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Messages 1601 - 1620 of total 2637 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
slabbo

Trad climber
fort garland, colo
Mar 29, 2013 - 08:19pm PT
No building today- just diggin footing holes in a stiff wind.... SO much fun
Credit: slabbo

Remembering this from last year
John M

climber
Mar 29, 2013 - 08:22pm PT
I really like that stained glass by Justthemaid. Very nice.. Perfect colors and composition.
Edge

Trad climber
New Durham, NH
Mar 29, 2013 - 09:09pm PT
I spent the morning lacing the head on a 24" diameter X 12" high powwow drum of elk rawhide and cedar. The frame was made from 16 staves glued along the grain, which I have found helps the drum hold its tone much better than laminated frames; as the humidity rises and the hide loosens, the wood also swells across the grain around the circumference and everything remains tight.

The cedar stand is half lapped at the intersection and held together with a bolt and wing nut so it can be quickly disassembled and stored flat. Once the rawhide dries on the heads I will tie four handles to suspend the drum from the frame, and then the four beaters.

Powwow drum.
Powwow drum.
Credit: Edge
adatesman

climber
philadelphia, pa
Mar 29, 2013 - 10:26pm PT
I swear that once I get this schoolhouse finished I'll post some climbing content. But in the meantime, the Township has been after me about the (large) amount of mud being tracked out of the driveway and onto the PA-73, so figured I may as well play Scrapheap Challenge and see if I could cobble together a functional scraper blade for the backhoe/loader using nothing more than materials laying around the garage....

Step 1: Google Image search to see what a bolt-on scraper blade for a loader bucket looks like.



Step 2: Root around the property for a suitable piece of steel, which turned up a piece of 3/8" plate that had been relegated to keep-the-backhoe-from-sinking-in-the-mud duty. Had to pull it out with said backhoe, as it weighed quite a bit more than I could manage by myself.



Step 3: Deliver to the work area.



Step 4: Cut to length. Amazingly enough, my puny 40 amp plasma cutter, which is only rated to severing 1/4" plate (when connected to 240V), managed to gnaw its way through 3/8" plate without complaint. The cut is ugly as hell, but worked. Oh, and only took 2 minutes to sever the 10" width. I don't even want to think how long it would have taken with a sawzall....

Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Mar 29, 2013 - 10:34pm PT
Dig a ditch. Put a steel grate with large steel ribs over it. The grate will shake the clay off.

It's mandatory in CA. They go even further there. After you shake off your tires, you have to get them washed and inspected.
adatesman

climber
philadelphia, pa
Mar 29, 2013 - 10:36pm PT
Step 5: Notch the plate to fit the bucket. As I mentioned, the cut was ugly, but worked just fine. On a side note, it now occurs to me that the logo on the torch is strikingly similar to the Marlboro cigarette logo.



Step 6: With the slots cut, lift the plate and tack weld the brackets on over the bucket teeth. Kinda a PITA since the bucket's been beat to hell and nowhere near straight/level, but not too bad. (hence the brackets being nowhere near in line)



Step 7: Tacked in place, so drill a pair of holes in the scraper and bucket for bolts to hold it in place...



Step 8: Quick test scrape before welding everything all permanent-like...


End result was actually a lot better than this last pic, as I tweaked the fit to compensate for the fact that the rear left tire is 2" larger diameter than the rear right tire, which has the bucket 1" out of level over its width. It now scrapes completely clean and level, and I can now walk across the driveway without getting all muddy.

All told, not bad for a day of goofing off using only found materials...

:-)

-aric.

ps- on the offchance anyone's in the market for a plasma cutter, mine is a Simadre Tech Cut40D and while (comparatively) cheap has handled everything I've thrown an it in stride. Well, everything except piercing 1" steel plate, which is almost an order of magnitude thicker than it's rated to.... It would get about half an inch in and then the ceramic torch cover would shatter due to heat, which isn't surprising. Aside from that it's quite the nice piece of equipment.
sempervirens

climber
Mar 31, 2013 - 03:45pm PT
I'm planning on tiling a shower and bathroom - walls and floor. Can anyone help advise? Do I really need to put thin set below the hardi backer board? Should I use 1/2" hardi backer on the walls? (I already intend to use the 1/2" hardi backer on the floor, but thought I might get away with the 1/4" in the walls?). Is there a more water proof type of thin set cement that should be used in the shower? The space is a bit tight for a shower stall, so we decided to just tile the whole floor and most of the bathroom walls. I intent to build a 2" high lip on the floor around the shower perimeter to conatain the water and there will be a shower curtain. But I want the whole floor to be able to withstand some water.

Any help appreciated,thanks.
wilbeer

Mountain climber
honeoye falls,ny.greeneck alleghenys
Mar 31, 2013 - 03:59pm PT
Sempervirens,i would put a coat of thin set[i like the kind you mix up] under the floor seams and where the sidewalls butt to the floor.1/4 inch is all right over straight wallboard.If the walls are not good use 1/2 inch.Keep your seams tight,use an even coat under your tile.Use the best grout you can afford.Either way ,you will be grouting down the road,but that is maintenence. Best of Luck,Terence


also,try not to fasten near seams,that helps
Scott Thelen

Trad climber
Truckee, Ca
Mar 31, 2013 - 04:01pm PT
Get a PVC type liner for the floor make sure it goes up at least 8" on the sides. Make sure not to put any holes in it. Put in your drain then fill it with bedding mortar making sure to angle from the sides to the drain. then add tile.

hope that helps Ive had a few bloody marys

Happy Easter
Onewhowalksonrocks

Mountain climber
portland, Maine
Mar 31, 2013 - 06:26pm PT
almost done
almost done
Credit: Onewhowalksonrocks

Deck, door and fence almost done!
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Mar 31, 2013 - 06:48pm PT
Semper, if you want the most bombproof setup buy a one piece tile base.
There are good ones made of some kind of heavy duty 'plastic' that looks
and feels like corian and Kohler makes really nice ones of cast iron.
Captain...or Skully

climber
Mar 31, 2013 - 06:54pm PT
They make Corian shower bases, too. It's more polyester than plastic, so it'll last longer....There's also the Wedi tilebacker systems. Good stuff, that.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 31, 2013 - 09:09pm PT

emper, if you want the most bombproof setup buy a one piece tile base.
There are good ones made of some kind of heavy duty 'plastic' that looks
and feels like corian

There's an outfit in the Anaheim area that custom makes those to size as well as wall slabs.

The trade name for the product is "cultured marble"

sempervirens

climber
Mar 31, 2013 - 09:19pm PT
The one-piece tile base probably won't work for me 'cause the drain hole is not in the center. I suppose I could move the hole and the shower drain pipe but there is a bunch of plumbing under there that'd be in the way. I'm assuming the one piece tile base has the drain hole centered.

I'm not familiar with the pvc stuff. Is it in a plyable sheet? Like a sheet of plastic? And does it go under the hardi backer? Or over?

I do need to angle the thin set and tile toward the drain a little too as suggested.

Thanks for all the help people.
richross

Trad climber
Mar 31, 2013 - 09:38pm PT
The stonework on the addition at the Lundy estate.

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/03/04/nyregion/large-estate-to-help-link-parks-chain-near-catskills.html

Credit: richross

Credit: richross

Credit: richross

Credit: richross

Credit: richross

Credit: richross

Credit: richross

Credit: richross

Credit: richross
sempervirens

climber
Apr 2, 2013 - 11:15am PT
That stone work is super cool. Where is the Lundy estate? I've never heard of it. Aesthetically speaking, the roof lines look kinda jumbled and don't really go together, IMO. Seems like a building where additions were put on as after thoughts. It's funny to me that so much effort (and $) was put into such a castle and it looks like it doesn't fit together. Also, I'm surprised they painted the large post and beams grey; I'd have preferred a wood stain preservative. The craftsmanship is excellent though.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Apr 3, 2013 - 07:25pm PT
hey there say, wow, wonderful things getting built here...

booDawg and ekat, i hope to at least put good soil in my garden this year...
not sure when i can plant now, it is still in the 20's mid, and 30's some...

wow, i may just plant and fall will set in :O

hope not, ;)




also, neat building stuff rielly and all...


here is WHAT I JUST BUILT:

cost about 4 bucks, i think it did, from thrift store finds, :



made me an easel :&#41;  out of plant hanger, package tape, and plasti...
made me an easel :) out of plant hanger, package tape, and plastic baskets for the paints and spice bottles for the brushes...
Credit: neebee
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Apr 3, 2013 - 07:34pm PT
Those flared-eave gambrel roofs look a little out of harmony to me as a matter personal taste, but that's your std Dutch colonial revival roof. Looks a little more out of place being adjacent to that std gabled roof on the second building in back.

Pretty much the defining characteristic making it a "dutch" colonial rather than some other colonial is the gambrel roofs, and the revival era ones tended toward the flared eaves.

Love this thread. One day I'll actually put up some pics.
slabbo

Trad climber
fort garland, colo
Apr 3, 2013 - 07:35pm PT
i have done quite a bit of work with clay/adobe/mud-- most stuff has a high silt content (not good) it's suprisingly hard to get it right.

Cordwood/ strawn]bale house,, 5 years now, no problems.. it's all about the design 30" overhangs,, drains, etc
s
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 3, 2013 - 08:47pm PT
Cherry Insta-Closet!

Credit: Reilly

The retards were too cheap to change the existing crown so I had to
cope mine into the existing! Grrrrr....Waaay stoopid.
Credit: Reilly
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