Show Me What You're Building!!

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Messages 2461 - 2480 of total 2530 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 4, 2014 - 05:16pm PT
It's the most annoying tie-in ever. How are we going to make this work? You're correct in that the tie in point at the top of the hip will probably be outside of the corner.

I suck at math, and I'm still stuck thinking about this stuff.

Edit; Wilbeer, missed your post. Yeah, it's all in the square.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 4, 2014 - 05:28pm PT
One word: trigonometry. The easiest way is to determine the tie-in point.
Then you can figure the hip as a common. Of course the cheek cuts are not
going to be the same but that is simple when laid out in plan view. It
gets a little trickier with the jacks but agin if you just take the plane
of each side and work them as right triangles it is much simplified.

Have fun!


Edge, sweet scribe job! But what a PITA up there under that eave!

wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 4, 2014 - 05:30pm PT
Brandon,Get your common rafters from working with heights ,frame your overhang [if you can,or at least mock it up,especially your fascia].

You should be able to get that hip in the corner above,It Will have to be off the outside corner[slightly] of your framed walls.

I hope that may help you.Cheers Wilbeer

rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Jun 4, 2014 - 08:08pm PT
I figured Reilly would get a hard-on over that scribe job...rj
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jun 4, 2014 - 08:41pm PT
You will have a section of ridge on the wall with 3 windows if you mirror the pitches.

Cut a common to the low pitch leaving the inch and a half ridge on it and mark the top. Then cut a long steep common, draw the pitch plumb line on it and hold it up there with a whiskey stick on that line.

Mark where that intersects your ridge line.

This is where your hip starts up top.

Cut a piece of ply for the outside corner with your desired overhangs and fasten short pieces of sub-fascia to it.

Mount that on the corner and run a dry line as the top of your hip.

Hip won't cross right on the corner, you can figure out how to cut it from the string as far as hieghts above the birds mouth and so on.

Bevels and such will always add up to 90.

Godspeed.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 11, 2014 - 02:49pm PT
Onto the next...

Credit: Brandon-

34' LVL with 24' DF rafters on one side, 20' spruce on the other side. Killer view to boot.

Framing with the pros, I feel inadequate. Good knowledge regardless. It's ok to be the low man on the pecking order sometimes. My mind is a sponge.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 11, 2014 - 02:55pm PT
Nothing like having a Lull around,aye?
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Jun 11, 2014 - 06:08pm PT
Nothing like having a Lull around,aye?

One of the reasons I left NH is because there were too many lulls in my work.

*rimshot
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 11, 2014 - 06:22pm PT
Yes,I believe the lulls are over,Edge.[hopefully]
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 19, 2014 - 01:51pm PT
Bump. What's everyone building?

I'm still on the same projects, so nothing much to share.
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jun 19, 2014 - 04:45pm PT
Brandon,

I just checked in on this thread, and noticed your question on a bed frame.

I'm involved with building a timber frame addition onto my house, but if I get a chance, I'll take a few pictures of a cherry bed I made about 30 years ago.

The headboard and footboard are both permanently glued together. All four post are 4" Cherry, not glued up, turned on a lathe. Each post is morticed for headboard and footboard. I used a Bridgeport Milling machine, ( which I still use), for the morticing.

The side rails are real heavy Cherry, about 2" thick X 8" deep. with hefty tennons on each end, which mortice into the post. I made custom bed bolts, about 1/2 dia. X 8" long, which are recessed into post, ( covered by those classic brass covers), The rails have 1" round holes, ( not thru holes), on the inside, which are fitted with steel plugs tapped to accept the 1/2 bolts.
The bed completely comes apart in minutes by simply tightening or loosening the four bolts with a socket wrench. It is also EXTREMELY rugged, and will last 100's of years. My bed is a Queen size, but obviously you can make it any size you want.

Rotate or zoom in on the pictures for more detail. Hope this helps.
Headboard- totally glued up piece. Lower part morticed for side rails.
Headboard- totally glued up piece. Lower part morticed for side rails.
Credit: steveA
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jun 19, 2014 - 04:49pm PT
Footboard- glued up assembly-lower part also morticed for side rails. ...
Footboard- glued up assembly-lower part also morticed for side rails.
The tenons on side rails are real heavy-about 3/4 x 5". The side rails are about 2" thick x 8" deep-solid cherry
Credit: steveA
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jun 19, 2014 - 04:54pm PT
View of footboard assembly-permanently glued up. The bed bolt is about...
View of footboard assembly-permanently glued up. The bed bolt is about 8" long. The side rail is drilled thru end grain, centered on tenon, and has a counterbored hole on inside to accept steel plug, threaded for 1/2 inch bolt.
Credit: steveA
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jun 19, 2014 - 04:57pm PT
Photo shows side rail joining post. This bed is rock slid due to heavy...
Photo shows side rail joining post. This bed is rock slid due to heavy construction.
Credit: steveA
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Jun 21, 2014 - 03:24pm PT
Making a 34" wide x 52" long elliptical frame for a glass top coffee table. Last Saturday I planed the boards to thickness, then miter cut them to match the angles on my full size drawing. Each half of the eight glue lines was mortised 1 3/4" x 5/16" x 2" deep for loose tenons. Everything was dry fit then disassembled for glue up.

The oval orifice.
The oval orifice.
Credit: Edge

I glued up the whole mess with polyurethane glue (which I never use but seemed appropriate here) and clamped individual sections down to a dead flat MDF base covered with taut plastic sheeting. The joints were then lathered with glue and pushed together, with final clamping across the glue line courtesy of pinch dogs, an old timey but fabulously simple and effective device.

Pinch dogs.
Pinch dogs.
Credit: Edge

These are sunk in the waste wood that will be cut away, and develop tremendous pressure.

Tight is right.
Tight is right.
Credit: Edge

Today I popped off the clamps and dogs, then scraped off the glue squeeze out before sanding the frame flat. There was one small knot void on the underside, which I filled with fine sawdust from the shop vac sander hose, thin cyanoacrylate glue, accelerator, and a final sanding.

There is always a supply of matching, fine sawdust just inside the sho...
There is always a supply of matching, fine sawdust just inside the shop vac hose adaptor.
Credit: Edge

To complete the engineered top it will get veneered top and bottom with 1/16" thick plain sliced cherry veneer with the grain running perpendicular across the frame's glue lines. Bomber.

The top will then be sawn to shape inside and out (3" wide) and rabbited for a 1/4" glass insert. More pics to come, but I'm only working this one sporadically.

23" wide x 10' long x 1/16" thick cherry veneer.
23" wide x 10' long x 1/16" thick cherry veneer.
Credit: Edge
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Jun 22, 2014 - 09:44am PT
Completely out of the blue I got a message on my business facebook page this morning.

Hi Loran - I'm not sure if you might remember me but my husband Stewart and I bought a wonderful dining table in cherry from you some years back when we were living in Manhattan. I remember you bringing it up 62 stairs (no elevator). I still have and treasure the table. Stewart sadly died in 2003 and I moved last year from NYC down to Florida. I notice you too have moved from NH to Colorado. I'm sitting at the table as I write this. It's oval in shape with two fold down flaps.

Lizzie and her husband commissioned this table in 1989; 25 years ago. I have hard copy photos somewhere, but it was an elliptical top, drop leaf table with a Watco and spray lacquer finish. I recall several things about the job including damaging the finish before delivery and having to scrape off an entire coat of lacquer with a razor blade as well as carrying the table up to their apartment; a half inch larger in any dimension and it would not have fit up the stairway, period.

This was my first commissioned table and I built it in my first shop which I had set up in the basement of an apartment.

Loran Smith Woodworking Global Headquarters circa 1989
Loran Smith Woodworking Global Headquarters circa 1989
Credit: Edge

Kind of a trip getting this great message after a quarter century. It's a great reminder to take pride in your work and to build as though your work will last many lifetimes, as is evidenced by the plethora of early American originals still floating around New England and beyond.
o-man

Social climber
Paia,Maui,HI
Jun 22, 2014 - 03:38pm PT
Credit: o-man
Credit: o-man
For more on this hugely rewarding project click on the link below.
http://rockerwaves.blogspot.com/2014/06/aala-recording-maui_6154.html
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Jun 28, 2014 - 04:59pm PT
Veneering the coffee table top frame.

Oversized blank of 1" cherry with 1/16" cherry veneer top and bottom.
Oversized blank of 1" cherry with 1/16" cherry veneer top and bottom.
Credit: Edge
bamboo

Trad climber
pike co
Jun 29, 2014 - 05:19am PT
I recently finished up these barn doors-they serve as partitions between
two dormitories
all 6/4 T&G
[url=[/url" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://s275.photobucket.com/user/kittitiny/media/Mobile%20Uploads/DSCN06071.jpg.html][/url]
doweling jig
[url=[/url" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://s275.photobucket.com/user/kittitiny/media/Mobile%20Uploads/DSCN06051.jpg.html][/url]
[url=[/url" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://s275.photobucket.com/user/kittitiny/media/Mobile%20Uploads/DSCN06041.jpg.html][/url]
vintage saw worked and worked!!
[url=[/url" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://s275.photobucket.com/user/kittitiny/media/Mobile%20Uploads/DSCN06021.jpg.html][/url]
shop made router table works like a mule too
[url=[/url" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://s275.photobucket.com/user/kittitiny/media/Mobile%20Uploads/DSCN06001.jpg.html][/url]
the machining on these door parts seemed endless!
 four doors!
[url=[/url" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://s275.photobucket.com/user/kittitiny/media/Mobile%20Uploads/DSCN05971.jpg.html][/url]
telemon01

Trad climber
Montana
Jun 29, 2014 - 02:11pm PT

A house I am building in Whitefish this summer. We broke ground the day after I got back from Spring Break in Joshua Tree last April.

Credit: telemon01
Credit: telemon01
Credit: telemon01
Credit: telemon01
Credit: telemon01
Credit: telemon01

Good views of the ski area and Whitefish Range from the 2nd floor

Credit: telemon01
Credit: telemon01
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