Cataviña,La Mysteriosa-Baja Beauty Kevin Worrall Climbing 95

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bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, CA
Dec 27, 2010 - 02:11pm PT
This seems to be the location. Or at least pretty darn close. I think...

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=217892262123461097139.00048d147095f50172cbc&ll=29.753424,-114.744022&spn=0.008383,0.012982&t=h&z=16&lci=com.panoramio.all

Looks like a cool place!
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Dec 27, 2010 - 02:19pm PT
...and when your tips are fried,
just keep on truckin.





The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 27, 2010 - 04:12pm PT
Bluering,

It's a bit north of where you're link puts you, like a mile or two.


Is that The Wall Jefe?

There is some excellent climbing within a half hour of The Wall.
Klimmer

Mountain climber
San Diego
Dec 27, 2010 - 10:12pm PT
You guys are making me miss Baja.

How I miss Baja.

My bachelor's party was at Canon Tajo.

My children haven't even seen TJ yet.

I'm tired of staying out of Mexico because of the drug wars.

Great climbing, exploring, paragliding, surfing, diving and snorkeling, the list goes on and on.



I wish things would return to some normalcy down there. Well everywhere actually. The only real way to go now and to do so safely, is to go down in a large group or caravan. My wife and I used to drive all over the peninsula via my Toyota 4x4, just the 2 of us alone, and our equipment.

What is everyone's opinion on this concerning safety now in Baja and the frontera?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 27, 2010 - 10:56pm PT
Safety wise, in the outback, either try to camp with others in a group, or hide your camp from any road, and hide your tire tracks to get there, if at all possible. This might sound extreme, but it gives you peace of mind.

Don't stop on the hwy for any reason other than emergency. Drive far enough down a side road so you can't be seen if you've gotta pee or eat something.

I don't worry much at all if I'm over 10 miles from the nearest town once I'm down below El Rosario, and off the paved road.

Don't stop to help mexican motorists flagging you down - let the Green Angels or their hermanos do that.

Avoid camping alone at spots where gringos often camp.


I've spent a lot of time down there, not so much lately, and I've heard some horror stories both second hand and directly - they all seem to have camping and a nearby population center in common.

Keep moving through the border towns. Knowing how to speak Spanish can make your trip safer too.

Juan Maderita

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Dec 27, 2010 - 11:23pm PT
Klimmer,
This link provides the best answer on the safety of Mexico. Well, maybe just the funniest answer:
http://www.simplyvallarta.com/safety-of-mexico/

Otherwise, what Kevin said.
I'm at or near Cañón del Tajo a couple 1-2x per month and haven't heard of any robberies in several years.
Watusi

Social climber
Newport, OR
Dec 27, 2010 - 11:47pm PT
Checking this thread... I was always psyched to see that place Kev!! I'd been to the Trono countless times and saw this article, I was also intrigued by what my Hatchett brothers had said as well. Cool to see my old friend (and employer at The Kona Bar and Grill) George Hoover in these pics!! If you run into him ever will you tell him Michael Paul sends his best!! Still love to check that place...Mi corazon es en Baja!!! :)
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Dec 28, 2010 - 06:48am PT
San Juanico.

Drive fast. Don't stop. Engage cloaking device, bring dogs, don't exude fear, have fun.

Catavina is beautiful and unique in the world. All of Baja, really.

There was a (semi)recent article about bouldering there. A few diamonds in the rough~ a Caveman meets Hueco kinda affair.


Keep searching.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 28, 2010 - 08:51am PT
all those pinche point breaks look the same, Jefe - perfect!

Only went to Scorpion Bay once, and it was barley breaking at the time. I was shocked to see a guy there I had climbed with once in Yosemite over 10 years previously, and this was in 1981, before it got popular.

We kept driving, and got head high lefts at Conejo.
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Dec 29, 2010 - 12:28pm PT
Here's the video of the "Caveman meets Hueco" problem I mentioned.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzAT9TDnyfo
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, CA
Dec 29, 2010 - 12:33pm PT
That's a gnarly looking problem, Jefe. A mantle top-out to boot!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 29, 2010 - 01:21pm PT
Wow! Really impressive and beautiful problem.

If enough boulderers spent enough time in Catavina, and GPSed all the best stuff...

Tendon

Boulder climber
Fort Collins, CO
Dec 29, 2010 - 02:37pm PT
Thats the best boulder in catavina. very very atypical.
We looked around for 5 days over the course of that trip.
Saw thousands and thousands of boulders.
10% can be climbed on, 5% might actually be worth climbing on,
and less than 1% of those climbs are worth the drive down there.

Tons of rocks but lots and lots of choss....just go to Jtree IMO.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 29, 2010 - 02:44pm PT
As I wrote in my article, to paraphrase, if 1 out of 10,000 boulders has a classic problem with a good landing, there should be about 1,000 good problems in the Catavina area.

I've probably spent 60 to 80 days exploring Catavina over a period of 30 years, and I don't begin to think I have seen it all.
Scole

Trad climber
San Diego
Jan 1, 2011 - 04:59pm PT
Credit: Scole
Credit: Scole
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 1, 2011 - 05:05pm PT
Ocotillo y quien sabe?
Rokjox

Trad climber
Boys I'dunno
Jan 1, 2011 - 05:21pm PT
Warbler has good advice on how to survive the banditos. Don't be in sight of the road, hide your camp, don't tell anybody in town you are camping outside town. Especially at the gas station, store, restaurant or bar.

If you see something blocking the road, stop immediately and WAY before you get near it. DON'T creep up on it slowly without looking the scene over very closely, especially looking to see if the spot offers hiding places for others who might pop up once you are close. This ploy is used for ambushes, where an apparently dead animal or car is used to get you to stop, then you are suddenly surrounded, removed from your vehicle and then left on the side of the road as everything you own just drives away.


Park somewhere you are not easily hemmed in by a single vehicle, you may need to leave FAST. Keep most of your camp inside the vehicle, so you don't have to abandon anything you might want to stay and argue over. NOTHING is worth ANYTHING if it isn't inside the vehicle.


If you are somewhere lonely with a stoplight that doesn't change, run the light before letting somebody walk up to you. Especially if they seem to be angling up behind you in what might ordinarily be a blind spot. Have NO blind spots. I had a guy try and kill my VW once in a similar situation. I peeled out just as he reached for the engine lid.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 1, 2011 - 07:08pm PT
Es un Cardon, Esteban, el cactu mas alto de los desiertos de Baja California, a vezes creciendo a una altura de casi veinte metros.
Watusi

Social climber
Newport, OR
Jan 1, 2011 - 08:17pm PT
Yeah that's a pretty baddass looking problem! :)
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 1, 2011 - 08:30pm PT
That boulder is actually 40 ft tall, Mike
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