SuperT, SuperT, How Does Your Garden Grow?

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 121 - 140 of total 214 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Aug 11, 2011 - 06:04pm PT
The beans are exploding in the garden. As are the tomatoes, leaf lettuce, and cukes.

But, I picked a jalapeno today for dinner and didn't expect much. That plant had produced a couple already that didn't amount to much more than a bell pepper. I ate a little slice and, holy shit! Too hot! Totally caught me off guard.

I'd already made the wrap with the pepper in it before I sampled my bounty. Now I'm stuck with a really good wrap that I'm scared to eat. The pepper was that hot, and I was liberal with it in my wrap.

The melons are softball sized and practically pulsing 'cause they're growing so fast.

The purple potatoes are telling me that I planted my rows too close, as they are between the rows and spilling to both sides and getting caught up in the cucumber vines.

And that is my garden rant.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Aug 11, 2011 - 08:37pm PT
Some----of our peaches are ripe.

We netted the best tree against "peach-pecking" birds today.

I put the "anti-raccoon" cone on last week.

Now waiting for "tree-ripe" organic peaches.

Anyone, who eats one: will never enjoy a grocery store peach again.

Heidi---last year with our peaches.  The first ones today are so-----g...
Heidi---last year with our peaches. The first ones today are so-----good!
Credit: Fritz

neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:01pm PT
hey there say,all...

well, course i don't have the squash, since it failed, but i left a few spindly stalks to see if they'd climb the fence, kind of fun to see that, :)


BUT:

i DID get two small cucumbers! and some turnip greens, and lettuce...
and thanks to the good lord's grace, i DO have some tomatoes!!

and, wow, the black eyed peas, make great fillin for just about anywhere... they are bushing in all the areas that i put them in, and make the yard not look so empty... plus:
it appears that bits of fruition, as to pea-pods ARE growng now,
:)


i did get to seed a tiny bit of fill in grass, into the woodsy ground cover in back, too... so not so much dirt, ... little by little, i may get to fix up some seed where the dirt if still plenty, by the back door, too...


here is a picture of the yard, and some of the garden, got rasberry bushes, but no rasberries, but at least, this year, they DID flower!! :)


michigan wild plants, are in various areas, too...



mainly you can raspberries, and tomatoe plants shooting up.. and lettu...
mainly you can raspberries, and tomatoe plants shooting up.. and lettuce... :)
Credit: neebee


haha, "grew" these in the ol' yard, as well, :))


a 'breed' all their own, :O
a 'breed' all their own, :O
Credit: neebee



:)


neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:07pm PT
hey there, say, fritz....

not special organic, but in south texas, in the home that i had to leave, i HAD two of the most wonderful peach trees in the world...

always perfect flavored (yep, if the birds did not get them) :))

i had transplanted them from an in-law type cousin family's back yard...

and they grew to be lovely trees, as well...
though, to some, they were small, but to me, nothing was better!
they could sit in the palm of your hand (bigger than an apricot, though, of course)...

very orangy and with red on the skins... so nice colored inside, as well...
so very delicious....



sadly, i have never had a peach like them, anywhere, since... :(
sure hope and pray, perhaps some day, i can find or plant something similar, you never know.... they do have peaches up here and apples and cherries, and lots of berries, but to me:


the berries that grow up here, are the best...
the other fruit is good, but something is lacking...
(though the apples are good)...

:)




thanks for the share, i also miss south texas, as we had papayas, small perfect flavored ones, as well, in our yard, and i planted them from seeds, of all things--they acturally GREW for me... :)

when the woodpeckers did not beat me to them, i loved to eat them with lemon!


thanks again for the neat peach share, :)
god bless...
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:10pm PT
hey there say, Brandon-

your garden sounds great, even if it is a 'rant', :))

hope the melons do well...
i have some backeyed peas that are doing great, leaf wise,
we will see, as to the pea-pods... (depends on the shade and overcast issue here)... but they are lovely ground cover, :)


say, now, DR. F... now THAT is a garden i never seen before... :O
really NEAT STUFF you got there... thanks for the share...


:)
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:19pm PT
This has been a fortuitous year for the Obamagarden.

We won't have much of a grocery bill for the rest of the year.

It started out with Artichokes, Asparagus, cabbages and beets till we were sick of them.
The cold this winter nuked the Broccoli and Cauliflower however,the beets got pickled in red wine and we have a years worth.

I accidentally made a discovery about cabbages. If you harvest the head, but leave the rest of the plant it will produce a second crop of mini cabbages or giant Brussels Sprouts, depending on your perspective. We've had Shallots the size of onions all summer from another experiment.


The first crop of sweet corn and green beans is vacuum bagged in the freezer and the second crop is now producing. Also in the freezer about five gallons of raspberries and ten gallons of boysenberries that will become jam this fall. So, Fresh corn and green beans at both ends of summer as well as the dried and frozen ones for later.

The tomatoes have done incredibly well. I've canned a couple dozen pints of salsa, a dozen of zucchini in tomato sauce as well as massive amounts of sauce and dried. We've also been eating a lot of BLT's. I'm gonna have to crank out an other batch of salsa Sunday as well.

the Butternut didn't get that big, but they are just about right size for two people. I've still got a couple of spaghetti squash going as well.

Next month I'll start in with prep for the Fall/winter garden.

Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Aug 11, 2011 - 10:17pm PT
Neebee: Always good to hear from you.

I hope you find a Michigan peach tree to enjoy.

I am jealous of your tale of Texas Papayas.

Long ago, on a summer Hawaii trip, I was able to shake large ripe Papayas out of a tree, and then move them onto my breakfast table within minutes.

No Papaya since then: has tasted as good to me.



Tree-ripe and fresh: is Best!
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Aug 12, 2011 - 08:55am PT
1,500 lbs of Lamb Haas Avocados! ( aprox, they filled a bin-and-a-half, at around 1,000# per bin )

Two years ago, it was 345 lbs. I don't know what was produced last year, because someone helped themselves to all of them in the middle of the night.

My neighbor's daughter picked them while I'm out of town. He thinks she deserves $75. I think it should be about twice that, because it had to be a long, hot day for her.

I would have had an even ton, if I hadn't been eating guacamole every day for the last six months ( and an avocado a day each for four dogs ).

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 7, 2011 - 10:44am PT
Disclaimer: KNOTT mine! My sis-in-law's in Frisco, CO.
Poor thing is in a state over the fact it could be under snow in a few weeks.
Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly


Don't ask, I don't know. But they're cool.
Credit: Reilly

1/2" across
1/2" across
Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly



Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jan 21, 2012 - 05:21pm PT
Looks like a good year for the Haas crop.





Even the tiny, stunted trees are kicking butt!





Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jan 21, 2012 - 06:45pm PT
Avocados store well, Lolli. Real well. Better than any fruit I know.

A lot of the time they keep too well.

They don't get ripe until after they're picked. They're hard as rocks the whole time they're on the tree, and for at least a week after they get picked. The season lasts for several months, so you can pick what you need, and leave the rest on the tree for as long as you want.

Once they're picked, they take at least a week to soften-up to the point they can be used. Put them in the refrigerator and they'll never get ripe. In other words, they'll keep as long as they're cold ( or on the tree ) - assuming they haven't already ripened. I've heard they'll last several months refrigerated, but I don't know for sure because I just store mine on the trees.

When I drive up the coast to see my folks in Washington I bring them a wine-case box full of Lamb Haas avocados. I don't put them in an ice chest or anything, they just ride in the back of the truck with everything else. It always takes me well over a week to get there, and the avocados still need a while to ripen before we can get to making guacamole.

I was just searching around to find the *approved* method of shipping avocados through the mail ( I don't want to do it for money, I just want to send some to my widely-scattered friends and family ), and I think I'll just wrap a bunch in newspaper, and put them in a Priority Mail container. Priority Mail is always there in three days, and the avocados will still need a week to ripen.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
May 1, 2012 - 10:46am PT
I'm expanding my garden this year. A new patch for my peppers with more sun.

I just picked up a book at my local bookstore, 'The Vegetable Gardener's Bible', by Edward Smith.

Good stuff, anyone looking for new knowledge regarding their garden should check it out.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
May 28, 2012 - 09:33am PT
So...how are all y'all gardens doing?
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
May 28, 2012 - 09:38am PT
Hopin' to get this puppy planted by June 9th. . .

photo not found
Missing photo ID#249868
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Sep 25, 2012 - 01:10pm PT
Fall planting in California. Having great success so far with the back to eden style of gardening.

Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Sep 25, 2012 - 03:27pm PT
Yummmmmm

Me WANT, Chaz!!!!





I would GLADLY pay for shipping!



I wish Avacado trees grew here in Vegas.
I'd have a couple.

:(
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Sep 25, 2012 - 04:57pm PT
Weird garden year here in NH.

I experimented a little last fall and turned in a bunch of compost, covered by cardboard. This spring I turned in organic soil and organic fertilizer.

My plants took off!!! The squashes quickly outgrew the critter fence and things were looking awesome!

Then, late July hit. Something started getting into my lettuce, then my squash leaves. I built a trap, the only way in was thought the trap if it was a rodent of some sort. This mostly worked, but the damage was done.

The lettuce tried to come back, but just went to seed instead of producing. Half the squash plants survived, and white blight (or mold, whatever it's called), took most of the rest.

The cukes were the most hardy, they looked stunted for a while, then started producing like crazy.

Tomato worms suck. I hate them.

The big experiment of the year was the peppers though. I planted half in the garden and potted the other half in pricy farm store bagged organic soil. The garden peppers did nothing all summer, hardly even grew. The potted peppers, which I kept outdoors in full sun did incredible. My yield was off the charts, both in quantity and hotness. Jalapeños and Cayenne, they're both still giving me more than I can use. I've gotta pawn them off on friends.

I think next year I'm going to shift more to potted veggies even though I live in a fertile neck of the woods. It's just so much easier to cater to each plants individual requirements.

Viva la finca!!
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Sep 25, 2012 - 07:01pm PT
Brandon, check out backtoedenfilm.com , ignore the religious stuff. Some really good info on no till, deep mulch gardening.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Sep 25, 2012 - 09:06pm PT
We moved to a new house to late last year to do much in the way of planting, but we got a few things in this spring, including these hops, which I just harvested last week.

Not bad for first-year growth
Not bad for first-year growth
Credit: Ghost

We also got a good tomato crop, which is unusual for Seattle, and the few herbs and peppers we managed to get into the ground are doing really well. I think it helps to have a yard that actually gets some sunlight.
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Oct 22, 2012 - 12:06pm PT
Here is how our small garden is growing.

Messages 121 - 140 of total 214 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Trip Report and Articles
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews