Show Me What You're Building!!

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Messages 2401 - 2420 of total 2595 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Flip Flop

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
Mar 31, 2014 - 09:57pm PT
Reilly, the cedar scribes to the stone columns was fun. I needed a hack to make them as fast as possible. The siding met the stone columns at absurd angles. Four of the pieces were high off the ground and a long walk from the shop. I used a 1/2" x 4" vertical with some random Masonite to get the basic form. At this point my thickness was correct and I would build a scribe from blue tape. It is surprisingly quick and accurate. Then I transcribe by eye and with a little combi square occasionally. Then I scored the face to prevent tear-out. I set the jig saw at 45 degrees. Then I cut the line twice. The second pass I floated the jigsaw.
Quick and tight
Quick and tight
Credit: Flip Flop
SCseagoatt

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Mar 31, 2014 - 10:10pm PT
Making our own boat parts...hoping they hold up to the Southern Ocean
Shivs and blocks that will mount to the rails for line management.
Starting with a block of metal in the Bridgeport mill
Starting with a block of metal in the Bridgeport mill
Credit: SCseagoatt
Lots of parts
Lots of parts
Credit: SCseagoatt
How it will fit together over the stanchion
How it will fit together over the stanchion
Credit: SCseagoatt
This angled boring was the trickiest...broke an expensive boring tool ...
This angled boring was the trickiest...broke an expensive boring tool on this
Credit: SCseagoatt

Susan
T H

Boulder climber
extraordinaire
Apr 2, 2014 - 10:41pm PT
new grips
Credit: T H
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Apr 2, 2014 - 10:46pm PT
Biotch...Nice grips...where did you get them...?
T H

Boulder climber
extraordinaire
Apr 3, 2014 - 01:10am PT
My boss had me sand and seal some sketch ass wall trim for his rentals.
Mold, re-sawn rips, mill stamps etc.
I thought it good to just go ahead and run with it.
Use the sander to accentuate the character of the wood.
Credit: T H
T H

Boulder climber
extraordinaire
Apr 3, 2014 - 01:19am PT
RJ -- 5.95 / pair (free shipping) on eBay http://www.ebay.com/itm/MOUNTAIN-BICYCLE-BIKE-GRIPS-PAIR-BLACK-KRATON-RUBBER-/380870367410?ssPageName=ADME:L:OC:US:3160#ht_645wt_688
Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Apr 3, 2014 - 03:05pm PT
I think I finally have something worth adding to this thread. It's a work in progress, but thought it would be fun to share.

As a kid, I wanted to be a ham radio operator very badly, but I could never get fast enough at Morse to pass the exam. This was probably more due to the fact that I was about 12 and couldn't pay attention, more then anything.

About a year and a half ago, I found out that the Morse requirement had been removed, so I promptly ran out to get my Technician ticket and have been happily using ham radio since.

I was always fascinated with tube radios, and especially the home made rigs that used to be the norm for ham radio enthusiasts. With that in mind, I decided to start building a home brew transmitter, learn Morse and build a set that would be accurate to the 1940's.

I started by purchasing a kit from a company called Pastime Projects. They send you some slats of wood, and all the wiring and parts needed to build a transmitter in the old style. So, you get something that looks like this:

Pastime Projects "Remember When" CW Transmitter Kit
Pastime Projects "Remember When" CW Transmitter Kit
Credit: Vegasclimber

You have to mark and drill all the holes for the different components and leads. In this picture, you can see the chassis assembled, all I have to do is drill the hole for the variable capacitor and I will be done with the prep work (Unfortunately I can't figure out what I did with my big drill.) Note the dowels on the right - I will have to hand wind the primary coil and local area antennae. Once I get done with the drilling, I will break it back down and stain the wood.

Marking and drilling holes for the components
Marking and drilling holes for the components
Credit: Vegasclimber

One of the down sides is that the old school large tubes aren't really available anymore, so I was sent a smaller "modern" tube. I rectified this by visiting an antique store that had a good supply of tubes, and found an original 6L6 tube new in the box. On the left is the transmitter crystal, this rig will transmit on 40 meters.

Showing the crystal and new tube in the installed position
Showing the crystal and new tube in the installed position
Credit: Vegasclimber

One of the agents at my company used to be a ham, as was her husband who passed away a few years ago. She knew I was looking for a telegraph key, and brought one in for me. I was really happy when I saw it - this is a Signal Corps Lionel (yes the model train company) J-38 key that is a perfect match for the era of my kit. The knob on this particular key is Navy issue, so it may have been used by them instead of the Signal Corps.

J-38 key before restoration
J-38 key before restoration
Credit: Vegasclimber

The key was in pretty rough shape, so the next step was to bring it back to usable condition. I put the cast and Bakelite parts in soapy water, and broke down all the brass and metal components in an ammonia bath. After a two day soak, it was time to do a LOT of micro polishing with Nevr-Dull.

So many parts to clean...
So many parts to clean...
Credit: Vegasclimber

When put back together, the key cleaned up really nicely and has great response. It will be usable for years to come.

Ready to send! Morse, that is.
Ready to send! Morse, that is.
Credit: Vegasclimber

Part of building a CW rig is also about getting a good receiver. I have always been a huge fan of the old Hallicrafters radios - this company made radios that saved a lot of lives during WW2, as their transmitters were used by groups like the Coastwatchers. I chose an S-20R Sky Champion, and after some patience got a great deal on Ebay and paid about a quarter of what they are worth. This receiver model was used by a lot of troops during the war, and mine is in amazing condition - I think it was rarely used. I need to have the speaker re coned, and then I will set about retuning it.

Hallicrafters S-20R
Hallicrafters S-20R
Credit: Vegasclimber

So that's the project for right now. I still need to build a power supply, and will probably pick up a set of Signal Corps headphones to complete the kit. Then it's all about building a stealth antennae for my condo so I can get this beast on the air!

NutAgain!

Trad climber
South Pasadena, CA
Apr 3, 2014 - 03:27pm PT
Replacing capacitors in a dead preamp built into my Takamine classical guitar:





Edit: Vegas, neat stuff. I have had an undisciplined interest in Morse code for a long time, and the old vacuum tube project looks pretty cool. Drilling wood instead of using a modern plastic-covered "bread board" or PCB!
Flip Flop

Trad climber
Truckee, CA
Apr 3, 2014 - 05:20pm PT
Vegas that's a great project that you've got going. Keep us posted. Thanks for playing.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Apr 3, 2014 - 07:14pm PT
Credit: Brandon-

Credit: Brandon-

Credit: Brandon-

We're doubling the size of this little hippie house. Net zero, double stud 2x4 walls. So much fun working on this crew that I've called family for four years now. We get stuff done and have fun doing it.

I love this thread.

Edit; Flip Flop, hardest working carpenter? Hardly! I have down time between projects, and I'm sure many others here bust their asses more than I do. I treat framing like an athletic challenge, but framing is only one part of the job obviously. That said, I do enjoy the framing portion of the project. It helps keep me in shape.

Then there all the mental gymnastics and back end work that goes into a project. I'm a carpenter, not a business owner. I'm guessing that most builders on this thread work harder than I do when the concept of work is presented in the broader spectrum. I gave up working as a GC because my need for money is small, and I love just going to work and building cool things.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Apr 3, 2014 - 09:31pm PT
Vegas

Samuel Morse would be proud!
Gene

climber
Apr 3, 2014 - 09:35pm PT
...- . --. .- ...

.-- .- -.-- -.-. --- --- .-..

--. . -. .
Sanskara

climber
Apr 3, 2014 - 09:47pm PT
Credit: Sanskara

Credit: Sanskara

Credit: Sanskara

Nothing special just some simple birch plywood with solid stock maple face frames.

I am building these for a yoga studio I practice at.

Two coats of conversion varnish and they are ready to instal replacing the garbage in the last picture. Two more sections are to come that get built around the utilities.

More pics when I'm done.

guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Apr 3, 2014 - 09:51pm PT
June 20 1840
Gene having spent beaucoup time and miles blue water passaging can certainly appreciate this concept more than most of us.

The man, the idea, the patent and the rest is history!

Credit: guido
Sanskara

climber
Apr 3, 2014 - 09:51pm PT
Gutted and renovated this last summer. It payed for me to ice climb all winter and not work

Nothing fancy but I did all the work from gutting it to the carpentry, building the vanity doors and all and painting.

Credit: Sanskara

Credit: Sanskara
treez

Trad climber
99827
Apr 3, 2014 - 11:11pm PT
I recently made these jigs for some rails and stiles.

I have several of those laminated doors from a school remodel.
They are amazingly flat and stable. I use them for all sorts of things.

Jig works great. Heavy and stable, slides nice.

Credit: treez

Credit: treez

Credit: treez

Credit: treez
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Apr 4, 2014 - 12:17am PT
treez-

As often happens, the jigs are an art piece in their own right. Nice!
treez

Trad climber
99827
Apr 5, 2014 - 01:43pm PT
Thanks, Guido. I've always wanted a bumper sticker that said "Can You Jig It?"

I forgot to show how the hole and slot is used to clamp the leading edge of wider stock.

Credit: treez




Hey Flip Flop - Of coarse there's a million ways to rig up a scribe for free, since I purchased the Accu-Scribe, I've found myself using it a lot. It's a great design.

Credit: treez


Vegasclimber

Trad climber
Las Vegas, NV.
Apr 11, 2014 - 12:12pm PT
Another stage of the homebrew project is complete!

Finished chassis after staining and reassembly

Chassis after staining and reassembly
Chassis after staining and reassembly
Credit: Vegasclimber

The base wiring in complete - it's been years since I used a soldering iron so it isn't pretty, but will get the job done!

Completed base wiring
Completed base wiring
Credit: Vegasclimber

The next step was to make a very high tech winder for the primary and antennae coils.

High tech coil winding machine
High tech coil winding machine
Credit: Vegasclimber

The primary coil after winding

The primary coil
The primary coil
Credit: Vegasclimber

And, the completed project. The next step will be to replace all the capacitors in the S-20 with modern ones, and then I will order and build the homebrew power supply for the transmitter.

Completed transmitter
Completed transmitter
Credit: Vegasclimber
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 11, 2014 - 12:15pm PT
Sanskara, nice work!

Vegas, WTF? You the second coming of Ted Kaczynski?
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