SuperT, SuperT, How Does Your Garden Grow?

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Messages 141 - 160 of total 227 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 8, 2013 - 02:08pm PT


DIY Scarecrow





Dog-resistant beverage holder
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 8, 2013 - 03:37pm PT
Well we've been enjoying greens from our cold frame all winter. Not sure why I don't have any recent pics. But mainly it's a jungle as we divert attention to this:
Hopping Rabbit Farm west field overview
Hopping Rabbit Farm west field overview
Credit: khanom

Currently we have in garlic, onions, potatoes, spinach, chard, scallions, and strawberries. Of course much more still to go in, but this year we're using only a small part of our usable area for row crops. Elsewhere the apples, peaches, blueberries and raspberries are coming along well.

Right now up close it's mainly dirt... but I'll post more photos later as things get going and if I remember.
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 22, 2013 - 04:37pm PT
Ok, I just remembered...

From left to right, rows of potatoes, garlic, spinach, scallions, and ...
From left to right, rows of potatoes, garlic, spinach, scallions, and more
Credit: khanom

Winter greens: spinach and kale
Winter greens: spinach and kale
Credit: khanom

Hey, pssst... got any food? Huh?
Hey, pssst... got any food? Huh?
Credit: khanom
Michelle

Social climber
1187 Hunterwasser
Apr 22, 2013 - 04:59pm PT
So this year I will be experimenting with a mostly container garden. I have a little strip of soul on my patio as well that is currently overgrown grass. Any suggestions on how best to prep the soil for food crops? Unknown origin or previous treatment. I was thinking I might just haul most of it out, line it and plop some good soil in. I'm sick of food costs and love gardening.
WyoRockMan

climber
Flank of the Bighorns
Apr 22, 2013 - 05:02pm PT
My garden was looking great. Now I can't find it.
Earth Day 2013
Earth Day 2013
Credit: WyoRockMan
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 22, 2013 - 05:36pm PT
Michelle - it really depends on what your region is like, what you wanna plant, what your microclimate is like, et'c et'c.

Since you have to get soil for your planters, you might as well get rid of the grass & soil it's in and start again. Grass can be a friend or a pain in the bum.

khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 22, 2013 - 06:31pm PT
I have a little strip of soul on my patio

If you've only got a little soul, you probably don't want to haul it away.


Any grass buried deep enough will die, so if you are building a raised bed you can just get compost etc and dump it in on top. Depending on how high the bed is and what you are growing, you don't need to do anything with the grass -- it'll just decompose and provide organic matter. If it were say 12" and you wanted to grow tomatoes, you might want to cultivate some but unless it's rock-hard clay it probably won't matter.

When I was doing raised beds in Joshua Tree I got a big load of horse manure and composted it down. I supplemented with purchased compost mix and steer manure. Any decent nursury should be able to sell you better compost and/or soil mix for cheaper than the crap at the big box stores. Of course the best plan is to be composting all year.

I do it now on a bigger scale -- about five yards of horse pooh a week, to which I add chicken pooh, wood mulch, grass clippings, etc. I just turned the pile and man do I smell... of... freedom.

TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 22, 2013 - 06:39pm PT
Any grass buried deep enough will die,

Unless it's Bermuda Grass

Then get out the Roundup.

Repeatedly.

Check and see if your state has an agricultural extension program, or check with a local, small nursery / garden shop.

Soils and requirements can vary widely and if the area you want to plant is right up next to the house there's a good chance that construction leftovers have changed the soil composition radicaly from what's just a few weet away.

Just don't get suckered into buying sacks of "garden soil"
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 22, 2013 - 10:02pm PT
Then get out the Roundup.

Repeatedly.


Yup, because of course you want to be spraying poisons on ground where you grow food.


I'm by no means a grass expert but I believe most grasses of that type (called rhizomial ??) will not be able to survive buried at least 12". Don't quote me on that.

We have some perrenial grass here that is quite persistant, although I've not identified it exactly. If you leave a clump in the ground it will survive, but only if less than about 4-6". My strategy for those areas is to flip the sod with a bottom plow and let it dry, and/or remove the clumps. Where the roots are exposed it dies.

Thought I'd take a pic of the main pooh pile to make all you gardeners jealous. What's left in this batch is about 20 yards and it's got about another 2 weeks before it's ready. And yeah, the apple trees are blooming. The brown thing is a mobile chicken coop.

Credit: khanom
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 22, 2013 - 10:11pm PT
Khanom knows his shit!

This is what I'm working off this year.



Mostly donkey manure, with whatever else I raked up off the yard layered together. I stir it up with the Mantis, and it makes for a real earthy mix.

I miss that donkey, and I'll miss her even more when my manure mulch piles run out.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 22, 2013 - 10:59pm PT
Bermuda will survive even if a foot deep in well aerated soil.

(been there dun that)

Horse manure works great because it isn't as "hot" as steer manure and has a lot of incompletely digested fibrous material that really helps loosen up clay soil, and you can also usually get it for free or next to it.

Just make sure you compost it for a few months and don't put it on fresh or you will burn up your plants, mostly from the overabundance of the nitrogen in the urine. Also it gives time for any anti parasitic agents the horses had in their system time to break down. Horse wormer even in incredibly small concentrations will nuke all the earthworms.

Roundup on the other hand breaks down completely in about two weeks.







couchmaster

climber
pdx
Apr 22, 2013 - 11:01pm PT
Had the craziest strong Brandy wine Amish heirloom tomato last year. We have 6 strong starts off the biggest tomato warming up in the bullpen. Suppose to warm up soon and they'll be planted.
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 23, 2013 - 10:54am PT
Well, I'll take your word for it TGT... I dunno. I've no real experience with Bermuda. But I've never seen grass survive when fully buried... now bindweed on the other hand...

If you wish to believe the Roundup is somehow safe, I guess I won't convince you otherwise. My thinking is that when you fúck with nature, she tends to fúck you back. Usually in unpleasant and frustrating ways.

More important companies like Monsanto are directly responsible for massive damage to agriculture and rural communities that may never fully heal. Thankfully the revolution in small-scale local farming is gaining speed. We're the people who will keep food costs down and be able to provide you with wholesome natural non-toxic food when all around you huge food monopolies are jacking up prices and forcing you to eat cheatoes.


We have a sweet deal with a local stable. They need to get rid of their crap, so we come about once a week with our dump bed truck and they load it for us. We don't pay for it but that doesn't mean it's free.

I find horse manure on it's own to be lacking. We also got a bunch of sheep manure -- the two together is fantastic. My philosophy with compost is the greater diversity the better.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 23, 2013 - 11:29am PT
Very envious of your spread there khanom. We have a tiny patch of city land here ... no room for a manure pile. We have two 50-gal drums of worm compost. They survive winters easily ( tho' we have a fairly mild winter ).

And agreed on grass. Around here the quackgrass ( rhizomal ) needs to be dug out , rhizomes and all and then ya gotta be vigilant for the little bits missed.

Don't use Roundup on food crops. Better to go an Organic route - yeah, I know - there's crap in the atmosphere but why put more in? Dig dig dig. We ridded our yard of convolvulus (sp?) that way. I still fight quack grass despite digging it out every spring.

There's no perfect garden. It's always work in keeping the weeds away.

Thanks for the note about horse-worm meds in horse manure. We don't have an easy source for horse manure but I do tend to jump on it if we get it. Don't wanna mess with our earthworm population !!!
Michelle

Social climber
1187 Hunterwasser
Apr 24, 2013 - 10:31pm PT
so back to this project. Round-up, no. unfortunately, I can't do a raised bed, so the next best thing would be to dig and haul. I can't get the depth being suggested but I suspect if I clear most of the "offending" soil, I can line it and replace. I have to be ghetto cheap about this, so I'm scavenging things. I'm also starting plants in toilet paper rolls! I the previous grass infested patch, I was thinking planting sunflowers, zuchinni and herbs in the ground. maybe corn. to disguise my mj plants in containers. tomatos and maybe peas. for sure cucumbers to pickle. then I started thinking I could do greens in the ground too. I need to do more research. your stuff all looks awesome folks! since I live on the SF peninsula, the weather is bomber and I get lots of summer sun. the Star Gazer Lily is in heaven and I also have orchids that are stoked to be outside in the shade.

I can't wait to buy land and grow more food and rustle chickens. maybe goats for cheese. plus guns to keep the zombies out of my food.

Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
May 17, 2013 - 04:21pm PT
Dug up in my vegetable patch:



Wine cork for scale:



I'm pretty sure it's an old-timey injectible vial. Medical waste.

Back almost a hunred years ago, the big place next door was a tuberculosis hospital - and it's built like one. My place - a hundred yards away - was the doctor/nurse quarters.

The real estate guy told me about potential medical waste when I got the place. "If you dig up any jars, DON'T open them".
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
May 17, 2013 - 04:51pm PT
Glyphosate (trade name RoundUp, etc), is the most widely applied agricultural chemical in the country. If you're fretting over if being applied near food crops...well, that ship sailed decades ago.

It's basically an enyzme synthesis inhibiter. It only works on actively growing plants, the uptake method is through the foliage (i.e. it won't work as a pre-emergent). And it does breakdown relatively quickly for an herbicide. EPA gives it one of the lower toxicity ratings.

Still, I wouldn't want it on my food.

Hey Chaz, you coughing yet?
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
May 18, 2013 - 10:51am PT
Elcap, you usually make sense. What happened?


If you're fretting over if being applied near food crops...well, that ship sailed decades ago.

And:
Still, I wouldn't want it on my food.

Farmers spray it ON food crops. You know that right? That's the whole point.


EPA gives it one of the lower toxicity ratings.

Given your apparent confidence in government work, which is possibly lower than my own, I'm not sure this means much.


The perpetual problem of humans monkeying with nature is that we are rarely able to know and understand the long-term implications of our actions. In the early part of this century almost no agricultural chemicals were thought to have negative effects, but naturally with use and time to see them we discovered that was very much not true.

Everything you do on a farm has consequences. Everything you put on or near the soil affects it. Sometimes it's perceivable, sometimes it's merely measurable, and sometimes you don't see the consequences for many years.

If you google glyphosate toxicity you can find studies that link the chemical to deliterious effects on living creatures (here's just one). But do you need a study to tell you that wiping out all plant life in a given area will not have some consequence? It matters to me that it is toxic to humans or toxic to mice, but far more important is that this practice ignores the delicate balance of systems farmers must work within to ensure long-term soil health and productivity.
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
May 18, 2013 - 11:04am PT
It is going to be awesome!
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
May 18, 2013 - 11:08am PT
Need a wider lens...
Need a wider lens...
Credit: khanom
Spinach!
Spinach!
Credit: khanom
Potatoes! &#40;And garlic to the left&#41;
Potatoes! (And garlic to the left)
Credit: khanom
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