Show Me What You're Building!!

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Messages 2421 - 2440 of total 2950 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Sierra Ledge Rat

Mountain climber
Old and Broken Down in Appalachia
Jun 3, 2014 - 01:06pm PT
I'm guessing mammoth ivory is not a cheap commodity?

Mammoth ivory scales are commonly used for knife handles.

https://www.fineturnage.com/shop/home.php?cat=256
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 3, 2014 - 03:11pm PT
A little OT, but the calories burned during a day of framing somehow negate the energy I had for the bed project I'm undertaking. Until this weekend, bed project!

Also, the frame I'm working on is on the strangest looking home I've laid eyes upon. Clear story up to a tower with a hip and teeny deck at the 3.5 story level. Strange building, to say the least.

More building stories, please. Seeing what everyone else builds is so great to watch unfold, and builds the stoke!
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Jun 3, 2014 - 05:24pm PT
Brandon, Reilly has given you good beta on the bed. Tapered pencil post with mortise & tenon head and foot boards and knock down bed hardware on the side rails is a good intro project for bed making. Try Rockler or Woodcraft for the KD hardware.

I bet the local sawmills have flame birch or curly maple, just make sure it's dry. If you want a reliable source for both check out Northland Wood Products in Kingston.

http://www.northlandforest.com/retail-hardwoods-kingston.html

As for me, I spent the day scribing.

View of the backside, back beveled, stop sawn, and finished by chisel.
View of the backside, back beveled, stop sawn, and finished by chisel.
Credit: Edge

Anyone with a basic knowledge of geometry can see the special challenges involved. The goal was to shoot for a fairly consistent 1/8" gap; the beetle kill T&G boards will get clear coated, then the gap will be caulked prior to painting the logs with a semi-solid stain. A nice challenge, and I was able to finish about 100 lineal feet today. Total elevation change (up ladder, down ladder, repeat): about equal to Valley floor to Boot flake.

The scribed filler was the last board to be installed.
The scribed filler was the last board to be installed.
Credit: Edge
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 3, 2014 - 05:44pm PT
Nice work Edge and good to see you on a ladder,cheers!
Flip Flop

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
Jun 4, 2014 - 01:25pm PT
I'm making a Flintstones beer table.
Get stoned with the Flintstones
Get stoned with the Flintstones
Credit: Flip Flop
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 4, 2014 - 01:32pm PT
A small addition on a crazy looking building.

Credit: Brandon-

Credit: Brandon-

Credit: Brandon-

The roof system should be fun, there will be a hip running from the inside corner on the existing to the outside corner on the addition. The pitches will mirror the two that are visible on the left and right of the existing. I'm pretty sure that I've never hipped a roof with two different pitches. Looking forward to that tomorrow.
Hardly Visible

Social climber
Llatikcuf WA
Jun 4, 2014 - 04:56pm PT
Brandon,
I am a long ways from being a math expert, but I've framed quite a few roofs. Looking at yer project I bet that hip winds up being out of the existing inside corner and moves toward steeper roof pitch. Looks like a head scratcher for sure.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 4, 2014 - 05:07pm PT
Bastard hip,Math does work.

It really is all on a framing square.

Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 4, 2014 - 05:16pm PT
It's the most annoying tie-in ever. How are we going to make this work? You're correct in that the tie in point at the top of the hip will probably be outside of the corner.

I suck at math, and I'm still stuck thinking about this stuff.

Edit; Wilbeer, missed your post. Yeah, it's all in the square.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jun 4, 2014 - 05:28pm PT
One word: trigonometry. The easiest way is to determine the tie-in point.
Then you can figure the hip as a common. Of course the cheek cuts are not
going to be the same but that is simple when laid out in plan view. It
gets a little trickier with the jacks but agin if you just take the plane
of each side and work them as right triangles it is much simplified.

Have fun!


Edge, sweet scribe job! But what a PITA up there under that eave!

wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 4, 2014 - 05:30pm PT
Brandon,Get your common rafters from working with heights ,frame your overhang [if you can,or at least mock it up,especially your fascia].

You should be able to get that hip in the corner above,It Will have to be off the outside corner[slightly] of your framed walls.

I hope that may help you.Cheers Wilbeer

rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Jun 4, 2014 - 08:08pm PT
I figured Reilly would get a hard-on over that scribe job...rj
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jun 4, 2014 - 08:41pm PT
You will have a section of ridge on the wall with 3 windows if you mirror the pitches.

Cut a common to the low pitch leaving the inch and a half ridge on it and mark the top. Then cut a long steep common, draw the pitch plumb line on it and hold it up there with a whiskey stick on that line.

Mark where that intersects your ridge line.

This is where your hip starts up top.

Cut a piece of ply for the outside corner with your desired overhangs and fasten short pieces of sub-fascia to it.

Mount that on the corner and run a dry line as the top of your hip.

Hip won't cross right on the corner, you can figure out how to cut it from the string as far as hieghts above the birds mouth and so on.

Bevels and such will always add up to 90.

Godspeed.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 11, 2014 - 02:49pm PT
Onto the next...

Credit: Brandon-

34' LVL with 24' DF rafters on one side, 20' spruce on the other side. Killer view to boot.

Framing with the pros, I feel inadequate. Good knowledge regardless. It's ok to be the low man on the pecking order sometimes. My mind is a sponge.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 11, 2014 - 02:55pm PT
Nothing like having a Lull around,aye?
Edge

Trad climber
Boulder, CO
Jun 11, 2014 - 06:08pm PT
Nothing like having a Lull around,aye?

One of the reasons I left NH is because there were too many lulls in my work.

*rimshot
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Jun 11, 2014 - 06:22pm PT
Yes,I believe the lulls are over,Edge.[hopefully]
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 19, 2014 - 01:51pm PT
Bump. What's everyone building?

I'm still on the same projects, so nothing much to share.
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jun 19, 2014 - 04:45pm PT
Brandon,

I just checked in on this thread, and noticed your question on a bed frame.

I'm involved with building a timber frame addition onto my house, but if I get a chance, I'll take a few pictures of a cherry bed I made about 30 years ago.

The headboard and footboard are both permanently glued together. All four post are 4" Cherry, not glued up, turned on a lathe. Each post is morticed for headboard and footboard. I used a Bridgeport Milling machine, ( which I still use), for the morticing.

The side rails are real heavy Cherry, about 2" thick X 8" deep. with hefty tennons on each end, which mortice into the post. I made custom bed bolts, about 1/2 dia. X 8" long, which are recessed into post, ( covered by those classic brass covers), The rails have 1" round holes, ( not thru holes), on the inside, which are fitted with steel plugs tapped to accept the 1/2 bolts.
The bed completely comes apart in minutes by simply tightening or loosening the four bolts with a socket wrench. It is also EXTREMELY rugged, and will last 100's of years. My bed is a Queen size, but obviously you can make it any size you want.

Rotate or zoom in on the pictures for more detail. Hope this helps.
Headboard- totally glued up piece. Lower part morticed for side rails.
Headboard- totally glued up piece. Lower part morticed for side rails.
Credit: steveA
steveA

Trad climber
Wolfeboro, NH
Jun 19, 2014 - 04:49pm PT
Footboard- glued up assembly-lower part also morticed for side rails. ...
Footboard- glued up assembly-lower part also morticed for side rails.
The tenons on side rails are real heavy-about 3/4 x 5". The side rails are about 2" thick x 8" deep-solid cherry
Credit: steveA
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