Show Me What You're Building!!

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Messages 1741 - 1760 of total 2439 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 11:53am PT
Growing up, we cut these things called rafters

Easy there, snarky. I throw a pencil in the guard to pin it when needed.

Typically when cutting those things called rafters.

But, I never leave it pinned because I work on a crew where nobody does that. If you're not familiar with it, it can be mucho peligroso. I err on the side of caution and safety.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:03pm PT
i've the saw though minimal skull,
i did not see a guard to pin back?

am i missing something?
a few chromesomes maybe?

norwegian finish tool:
Credit: Norwegian
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:04pm PT
Wasn't a dig at you, just trusses.

Off to the parade.........
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:09pm PT
No worries man.

90 percent of my roof systems are framed with rafters.

Happy holiday!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:13pm PT
I also was taught 30 yrs ago to pin the guide back, and I agree trying to use the saw with the guard operating is more of a hassle, and more dangerous, if you're used to no guard. I was taught by my contractor boss to leave the guard on, but pinned back to avoid problems with OSHA. The idea being that the guard could be reactivated at a moment's notice.

There is also the liability issue of someone unfamiliar with the torque of a wormdrive picking up a saw with a removed guard on the jobsite or at home,

I still have and use my first wormdrive which I bought 30 years ago for construction work in Idyllwild with Fred East. I often marvel at what a great, well built tool it is. I've topped out the oil level a couple of times, and the table mounting bolts are a little sloppy, but the thing still rips.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:13pm PT
brandon you ever use i-joists as rafters?
super straight, light, any-length available
r-38 compatible.

plus a std. skill saw blade'll cut em.

Credit: Norwegian
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:20pm PT
A standard 7 1/4'' blade will cut any rafter, it's the angle that's the reason for pinning the guard.

I'm pretty aware of when I pin my guard, but since I don't do it all the time, I've had some close calls. Potentially mangled floors and thighs.

Yikes!

There is also the liability issue of someone unfamiliar with the torque of a wormdrive picking up a saw with a removed guard on the jobsite or at home,

I know I'm just nitpicking here, but every beam saw I've used had the guard intact. It is part of knowing how to make accurate cuts that requires you to pull the trigger, let the wobble go away, retract the guard with one hand, and begin the cut with the other, before returning your lesser hand to the equipment. Like I said, nitpicking, but I like keeping things safe on a jobsite.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:43pm PT
ah the most liberating skill that
i've learned as a carpenter is surrender.

i fall trees for a living,
and i recognize in each one,
a personality.

some argue with me all day long.
others concede willingly to mine will.

at first, when i began to build my home,
i mistook this material input as my mistake.

then after a few wrestling matches 'tween i and understanding,
i let go of my hope for plumb and level.

i let the character in the wood define our relationship,
of course with minimal coercion on my part;

and this led to complementary "mistakes" that suitors
of my space cannot pinpoint.

it's a spacial feeling thing.

we strive as a society for absolute definition of
our's confinement; but then we inhabit this strangled
space and cannot realize why it is dis-inviting.

the eyes seek out confusion, for mere entertainment,
because everywhere within our domesticated cage,
organization suppresses the covalent message as offered
of that which we interact with.

so i built my space all reckless and drunk,
and my hope crawled down a hole and died;
so i buried it proper, and out of that patch
grew some dreams, that now manage my reality.

brandon, and other in-business builders:
clients absolutely love the slightly compromised
spaces that i create.

seriously, i've no contractor's license and i disclose as much,
but i cant keep my phone silent, or my bank account empty,
no matter how hard i try.

f*#k up and call it art.
as long as your song is convincing enough,
prisoners of our culture and of our domestic interpretation
but heartily into your folly.

and thus, the bills be paid.
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:44pm PT
Well, obviously, that's my personal gear. I'd sooner share a needle.

The gumbies get a saw with an operable guard for sure. I don't need to be hung in public.

I think you kindof missed my point.

90% rafters? Nice. Trusses just make sense most of the time.

You cant cut 360 series and up bcis in a single pass with a stock 77.

You can see my 044 in the van too. I used that the other day to cut an entire bunk of tgis that went between top flange hangers on beams. Best to have a quarter inch in that situation.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 12:46pm PT
You can see my 044 in the van too. I used that the other day to cut an entire bunk of tgis

that's rad, treez.
you cut lumber with a gun.
surely without ear protection, right?
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:27pm PT
Huh?


Cheers
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:31pm PT
It's interesting to see the reaction of people to the "defects" and imperfections in stuff built from local trees.

Voids, big knots, splits, insect boring trails, bark still attached - some people really aren't comfortable with a piece unless it's perfect - the first thing they ask is if you're going to fill the cracks and voids. Other folks love the irregularities more than a piece that's perfect.

A Rorschach test in wood.

I've found here's a pretty sharp line between the two personality types - rarely are people on the fence.
Norwegian

Trad climber
dancin on the tip of god's middle finger
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:34pm PT
is not 044 a guage?
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:38pm PT
That was a hearing protection joke.

It's a Stihl. With a 32 inch bar.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 01:56pm PT
90% rafters? Nice. Trusses just make sense most of the time.

It depends on the size and snow load, obviously. In NH it's cheaper to cut a birds mouth than it is to source and purchase trusses.

Another regional difference, like worm drives/sidewinders.

It's interesting to see the reaction of people to the "defects" and imperfections in stuff built from local trees.

Absolutely. Are you familiar with the term 'Wabi Sabi'? It's a Japanese term meaning 'Perfection through imperfection', and I'm a huge proponent of this style. Not imperfection in craftsmanship, rather, perfection in the imperfection of the medium you are using.
Cragman

Trad climber
June Lake, California....via the Damascus Road
Jul 4, 2013 - 02:22pm PT
Hey Weeg....that bathroom vanity is REALLY wonderful! I love the whimsy! Very fine craftsmanship there, sir!

When I constructed Victory Lodge, my clients gave me the charge of making EVERY room unique unto itself. That was easy with the large rooms, but the smaller ones required a bit more effort.

Credit: Cragman

The 75 square foot powder room bath off of the Great Room was in need of something wonderful....and I found the answer in an old Walnut stump. The stump had LOTS of really nice burl feature, and when I saw the rotted out section in the heart of it, I knew I had found myself a sink pedastal.

Credit: Cragman

(I actually bought 4 stumps including this one, and made use of all of them throughout the Lodge)

The 4 stumps were VERY wet, so I built a kiln in the Lodge large enough to house all 4, then let them cook for 8 months.

With the rot area near the base of the stump, as well as all the finest burl features, I installed the stump upside down, utilizing the rotted out area for my basin. (I found a bronze sink that resembled the flaring nature of the upside down stump)

The first order of business was to cut a flat side, so the stump could fit tightly against the wall. I also had to hollow out the stump enough to accomodate all of the plumbing. I scribed in a piece of 3/4" plywood into the hollow area to support the basin.

Credit: Cragman

I also hollowed out the stump to a greater degree on the left side, then using a Fein Tool, cut in an access door on that left side, giving access to the plumbing fittings should a problem arise. The Fein tool blade left such an indiscernable line, the door is not noticable at all.

Credit: Cragman

I manuevered the stump into where it was going to reside, then scribed the base to the slightly uneven slate flooring. Once the stump was ready for install, I set to sanding it to a 220 fineness....all told, about 25 hours of sanding of the stump prior to finish.

I coated the stump with 4 coats of polyurethane to bring out the richness in the Walnut. I finished off the sink area by filling the recessed area around the base of the bowl with a crushed, colored, tempered glass...slightly green to play on the color of the walls.

Credit: Cragman

A fun little feature amongst SO many in Victory Lodge!

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Jul 4, 2013 - 05:18pm PT
Warbler, love those tables!

Weege, you do the wood proud. You the Tree Karma Man.

I've heard about those dangerous-looking saws but I'm too young to have done such. ;-)

I've also heard that people used to use chalklines and such. WTF?

Credit: Reilly
Credit: Reilly
Credit: Reilly
I hate sawdust!
Credit: Reilly

Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 4, 2013 - 05:41pm PT
When I work with logs, I use inklines.

My buddy is a traditional Japanese timberframer, so I've learned to use flexible framing squares and inklines.

Additionally, I've learned that true Japanese timberframers sit down to hone their iron, rather than do it at a table.

It seems simple, but it's a huge difference.

Such nuances are what I strive to learn.

It's going to take my entire life, and I'll never have learned everything, but I'm OK with that.
rottingjohnny

Sport climber
mammoth lakes ca
Jul 4, 2013 - 07:22pm PT
Reilly...No chalklines, chainsaws , or saw dust...This is madness...! This is Sparta....! RJ
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Jul 5, 2013 - 12:02am PT
All of this fine craftsmanship and tech talk is making me yearn to get back in the shop and craft me some fine furniture.

Not that I'm gonna end my road trip early or anything foolish like that. I'm willing to wait out the urges. (Insert here: "All good things in their own time", and other suitable cliches.)

In the meantime, please carry on!
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