LEB's one crystal isn't bigger than mine, I am worried
This is above our TV, and I moved some small ones out to see the biggies
The 2 center are quartz sabers, the ruler is 12 inches
the back ones are Selenite, or Gypsum
Credit: Dr. F.

This Selenite and 6 inch quartz live on the entrance table
Credit: Dr. F.

I have bigger still
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 25, 2011 - 07:19pm PT
I predict you and LEB will circle each other from one end of this site to the other. A perfect match, enjoy.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 07:24pm PT
Everyone of those is unworthy of ID-ing

Try again
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 25, 2011 - 07:34pm PT
You and LEB LOL

DMT
MMCC

climber
New Zealand
Jan 25, 2011 - 07:34pm PT
Minerals aren't rocks, this is like starting a "celebrate curry" thread then showing photographs of cumin and turmeric, in little zip loc baggies.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 08:08pm PT
Credit: Dr. F.

These are minerals worth ID-ing
top left . to right
second row..
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 08:37pm PT
I do like opalized mollusk shells
Credit: Dr. F.
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 25, 2011 - 08:39pm PT
OCD is a tough rap to beat.

DMT
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 10:43pm PT
Just a naturalist in training
Rocks, plants, animals, evolution, ecology
Its all one glorious never ending adventure
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 25, 2011 - 10:56pm PT
hey there Dr.F and all...

especiall, spider, and maybe weschrist, too...

mine are just common rocks... don't have any special ones, but i love them all...

lost a lot, when i moved... :(

but i did mail some, here, and have a small box left... think i left some at my mom's, not sure...

well---NOW that i am in the digital-camera world, i can take some pics, :)
AND--NOW THAT i am in a bigger place, they are NOT PACKED away where i can't reach them :))

so i will be back in a bit... and share some... course, i got to downsize the pics, etc...


well, at any rate, they are special to me...

love them rocks!!!


*oh, say, any of you folks from san jose, or campbell, los gatos, or saratoga, or whatever...
mark (chappy) and matt, used to be going to the campbell rock shop a lot...
wished i could have, but they got to ride their bikes there??? i think, and i did not get to...
well:
did ANY OF YOU ALL ever go there, i am just curious...

:)

all for now...
fun stufffffffffffffffff...for sure...
wow, if you can't climb, lug 'em home...
or, stuff them in your ol' pockets... ;)

:))
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 11:06pm PT
Everyone has some rocks

I have 1000s

we just hauled 800 lbs of rocks, gravel, sand, and pet wood back this week end after going to Quartzite, the river, Turtle Mts

we got peridot, brown feldspar, jasper pebbles, calcrete,
I bought a huge piece of natural copper from Michigan, and a crystal of apatite from Mex 3 inches long
plus some arrow heads from the Sahara Desert, dated at 10,000 BPA

to go with the arrowhead collection
most of which are found by me, but I buy them sometimes, when they are too good to pass up

Here is the "Found" Arrowhead Collection
Todd Gordon gave me the one big white one, as part of a wedding gift, Thanks Todd
Dave Stahl found the one just to the left, on our second Ever excursion on a new area we developed. Its made from Chalcedony, its glows
Its my favorite, and is Flawless

I found most the rest near Mammoth, or in the desert
Credit: Dr. F.
Dave Stahl also found the white broken one, just to the left
He picked it up, said "its broken" and threw it into the bushes

I go "wait, I want It" too late, but I searched for it and found it after about 10 minutes
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 11:19pm PT
I have perfect
How big is your perfect one?




Any fire? Any prisms inside

I quartz, those are flaws, not perfection
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 11:33pm PT
Here's perfection
double terminated pencils, 6 inches long
and a 1 inch Grade AAA Herkimer Diamond
absolutely clear, and perfectly terminated
I will get a better picture someday
Its worth alot more than $15
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 25, 2011 - 11:56pm PT
well all 3000 found me

and if crystal energy is real
I would be flying higher than a kite, because they are everywhere in the house
big ass topazes, Aquamarine the size of beer cans
Tourmaline rainbows and garnet gravel


LEB, rather than BLAH, blah blah

Take my ID quiz from the page before

Its easy
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 26, 2011 - 12:15am PT
hey there say, Dr. F.... wow, more great pics you got...

say, yes, i am just simply the "pick up what impresses you" kind of collector...

say, i got one more curtain to make, and i hope to share my meger, but rocks-non-the-less stuff... :))

fun thread, say, i hope more folks chip in too...
would be really fun to see more collections, especially from all over
the states, and other countries, too...

:)
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 10:26am PT
I have alot of amethyst already

and wrong again, LEB
The only reason I have been so successful, is because I CAN focus all my energy, and passion into constructive endeavors
Rokrover

Trad climber
SB, CA
Jan 26, 2011 - 11:30am PT
We love collecting serpentine. Not only is it our favorite local mineral but it enables a lot of hiking through otherwise impenetrable chaparral, being toxic to many plants. There are many serpentine barrens around Figueroa Mountain near Los Olivos as well as outcrops of cinnabar, chromite, magnesite, calcite etc.

Here's some serpentine images from the area.



A vast scree:


A big block:


The local sculptor John Cody is famous for working primarily in serpentine and here's a bear we are proud to own:



Not a healthy mineral to carve as it often contains asbestos!
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
Who'll stop the reign?
Jan 26, 2011 - 11:36am PT
Now those are some MAN HANDS.

DMT
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 12:48pm PT
They look like Big Wall hands!

Where is that Serpintine located
I went to School at UCSB
I would love to check it out some time
Thanks In adavance
Rokrover

Trad climber
SB, CA
Jan 26, 2011 - 01:30pm PT
Spot on, Dingus. John lived for years back in the San Rafael wilderness near the Manzana - Sisquoc river confluence manually hauling out boulders back to his cabin studio. Great training hefting 300lb. boulders around and wielding hammer and chisel all day.

Dr. F. - just head west on 154 from Santa Barbara over San Marcos Pass to Los Olivos then north on Figueroa Mountain Road. This road winds up the mountain and soon you will see lots of exposed serpentine either side. Google Earth shows many of these green barrens scattered on the way towards Ranger Peak then down to Cachuma Saddle and Happy Canyon Road.

These names should help pinpoint the area for you. The serpentine there ranges from blue, green, red to almost black. It often has a slick, mirror surface with tell-tale reflections to help spot a good lode from a distance.

<edit> forgot to add - Dr. F. while you're in Los Olivos check out "Rocks and Rocks on Rocks" along Alamo Pintado Av. There's lots of artistic balanced serpentine boulders out front of a home there and some superb rose quartz from Brazil, too.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 01:43pm PT
I've collected Serpentine before
we used to get it at Jade Cove, on Hwy 1
along with a litle jade

then we found the mother lode of sweet lite green serpentine near Spencer's (HashBro) house in Oregon

we sell serpentine gravel to cactus collectors
we sift it there, and only take about 100 lbs

Will check the SB area, it looks cool
originalpmac

Mountain climber
Anywhere I like
Jan 26, 2011 - 02:14pm PT
love all that watermelon tourmaline in the first few pics. Cool stuff! I'll try to post some pics of my crowning 'jewel' of my collection in a bit.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 26, 2011 - 09:25pm PT
hey there Dr. F, and all...

okay... here is my simple stuff...
*i lost a really neat small hunk of "galena" the best i had
ever seen... not sure how or where... :(

*and, i left some nice ones at my mom's, way back...
*and--i had the NEATEST rock from west coast beach, santa cruz area, that when you SOAKED it with water, it WOULD absorb it all!!! and then--when you put in under a glass bowl (bowl turned upside down), etc, in the sun, the water would collect on the bowl... :) i really MISS that rock... :(

well, here is what is left:
*oh, by the way, i TRIED to keep them in similar groups, of similar groups, haha, etc...

but these first TWO, or not similar, just special, the rock on the left, here, on the first picture, is a ROCK from a wall that my grampa, from slovenia, helped BUILD in garfield hieghts, ohio... it was STILL standing, shockingly so (meaning the store did NOT tear it down!) right next to a modern store, in a busy intersection area... *i had to have a piece of it, as it means most-likely NOTHING to anyone, but me, me, knowing he helped to build it...

and the other rock on the left, is from where me and my mom always walked, when i lived in san jose with her, now i am too far away to walk with her, in the san jose foothills of that "walking park" (can't remember the name of it) (not the quick silver mine area, i dont think, but it could be???)


okay, here goes:


Credit: neebee


THESE break apart, in JAGS...
THESE break apart, in JAGS...
Credit: neebee


*some of this is TAR? i think... can't remember where i got it... :&#41;&#41;
*some of this is TAR? i think... can't remember where i got it... :))
Credit: neebee


UPPER left, and UPPER right, are a bit "bubbly"...
UPPER left, and UPPER right, are a bit "bubbly"...
Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


*these have bits of SPARKLE in them... :&#41;
*these have bits of SPARKLE in them... :)
Credit: neebee


*more sparkly stuff...
*more sparkly stuff...
Credit: neebee


more sparkle-shiney stuff... easily recognized...
more sparkle-shiney stuff... easily recognized...
Credit: neebee


*store-bought... :&#41;&#41;
*store-bought... :))
Credit: neebee


*montana "mud rocks" --and a SPECIAL not-mud-rock bear, FROM CHAPPY......
*montana "mud rocks" --and a SPECIAL not-mud-rock bear, FROM CHAPPY... :)
Credit: neebee


WELL, that's it... but now that i got my own place...
i can start collecting, again... :))




EDIT: many of these, are from river beds, in calif...
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 09:33pm PT
For Klimmer
I got my Mineralogical Record today
20 year subscription
Credit: Dr. F.

neebee, nice collection
are you asking for an ID?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 10:04pm PT
Steve Smale, Mt. Climber, World Renowned Mathematician
and Rock Collector

He donates money to the Mineralogical Record by placing an ad
but its just a nice picture from his collection, which is world renowned
Credit: Dr. F.
That's a 24 ounce beer can Aquamarine
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 26, 2011 - 10:12pm PT
hey there say, Dr. F...

wow, as to ID, sure, that would be nice...

i never did know what they were...

some are soft... the green one, from san jose foothills, feels soft...
and may "sheer easy" *cant' remember if THAT was like others that i had, that did--but i think it was...

i AM curious what my grampa's wall rock is... the wall was made in garfield heights, as i said, but who knows where the rock came from...

then... many were from creek beds, etc.. in san jose area, and upper calif..

there is some slate, i think, in there too... the soft grey flat pieces...

then, those stripes ones, many were from riverbeds, too...
red ones, with stripes were FUN to find... :))


well, if you all would fun doing that, i'd sure like to
learn what they are...

say--will be back in a few hours, i got to do a few projects here
in the ol' new place here...

see you all soon...
god bless...
happy supertopo eve, to you all...
:)

OH--the soft sandy looking ones (two of them, light tannish-orangish-cream), are NOT grainy like sandstone,
but are soft, but not smooth soft (hard to expain)...

:))



edit:
say, Dr. F:
if you read back, a bit, WHAT would my
"water absorbing grey rock, that i lost, (not shown here)be?
it was from ocean, the beach near santa cruz areas...

thanks :)
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Jan 26, 2011 - 10:22pm PT
a lot for sharing Dr F. Wonderful.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 10:26pm PT
Pumice!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 10:27pm PT
LEB
My Dr. says NO
AlexC

climber
Bay Area, CA
Jan 26, 2011 - 10:32pm PT
Lots of nice rocks!

People usually look at me funny when I say I like to collect rocks... it's nice to see I'm not the only collector!

I used to be into all kinds of minerals, but these days I mostly go for varieties of quartz, and agates in particular. I'll make an exception for anything that is nice to look at though :)

My most recent project has been to build a sphere grinder and make polished spheres out of all the various kinds of granite that I can find.

I also have a personal rule that if I don't collect it myself it doesn't count :)

Alex
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 10:45pm PT
we call this rock porn
its just too good!

This was a Magazine supplement, Collectors from Italy
Tourmaline s
Credit: Dr. F.
the one on the right is 20 cm, or 8 inches!

Tourmaline s, and Ukrainian Heliodor, my ultra Fav, which I have a couple peices of, but not 8 inches worth
and one was on the Quiz Photo display,
Credit: Dr. F.
I'm still waiting for some quiz answers!!
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 26, 2011 - 10:58pm PT
Dr. F,

OK, you convinced me, you are good. You've been at it a looooong time.

If I bump into trouble IDing a mineral I'm gonna come knocking. Part of the joy of minerals and rocks is the science, and the IDing. I enjoy that. It might take me longer than others, but I will get there.

Hope that is OK?



Some favorite Mineral and Rock Shows/Museums in my neck of the woods (sorta):

Not to be missed all very good . . .

San Diego Natural History Museum
"All theat Glitters" May 15, 2010–April 8, 2012
http://www.sdnhm.org/exhibits/allthatglitters/


GIA, fine private collection and Museum, RSVP, (near Legoland, Carlsbad)
http://www.gia.edu/


California State Mining and Mineral Museum, Mariposa, CA
http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=588


Marshall Gold Discovery SHP
http://www.parks.ca.gov/default.asp?page_id=484


Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 11:00pm PT
I did say Crestmore, and got zero credit
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 26, 2011 - 11:01pm PT
Dr. F,

I knew you would know. Lol

Good job. :-)
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 26, 2011 - 11:20pm PT
Crestmore Quarry

I worked there about 10 times, at the Concrete Kiln area, testing air pollution,

I would sneak off and explore the other side of the hill
At the North End of the hill, is an gully which you can 3rd class up, I found vesuvianite (sp?) crystals eroding out of the limestone there, big blocks of it,
I collected a bunch, and used acid on some blocks of limestone to get more crystals out

around to the east, there is a lake, with a major pack of coyotes,
and on the hill side of the lake is the blue calcite, and Clintonite crystals, I filled a jar, for the jar collection
The blue Calcite is very sweet

Me and my wife sneaked in once, we collected more of the same stuff, but it was too risky to do again

Once I climbed to the top, the geo maps said there would be all kinds of great stuff up there

It was a total weed thrash, and there was nothing up there of note, except some nice lizards having a huge Mt. to party on
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 26, 2011 - 11:42pm PT
I have only looked at the Crestmore quarry wantonly through the fence.

I do have a few minerals specimens that are fluorescent from there that I purchased.

It would be nice to get on site some day.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 26, 2011 - 11:51pm PT
OK! I realize it is a lot more difficult to ID minerals from photos than "up close and personal."

My point here is: even well known minerals sometimes take slightly different forms, and only the skilled Mineralogist collector will reason out what they must be.

Here is a fairly uncommon, but highly collectable Skarn mineral in a unusual termination.
Skarn mineral from a well-known Idaho location, in atypical crystal te...
Skarn mineral from a well-known Idaho location, in atypical crystal termination.
Credit: Fritz

Here is a more typical crystal and termination of the same mineral.
Black crystal on garnet and calcite from same Idaho Skarn: is a typica...
Black crystal on garnet and calcite from same Idaho Skarn: is a typical form of this crystal. ???
Credit: Fritz

ID please???




Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 27, 2011 - 12:05am PT
My best hypothesis (guess) without definitive tests would be Epidote.

Sounds like the right association: garnet, calcite etc.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 27, 2011 - 12:18am PT
Klimmer: I know you have the proper background, but your answer shows why photos are a real tough way to ID minerals.

That said: Those previous photos were black minerals, and my background in Epidote is: it is a dark-green mineral.

Here's some Idaho Skarn Epidote.

Epidote on Garnet, from an Idaho Skarn.
Epidote on Garnet, from an Idaho Skarn.
Credit: Fritz

Massive Epidote &#40;with small garnets&#41; from the same Idaho Skarn.
Massive Epidote (with small garnets) from the same Idaho Skarn.
Credit: Fritz
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 27, 2011 - 02:14am PT
hey there Dr. F and all... say, WOW!
this is getting more and more beautiful, with all these pics...

thanks for the shares... and starting, it, i say once again...

the colors and size of these, are really amazing...
:)
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2011 - 10:02am PT
well if its not epidote, nor garnet
I will guess at Vesuviante
If wrong, I will consult my books, and give another guess later

It looks like a metal, is it?
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 27, 2011 - 12:59pm PT
Dr. F. Vesuvianite is a good Silicate guess! I didn't think it occured in black.

Neptuite is my favorite California Silicate. I think the only occurance of that rarity in the U.S. is in San Benito, CA.
Neptunite, San Benito, CA
Neptunite, San Benito, CA
Credit: Fritz

My mystery black mineral is also a Silicate. Not quite as rare as Neptunite, but not common. Not metallic. Always black.

Here's another specimen of it from Idaho.
Mystery Silicate mineral on calcite from an Idaho Skarn.
Mystery Silicate mineral on calcite from an Idaho Skarn.
Credit: Fritz

I love those black Silicate crystals!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2011 - 05:44pm PT
always black, not a metal


Ilvaite
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 27, 2011 - 06:02pm PT
Dr. F.

Ilvaite!

BINGO!

Ilvaite from Russia.  These crystals are a little more classic.
Ilvaite from Russia. These crystals are a little more classic.
Credit: Fritz
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2011 - 06:08pm PT
Lets try this easier quiz
top row left to right,
and second row, first two
Credit: Dr. F.

neebee
which ones do you want ID-ed
we will work on those couple, but not all
Pewf

climber
nederland
Jan 27, 2011 - 07:37pm PT
I started collecting rocks before I can remember. My mom saved some of my earliest acquisitions for me.

I cannot go into the hills without bringing rocks home. Unfortunately, I don't always remember all the backpack compartments I've stashed them in, and I usually and up hauling an extra five pounds or so on the next trip out.

Have many that need identification because I sure can't do it!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2011 - 07:39pm PT
More quiz Minerals
These should be fairly easy for any geologists

1) This is probably the hardest one, Its on my other quiz, second row
Credit: Dr. F.

2)
Credit: Dr. F.

3)
Credit: Dr. F.

4) two minerals
Credit: Dr. F.

5) two minerals,
Credit: Dr. F.

6-8) left to right, very uncommon metals, 6 is the rarest
Credit: Dr. F.
MisterE

Social climber
Bouncy Tiggerville
Jan 27, 2011 - 08:03pm PT
Yes we do! Here's two of my creations, one is in the back yard and one is in the house:

photo not found
Missing photo ID#188605

photo not found
Missing photo ID#188606
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 27, 2011 - 09:15pm PT
Nice work
Mister E
Crimpergirl

Sport climber
Boulder, Colorado!
Jan 28, 2011 - 12:12am PT
So much cool stuff on this thread. Really neat!
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 28, 2011 - 12:15am PT
Lots of wonderful photos!

I wonder if there is a gene for "collecting" things? If so, I don't have it, or it's recessive - although most of my family are compulsive packrats. I've seen some marvellous things in nature, especially the mountains, but with rare exceptions just leave them there.
tuolumne_tradster

Trad climber
Leading Edge of North American Plate
Jan 28, 2011 - 12:17am PT
Impressive mineral collection Dr F...I'm envious.

TFPU
MisterE

Social climber
Bouncy Tiggerville
Jan 28, 2011 - 12:57am PT
Ok, I added a wire guy cuz the rock seemed lonely:

photo not found
Missing photo ID#188638

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 01:14am PT
Cool stuff Fort
I have Libyan Glass, have you heard of that
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 01:31am PT
Heres some more rock porn from the Mineralogical Record
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
AlexC

climber
Bay Area, CA
Jan 28, 2011 - 02:05am PT
> Wow, Alex, that is neat. What does a sphere grinder look like?

I couldn't find any good pictures (and don't have any of my home made machine) but this YouTube video shows a typical configuration:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJ0ilzB3l_o

The sphere is held between three rotating cups. As the cups turn, the sphere rolls randomly between the cups and gradually becomes spherical. Some grinders only use two cups, but three seems to work better. Iron pipe fitting make good cups for grinding, plastic ones work better for polishing.

Machines like this are available for spheres at least up to about 10". I've seen fountains with floating spheres that are up to about 6' in diameter. I'm not sure how those are made. Ball bearings are made using a different type of machine where the balls run in grooves between two rotating plates.

Alex
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Jan 28, 2011 - 04:49am PT
Beautiful...........
steveA

Trad climber
bedford,massachusetts
Jan 28, 2011 - 07:11am PT
The first thing I collected was minerals. I was around 12 years old. A very famous collector lived down the street- Mrs. Dearborn. She started this club
for young kids and we met once a week.
She had a superlative collection which later went to the Harvard Museum.

Jimmy Dunn's primary source of income for years has been mining minerals
and his climbing skills have come in handy at times in his endeavors.

This thread is one more reason why I find ST so interesting!
Rokrover

Trad climber
SB, CA
Jan 28, 2011 - 08:07am PT
The best crystals I ever saw were on display at the Knoxville airport. Huge, perfect specimens. Sorry to offend the purists but these were from Oak Ridge and dare I say the S-word (synthetic)

http://lachlan.bluehaze.com.au/usa2003/october2003/16oct2003a/

The MRS site www.mrs.org/s_mrs/doc.asp?CID=2148&DID=84003 has more information but their great pictures don't seem to be linked anymore.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 10:44am PT
Where are the Quiz takers??

???????????????????????????????????????

I'm going stop posting, unless we get some interaction going here
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 10:49am PT
Without crystal-growth science and synthetic crystals, neither the electronics or laser industries would exist.

well said
I have a couple lab grown



I have a bigger problem with CUT GEMS

they take a perfectly natural grown crystal, a miracle of nature

and turn it into the equivalent of a piece of Glass

I couldn't tell the difference from a diamond, topaz, ruby, sapphire, emerald, and a well faceted piece of glass

if I was just to look at it, and not test it physically

Its a crime to cut them, IMO
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Jan 28, 2011 - 12:16pm PT
this is a wonder for me... what about uranium in the Sierras?
this is a wonder for me... what about uranium in the Sierras?
Credit: pyro
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Jan 28, 2011 - 12:30pm PT

A sort of south-of-the-border Fortress of Solitude, Mexico's Cueva de los Cristales (Cave of Crystals) contains some of the world's largest known natural crystals—translucent beams of gypsum as long as 36 feet (11 meters).



http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/04/photogalleries/giant-crystals-cave/

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 12:39pm PT
I have some pieces of that Gypsum
2 foot swords
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 12:50pm PT
Someone mentioned Temple Crag
Yes, it does have a lot of Alpine Minerals

When I free soloed The Moon Goddess Arete, I found all kinds of Smokey quartz crystals, coated with green (Clorite?) and epidote
maybe a couple more cool things




I have a secret Skarn location in the Sierras, were I found pounds of super great Garnet Crystals, and epidote

Problem is, its at 13,500 ft, and way off any trails, and the trail head starts at 6,000 ft

I went there 3 times, and the best way is to do it in a day, so you don't have to backpack in, which is just too much work


Another location I found has gorgeous purple druzy quartz clusters, with crystals of about 1/4 to 1/2" that form big chunks
also huge blocks of calcite rhombs

I brought down many pounds for the collection
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Jan 28, 2011 - 03:04pm PT
Great thread. Makes me want to collect & try to know more about the subject. That crystal cave is WILD! So I think I just saw that the rock & gem show is in Tucson this weekend? Anyone going? Do you have to have special credentials to get in? Hope some of you on this thread go-looks like your cup of tea.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Jan 28, 2011 - 03:32pm PT
I had a huge collection of "found" stones in Alaska, but of course those things don't go moving across the country for free, so the folks that bought our house benefitted.


So, I'm starting over. Strictly amateur hour compared to you folks....

Credit: survival




Credit: survival




Credit: survival




Credit: survival




Credit: survival




Credit: survival





Credit: survival




Credit: survival


Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Jan 28, 2011 - 03:56pm PT
I like the sun stone.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 04:00pm PT
The Tuscon Show is open to anybody
and is worth checking out

are you talking about Oregon Sunstone
That stuff is great

I collected Oregon Sunstone Sand at the location
The ants bring it to the surface, and its 90% sunstone pieces
They like a certain size of sand, that they can dig out and carry to the surface

It makes a beautiful Top Dressing on Cacti

We Call it "Oregon Sunstone Ant Fines"
Nate D

climber
San Francisco
Jan 28, 2011 - 04:16pm PT
Dr. F,
Took my boys to the Himalaya Mine a couple years ago and scored some nice little pieces of Watermelon Tourmaline. Is that where you got some of your specimens?

Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Jan 28, 2011 - 04:43pm PT
What I really like is in the magazine page you posted:

Elbaite & Liddicoatite: they were the rainbow looking crystals. They are from far off places, any chance of finding them in the U.S.?

When I said sun stone, I was referring to Survival's rectangular stone with the sun carved in it. But then I looked up Sunstone, and those crystals look very cool!

This thread has so many great pics of stones and crystals. Good info too. I'm going to write down my favorites.

I thought I didn't have anything to contribute, but then I remembered this Amethyst.

Amethyst.
Amethyst.
Credit: Gal
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Jan 28, 2011 - 04:45pm PT
"The ants bring it to the surface, and its 90% sunstone pieces"

So mysterious. The Sioux Indians have a Yuwipi ceremony in their sweat lodges to commune with the spirits. The Yuwipi are small stones that ants collect and put on their mounds and are thought to have great power. Among the Yuwipi are tiny ancient fossils of the earliest mammals. Paleontologists search ant mounds to find them. Without the work of the ants little would be known about the earliest mammals.

Alone Atop the Hill by Lame Deer and Richard Erdoes

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/dl/free/0073383856/664984/bus9257X_ch03.pdf

see page 96

Another group of keen natural observers—paleontologists—also consider ants as their allies. The ingenious "ant hill method of collecting minute fossils" was perfected in 1886 by one of the most original and successful bone hunters of that era, John Bell Hatcher. Noticing that anthills in the Nebraska-Dakota badlands yielded a "goodly number of mammal teeth," Hatcher used a baker's flour sifter to sort piles of anthill sand. By this method, he wrote, "I frequently secured from 200 to 300 teeth and jaws from one ant hill." Hatcher even began transporting shovelfuls of sand and ants to other Cretaceous mammal localities that he had discovered. After two years he would return to the site to harvest the ants' "efficient service in collecting . . . small fossils." By 1888, Hatcher was scooping up entire ant mounds on the prairie and packing them into crates addressed to Professor O. C. Marsh at Yale, where they were sifted in the Peabody lab for minuscule fossils of the earliest mammals.

Now, of course, it has become standard paleontological practice to examine anthills for microfossils. One Cretaceous mammal deposit in eastern Montana is known as the Bug Creek Anthills site, after paleontologists gritted their teeth and braved the stinging red harvester ants to collect an astonishing 130 tiny mammal teeth in just ten minutes. In 1965, fossil hunters found five thousand fossil traces of more than twenty-five species in a hundred anthills in the Badlands of South Dakota.

http://www.dinosaurplanet.info/fossils/cheyenne-fossil-knowledge.html
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 04:54pm PT
I did go on a Himalaya Mine pay dig
and found some small stuff
But I picked up my best piece just walking around, I found a big (2 lbs) crystal of beryl lying in the dirt walking down to the mine

Since it was colorless, it went undetected for years


I do have some fine tourmalines, that I will post photos of soon
I bought most of my tourmaline at Rock Shows
I've been buying for 30 years now, and I pick up a couple new ones every year, so hence, have about 50 nice piecies


Those scans are from a magazine, not my collection

rlf

Trad climber
Josh, CA
Jan 28, 2011 - 05:05pm PT
Damn Dr. F! That's one fine collection you have there. Normally when I hear the word crystal it's either something filthy, stoned and mumbling in the dirt about peace and love, or it's the dude crawling through someones window in the middle of the night so they can steal enough to buy some.

That's a very cool collection! Thanks for that.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 28, 2011 - 05:14pm PT
Nice rocks everyone!

Dr. F. No photo mineral ID work for me. I need to touch, sniff, and heft.

Gal: I am not going to the Tucson show this year. Sigh. I really enjoy getting away from winter in Idaho and going to the Tucson toy ---I mean gem show.

There are a bunch of hotels where dealers show minerals. My favorite is the InnSuites, just north of downtown. It takes hours to work through all the dealers at just that show. The hotel shows on the west side of the Interstate tend to be heavy on curios, although some quality rocks are also there. (that's also where most of the big Brazillian quartz crystals are). There are some open only to Retailers shows, but those are mostly more jewelery & cut gem oriented.

Elbaite is the main gem variety of tourmaline. A whole lot has been found in San Diego County and per above post---still is being found. Here's an info link on Elbaite http://new.minerals.net/Mineral/elbaite.aspx

Liddicoatite is yet another variety of tourmaline----that I know little or nothing about. I don't think there are U.S. collecting locations for it?
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Jan 28, 2011 - 05:22pm PT
Wow, never ceases to amaze me how some like to take things way out of context. First of all I never said nor ever implied that what little soloing I did in my youth (I'm 62 now, so I'm a has-been old fart) was amazing. I only toyed with soloing after I free-solo'd once by default and realized after the fact, after I calmed down and changed my soiled pants, that I had lived to talk about it and realized that maybe I could deliberately try soloing and manage to survive.

The level of soloing I did can't compare to the great soloists we've all been talking about in this forum. But because I did some soloing on routes that I would have died on with 100% certainty if I had blown a move, I have a direct understanding and appreciation for where the soloist must take his/her mind in order to solo, regardless of the route.

And PLEASE, DUDES, quit the sexist crap about whether or not women can or should solo. It's 2011, not the Dark Ages, ok? I have to wonder if the guys who rag on about women soloing feel threatened that they don't have the huevos to do it. I'm in awe of any man or woman who can solo at a high degree of difficulty and exposure. Free-soloists are simply the cream of the crop. They are the TRUE CLIMBERS, no debate, end of story! All others are mere pretenders to the throne!
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Jan 28, 2011 - 05:26pm PT
Dr F do you have any samples of the "California Blue Diamond" Benitoite?
GnomicMaster

Mountain climber
Ventana Wilderness
Jan 28, 2011 - 05:37pm PT
Methinks there's a flaw in this Supertopo website. I logged onto the topic "free-soloing" in which I've partaken a few times. So I posted a reply to that forum but it showed up in the random-ass topic of climbers liking to collect rocks. How did that happen? Should I expect to reply to the topic of ice climbing and have it show up in climbers who like to suck their toes?

Hey, Supertopo webmasters, get it together!!
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 28, 2011 - 10:26pm PT
At one time in the past, when I was still climbing a lot

I thought it would be cool to collect huge wide flakes of Granite, that had nice character, but were thin, so I could carry them home

Of Course I would I only collect them at locations that were open to collect

This song was an inspiration after the fact
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvWgkr3zSgU

Pretty Girls Make Graves -Teeth Collector -
Credit: Dr. F.
with giant Jasper chunk, from Jasper Hill
Credit: Dr. F.

This one has a Ulexite Crystal as a friend, 12 inches, a Borax Mineral
Credit: Dr. F.


Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Jan 29, 2011 - 12:41am PT
Here is a great resource I always share with my Earth Science students for California's official state mineral (native Gold), rock (Serpentine), and gemstone (Benitoite):

http://www.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/geologic_resources/mineral_resource_mapping/Pages/Index.aspx
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jan 29, 2011 - 02:04am PT
Yes, the post about women free-soloing seemed rather gnomic (enigmatic), for this thread.
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 29, 2011 - 02:48am PT
The only cool rocks that I have inside anymore are a couple of Herkimer quartz crystals that my father collected on-sight. I used to have more, but I gave a few to hippies. I guess the double-terminated quartz has strong mojo.
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
Jan 29, 2011 - 07:50pm PT
Dr. F......an amazing individual on and off the rocks....

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 29, 2011 - 07:51pm PT
Todd
e-mail your real e-mail address
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 29, 2011 - 07:55pm PT
We had a nice quiz for that Skarn mineral Ilvaite
I thought I might have a specimen or two, but what I thought was it turned out to be something different, Hence, I have no Ilvaite

any guesses what this is??
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 29, 2011 - 08:01pm PT
Epidote is favorite mineral for the Cragster
Common in crystal, or massive form

I have some great specimens
the center one is from the Green Monster Mine
the far left is the only one I collected that made it to the Cabinet status
I have another jar full of good small crystals
and chunks of massive crystals
we know of this one place in the Mojave Desert that has whole hills of massive Epidote, microcrystalline, its a pale green
Credit: Dr. F.
Some of these crystals are of unusual crystal forms
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
Jan 29, 2011 - 08:04pm PT
Dr. F....my email "died" a couple of months ago.....it's a Canadian server, and they are having trouble getting me back on track.......not that all those nice people in Canadia are not awesome people;.....Canadia is one of my favorite states.....or is it a country.....whatever.....but use Andrea's and I'm good;..andreatoddgordon@gmail.com Bye....

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 29, 2011 - 08:09pm PT
Nice Photo of Terrapin Station, Todd
what was the Route Name again?



While at Quartzite
I spent my alotted $200 quickly
Here are some highlights

Perfect cube Pyrite, from Mex $10, and $15 Apatite also from Mex, 3 inches
Credit: Dr. F.


Native Copper from Michigan, 4 lbs, 10 inches high, cabinet, $40
Credit: Dr. F.

Danish Dagger, $55. usually I would never buy a modern knapped knife
But after I saw this , and heard the story
The Danish used to make these from Danish Flint, and they were traded around the world

It looks like a modern Military assault knife, except its made of stone

I don't need a gun, I will take care of any intruders with this baby, Dexter Style
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 29, 2011 - 08:38pm PT
These are some of the Garnets I found at the Secret Skarn Location on the East Side
I have some nice small perfect ones that made it into the case
They are mostly brownish red, but sometimes meld into green
Credit: Dr. F.

The Other area is a pure limestone section of the East Side
Near the top of one peak, there is a huge pocket of
these Calcite Rhombs
There are better ones, but these came down the Mt. exactly as found, ~8 inches
Credit: Dr. F.
the funny story about this area
We told Dave Tapes about it, so him and the Great "Jesse Beck" went up there and collected 20 lbs each on a day hike
They just filled their packs with it, and then ran down the 8 mile trail


when they unloaded the precious gems, they found them ground to dust, Whoops

These are from the same peak, its a huge vug of quartz, that nice Drusy clusters formed in, some have purplish tint
Credit: Dr. F.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COX9B57GW3I&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtigpB7q2LI&feature=related
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 29, 2011 - 09:35pm PT
hey there say, todd... wow, what a nice hunk of rock, there...

thanks for the share..

say, if you ever have any spare time, Dr. F, it would be special to see what some of my rocks, are... *later down the road, no hurry...

i was just thinkin about it, the other night, as i got them out of the box, and around the house so the grandkids, can see... would be extra fun, for the names, at that...
:)
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 29, 2011 - 09:39pm PT
neebee, many of those are unidentifiable without better photos, and some addition info

Pick out 2 or 3, and we can work on them

neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 30, 2011 - 04:20am PT
hey there say, Dr. F... okay, i will think on which ones, and post, tomorrow...

thanks, just for fun, though, if it gets to be too much, and you are busy, i will understand... :)

also, too... i was more curious about certain ones, over others, too... so that will help narrow the choices down...
:)

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 30, 2011 - 08:28pm PT
Dude, I live in So Cal
I collect East of Barstow all the time,
My wife just keeps pleading to me, "when are we going again?!", soon, I say, soon



I did a bunch of climbing in Red Rocks in the 80s
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
Jan 31, 2011 - 12:34am PT
The mysterious Dr. F.........

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2011 - 11:18am PT
This rock has the rare property of emitting Anti-gravity waves

and you have to hang on sideways,

Credit: Dr. F.
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Feb 2, 2011 - 12:54am PT
I can't belive i waste time on this!
Credit: pyro
personal Ilvaite sample.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Feb 2, 2011 - 01:22am PT
Pyro: Ilvaite collectors are in a very small (I won't say sick) club.


Since I'm in that small/sick club??

Did you find it?

Where has that ilvaite been,

and what may you have done with it?

You can share??

It's all right, your're among Ilvaite collectors.

I don't think Ilvaite abuse is illegal yet.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 2, 2011 - 10:54am PT
Ilvaite doesn't excite me that much,
but now I will have to find a specimen for my collection, since I am aware of its collector interest
But here are some world class specimens from the Mineralogical record
the first two are from China
the second scan is from Italy
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Feb 3, 2011 - 06:14pm PT
Cross-posted here where it is more relevant . . .

Well, a cavern can be sealed from the surface. This cavern of selenite crystals was completely sealed off from the surface, when by chance miners broke through to it. The cavern was flooded, with the crystals growing in a brine like solution. Then drained to explore it. Magical. Unbelievably spectacular in a mineral and cavern sort of way. Who knows haw many other rare special crystal caverns exist in the World that are sealed from the surface. Would be incredible to chance upon one. Simply amazing. I have had dreams like this, but the crystals are brilliant in color and flourescent . . .

A rare glimpse of the cave of crystals

Mexico's Cave of Crystals stunned geologists when it was first discovered in 2000. The underground chamber contains some of the largest natural crystals ever found - some of the selenite structures have grown to more than 10m long. Professor Iain Stewart got a rare glimpse of the subterranean spectacle while filming for the new BBC series How the Earth Made Us.

Short spectacular video:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8466493.stm



Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2011 - 06:15pm PT
I have one of the swords
they are quite sweet
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2011 - 06:21pm PT
no one has taken my Quiz yet
here it is again

These should be fairly easy for any geologists

1) This is probably the hardest one, Its on my other quiz, second row
Credit: Dr. F.

2)
Credit: Dr. F.

3)
Credit: Dr. F.

4) two minerals
Credit: Dr. F.

5) two minerals,
Credit: Dr. F.

6-8) left to right, very uncommon metals, 6 is the rarest
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2011 - 08:09pm PT
Here is my best found specimen
meaning found naturally, not at a pay to collect area

I found this at my secret skarn location at 13,500 ft.
Garnet on Double Terminated Quartz, 4 in
Credit: Dr. F.

I hope more people can bump this thread,
I have a lot of cool things I can take a photo of, if anyone else was keeping this thread alive beside me
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Feb 3, 2011 - 08:27pm PT
Well, here's a rock photo. I left it where it was, though.
Mount Hollyburn
Mount Hollyburn
Credit: Mighty Hiker
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2011 - 08:31pm PT
My parents used to take me to Jumbo Rocks Campground every year, and me and my sister would run between the lines, and we called them "Finish Lines"

that one goes way back, but I still call them "Finish Lines" for fun, when they look like that
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Feb 3, 2011 - 08:41pm PT
Best found specimen?

Ohhhhhhh! That's a tough question Dr. F.

Biggest?

Most beauteous?

Rarest?

Most valuable?

The one I love the best, because I nearly died collecting it?

I’m entering the rarest and biggest specimen: that I nearly died, while collecting in 2010.

Idaho Diopside.  Large crystal is 5 Cm. long.
Idaho Diopside. Large crystal is 5 Cm. long.
Credit: Fritz


Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2011 - 09:08pm PT
its Your most loved specimen
not the rarest, or the biggest

The one you think is best

and that is a very nice Diopside
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 3, 2011 - 09:57pm PT
There are very few rocks on this earth that are only 6,000 years old

most are 100s of millions
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 4, 2011 - 08:15pm PT
Tourmaline Collection
My second largest of my Gem Mineral Collection,
1st-Quartz, 2-Tourmaline, 3-Garnets, 4-Beryl, 5-Topaz, 6-Apatite, 7-Rare Minerals, 8-Metals

I've collected all of them at:
rocks shows from specialty vendors, and as Gem rough for cutting
most pieces are way under a $100

Here are the lunkers, 2-4 inches
my camera shrinks things a little, makes them look smaller, which bothers the heck out of me
Credit: Dr. F.

Watermelon and other super cool specimens
Credit: Dr. F.

Spears and dish
Credit: Dr. F.

Red and Salmon, rare gem rough, saved from the cutters wheel
Credit: Dr. F.

Super Nice Green crystal
Credit: Dr. F.

I paid $120 for this one 20 years ago
Credit: Dr. F.

Most of these are from either Pakistan, or Brazil
a couple are from Pala, and some of the super special ones are from Madagascar

Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 4, 2011 - 11:00pm PT
Anyone have one of these

Credit: Dr. F.
actual shameless bump
hoping for others to post some rocks
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO1g251jF2g
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Feb 8, 2011 - 11:56pm PT
hey there say, dr. F.... (i still have to think on picking a rock, to ask for "identify" --ahhh, shucks, perhaps not... they are hard to tell, without good picks)...

but say, my FRIEND in england, she thinks she has a rock similar to the grayish, marked rock, next to the YOUR reddish rock, in that posted picture of yours--on the other page (just before this page that i am on now) :

the picture note says:
with giant Jasper chunk, from Jasper Hill:

there is two large flat granites, and then...
under them is a reddish rock...
and then to the RIGHT, in the picture, is the grayish rock...

hers is like that, but it has purple-ish color in in...

would hers be "jasper" perhaps, like yours is, there???


say, can you please let us know what you think?

*she thought her rock started with a name, using "b", but has not been
able to find a picture of it, 'til she saw your jasper-note ( a "j" name, however) :)
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Mar 14, 2011 - 01:46am PT
Morning star mine 04'.
Credit: pyro
ugly leech pit.
Credit: pyro
Credit: pyro
i heard the Japanese bought this thing?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2011 - 09:04pm PT
Neebee
I checked out that rock to the right, greyish
Its a piece of wood
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2011 - 09:08pm PT
I never posted these
since no one seemed to like rocks on ST

Topaz Collection
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.

Diopside
Credit: Dr. F.
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 15, 2011 - 09:11pm PT
Attempts at Crystal Photography!
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
I do need more light

What are they?
grover

climber
Dabville. Gnarlandia
Mar 15, 2011 - 10:20pm PT
#1 a piece of imported glass

#2 a frozen piece of phlegm

Am I close?





















Ahahahahaha........kidding.







Of-course I'm close.






bump
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Mar 15, 2011 - 10:25pm PT
cool stuff Craig! See ya in a couple weeks, I want to take a peak at some of yer rocks/crystals yer bringing out.
Peace
mike m

Trad climber
black hills
Nov 28, 2011 - 09:20pm PT
I love rocks. Climbingthem and collecting them. Would like to find some with some gold in them about right now.
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Nov 28, 2011 - 11:26pm PT
I never tire of looking through the photos on here.
Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 28, 2011 - 11:30pm PT
I could have taken more photos
But no one seemed interested
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Nov 28, 2011 - 11:34pm PT
I do like to admire my rocks.

This is one of the best!

It followed me home.

Credit: Fritz
nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Nov 28, 2011 - 11:37pm PT
these would all look so much better under LED lights.

just a little little rock.

Credit: nature

guesses on the gem?
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:03am PT
Nature: I am not good at cut gems, but I am trying to participate:

greenish???-----maybe aqua???

a little sparkle, but not a bunch.

Aquamarine?
Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 29, 2011 - 12:06am PT
All cut gems look the same as colored glass to me
Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 29, 2011 - 12:07am PT
Credit: Dr. F.
Now that's a GEM
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:12am PT
YOWLLLLLL!

THAT

IS

A

GEM!!!!
nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:20am PT
yeah, you guys have posted some amazing photos.

Kinda hard to put that last one on a post and wear it ;-)

it's a pretty little stone i have none-the-less. hardness of 9 and actually holds value because it is rare. It doesn't sparkle partly because it's not a clean surface.


The jeweler the King of Mysore also set this little thing...
Credit: nature
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:32am PT
Nature: at hardness 9,

I will move my previous guess on the first mounted piece to the Corundum variety known as Emerald.

Nice Opal in the last photo.

Thank you for posting some great stones.


"Everybody must get stoned."


Edit: Thank you Dr. F.

I knew Emerald was a Beryl family gem. Why wouldn't I know that?
Long Day! Drove 200 miles, had 12 staples removed from my recent head wound, I'm old, I'm likely nearly senile--------and I'm going to bed!
nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:34am PT
In the right "family"

It's a sapphire tho...

Thanks regarding the opal. It's a pretty little thing. All of it surrounded by 23k

I have a evaporite stone I collected years ago. If you can guess it I'll give you a million bucks ;)
Gonna have to find it and take a pict tho.

Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 29, 2011 - 12:38am PT
Corundum variety known as Emerald.


Emerald is green beryl

Any gem corundum not red is called sapphire
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:39am PT
Nature: Sapphire?

Sorry!

Being an "old-fart", I am forever hung up on the phrase:

"Sapphire-Blue."


Edit: See my above post for apologies!
Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 29, 2011 - 12:40am PT
Credit: Dr. F.
tuolumne_tradster

Trad climber
Leading Edge of North American Plate
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:43am PT
High grade, garnet-bearing blue schist. The mineral assemblage (glaucophane,almandine garnet, quartz) is indicative of high pressure (15 to 18 km burial depth) / low temperature (200 - 500 C) conditions found in convergent tectonic margins (i.e., subduction zones).

nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:45am PT
Yeah.... I always think of sapphire as blue.

Ex gf gave it to me.
She worked at Tiffany's grading corundum. She's a badass when it come to cut stones.

Me being a geologist I tend towards the uncut stuff. Though my emphasis was in soils so...

No apology needed. I had a jeweler guess peridote. Lol!
nature

climber
back in Tuscon Aridzona....
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:48am PT
TT - I've got a blue schist around somewhere with a band of garnet running through it that is isoclinally folded.

That's a neat shot!

Nothing like exotic blue schist knockers!!
gonzo chemist

climber
Fort Collins, CO
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:49am PT
I collected rocks and gems as a kid. At some point it fell by the wayside. Not really sure why. My family was sure I was going to be a geologist. I ended up studying chemistry, instead. When I started climbing, my family had a good laugh, and figured it was fated to be!

Great collection Dr. F.!
Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 29, 2011 - 12:50am PT
Credit: Dr. F.
tuolumne_tradster

Trad climber
Leading Edge of North American Plate
Nov 29, 2011 - 12:56am PT
Nature: that's cool...post a photo.

The photo I posted above is from an uplifted sea stack named Sunset Rocks (aka Mammoth rocks) on the Sonoma coast near Jenner, CA. It is a popular top roping crag. The rock is highly polished in some spots and has been interpreted as an animal rubbing stone. I didn't believe it at first.

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23566

Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 29, 2011 - 01:01am PT
You didn't make any of those

Those are all rare Gem Crystals
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Nov 29, 2011 - 01:10am PT
Dr F, any of those lab made, or all naturally found?

Dr. F.

climber
Retired Climber, SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 29, 2011 - 07:42pm PT
WTF??

Those are all natural gem crystals

Here is the history:
They came from the earth, and then the dirt was cleaned off, Not one of them was ever polished or cut.
They were sold as is

Then I bought them,
and then put them on a display base as part of a gem crystal Collection
Then I entered it in the OC Fair, and won 1st place for All Collections
Then took a picture of it, then disassembled it
and put the singles back in the Show case

That display is worth around $2000, I bought them one at a time over 20 years at Rock Shows from Native Country dealers

Close up
Credit: Dr. F.
Any one want to try and ID Them???
Jan

Mountain climber
Okinawa, Japan
Aug 27, 2012 - 02:21pm PT
Time to bump this thread again.
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 4, 2012 - 12:16pm PT
Working on some more photos, since it's raining

Apatite
Purple and pink are the most desirable color, due to it's rarity
Credit: Dr. F.

Yellow Apatite is the most common form
Credit: Dr. F.

I took these with artificial light,
and apparently not as good as the earlier ones I took using natural light
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 4, 2012 - 10:45pm PT
OK, the taco is looking a little slow tonight. It must be time for "rock-heads."

I like finding minerals in crystal form "in matrix."

Mostly in the mountains, but I do have a noted weakness for the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show.

Some Tucson show Apatite.

Apatite from Durango Mexico
Apatite from Durango Mexico
Credit: Fritz

And a cool feldspar & small smoky quartz crystal cluster I found in Idaho in the 1980's.
Microcline crystals and a few small Smoky Quartz crystals on Albite.
Microcline crystals and a few small Smoky Quartz crystals on Albite.
Credit: Fritz
splitter

Trad climber
Cali Hodad, surfing the galactic plane
Dec 5, 2012 - 08:32am PT
It is very cool. Great collection.

What year did you win at the fair?
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Dec 5, 2012 - 10:28am PT
We have been collecting up here for the last two years. The Oregon coast is fun and it gives me something to do while walking up and down the beach when I am not out climbing something.
Mostly we find agates and jasper and some petrified wood. We have tumbler and polish em up. It's fun and my wife loves it. It's like Christmas every time we open up the tumbler. I can hear it grinding away even as I type this.
Biggest piece of petrified wood we have found. Rough and un polished a...
Biggest piece of petrified wood we have found. Rough and un polished at this point.
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 5, 2012 - 11:30pm PT
Here's a great Tucson Mineral Show rock. The sellers let me photograph it. Price was out of my range.

Aquamarine on feldspar crystals.  About 10" x 12"
Aquamarine on feldspar crystals. About 10" x 12"
Credit: Fritz
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Dec 9, 2012 - 11:52pm PT
This is our haul today. One of the agates my wife found was the size of her fist.
Credit: Plaidman
The pile in this picture are un-polished, but they will be awesome when they are tumbled.
Credit: Plaidman

This next pic is all the jasper that we found. I kinda like the jasper better. They sure have some good color.
Credit: Plaidman

Here are some close ups of some of the agates with a flashlight underneath them to show off the color. This first one is the fist sized agate my wife found.
Credit: Plaidman
Another view.
Credit: Plaidman

Here are the last of the agates with light under.
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 10, 2012 - 12:21am PT
Plaidman! Your rocks rock!

Thank you for sharing!

I have found most of my mineral specimans, but I do have a weak moment every now and then at the Tucson Show.

Calcite crystals from Mexico.
Calcite crystals from Mexico.
Credit: Fritz

Aquamarine & mica from Pakistan.
Aquamarine & mica from Pakistan.
Credit: Fritz
ClimbingOn

Trad climber
NY
Dec 10, 2012 - 01:47am PT
Plaidman, that "biggest piece of petrified wood we have found" is not petrified wood. Not trying to be a downer, just saying...
Minerals

Social climber
The Deli
Dec 10, 2012 - 02:07am PT
Fritz, are you sure that’s not some sort of mica, like muscovite, with your beryl crystals? Doesn't look like feldspar.
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Dec 10, 2012 - 09:17am PT
ClimbingOn - Ok. What are you saying? If it isn't petrified wood what is it?
Heavy and rock, looks like wood with wood grain makes it petrified wood in my book. If I had a book about petrified wood.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Dec 10, 2012 - 10:25am PT
Minerals: re your comment:
Fritz, are you sure that’s not some sort of mica, like muscovite, with your beryl crystals? Doesn't look like feldspar.


Yes of course it is. I was just testing you.

Really!

I wasn't posting drunk!

Trust me!
spenchur

climber
Flagstaff/Thousand Oaks
Dec 10, 2012 - 10:54am PT
I agree with minerals here, that looks like muscovite. Feldspars don't usually have "sheets" like that, and muscovite often twins perpendicularly like that.

edit: fritz beat me back here.
ClimbingOn

Trad climber
NY
Dec 10, 2012 - 08:05pm PT
Plaidman, What you have is a nice piece of schist, polished by either a stream, beach, or possibly glacier. Yours is a dead ringer for the piece in the middle right of the following photo from a beach in Maine. Even the banding is the same. Petrified wood tends to have a number of different and identifying characteristics.

Credit: ClimbingOn
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 10, 2012 - 08:16pm PT
Me and my wife, who loves collecting rocks more than anything
went to Holbrook Arizona in Sept. and found `400 lbs of awesome agatized wood, just outside the Petrified Forest National Park, which we sell along with our cactus at cactus shows.

And what was really cool, is that we found this Petrified Wood Ant Fines Sand, I scooped up some to use on our plants as a top dressing.
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.

The Blue apatite is from Madagascar
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Dec 16, 2012 - 09:41pm PT
Our newest batch of polished rocks. I sure love these things. The reds are my
favorites. The jasper has so much color. We got some good agates too.
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Here are three shots of the same red jasper mix.
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
This is one of my favorite agates
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
And we are throwing in another load. This process will take 2 months of grinding and tumbling.
Why is patience a virtue?
Because not many people have it.
Tumbling rocks is an exercise of patience in the extreme.
Another would be watching me climb.
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Dec 17, 2012 - 01:22am PT
A couple more pics.
This first one is a banded agate.
Sure isn't easy getting photos of these gems with the camera that I have.
Also I aint much of a photographer.
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Credit: Plaidman
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Dec 17, 2012 - 01:46am PT
im fascinated by what cmac calls the "aplite" dike on Eichorn Pinnacle

Please elaborate. Chris Mac? and what is he talking about?
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Dec 17, 2012 - 01:54am PT
Answered my own question:
Aplite dikes are fine grained or sugary textured intrusives of granitic composition.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dike_(geology)
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 20, 2013 - 11:19am PT
"aplite" dikes, such as found on Eichorn Pinnacle often have smokey quartz and feldspar crystals, along with muscovite.
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 20, 2013 - 11:22am PT
Re did some of the Apatite photos

Blue from Madagascar
Credit: Dr. F.

Purple from Pakistan
Credit: Dr. F.

Yellow, various location
Credit: Dr. F.
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
Jan 20, 2013 - 12:44pm PT
I was going to say... I'm a climber and a Geologist, and I don't have a rock collection...

Then I realized... I have rocks from Fontainebleau, Monsant, Stanage, Hueco, and other areas that I have been lugging around for 15 years.
locker

Social climber
state of Kumbaya...
Jan 20, 2013 - 12:46pm PT


What a MEAN thing to write...


"Plaidman, What you have is a nice piece of schist"...



;-)

Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Jan 20, 2013 - 02:44pm PT
But Locker it is good schist!

Seriously our last few outings have been really good. We have to get-em polished up. When we do there should be some real gems in there.

We are on track to find some green agates in a new area we are going to get to as soon as there is a low enough low tide.
cliffhanger

Trad climber
California
Jan 20, 2013 - 07:22pm PT
Oldest Rock on Earth



"It's a zircon, from the Persian word "zargun" meaning "golden colored," an extremely durable mineral found all over the world. This one turned up in a dry, hilly region of Western Australia. It was sitting inside a larger rock, and when scientists checked, it turns out this little grain formed around 4.4 billion years ago. That would make it the oldest rock we've ever seen on this planet, old enough to know secrets about early Earth, old enough to tell us a little something about how life started here."

http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2013/01/10/169047159/the-oldest-rock-in-the-world-tells-us-a-story

Here's a cool banded iron formation:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banded_iron_formation
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 20, 2013 - 08:43pm PT
Oh, I love a good schist!!
Dr. F.

Ice climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 20, 2013 - 08:46pm PT
Scapolite collection
Purple is from Pakistan
Credit: Dr. F.

Some Aquamarine, also from Pakistan
Credit: Dr. F.
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Mar 8, 2013 - 12:34pm PT
Here is my new passion. Take the rocks I have polished and do something with em. I am really liking doing the wire wrap on the rocks. It is meditative and I seem to have the knack for it.
Credit: Plaidman

Credit: Plaidman

Credit: Plaidman

Credit: Plaidman

Credit: Plaidman

Plaid
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Mar 8, 2013 - 10:36pm PT
Here's my little collection. Mostly samples of Sierra granite and volcanic rock (obsidian) collected from road cuts and stream beds. One hunk of West Virginia coal. And the shale samples are from the Wadi Rum in Jordan.

Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat
.

Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 8, 2013 - 10:47pm PT
Prehnite balls, a zeolite
Credit: Dr. F.

Close up, with Epidote inclusions
Credit: Dr. F.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 8, 2013 - 10:54pm PT
Sure has collected a big pile of Leaverite.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:23am PT
I have always had a love for the Earth Sciences and elements, minerals, rocks, and now even meteorites.


G-d as described in his Good Book, well he's way into them also ...


Makes sense I would like them too.




Twelve Sons, Twelve Stones
by John P. Pratt
http://www.johnpratt.com/items/docs/lds/meridian/2005/12stones.html

THE STONES OF THE TWELVE TRIBES OF ISRAEL
March 11, 2009
http://oneyahweh.com/w/archives/306

The Tribal Stones For the 12 Tribes of Israel, not just the Jews.
http://www.godsstones.com/TribalStones.html

God’s Chemistry Set:
http://godschemistryset.blogspot.com/2012/06/the-minerals-of-revelation.html

Minerals of the Bible
http://www.rocksandminerals.com/bible/bible.htm

THE JEWEL STONES OF ISRAEL'S TWELVE TRIBES
http://www.eifiles.cn/js-en.htm

Gemstones of the Bible
The stones of the Foundation of the New Temple of Jerusalem, as mentioned in Revelations A summary by J. Michael Howard
http://www.jsbeads.com/Birthstones/GemstonesoftheBible.asp

Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:26am PT
theres a chunk of metiorite in there can ya spot it!?
theres a chunk of metiorite in there can ya spot it!?
Credit: Ron Anderson
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:32am PT
Give me a hint.

Stony?

Stony-Iron?

Iron?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:42am PT
option B Klim.
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:54am PT
The coolest rocks aren't the pretty crystals, which are only one mineral.

Take some granite. Go to a lot of trouble to extract the zircons. Do some more washing with harsh acids.

Then you can date a rock several billion years old with amazing precision.

Every rock tells a story, which is why I love geology. When you put them all into the proper relationship with each other, you can see the history of the planet.

I don't think that there was a single gemstone class offered when I was in school, and there still isn't. The cool rocks may be as simple as the Wingate at Indian Creek.

Crystals have fluid inclusions, and you can hit them with the electron microprobe and tell the chemistry of the parent melt.

Hell, ice is a mineral, and obsidian, strangely, doesn't fit the definition. We don't really care, because obsidian implys super fast cooling of a basaltic magma.

Hopefully I didn't get any of the igneous rock stuff wrong. I work entirely with sedimentary rocks, and I think that they are far more fascinating.

I turned down a choice job offer at graduation with the USGS because it was mapping volcanics in Nevada. Boring.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:57am PT
I would just like to say that it's very hard to identify a meteorite from a picture. Scientifically it's impossible, since it has to be validated geochemically, etc. etc. etc.

Having said that, I zoomed in on the image and its pretty grainy. Unless you give me a clear image of each specimen up close, I don't have a chance.


A stony-Iron is like a Pallisite:

Mostly metal with some minerals.




Marvin Killgore holding up a massive slice of his famous Chinese Pallisite meteorite that he purchased from a Chinese nomad for very little. Not good karma.





Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:57am PT
Base,,,Alvin McLane didnt think that was boring..;-)
ß Î Ø T Ç H

Boulder climber
bouldering
Mar 9, 2013 - 02:38am PT
volcanics in Nevada. Boring.
Michelle

Social climber
Toshi's Station, picking up power converters.
Mar 9, 2013 - 03:32am PT
Plaid, those are really pretty!

All of these collections are wonderful! Thanks for sharing.

I like to collect moonstone at the beach and totally need to go back to Glass Beach in Fort Bragg.

Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Mar 9, 2013 - 10:14am PT
Someone who likes rocks more than climbers: Rock eater!

Credit: Sierra Ledge Rat

Watch the segment 15:00 through 17:00 (actually starts at 15:10 but the part at 15:00 is worth watching...)


Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 9, 2013 - 11:46am PT
The coolest rocks aren't the pretty crystals, which are only one mineral.
Base
I disagree, these are treasures from the earth
They have a incredible story to tell.

I used to just look at the pictures in books, now I have my own collection of them, it's an adventure in the long lost past of earth's early history, mining, world markets, wheeling and dealing, and going to places to find your own

My photography needs work
Credit: Dr. F.
Aquamarine and Heliodor

I hope to scan some Rock Porn in soon, and you will agree that World Class minerals are truly incredible
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Mar 9, 2013 - 12:19pm PT
This is a different kind of collection. Samples collected from the various climbing area's visited. This is about 1/4 of the collection.
Credit: can't say
Credit: can't say
not mine of course
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Mar 9, 2013 - 12:31pm PT
Trophies.

Hey, Ron, howya at stuffing Rocks?
Ron Anderson

Trad climber
Soon to be Nipple suckling Liberal
Mar 9, 2013 - 12:36pm PT
Quite good actually Ol Merced Mustelid..

Ill be making some African Volcanic mud today...
Michelle

Social climber
Toshi's Station, picking up power converters.
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:35pm PT
Dr F, you got any Moldavite?
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:41pm PT
I opened an Esty store so I could sell these gems.
Here is the web address:http://www.etsy.com/shop/TheRealPlaidman

This is one I made for my daughter. She didn't want it polished. It is agate with the small shell florish.
Credit: Plaidman

Plaid
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Mar 9, 2013 - 01:57pm PT
Dr.:

In a practical sense, pretty gemstones aren't involved in geology other than their economic value.

An igneous rock is filled with crystals or each constituent mineral. From that mix of minerals, you can tell sooooo much. Pretty crystals are nice, but have you ever worked with thin sections or a SEM?

That is where the work is. Just ask Minerals.

Pallisite meteorites are way cool. The green crystals in it are Peridot, which is the gemstone name for crystalline Olivine.

On Earth, Olivene is found in very deep mafic magmas. The fact that they are encased in a lattice of extremely large crystalline nickle and iron means that they are probably part of the core of a relatively large body that got smashed to sh#t.

You can buy almost any mineral on Ebay. I believe that moldavites are sand that has been fused into glass from impacts. Many come from north africa off the top of my head. Now that rock tells a story, just as shocked quartz tells a story.

As a general rule, you get big crystals because as the melt or conditions for crystal growth, were steady at that point in time, giving time for the crystals to grow large. Pegmatites are an example of this. If a rock cools quickly, the crystals of each constituent mineral is typically small.

This is where I would hand off to minerals and he would explain the plagioclase feldspar megacrysts in Tuolomne..meaning the big knobs.
kpinwalla2

Social climber
WA
Mar 10, 2013 - 12:56am PT
because obsidian implys super fast cooling of a basaltic magma.

actually most obsidian results from fast, but not necessarily super fast, cooling of a rhyolitic lava (not magma) that has a low H20 content. It is a common misconception that because obsidian is black, it must be chemically related to basalt.
Ward Trotter

Trad climber
Mar 10, 2013 - 01:19am PT
http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=hRvWC5NddXQ&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DhRvWC5NddXQ
AlexC

climber
Bay Area, CA
Mar 10, 2013 - 03:34am PT
Agates anyone?

Three from eastern Arizona:

Credit: AlexC
Credit: AlexC
Credit: AlexC
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Topic Author's Reply - Mar 10, 2013 - 10:45pm PT
I just sold 16 lbs of Peridot
I know all about Peridot, want some?
Plaidman

Trad climber
South Slope of Mt. Tabor, Portland, Oregon, USA
Mar 11, 2013 - 10:02am PT
Newest addition. Figure 8 tie in on jasper. I got a drill press.....
Credit: Plaidman

Credit: Plaidman

Credit: Plaidman
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