Show Me What You're Building!!

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squishy

Mountain climber
Aug 21, 2012 - 04:36am PT
It's sort of a copy of a kit, the DJI 450, you can get cheap clone parts from RCTimer, but the rest is a hodge podge of parts that are not suppose to work together...it's really just a frame, four brushless motors and a battery, but what makes it go is what is interesting...

The quad is controlled by a Naza controller, basically a computer with three gyros, three accelerometers and a barometer. It also has a GPS radio and calculates that with the rest of the data, it will remember where it took off and when in failsafe (major error or lack of signal) it will fly home and land autonomously..all handled by the Naza flight controller...

Then there is the hard part of putting a video transmitter in it with enough range to match the control, now that's the hard part. Control is sent to the quad via 2.4ghz frequency hopping, just like off the shelf RC airplane stuff, when you place a strong 5.8ghz video transmitter (same one cops use to spy on people and such) near the control receiver all kinds of things happen and then the GPS won't lock in as well, so you have to build custom power filtering and I had to learn a lot about antennas (the quad has seven) and fresnel zones. There's also an on screen display hooked up to another GPS which shows my altitude, speed, heading and battery life so I can just look on the screen for all my info while flying. It's was not easy and it took lots of trial and error to get it right, things like lock-tight come to mind. I could not have done it alone, there's a large community of FPV (first person flight) hobbists now, all working out these problems. I even flashed the speed controller with a program written by a guy I met in some forum, took the buffers out and now the thing is super stable for shooting video...

I fly it from a tri-pod with a 9' screen on top in a sun shade, the base station, as we call them, is also equipped with a video recorder and does not go to blue screen like most TV's do, I wouldn't be able to see playboy through the fuzz when I get bad signal if it did.

I also strap an HD Contour camera on the bottom because the video feed is low def, most guys use gopros.

My long range UHF control transmitter comes next month, it will extend my range from 1 kilometer to 15, I will easily run out of battery before flying out of my range (my flight times are around 10 minutes right now)...I will also be equipping my FPV airplanes with this long range ability.

Of course you guys can see the potential of this and I am planning to deploy and get some video in the valley. The FAA is still working out the regulations but you can see the potential problems hobbists face in the future as our technology allows what is basically a personal UAV, I could have spent another 500 on the control and it would have flown way points in auto mode, like you just sit there and click google maps on a laptop and it flies there, but that's no fun...



It currently looks like this, repaired with some wine corks after it fell 948 feet upside down and crashed (long story, video is in my channel) and I used some swimming noodles for landing gear to raise it and fit the HD camera, maybe they will allow it to float long enough to jump in and get it just in case, lol.



I took it up to loon lake last weekend and filled the memory cards...I have tons of video to edit as it is...

If anyone is truly interested, I can help you get into it or build you one for about 3 grand...no flight experience necessary, it goes where you point it...

oh and my second one is sitting on the coffee table, got the motors mounted and have everything to finish it, it's going to be an aerobatic version so it can do things like this...

Gunkie

Trad climber
East Coast US
Aug 21, 2012 - 07:56am PT
squishy, ever consider flying one of these FPVs up the side of El Cap? Would be neat video, particularly if you could do multiple flights over a number of days (weeks for PTPP) and record an ascent. It's wouldn't be any more bothersome than BASE jumpers ripping by, which scare the crap out of me every time. However, I'd imagine the Yos cops might have something to say about that ;) Cool stuff.
squishy

Mountain climber
Aug 21, 2012 - 11:25am PT
no way man, that would be against the law and would hurt the hobby as a whole shutting down areas and creating more laws and restrictions...lol
squishy

Mountain climber
Aug 21, 2012 - 10:33pm PT
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Aug 27, 2012 - 01:32am PT
Here's some recent stuff:

Folding redwood shower enclosure made of old growth heart bender board...
Folding redwood shower enclosure made of old growth heart bender board, resawn 2x6, and brass
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
partially folded
partially folded
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
all folded up and out of the way
all folded up and out of the way
Credit: The Warbler
stairway to roof deck. all local western red cedar custom milled on th...
stairway to roof deck. all local western red cedar custom milled on the woodmizer lt 40
Credit: The Warbler
hidden light rope lighting with three way switches
hidden light rope lighting with three way switches
Credit: The Warbler
Recycled old growth redwood fence pickets - probably 50 years old
Recycled old growth redwood fence pickets - probably 50 years old
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler

The deck boards are all slightly tapered bookmatched pairs, sardined head to toe, so to speak, to make two parallel edges with every pair. The logs were originally chainsaw milled to 3" slabs on site on Mt Palomar, air dried, then ripped down the center, and resawn from 3" thickness to 1 1/2". Their taper is that of the tree trunk.

Credit: The Warbler
view west to pacific ocean
view west to pacific ocean
Credit: The Warbler

I chainsaw milled this tree about three years ago, air dried it, and built:

sugargum table - eucalyptus cladocalyx
sugargum table - eucalyptus cladocalyx
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
with little sister side table
with little sister side table
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
In its new home in Santa Fe
In its new home in Santa Fe
Credit: The Warbler

Made the benches with red cedar, turned cedar legs plugged into stepped holes with exposed endgrain integral plugs on the surface.



EDIT: I just received an email from President Obama - "You didn't build that."
skamoto

Mountain climber
coalinga ca
Aug 27, 2012 - 07:19am PT
This is what I'm working on.
Credit: skamoto
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Aug 28, 2012 - 07:26pm PT
That's some nice looking work, Warbler!

Here's my latest. It's a tiny house, built really cheaply. I dislike working on projects like this, as they are cookie cutter, bottom line structures.

I've already refused to side it, as it's going to be vinyl. I've got principles, ya know?
Regardless, it's work, albeit at a rock bottom wage, but it's work. I like to work.

This morning;



This afternoon;



In all, it was pretty fun for two of us to build staging, cut the rafters, and install them in a day.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 28, 2012 - 08:00pm PT
Getting the west wall prepped for painting
Getting the west wall prepped for painting
Credit: Ghost
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Aug 29, 2012 - 10:48pm PT
That's some impressive teamwork there Brandon, and a fair amount of weight to maneuver around while you're at it.

I'm into working too - it's hard to find a like minded person to build with...
Captain...or Skully

climber
Aug 29, 2012 - 11:54pm PT
Good stuff, Kevin. I like what you can see in a piece of wood.
john hansen

climber
Aug 30, 2012 - 12:57am PT
Bradon, it is always fun at the end of the day to look back and see what you got done. That is why I always liked framing.
One time we had a new guy working with us and me and Bob, my long time work partner decided at 2 oclock on a friday that we would build the stairs
from the lower to the upper story.

I cut the three stringers while Bob ripped the plywood for the treads and risers. We put the one by three on the stringer for the drywall and got them up.

A few big tubes of construction adhesive , a couple nail guns blazing,,

and we were done, only took about an hour and a half.

The new guy was fairly impressed.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 30, 2012 - 12:59am PT
I'm into working too - it's hard to find a like minded person to build with...

When we bought the place in the picture a couple of posts above, it was a wreck inside. But we were lucky to find a like-minded person to work with on the renovation. Some weird dude who posts here under the name Steve Grossman.

Construction skills right off the charts.
Bill Mc Kirgan

Trad climber
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Aug 30, 2012 - 07:53am PT
Squishy,

One of our cats was enthralled with your video of the quad in flight.

I was too... can't believe how that thing can maneuver.

Very cool build sir!




The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Aug 30, 2012 - 10:11am PT
Ghost,

How 'bout some interior shots of Steve's work?
Gal

Trad climber
a semi lucid consciousness
Aug 30, 2012 - 10:51am PT
Warbler, your stuff is amazing-GREAT JOB, thanks for the pics...

Love this thread!

Brandon you are building some cool involved homes!

good work ya'll, really fantastic..
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Aug 30, 2012 - 11:20am PT
Tks, Gal !

The woodpile is growing... time to build something new
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 31, 2012 - 11:24pm PT
Ghost, How 'bout some interior shots of Steve's work?

I'll try to get something together next week. We're up in Squamish pretending that we're still climbers right now, and I've got a deadline to deal with when I get back home.

But once that's out of the way, I'll see if I can get something up.
squishy

Mountain climber
Sep 3, 2012 - 10:08pm PT
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Sep 3, 2012 - 11:15pm PT
hey there say, all...

i always like this thread and what folks are up to....

i'm trying to more dreamcatchers now that the grandkids are back i school, and painting and may try a rag rug of burlap... not sure yet,
but for now:

i am a' building this for my twin buddies... this was a speical horse of their that died, :( and i am builing them this ol' SURPRISE...
kind of a late birthday gift, too...


the colors are already changed a bit since this pic...
more green and such added... :)
it's GETTING there, :)) face has a long way to go, still, too,
and the second pic, ON the pic, as well...

Credit: neebee
adatesman

climber
philadelphia, pa
Sep 4, 2012 - 01:08am PT
Not so much building as repairing, but I'm quite pleased with the result. Way back in ~1998 the spring that biases the pawl that advances the cylinder popped out of its groove (repeatedly), and the overly tight fit between the side plate and frame lead to accidentally breaking the POS die cast stainless side plate/cover in two.

Anyway, the pistol has sat in pieces in the gun safe for the past 15+ years and while reorganizing my workshop yesterday I had to empty the safe to move it, and realized the silver braze sitting on the workbench was perfect for this repair, so gave it a try since I was unexpectedly not on babysitting duty for the afternoon. A bit of filing to get the pieces to fit better, followed by some proper flux and a judicious application of heat and high-silver brazing rod resulted in this:



With a bit more filing/sanding/polishing the braze stain near the cylinder would reduce to a hairline like on the other side of the plate (uneven heating lead to a bit of a mismatch), but I really don't care that much and am simply happy to have it working once again.

BTW- simply ordering a replacement plate wasn't possible... they're custom fitted to the frame and they won't sell them as replacement parts; hence it sitting in the safe for so long... it just wasn't worth the bother to drag the box of parts to a local gun shop to pay them to ship it back to the manufacturer on their FFL for repair. All told, it probably would have cost me more than I paid for the gun in the first place.... (~$160, IIRC)

Also, how I got the pistol is rather amusing... I paid in cash, to an off duty police officer, through the window of his patrol car, in an empty parking lot, at night. Even more amusing is that the entire deal was on the up an up; he owned the gun shop I bought it from, I came in just before closing, his credit card machine was down and after filling out the required paperwork he followed me to the nearest cash machine on his way to his regular job. Still get a chuckle out of that.
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