SuperT, SuperT, How Does Your Garden Grow?

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 1 - 214 of total 214 in this topic
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Original Post - Jun 13, 2010 - 07:19pm PT
A little bounty from today.


Here's hoping that you're all eating a little fresh food with lots of trace minerals still in it!!



Credit: survival

Credit: survival


Credit: survival
eKat

Trad climber
BITD2
Jun 13, 2010 - 07:21pm PT
GoFarmerBruceGO!

These were from a couple years ago:

photo not found
Missing photo ID#160265

:-)

YUM!

ox

eKat

P.S. How in the SamHill do you have blackberries already?

HOW RUDE!

:-)
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jun 13, 2010 - 07:42pm PT
Those piccies make me want to step away from the pizza.

edit; patiently waiting for the mountain blueberries around here that have an amazing ability to grow on both North and South flanks of our beloved tree swathed hills.

Small and sweet, you can't believe what passes for blubes from the flats. A hiking mentality and happy bucket is all that's required.

When bushwhacking means BLUEBERRY bushes, you're in the right place ! As for Blackberries, there is a BB bush at the end of every lane and uncivilized patch in the urban region.
SteveW

Trad climber
The state of confusion
Jun 13, 2010 - 07:48pm PT

All we got up here is cold rain. . .bwaaaaah!
(but it's free agua)!!!!
tinker b

climber
the commonwealth
Jun 13, 2010 - 08:21pm PT
mint and chives is all we have so far. it would be nice if it stopped raining and warmed up a bit.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 13, 2010 - 09:13pm PT
Wow eKat, we have to start calling you Tomato Woman, your Indian name.

Not Blackberries, but really good Mulberries!

Will post up more bounty as the season goes!


Steve and Tinker, My sisters and other relatives have been complaining about the rain up in the Northwest for weeks.

NM is good for a few things, heh heh......
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Jun 13, 2010 - 09:17pm PT
I like to combine wild blueberries (flavourful) with store-bought ones (sweet). A good mix. But then, I eat a lot of fruit.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 13, 2010 - 09:23pm PT
A mixed year.

The cool wet start did in my tomatoes with fungal diseases and I had to tear them out and start over. The corn took of really slow also.

Damn global warming!

Good for the berries though. I've got 10 gallons of Boisen berries and a gallon of raspberries in the freezer so far.
David Knopp

Trad climber
CA
Jun 13, 2010 - 10:02pm PT
Survival are those mulberries in picture 2?
H

Mountain climber
there and back again
Jun 13, 2010 - 10:10pm PT
Sure looks like mullberries to me. They are my favorite
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Jun 13, 2010 - 10:21pm PT
Blackberries, Mulberries, this is an ST controversy we can all chew on....
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 14, 2010 - 11:40am PT
Wake Of The Flood

In the orchard. Thank you for ditch/acequia flood irrigation!!


Credit: survival


Credit: survival


The garden where it all goes down.
Includes Malbec and Old Mission grapes.

Credit: survival


Credit: survival


Credit: survival
eKat

Trad climber
BITD2
Jun 14, 2010 - 06:17pm PT
YEAH. . . now we're talkin'!

Look at FarmerBruce's FRIKKEN FARM!

Man.

It's just barely not winter here. . . I can't believe you're so far along!

The wildflowers, high atop the drumlin in the deep northwoods, are goin' off, though. (so are the weeds)

:-)

Here's to BUMPER CROPS!

ox

eKat
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 14, 2010 - 06:39pm PT
Yeah girl, and we have already ripped out a couple rows to start the next crop as you can see!

You can also see why I needed that big ladder eh?? Those Apricot trees are 30-40 ft tall!

I could grow some serious medical herb scrips here!!!
Captain...or Skully

Social climber
Seriously, Man, I didn't know she was Your sister.
Jun 14, 2010 - 06:42pm PT
Righteous fruit ranchin', there, Bruce!
Got it goin' on.
Fritz

Trad climber
Hagerman, ID
Jun 14, 2010 - 07:39pm PT
EKAT: Sounds like it is morel-hunting time for you!

For the non-initiated: morel = super-yummy mushroom. They are difficult (but not impossible) to mistake for poisonous mushrooms. Morels like pine-forest areas with disturbed, from logging or fires, soils.
Credit: Fritz
.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Jun 14, 2010 - 08:22pm PT
Hey there, here at 49ºN we are not yet in raspberries but the main crop strawberries are now IN from the Fraser Valley.

A litre ( about a quart ) is going for 8$. That's up from last summer.

We've had a wet, cold spring and stuff is about a week behind. Tonight's t-storm was prolly not a good thing for the strawberry pickers tomorrow.

Our home plots are spanky but the lemonbalm and sweet cicely are blasting away harder then our peas & lettuce.

Our roses are on their first bloom and their fragrance enlivens the neighbourhood at dusk.

This is my fave time of the year - just around the summer solstice.
tinker b

climber
the commonwealth
Jun 14, 2010 - 09:44pm PT
i'm in the north east, not the west. it is supposed to be 80 tomorrow though, and not raining. hopefully that will help the rasberries and blueberries, and everything else in the garden...
rincon

Trad climber
SoCal
Jun 14, 2010 - 10:07pm PT
Here's some potatos from our garden...yum!
Potatos
Potatos
Credit: rincon
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jun 14, 2010 - 10:12pm PT
hey there survival and all... oh my, in my dreams, only... :(

but i am patient... perhaps years from now, i will once again get my wonderful turn...

i actually DID get to get a small pot of tomatoes last year, with a donated plant... AND some donated brocolli from a gal across the street, so i had a fun time with that...

what i DO HAVE however, i will soon post:

i haveeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee taaadaaaa... :)
the ever wonderful milkweed plant!!!

well---if you don't eat too much of it, you actually CAN make soup from the pods, which i did once, from an old aneeshnaabee lady's "kind of" recipe...

but---- what i mean to be so very happy about is this:
the flowers of the milkweed smell so very sweet and lovely... especailly come near evening... the are a fist sized ball, of many spiked buds...

can you IMAGINE the wonderful joy the deer must have this time of year, romping the fields and smelling this over the pine trees...
heavenly.... (i used to SEE where they bedded down, under these milkweed areas, when i used to live across town, near to the woods... )...

well, i have this, around my pond, as i transplanted them, but--all around here, the natural land, eases in, anyways... but i miss the other side of town, however...

well, i will post some pics of my pond area, a little tiny tub sized patch of dirt... if i get a job by next year, i could plant veggies, but there really is not much sun at all.. would have to have moveable push carts, etc....

but i will try to go gather black and blue berries, soon...
*this was my punch line, you all... ;)





well, i will be back later, tonight or morning, with the neat pics...

wow, have fun cooking and eating all this stuff...




oh, say, tinker b... i DO have mint (love mint) :)... but these last two years, it keeps turning DARK spotted on the ends... :( do you know why???


well, all for now... :)
Captain...or Skully

Social climber
Seriously, Man, I didn't know she was Your sister.
Jun 14, 2010 - 10:14pm PT
Hey, NeeBee, if you like mint, we've got MILES of it.
They grow the heck out of it here.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jun 14, 2010 - 11:00pm PT
hey there say, captain... or skully... :)

say, yes, i love it... use it for tea, too...

say, do YOU have any idea why my patch is getting dark speckles on the leaves... ?

it is a new patch, transplanted from the grandkids house... growing faster this year... but this year, far worse, than last year, it is getting kind of ruined, before i can use it...

have you ever seen this... i will try to post a picture later, when i post the other pics...

got to work on my "project" first though, or i will get behind on a goal...

wow, thanks for the share...always nice to hear from you...

wow, better to have miles of mint, i reckon, than miles of
poison ivey, huh... :) :)
Captain...or Skully

Social climber
Seriously, Man, I didn't know she was Your sister.
Jun 14, 2010 - 11:06pm PT
Well, actually, there's miles of THAT, too. (dammit!)
I dunno about spots, though. It's wetter there, though, maybe?
Moldiness can kill plants in a lotta ways. Just guessin'.........
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 15, 2010 - 01:18am PT
neebs,
There is always a greenhouse or nursery nearby that will tell you what is wrong with your plant, if you take them a sample.
They will always tell you about a fix also.
Thanks for posting.
B
eKat

Trad climber
BITD2
Jun 15, 2010 - 12:34pm PT

EKAT: Sounds like it is morel-hunting time for you!

Yeah. . . it probably is.

I've never done it.

Had a botany professor who said the only 'shrooms he'd ever eat came from Safeway! Kinda scared me from getting into it!

:-)

But. . . lots of people do it up here. . . it's almost as big a business as picking/selling huckleberries.

eKat
Fritz

Trad climber
Hagerman, ID
Jun 15, 2010 - 01:01pm PT
Ekat: I grew up hunting morels and gradually expanded to a few other "hard to mis-identify-----and die" mushrooms. Even took a course once.

It is best to go out with a local----after studying a book on the subject.

I agree, it is a scary subject, for those that don't know.

Amanita Muscaria.  Considered poisonous.  Some have taken it for the "...
Amanita Muscaria. Considered poisonous. Some have taken it for the "high." A friend of mine did and had a horrible night of strange compusive actions, linked to hallucinations. He was lucky, since it can also cause organ failure.
Credit: Fritz
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 22, 2010 - 09:24am PT
As the summer advances, so do the fruits of our labors. Hopefully!

All photos taken this morning.


Amber's apple tree. Not ripe yet.
Credit: survival



Peaches, READY FOR SLURPING!
Credit: survival

Credit: survival



The big apple tree. Bigger and sweeter, not ready yet.
Credit: survival


Wine Grapes. Coming along nicely, but not ready.
Credit: survival


More in a bit folks!


survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 22, 2010 - 12:40pm PT
And now onto another food type!


Big Jim Green Chile Peppers, the sweetest, the best.
Credit: survival

Credit: survival




Squash, cukes, coming along.
We have to plant them a bit later to get around the heinous squash bugs!
Credit: survival



Eggplant.
Credit: survival


More Peppers.
Credit: survival

eKat

Trad climber
http://www.ecokath.com/
Jul 22, 2010 - 12:40pm PT
GoFarmerBruceGO!

:-)

eKat
BooDawg

Social climber
Paradise Island
Jul 22, 2010 - 12:53pm PT
Anyone like bananas, mangoes, avos, and breadfruit??

Morning harvest...
Morning harvest...
Credit: BooDawg
Lynne Leichtfuss

Trad climber
Will know soon
Jul 22, 2010 - 01:06pm PT
Survival, I too have a Bumper crop of delicious Mulberries. Also have apricots, peaches, nectarines, plums and a ton of Anna apples. They grow abundantly here in my climate. Veggies include zucchini, yellow squash, saucer squash and tomatoes. Limited on what I can grow cause I'm not around much and they have to take care of themselves......and of course avocados. I also have a macadamia nut tree that produces many nuts every year. Oh yeah, couple of orange trees, lime trees, kumquat tree...a big sage bush and a few boysenberries. If I could afford H20 I'd be in fat city.

Nice to hear from Yo All and your growing adventures. :D lynnie
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 22, 2010 - 01:23pm PT
Nice Lynne! Uh.....pictures please?


BooDawg, Awesome! Do you have pix of your trees?
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 22, 2010 - 03:25pm PT
Maters...
Credit: survival

More...Maters..
Credit: survival


Malbec coming along too!
Credit: survival
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
Transporter Room 2
Jul 22, 2010 - 03:29pm PT
Ah, the fruits of the vine!
Good stuff, Bruce.
My garden has grown like sh#t this year.
Maybe my green thumb has turned brown.
BrianH

Trad climber
santa fe
Jul 22, 2010 - 03:33pm PT
It's been a tough year for gardening. Last night I harvested the 'taters and a kuke, yummy! I have high hopes for my tomato(e)s and the raspberries are OFF THE HOOK. We ate salad for about ten weeks but now it's all bolted. The rains look to be starting up again, so maybe it's time to plant some more.

Fingers still crossed for the artichoke...
sunflower

climber
Jul 25, 2010 - 07:34am PT
Nice garden.
Wade Icey

Trad climber
www.alohashirtrescue.com
Jul 25, 2010 - 09:33am PT
Credit: Wade Icey
locker

Social climber
COLORADO
Jul 25, 2010 - 09:40am PT


I have never seen nor tasted a mulberry...

Heard of them from that song though...


"Here we go round, the MULBERRY bush" (or however it goes)...


Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Jul 25, 2010 - 10:32am PT
Welcome to our gardens @ 3,000ft. Sierra western slope.....
Grape arbor
Grape arbor
Credit: Charlie D.
No vegetables yet but the giant lotus' are going nuts....
Lotus leaf
Lotus leaf
Credit: Charlie D.
Giant lotus
Giant lotus
Credit: Charlie D.
Lotus flower
Lotus flower
Credit: Charlie D.
The water lilies are looking fine....
Hardy lilies
Hardy lilies
Credit: Charlie D.
Our very own Half Dome....
Half Dome
Half Dome
Credit: Charlie D.
Veggies on their way, tomatoes aren't here until late Aug or Sept....
Veggies galore
Veggies galore
Credit: Charlie D.
So while we wait we don't watch them grow, we climb....
A swim up South Crack
A swim up South Crack
Credit: Charlie D.
With a watchful eye on my master gardener....
The gardeners slave, Charlie D.
The gardeners slave, Charlie D.
Credit: Charlie D.
The master gardener emerges from a granite crack....
My lovely Nancy
My lovely Nancy
Credit: Charlie D.
So we can go back to the garden & feed the fish....
Hungry koi
Hungry koi
Credit: Charlie D.
Life is great on the western slope.......Berg Heil.

nature

climber
Tucson, AZ
Jul 25, 2010 - 10:35am PT
whoa.... badass on the Lotus flower. Wow!

I didn't do much in the garden this year. It's a good thing as I'm moving out in a week. I did plant peppers and Basil. I'm about to harvest 27 million pounds of basil. Gallons of pesto anyone? Pesto Sushi?
BW

climber
Bishop, CA
Jul 25, 2010 - 12:27pm PT
Here's our humble garden in Bishop where the bright Sierra sun makes the plants extremely happy and productive. Funny how fast they grow, especially when you're not watching them and going climbing instead. Thank the heavens for automatic drip systems. See complete story at:
http://adventuresportsjournal.com/content/current-issue
The salad bowl of Bishop
The salad bowl of Bishop
Credit: BW
The missus with hoe
The missus with hoe
Credit: BW
Bishopican Gothic  (out takes from a magazine article on gardening...
Bishopican Gothic (out takes from a magazine article on gardening and climbing)
Credit: BW
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 25, 2010 - 02:22pm PT
HA! I freekin' love that last pic!
Captain...or Skully

Big Wall climber
Transporter Room 2
Jul 25, 2010 - 03:49pm PT
Super classic, huh?
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jul 25, 2010 - 08:58pm PT
hey there say... oh my... i will have to keep this post fresh here tonight and jump in, just a bit later tonight, with my crop:

or, all that i can grow this year... (other than the mint and catnip)...

yes SIR-REE... folks... i will soon post my small crop of milkweeds, :)


just got to resize some pics... back a bit later tonight...
:))
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Jul 26, 2010 - 06:29am PT
Great garden BW, Bishopcan Gothic classic!!!!
telemon01

Trad climber
Montana
Jul 28, 2010 - 06:54am PT

Survival,

Our garden here in NW Montana is no match for what you have going on where you are. Peaches? Wow.

Or how about that garden in Bishop? Another reason to drool over the east side of the Sierra's.

We had a late start, we waited until the June monsoon was over, and we planted starts from one of our local organic farmers.





We are sticking to the basics this year; lettuce, garlic, onions, broccoli, kohlrabi, winter and summer squashes, tomatoes, basil, peas, beans,and swiss chard.



So far we have harvested salads, and one round of basil and garlic for my wife's awesome pesto. True bounty won't be for another month.

We also keep a small flock of birds for eggs-



survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 28, 2010 - 07:20am PT
Telemon,
That's a beautiful garden! It looks uh....tidier...than ours.

I'm really stoked about my Big Jim chile. You can buy them by the gunny sack around here in central NM, but I've never grown them before.

We have some chickens too, still youngsters, not laying just yet.
I'll take some pics of them later too I suppose.

One of our friendly pest control methods.
Credit: survival



Credit: survival



Roses still jamming too!
Credit: survival


Credit: survival
LEB

climber
PA
Jul 29, 2010 - 06:40pm PT
Well, I have an update on the rabbit saga. For those following this little melodrama, it seems that rabbits broke into my holding pen (where potted fruit trees waiting to be planted resided) several years back and caused an inordinate amount of damage. They literally virtually destroyed all the trees in there. Over recent seasons the farm rather resemble the Australian outback - there were rabbits EVERYWHERE.

Various people made all manner of suggestions esp my good buddy, Rox. I kept hoping for predators but no such luck. WELL............a family of gray foxes moved in this summer. Seems they just love (ahem) rabbits! They damn near cleaned out the whole population of them and I was thrilled. Nary a rabbit in sight! Problem is, (sigh) it seems they ate them all up and then it would appear the foxes have moved on. (damn!). Now, it seems the rabbits are beginning to rebound. Double Damn!

So, I guess the trick is to figure how how to keep the gray foxes happy enough so as they stick around. I wonder if they would like some dog houses out in the back fields and wooded areas. Hey, these guys can just name their price. Whatever they want, they got it. Nothing is too good for my buddies, the gray foxes. Seems the coyotes which have been plentiful enough have not done jack sh#t all these years when it comes to rabbits. But.......one family of gray foxes took care of the whole problem in less than a month's time. Babies were cute as a button, too. Now how to get them to come back.
Rokjox

Trad climber
Boys I'dunno
Aug 1, 2010 - 06:47pm PT
That is plenty funny. Migrant Foxes. I suppose they are small enough to follow a rabbit into a warren.









If it was all that much food for them, they will add you to their migration pattern, I bet.





NOW is the time to make the area less rabbit friendly. Find somebody who can blow up their warrens with the propane injection gadgets.



I saw a wild baby rabbit hopping around a couple days ago. About 3 inches long, and cute as hell.




Nothing seems to be growing in my vegetable garden this year. A late season, too much water. So far, I have not even got a tomato. My partners garden is got onions that have ended their growth and gone to seed ... we were chasing deer out of it just a few days ago. They seem to like the carrots and beets ... but don't touch the onions ...
LEB

climber
PA
Aug 1, 2010 - 07:11pm PT
Actually, Rox, these guys are big suckers. These are the gray foxes and they are about the size of a small coyote. They are much bigger than the red foxes. Apparently, they like rabbits which is just fine with me. Seems to me that the coyotes like hunting mice and voles more than they do rabbits. I think it is easier for them and, my experience with dogs dictates, that they always take the easy way out. They grey foxes are also willing to come right up close to the house versus the very shy coyotes who stay in the back fields. I saw a grey fox walk right across my yard not 20 feet from the house. I also see quite a bit of grey fox poop around when they were in town.

They seem bolder and more willing to come down from the woods and get their prey. Course I suppose that is not good for the cats but I only have one cat who goes outside and he sleeps all night inside. I only see him wander up the fields if we are there otherwise he pretty much stays very close to the house. He is not a roamer or wanderer. He is our very nasty bipolar, anger-management cat which I spoke about on the pet ban thread. I have one very sweet 1 year old kitty but she is strictly indoors and one 19.5 year old cat who pretty much spends her entire life asleep on the bed. She gets up only to eat and pee/poop - otherwise she is asleep. I guess pushing 20, she does not have much energy but she eats like a horse. Also, she DOES beat up the 1 year old kitty which totally amazes me. She goes after her with a vengence and attacks her.
Rokjox

Trad climber
Boys I'dunno
Aug 1, 2010 - 07:21pm PT
I still have nine cats (down from 15) and know cats well. They take liking and dislikes very seriously. They have a lot of jealousy, too. And a larger social structure than is commonly known. Even young cats sleep up to 18 hours a day ...





Our foxes here are quite a bit smaller, at least the ones I have seen. Nobody would expect one the size of a coyote, unless coyotes are smaller in Penn.


Rabbits were designed to be food. A sad thing for rabbits, but I think that is my final answer. Anybody who has ever taken one apart knows how easily they disassemble.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 2, 2010 - 08:59am PT
Veggies and more PEACHES!!!

Credit: survival


Credit: survival


Credit: survival
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 4, 2010 - 06:40am PT
hey there say, all....

finally got a chance to get back...

here is my main plant here, or was... it got attacked by aphids, or something... and got all yucky, :(

so i only have a few left... they were so lovely though, but huge...

wanted to see the milkweed pods open... and i still may, if these last, are okay...

here is the sequence:


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


god bless... happy garden day!
:)


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee


Credit: neebee



hope you enjoyed the monthly progress...

here now, is my other bit of garden where all this grows:


Credit: neebee
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Aug 4, 2010 - 08:50am PT
Here is part of our garden. We have oranges, peaches, avos, nectarines, lemons, blueberries, raspberries, potatoes, peppers, zuchs, tomatoes, carrots, radishes, cucumbers, grapefruits, bananas, apples, snap peas, sunflowers,grapes, pumpkins... Not all are fruiting yet (banana, grapes).
We also have a spice garden with much basil and quite a flower selection.
We decided to go big this year.

Margy is also obsessed with the butterflies, especially the Monarchs so we have much milkweed. We are now on the Monarch migration map.
The Hummingbirds love the yard.



Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Aug 4, 2010 - 10:59am PT
Flowering Stones
Credit: Dr. F.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 4, 2010 - 04:30pm PT
hey there say, dee ee....

does or did, your milkweed... every get full of yellow bugs (aphids? perhaps)...

and or did it ever start turning brown and ugly-ish on the plant... (not just the pods?)...

i never rmember seeing them, thusway, in the woods... or last year, even.. this year, they looked bad... :(

had a great crop of flowers and butterflies, though!
this trouble is recent, ...

andsay, do you get those small long black and red beatle type bugs on them? i just noticed, that, too... these bugs are using the plants for "mating' ... oh my... i am either doing nature a good service, or a bad one---depending on these bugs... (i will look them up later tongiht) ...
right now, i am on a "tech mouse" hunt...

:)

thanks for any info...
god bless! nice to hear of the butterflies!
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Aug 4, 2010 - 05:12pm PT
Hi Neebee,
I just took a look at the Milkweed and there are no pests of any type on them right now. Just the usual suspects (spiders and bees). We have had other pests on other plants and just sort of deal with it, no pesticides allowed. There are too many kids, dogs, cats, birds, etc. around.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 5, 2010 - 03:49pm PT
hey there say, dee ee.... yeah, i just sprayed soapy water on them... but far too late... next year, i will look sooner... was very busy editing my books, this year, as a lump project, and not dragged out, as the usual way...

say, i DO have some pics of two of the critters using these plants (aside from the bees, and butterfly)...

here you go:

the bugs, and their "honeymoon" spot
(child friendly--as bugs are bugs):

*edit: must have been at least six 'couples' of bugs, there
that day... most likely more, later...


Credit: neebee


*as you can see, the milkweed leaves, were already turning yellowish, and thus they up and fall off... it could be natural-process, or, it was due to the other tiny yellow bugs, ruining the plant...


yes, this is how i found it, upside down... ---great climbing skills, ...
yes, this is how i found it, upside down... ---great climbing skills, huh... :))
Credit: neebee


haha, oh my.... never took a picture of the "small hords of yellow aphids? or whatever they were)....
hmmm, i may go look that up...


thanks, dee ee.... for the share...
god bless...
:)


survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 5, 2010 - 03:53pm PT
eeewwwwww!
Don't worry NeeBee, we all got some bugs!
Just keep up the good fight.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 5, 2010 - 03:58pm PT
hey there say, thanks survival....

say, funny, huh... you can bring in some bugs, to get rid of other bugs...

you can bring in plants, to get rid of some other bugs...

but who'd of thought that i'd bring in a plant, to BRING IN bugs...

:))



ahhhhh, nature, and the ways thereof... a mystery at times...
but always a lesson in progress, and most of the time, a joy....

*not when they eat our tomatoes, though... :(
(not that i have more than three, small ones)... :))
dee ee

Mountain climber
citizen of planet Earth
Aug 6, 2010 - 06:51pm PT
Yo Neebe, as I'm sure you know...that cat is a monarch in metamorphasis.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 7, 2010 - 10:00am PT
It's been a tough year in Seattle, but we're starting to see some progress. We ate the first tomato from the garden last week.
First fruits
First fruits
Credit: Ghost

survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 9, 2010 - 10:02am PT
BIG JIM!!!

Credit: survival


And roasting away.
The aroma is to die for!
Credit: survival
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 9, 2010 - 10:09am PT
Bruce, growing peppers in New Mexico doesn't count. That's like growing moss in Seattle. Show us something serious. Peppers in Seattle is 5.12 gardening.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 9, 2010 - 11:24am PT
HA HA hhaaaa!!
Now that's funny.
Does that mean I have to grow moss here to qualify for 5.12???
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 9, 2010 - 12:02pm PT
Does that mean I have to grow moss here to qualify for 5.12???

That would be a start. Or fiddlehead ferns, maybe. Or orchids. But peppers in NM is, well, easy. 5.2 gardening. Kind of like growing rosemary in Seattle.

Peppers a challenge up here. Some years I get a reasonable crop, other years (like this one) are not so great. But it's fun to try. And I somehow always manage to harvest enough to get me through the winter.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 9, 2010 - 12:09pm PT
And I somehow always manage to harvest enough to get me through the winter.


I guess that makes you a 5.12 gardener, and me 5.2......sh*t......

Actually, what I like the best are the plants that have the least pests on them!
eKat

Trad climber
http://www.ecokath.com/
Aug 9, 2010 - 12:09pm PT
. . . or maybe RIPE tomatoes in Mammoth.

:-)

I gardened like a fool, deep in the cool, pumice rich shade up there and my biggest bumper crop was 56 HARD GREEN toms. . . made good Green Tomato Chutney year after year.

HA!

eKat
Fritz

Trad climber
Hagerman, ID
Aug 14, 2010 - 07:36am PT
It is "just peachy" now on the ranchette. Two weeks later than normal, due to the cold April, May, June.

I never plucked a ripe peach from a tree until we moved here.

Tree-ripened peaches are a juicy delight.

Unfortunately, I haven't enjoyed a grocery-store peach, since then. I discovered they now taste like cardboard.

Heidi and fresh peaches
Heidi and fresh peaches
Credit: Fritz
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 24, 2010 - 09:33am PT
Nice Fritz! Yeah, I'm kinda picky (get it?) about my peaches these days too.

'Maters!! With MANY more to come!

Credit: survival


Credit: survival


Apples!! Yes, they're a little funny looking, but that's what happens when you try to be Joe Organic instead of Joe Chemical.

Credit: survival


Credit: survival




Laid up for hard times. That's a helluva lot more work than it looks like, for those of you that haven't done it!

Credit: survival

Credit: survival



And one special addition just for Ghost.

Credit: survival

Yeah man, like growing moss in Seattle!



survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 26, 2010 - 10:16am PT
Grapes!!

Credit: survival



Credit: survival




And another treat for Mossgrower Ghost!!


Credit: survival


Credit: survival



Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Aug 31, 2010 - 02:48pm PT
Bad enough you should wound me. But to then rub salt in the wounds? (or rub hot peppers in the wounds)

My pepper crop is pretty pathetic this year. On the other hand we'll soon have enough tomatoes to feed an army.
kbstuffnpuff

Sport climber
State of Confusion
Aug 31, 2010 - 04:53pm PT
Here's a quick look at a garden, harvested 2 weeks ago. Big round of applause for California laws!:
AK-47 from soil
AK-47 from soil
Credit: kbstuffnpuff
Hawaiian.
Hawaiian.
Credit: kbstuffnpuff
A vat of AK.
A vat of AK.
Credit: kbstuffnpuff
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Aug 31, 2010 - 05:17pm PT
oh.............dear.................me.............









survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Aug 31, 2010 - 07:16pm PT
Oh my goodneh.......

KB just took things to a whole 'nother level didn't he?

There ain't none of that in my garden.

Although there's some ditch weed growing in these parts.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 1, 2010 - 01:37pm PT
Hey Ghost, salt in the wounds? Nah bro, just wishing I could share.



More Peaches!!!

Credit: survival

Credit: survival



Mutant Peach!!

Credit: survival



More 'Maters!


Credit: survival



eKat

Trad climber
http://www.ecokath.com/
Sep 1, 2010 - 01:39pm PT
SunFarmerBruce. . . you've got some of the coolest bowls. . . I LOVE that wooden one!

:-)

YAY.

eKat
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 1, 2010 - 07:40pm PT
Thanks eKaterina!

My uncle makes those.
Lots of artists in this family.....
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Sep 1, 2010 - 08:45pm PT
Goooood Lawwwwwd those are FINE PEACHES !!!!!!




Signed a Big Fan of FREE peaches. ( clingstone makes me nuts )
murcy

climber
sanfrancisco
Sep 1, 2010 - 09:24pm PT
Credit: murcy

Southwest-facing window; tomatoes and cayennes are going nuts.
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Mar 26, 2011 - 06:10pm PT
Just harvested our first greens from our new mini-raised bed.

It's all chard all the time in our veggie garden! ( We really like fresh chard).... and a few green onions.


Credit: justthemaid


Credit: justthemaid



Credit: justthemaid
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Mar 26, 2011 - 06:25pm PT
Not a big fan of chard, but last night it was chicken salad with arugula, mustard greens, spinach, baby romaine, beets, carrots and asparagus all from the back yard.

Bad year for the broccoli and cauliflower though. To damn cold!

I've got the corn planted as well as the tomatoes and basil.

Planted some fruit and nut trees this year too.

eKat

climber
http://www.ecokath.com/
Mar 26, 2011 - 06:34pm PT
HohMahn. . . youz dadz are killin' me, here. Can't plant (without Walls O' Water) til June 9th.

When it's all said and done there'll be:

red chard
collards
beets (for greens and roots)
toms (heirloom pineapple and others)
onions (green and root)
tatoes (yukon gold and tiny reds)
assorted lettuces
zucchini
straight neck (yellow) squash
butternut squash
spaghetti squash

YAY.

I'm only dreamin' - since it's still skeezin season.

:-)

eKatHighAtopTheDrumlinInTheDeepNorthWoods
MisterE

Social climber
Cinderella Story, Outa Nowhere
Mar 26, 2011 - 06:36pm PT
Nice list, Kat!

The basil is dead or dying - it didn't survive the deluge-then-freezing-temperatures.

Edit:

Nice raised beds below!
eKat

climber
http://www.ecokath.com/
Mar 26, 2011 - 06:41pm PT
Yay. . . thanks, E!

photo not found
Missing photo ID#196231

Hmmmmmmmmmmm. . . might have to put in some basil, too. . . now that you mention it!

:-)

It's such a stoker that I can BEND OVER this year. Couldn't even pull weeds last year - didn't even plant a garden and had to hire out all the mowing!

It's a NEW YEAR. . . I'm a NEW eKat!

oxox

eKat
khanom

Trad climber
The Dessert
Mar 26, 2011 - 08:58pm PT
Also having trouble with basil. And we lost the first round of beans and cucumbers to frost, even in the green house.

But tonight I'm eating pizza with fresh spinach, basil, and oregano. Plus of course the salad with mesclun, radishes, and green onions.


I'll post pics tomorrow.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Mar 26, 2011 - 09:03pm PT
YoooWZZZZ!

No snow here in the S. ID high desert, but not much green poking up.

The Asparagus are teasing us, and then freezing back. Had some chives to serve on our state tuber last week.

The Crocus are blooming!

I'm envious for your greenery!
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Mar 27, 2011 - 06:26pm PT
hey there say, all... wow, i may get to have a real garden this year... :) long as i can get some plants, that is... i DO have yard space now!!!! wow, i am so happy to say that!!!!

will let you all know how it goes, and will post pics, too... first there is still a bit more junk from the other folks to get out of here, then, the fence too, will get put back up...

ground is a tad hard, still, but we are getting there...
:)

thanks for all the shares, folks...
:)
tinker b

climber
the commonwealth
Mar 27, 2011 - 07:07pm PT
it's still a little cold here, but i have been giving the grapevines some trimming love. i don't hink they have had any attention since my grandfather died forty five years ago. i've been clearing land that used to be garden for the past few days and it makes me want to settle in and start a garden, and i would if i was in cali or anywhere in the west. so i will give up my patch of dirt for rock climbing...
MisterE

Social climber
Cinderella Story, Outa Nowhere
Mar 27, 2011 - 07:30pm PT
SunFarmerBruce. . . you've got some of the coolest bowls. . . I LOVE that wooden one!

:-)

KB has some fine bowls too...some of them are wooden...
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Mar 27, 2011 - 07:45pm PT
My garden is currently on standby:

Credit: Willoughby

Poor little guy wants to shed the roof, but at the moment there's nowhere for it to go.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 6, 2011 - 07:44pm PT
Nice crop of weeds, this year.

Ricky D

Trad climber
Sierra Westside
Apr 6, 2011 - 07:45pm PT
Nice ass.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Apr 6, 2011 - 08:14pm PT
Not so well, not so well, I should have planted in the San Rafael Swell.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
May 10, 2011 - 09:34pm PT
hey there all, say.... wow, finally i got me a garden!

i mean a REAL one--as--the last few years i did try planting wild plants, and a tomatoe from my daughter, and a few bits of stuff (lots of milkweed, for instance) and a few flowers...

well, this house has a whole yard!!! :O

and i am taking it to hand:

now, i just to water, and weed and pray that it grows...


oh my... patty is kind of BORED by it all...
oh my... patty is kind of BORED by it all...
Credit: neebee


took all the weeds from the fence line, too, and put seeds on all the fence sections... some were old flower and veggie seeds from years back...

the ones in the garden, though are new seeds... sure hope there is enough sun this year for them all to grow....

got some already-grown tomatoe plants, and a few grown plants, too, for certain other areas...

and--lots of transplants as to wild-stuff from the other yard...


grow like weeds: the tiny grape hyacynths... here in the midst of sasa...
grow like weeds: the tiny grape hyacynths... here in the midst of sasafras trees... :)
Credit: neebee


well, i will share how it does, in a month or so...
:)
S.Leeper

Sport climber
Pflugerville, Texas
May 10, 2011 - 10:02pm PT
awesome thread!

when I move, my next house is going to have a garden.
FortMental

Social climber
Albuquerque, NM
May 17, 2011 - 05:38pm PT
Credit: FortMental
6 lbs so far... having trouble keeping up.

Credit: FortMental
We don't even like radishes...
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Topic Author's Reply - Jun 16, 2011 - 10:22pm PT
Good stuff as usual gang!!

Garden is doing ok, not great. I'll put up some shots later.

But thought I'd put up a shot of my latest humanitarian rescue case in the meantime. Just finished this the other day.


Credit: survival


neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jun 16, 2011 - 10:41pm PT
hey there say, survival and all...


oh my, my swiss chard is about 1 1/2 inches tall, hahahaha, surely NOT like justthemaids, :))

but, i DO have a really neat and fun garden... just got done transplanting stuff today... :)

will post pics tomorrow, as i got to get up at 7!!! and i am STILL here, :O


well, the trouble here, is no sun... (not due to the huge oaks, and elms, or sasafras, either)... it seems to be rainy fall weather, still, and no may, june sun, excecpt for perhaps 6 days? in these last 2 months? or so...


think that may have stunted it all, but i SURE DO LOVE IT!!!!


WELL, see you all tommorrow...
god bless, and happy supertopo eve to you all...
:)
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 17, 2011 - 03:59am PT
It's my first year planting and it's taking off!

I've got string beans, a couple types of lettuce, a couple types of toms, blue spuds, watermelon, cantaloupe, zukes, summer squash, cukes, a couple types of broccoli, bell peppers, cayennes, jalapenos, cilantro, basil, and sage.

Two weeks in the ground and I've only lost one cuke plant, the beans are going crazy, and the spud greens are breaking ground.
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
Jun 17, 2011 - 09:19am PT
We got something going for summer here in Joshua Tree......we shall see what happens....so far, so good...



Something seems to be happening here....

skipt

Mountain climber
Washington
Jun 17, 2011 - 09:46am PT
"Cow sh#t tea."

Does anyone out there have a secret sauce they use as a fertilzer?

Last year a neighbor gave us a bucket of dry, one year old Cow sh#t.

I'm telling you, get a 5 gal bucket, fill it about a 1/3 of the way with
dry cow sh#t and fill the rest with water. Let sit a day or two in the
sun. Then take, about 6 ounces and add it to a gallon of water and you
have your self a miracle grow of maniac proportions.

Do this every day (every other day) during the vegetation stage and then
slow down over time.

Keep filling with water in the bucket as it goes down over time. Add more
cow sh#t when the water gets clear.

This tea is simple. Cheap. And better than anything I have ever seen at
the local store.


Skip
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 18, 2011 - 10:15am PT
So I'm checking in on my patch this morning and found that something came in overnight, scurried right to the center of it all, and ate my broccoli leaves. Nothing else, just the broccoli leaves. The stalks are intact, so hopefully they'll bounce back.

I've been peeing on the perimeter of the garden since before I planted, all for nothing I guess.
I thought the woodchucks left when I moved in with my dogs a couple years ago but something's lurking out there...

The fence goes in today.
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jun 18, 2011 - 11:04am PT
hey there say, skipt... a gal in ohio told me something like that, and, i am getting ready to make some... will see how it goes...

also, say, brandon-
some folks say, too, to spray dish detergent on the leaves...,
perhaps that will help???


something just ate the leaves off my hopefully-one-day-giant-sunflowers, oh my!


well, i got a few pics here:


only thing is: since i planted it, the sun moved it ray-trail... now, ...
only thing is: since i planted it, the sun moved it ray-trail... now, the fence on the left give a shade longer, before it was only a half a foot, now it almost two feet, til it moves... :O
Credit: neebee


another view... the fish pond is hiding on the garden side of the ol' ...
another view... the fish pond is hiding on the garden side of the ol' shed... :) *rest of yard, has bits of odds and ends planted along fence, and under trees... (looks like the woods here, and lots of shade) :) i miss the sun, but DO get a nice patch on
Credit: neebee



sasafras grove, and tomatoes in the far corner... and compost pile... ...
sasafras grove, and tomatoes in the far corner... and compost pile... this is the only other sunny spot, later in day... :)
Credit: neebee



well, say, happy garden time to you all...
things are still tiny here... hope they grow before winter sneaks up, ;)

:)
eKat

Trad climber
montanahilltophome.com/
Jun 18, 2011 - 11:10am PT
Dang. . . it's flat out WINTER up here. . . I won't be planting anything at all! The rule of thumb is that you don't plant warm season stuff til after June 9th. . . and we're at least 2 months behind. . . do the math. . . ain't no time for nuttin'!

:-(

Pretty amazing, really. . . I mean, NOTHING important (gardenwise) can grow, but the weeds are rampant!

YIKES!

eKat
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 19, 2011 - 06:51am PT
Fence installed.
eKat

Trad climber
RuralFrikkenMontana
Jun 26, 2011 - 03:58pm PT
Is this the saddest thing you've ever seen? The end of frikken June and NOTHING planted for the season. Just spent days clearing all the rain soaked weeds outta here and transplanted a bunch of volunteer yarrow. . . but it's just too cold and dark to plant anything yet.

:-(

I'm thinkin' the season's prolly a bust!

photo not found
Missing photo ID#207368

photo not found
Missing photo ID#207369

photo not found
Missing photo ID#207370

photo not found
Missing photo ID#207372

photo not found
Missing photo ID#207373

photo not found
Missing photo ID#207374













Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 26, 2011 - 04:02pm PT
EKat,
Oh man, think back 100+ years...homesteaders must've been HURTIN!!!

My garden's twice the height of the picture I posted last weekend. Bell peppers are poppin'!
eKat

Trad climber
RuralFrikkenMontana
Jun 26, 2011 - 04:17pm PT
HohMahn. . . people woulda taken the chop in a year like this! I'm usually already getting at least beet greens outta the deal by now!

I think I'm still gonna try to plant salad stuff, beet greens and chard. . . oh, and onion sets.

We'll see.

This year, I'm afraid, the weather is writing its own record book!
eKat

Trad climber
RuralFrikkenMontana
Jun 26, 2011 - 04:20pm PT
Ya know what really cracks me up about this is that DFU (DogF*#kingUgly) fence. . . I mean, it's elk, deer, bear, wolf, moose, turkey, rabbit, coon and fox proof - but the only things growing in there right now are things none of the beasts will eat!

HA!

What a year!
Willoughby

Social climber
Truckee, CA
Jun 26, 2011 - 05:10pm PT
I threw in the towel back at the end of May, not that I was ever really in the fight this year. But I'm not bothering to plant anything this year either. It does appear to have finally stopped being winter, but starting a garden in late June just seems like it would just be a waste of effort, so I'll find other projects to spend my time on.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Jun 26, 2011 - 05:11pm PT
Oh man, think back 100+ years...homesteaders must've been HURTIN!!!

But the aboriginal people who lived here have done so for thousands of years and, yeah, sometimes they were hurtin' but, the thing that got them was smallpox.

Go figger.

eKat

Trad climber
RuralFrikkenMontana
Jun 26, 2011 - 05:24pm PT
I threw in the towel back at the end of May

I hear ya!

:-(

But. . . I LOVE being out there. . . I was feelin' kinda Delta Dawn today, WATERING.

:-)
skipt

Mountain climber
Washington
Jun 26, 2011 - 05:34pm PT
eKat,

That's one of the dangers when you live way out yonder' in huckle country.


Skip

eKat

Trad climber
RuralFrikkenMontana
Jun 26, 2011 - 05:35pm PT
huckle country

STEALIN' IT!

:-)

GoodOne!
eKat

Trad climber
RuralFrikkenMontana
Jun 26, 2011 - 06:21pm PT
Hmmmmmmmm. . . I guess, for all intents and purposes, this is a garden, eh? One that almost never needs any work - and that's a good thing, since it's many acres!

:-)


Montana wildflowers for Jessica. . . from my backyard. <br/>
 <br/>
oxoxoxo
Montana wildflowers for Jessica. . . from my backyard.

oxoxoxo
Credit: eKat

BrightLittleBankies
BrightLittleBankies
Credit: eKat

BirDayBouquet
BirDayBouquet
Credit: eKat



neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jun 26, 2011 - 08:43pm PT
hey there say, ekat... wow, this is the first time in 8-9 years that i have been able to HAVE a real garden, and oddly, no sun, :(


but the rain has helped it, for sure...
but, here in mich, my garden now, is as big as when folks get their plants from the store and START their gardens, in may (though they many times, have frost to deal with, and have to cover it, or keep the plants in the basement, etc) ... but now, not just ME, but ALL of us have a garden that is "a bit behind" in size...

but i am so happy for the joy of being out there...
i know you will too, if you just plant some greens, :)

and, somehow,
yet--i am being hopeful, being that i had the open door to do this...
:)

will let you know how it goes...

p.sp
folks are still trying, at least, out here, but we WERE OUT OF SNOW, before you all were, so we had that much hope, this time, :)
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Jun 26, 2011 - 08:51pm PT
I grow cacti and succulents
This is the Hot Box
Credit: Dr. F.
We have two other green houses and another 1000 plants on benchs outside under shade cloth

Here are some Lithops inside the greehouse
Credit: Dr. F.
More succulents
Credit: Dr. F.

What the heck is that thing?
Credit: Dr. F.
FortMental

Social climber
Albuquerque, NM
Jun 26, 2011 - 10:57pm PT
Hey F!

You grow anything we can smoke?
Dr. F.

climber
So Cal
Jun 27, 2011 - 08:49am PT
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
There is nothing you can eat or smoke grown in our Gardens
Sorry, its for science and pleasure only

Its an addiction, always adding to the collection, always wanting new plants.
We just brought home 100 new plants last week!
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Aug 11, 2011 - 06:04pm PT
The beans are exploding in the garden. As are the tomatoes, leaf lettuce, and cukes.

But, I picked a jalapeno today for dinner and didn't expect much. That plant had produced a couple already that didn't amount to much more than a bell pepper. I ate a little slice and, holy shit! Too hot! Totally caught me off guard.

I'd already made the wrap with the pepper in it before I sampled my bounty. Now I'm stuck with a really good wrap that I'm scared to eat. The pepper was that hot, and I was liberal with it in my wrap.

The melons are softball sized and practically pulsing 'cause they're growing so fast.

The purple potatoes are telling me that I planted my rows too close, as they are between the rows and spilling to both sides and getting caught up in the cucumber vines.

And that is my garden rant.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Aug 11, 2011 - 08:37pm PT
Some----of our peaches are ripe.

We netted the best tree against "peach-pecking" birds today.

I put the "anti-raccoon" cone on last week.

Now waiting for "tree-ripe" organic peaches.

Anyone, who eats one: will never enjoy a grocery store peach again.

Heidi---last year with our peaches.  The first ones today are so-----g...
Heidi---last year with our peaches. The first ones today are so-----good!
Credit: Fritz

neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:01pm PT
hey there say,all...

well, course i don't have the squash, since it failed, but i left a few spindly stalks to see if they'd climb the fence, kind of fun to see that, :)


BUT:

i DID get two small cucumbers! and some turnip greens, and lettuce...
and thanks to the good lord's grace, i DO have some tomatoes!!

and, wow, the black eyed peas, make great fillin for just about anywhere... they are bushing in all the areas that i put them in, and make the yard not look so empty... plus:
it appears that bits of fruition, as to pea-pods ARE growng now,
:)


i did get to seed a tiny bit of fill in grass, into the woodsy ground cover in back, too... so not so much dirt, ... little by little, i may get to fix up some seed where the dirt if still plenty, by the back door, too...


here is a picture of the yard, and some of the garden, got rasberry bushes, but no rasberries, but at least, this year, they DID flower!! :)


michigan wild plants, are in various areas, too...



mainly you can raspberries, and tomatoe plants shooting up.. and lettu...
mainly you can raspberries, and tomatoe plants shooting up.. and lettuce... :)
Credit: neebee


haha, "grew" these in the ol' yard, as well, :))


a 'breed' all their own, :O
a 'breed' all their own, :O
Credit: neebee



:)


neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:07pm PT
hey there, say, fritz....

not special organic, but in south texas, in the home that i had to leave, i HAD two of the most wonderful peach trees in the world...

always perfect flavored (yep, if the birds did not get them) :))

i had transplanted them from an in-law type cousin family's back yard...

and they grew to be lovely trees, as well...
though, to some, they were small, but to me, nothing was better!
they could sit in the palm of your hand (bigger than an apricot, though, of course)...

very orangy and with red on the skins... so nice colored inside, as well...
so very delicious....



sadly, i have never had a peach like them, anywhere, since... :(
sure hope and pray, perhaps some day, i can find or plant something similar, you never know.... they do have peaches up here and apples and cherries, and lots of berries, but to me:


the berries that grow up here, are the best...
the other fruit is good, but something is lacking...
(though the apples are good)...

:)




thanks for the share, i also miss south texas, as we had papayas, small perfect flavored ones, as well, in our yard, and i planted them from seeds, of all things--they acturally GREW for me... :)

when the woodpeckers did not beat me to them, i loved to eat them with lemon!


thanks again for the neat peach share, :)
god bless...
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:10pm PT
hey there say, Brandon-

your garden sounds great, even if it is a 'rant', :))

hope the melons do well...
i have some backeyed peas that are doing great, leaf wise,
we will see, as to the pea-pods... (depends on the shade and overcast issue here)... but they are lovely ground cover, :)


say, now, DR. F... now THAT is a garden i never seen before... :O
really NEAT STUFF you got there... thanks for the share...


:)
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Aug 11, 2011 - 09:19pm PT
This has been a fortuitous year for the Obamagarden.

We won't have much of a grocery bill for the rest of the year.

It started out with Artichokes, Asparagus, cabbages and beets till we were sick of them.
The cold this winter nuked the Broccoli and Cauliflower however,the beets got pickled in red wine and we have a years worth.

I accidentally made a discovery about cabbages. If you harvest the head, but leave the rest of the plant it will produce a second crop of mini cabbages or giant Brussels Sprouts, depending on your perspective. We've had Shallots the size of onions all summer from another experiment.


The first crop of sweet corn and green beans is vacuum bagged in the freezer and the second crop is now producing. Also in the freezer about five gallons of raspberries and ten gallons of boysenberries that will become jam this fall. So, Fresh corn and green beans at both ends of summer as well as the dried and frozen ones for later.

The tomatoes have done incredibly well. I've canned a couple dozen pints of salsa, a dozen of zucchini in tomato sauce as well as massive amounts of sauce and dried. We've also been eating a lot of BLT's. I'm gonna have to crank out an other batch of salsa Sunday as well.

the Butternut didn't get that big, but they are just about right size for two people. I've still got a couple of spaghetti squash going as well.

Next month I'll start in with prep for the Fall/winter garden.

Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Aug 11, 2011 - 10:17pm PT
Neebee: Always good to hear from you.

I hope you find a Michigan peach tree to enjoy.

I am jealous of your tale of Texas Papayas.

Long ago, on a summer Hawaii trip, I was able to shake large ripe Papayas out of a tree, and then move them onto my breakfast table within minutes.

No Papaya since then: has tasted as good to me.



Tree-ripe and fresh: is Best!
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Aug 12, 2011 - 08:55am PT
1,500 lbs of Lamb Haas Avocados! ( aprox, they filled a bin-and-a-half, at around 1,000# per bin )

Two years ago, it was 345 lbs. I don't know what was produced last year, because someone helped themselves to all of them in the middle of the night.

My neighbor's daughter picked them while I'm out of town. He thinks she deserves $75. I think it should be about twice that, because it had to be a long, hot day for her.

I would have had an even ton, if I hadn't been eating guacamole every day for the last six months ( and an avocado a day each for four dogs ).

Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Sep 7, 2011 - 10:44am PT
Disclaimer: KNOTT mine! My sis-in-law's in Frisco, CO.
Poor thing is in a state over the fact it could be under snow in a few weeks.
Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly


Don't ask, I don't know. But they're cool.
Credit: Reilly

1/2" across
1/2" across
Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly

Credit: Reilly



Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jan 21, 2012 - 05:21pm PT
Looks like a good year for the Haas crop.





Even the tiny, stunted trees are kicking butt!





Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jan 21, 2012 - 06:45pm PT
Avocados store well, Lolli. Real well. Better than any fruit I know.

A lot of the time they keep too well.

They don't get ripe until after they're picked. They're hard as rocks the whole time they're on the tree, and for at least a week after they get picked. The season lasts for several months, so you can pick what you need, and leave the rest on the tree for as long as you want.

Once they're picked, they take at least a week to soften-up to the point they can be used. Put them in the refrigerator and they'll never get ripe. In other words, they'll keep as long as they're cold ( or on the tree ) - assuming they haven't already ripened. I've heard they'll last several months refrigerated, but I don't know for sure because I just store mine on the trees.

When I drive up the coast to see my folks in Washington I bring them a wine-case box full of Lamb Haas avocados. I don't put them in an ice chest or anything, they just ride in the back of the truck with everything else. It always takes me well over a week to get there, and the avocados still need a while to ripen before we can get to making guacamole.

I was just searching around to find the *approved* method of shipping avocados through the mail ( I don't want to do it for money, I just want to send some to my widely-scattered friends and family ), and I think I'll just wrap a bunch in newspaper, and put them in a Priority Mail container. Priority Mail is always there in three days, and the avocados will still need a week to ripen.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
May 1, 2012 - 10:46am PT
I'm expanding my garden this year. A new patch for my peppers with more sun.

I just picked up a book at my local bookstore, 'The Vegetable Gardener's Bible', by Edward Smith.

Good stuff, anyone looking for new knowledge regarding their garden should check it out.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
May 28, 2012 - 09:33am PT
So...how are all y'all gardens doing?
eKat

Trad climber
BITD3
May 28, 2012 - 09:38am PT
Hopin' to get this puppy planted by June 9th. . .

photo not found
Missing photo ID#249868
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Sep 25, 2012 - 01:10pm PT
Fall planting in California. Having great success so far with the back to eden style of gardening.

Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
AKA Dwain, from Apple Valley, Ca. and Vegas!
Sep 25, 2012 - 03:27pm PT
Yummmmmm

Me WANT, Chaz!!!!





I would GLADLY pay for shipping!



I wish Avacado trees grew here in Vegas.
I'd have a couple.

:(
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Sep 25, 2012 - 04:57pm PT
Weird garden year here in NH.

I experimented a little last fall and turned in a bunch of compost, covered by cardboard. This spring I turned in organic soil and organic fertilizer.

My plants took off!!! The squashes quickly outgrew the critter fence and things were looking awesome!

Then, late July hit. Something started getting into my lettuce, then my squash leaves. I built a trap, the only way in was thought the trap if it was a rodent of some sort. This mostly worked, but the damage was done.

The lettuce tried to come back, but just went to seed instead of producing. Half the squash plants survived, and white blight (or mold, whatever it's called), took most of the rest.

The cukes were the most hardy, they looked stunted for a while, then started producing like crazy.

Tomato worms suck. I hate them.

The big experiment of the year was the peppers though. I planted half in the garden and potted the other half in pricy farm store bagged organic soil. The garden peppers did nothing all summer, hardly even grew. The potted peppers, which I kept outdoors in full sun did incredible. My yield was off the charts, both in quantity and hotness. Jalapeños and Cayenne, they're both still giving me more than I can use. I've gotta pawn them off on friends.

I think next year I'm going to shift more to potted veggies even though I live in a fertile neck of the woods. It's just so much easier to cater to each plants individual requirements.

Viva la finca!!
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Sep 25, 2012 - 07:01pm PT
Brandon, check out backtoedenfilm.com , ignore the religious stuff. Some really good info on no till, deep mulch gardening.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Sep 25, 2012 - 09:06pm PT
We moved to a new house to late last year to do much in the way of planting, but we got a few things in this spring, including these hops, which I just harvested last week.

Not bad for first-year growth
Not bad for first-year growth
Credit: Ghost

We also got a good tomato crop, which is unusual for Seattle, and the few herbs and peppers we managed to get into the ground are doing really well. I think it helps to have a yard that actually gets some sunlight.
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
Oct 22, 2012 - 12:06pm PT
Here is how our small garden is growing.

Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jan 13, 2013 - 10:19pm PT
We'll see this week if I can produce an avocado crop this year, or not. It's been pretty damn cold here for a few nights now, with a couple more cold nights to come.

Good thing I held off expansion until later this year! It'd be discouraging to watch a bunch of small trees freeze.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Jan 14, 2013 - 12:32am PT
Our "weed-like" but tasty Arugula, lasted into late December this year through temps into the teens F.

Once Choss Creek Temps went to near 0 F----The Arugula "froze-down."

Arugula on Dec 6th, loving it!

Credit: Fritz



Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 3, 2013 - 09:03pm PT
We're well into Spring. Anybody but Fritz got anything going this year?


I finally created enough sunshine to grow some vegetables in my own yard. ( I had to cut down seven good sized shade trees to do it ).

It's a Salsa/Pickle/Stir-Fry/Spaghetti patch. ( it was going to be a Guacamole patch, too, but that was before the Great Freeze Of '013 killed all of my Avocados )

I put up the Deer Fence in February. The deer around here are the size of Pygmy Goats and Cottontail Bunnies, so the deer fence only needs to be two or three feet tall. Chicken wire mesh, but heavily reinforced ( with scrap lumber ) because the Goat will test any fence she sees, espeially if there's something to eat on the other side of it. She's tested this one, and so far it's held up.

The pots were planted last month with Bell Peppers, Hatch Chiles, Poblano Chiles, Jalapenos, Haberneros, tomatoes ( Romas and cherries ), and Italian herbs. So far, so good. Nothing's died.

I got the cucumber trellis framework up last month. Four 12' rows of pickling cucumbers should give me enough to do whatever I feel like doing with them. If the Goat gets lucky, there'll be a surplus. She LOVES cucumbers. Once they get going, I'll be hanging concrete reinforcing wire on the A-frames to give the vines something to climb. If everything works as planned, I'll install a wire "roof" betwen the two A-frames, and create a tunnel of cucumbers.

I'm using weed cloth this year. Never used it before. It can't hurt. Maybe it'll cut down on the ammount of water needed.


( this evening, about 6:00 pm ) ( I used a kite to fly the camera )
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 3, 2013 - 09:13pm PT
Had Asparagus from the Obamagarden tonight.

The cool spring so far has been good for the tomatoes, but bad for the Satsuma sweet potatoes.

I'll probably plant sweet corn and green beans this weekend.
Fritz

Trad climber
Choss Creek, ID
Apr 3, 2013 - 09:13pm PT
Latitude 44 degree Idaho Asparagus on 3/10/13.
Latitude 44 degree Idaho Asparagus on 3/10/13.
Credit: Fritz

Blooming Apricot tree in Choss Creek Idaho on March 20, 2013.
Blooming Apricot tree in Choss Creek Idaho on March 20, 2013.
Credit: Fritz

I guess we need to try planting bananas in Idaho.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 3, 2013 - 09:20pm PT
I'm tired of paying a DOLLAR for a shrivelled Bell Pepper with a dried-up stem, or a DOLLAR for a little Zuchini that's only about the size of my own ... well, not very big. Used to be, the time of year when your garden was cranking out the produce, the prices at the market went DOWN, but not anymore. So it makes more sense than ever to plant today.
Captain...or Skully

climber
Apr 3, 2013 - 10:22pm PT
I dig my little garden. Put in seeds, some compost, & a bit of Love and VOILA!!!!
Big results. Like free, but better.
survival

Big Wall climber
Terrapin Station
Topic Author's Reply - Apr 4, 2013 - 05:09am PT
Had Asparagus from the Obamagarden tonight.

Awesome. Your bitterfruit should be coming along nicely as well!
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 4, 2013 - 07:10am PT
It was sweet!



I get the Bitter Mellon from the Viet next door neighbor.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 8, 2013 - 10:39am PT


Bugs are under control, so far.
Reilly

Mountain climber
The Other Monrovia- CA
Apr 8, 2013 - 10:47am PT
Not doing too badly here in LaLa Land.

About 7" diameter...(jess sayin') ;-)

Credit: Reilly
Dr. F.

Big Wall climber
SoCal
Apr 8, 2013 - 10:58am PT
I'm growing succulents in my garden
I just toss out the seeds on to the soil
Credit: Dr. F.
Credit: Dr. F.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 8, 2013 - 11:08am PT


DIY Scarecrow





Dog-resistant beverage holder
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 8, 2013 - 12:37pm PT
Well we've been enjoying greens from our cold frame all winter. Not sure why I don't have any recent pics. But mainly it's a jungle as we divert attention to this:
Hopping Rabbit Farm west field overview
Hopping Rabbit Farm west field overview
Credit: khanom

Currently we have in garlic, onions, potatoes, spinach, chard, scallions, and strawberries. Of course much more still to go in, but this year we're using only a small part of our usable area for row crops. Elsewhere the apples, peaches, blueberries and raspberries are coming along well.

Right now up close it's mainly dirt... but I'll post more photos later as things get going and if I remember.
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 22, 2013 - 01:37pm PT
Ok, I just remembered...

From left to right, rows of potatoes, garlic, spinach, scallions, and ...
From left to right, rows of potatoes, garlic, spinach, scallions, and more
Credit: khanom

Winter greens: spinach and kale
Winter greens: spinach and kale
Credit: khanom

Hey, pssst... got any food? Huh?
Hey, pssst... got any food? Huh?
Credit: khanom
Michelle

Social climber
1187 Hunterwasser
Apr 22, 2013 - 01:59pm PT
So this year I will be experimenting with a mostly container garden. I have a little strip of soul on my patio as well that is currently overgrown grass. Any suggestions on how best to prep the soil for food crops? Unknown origin or previous treatment. I was thinking I might just haul most of it out, line it and plop some good soil in. I'm sick of food costs and love gardening.
WyoRockMan

climber
Flank of the Bighorns
Apr 22, 2013 - 02:02pm PT
My garden was looking great. Now I can't find it.
Earth Day 2013
Earth Day 2013
Credit: WyoRockMan
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 22, 2013 - 02:36pm PT
Michelle - it really depends on what your region is like, what you wanna plant, what your microclimate is like, et'c et'c.

Since you have to get soil for your planters, you might as well get rid of the grass & soil it's in and start again. Grass can be a friend or a pain in the bum.

khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 22, 2013 - 03:31pm PT
I have a little strip of soul on my patio

If you've only got a little soul, you probably don't want to haul it away.


Any grass buried deep enough will die, so if you are building a raised bed you can just get compost etc and dump it in on top. Depending on how high the bed is and what you are growing, you don't need to do anything with the grass -- it'll just decompose and provide organic matter. If it were say 12" and you wanted to grow tomatoes, you might want to cultivate some but unless it's rock-hard clay it probably won't matter.

When I was doing raised beds in Joshua Tree I got a big load of horse manure and composted it down. I supplemented with purchased compost mix and steer manure. Any decent nursury should be able to sell you better compost and/or soil mix for cheaper than the crap at the big box stores. Of course the best plan is to be composting all year.

I do it now on a bigger scale -- about five yards of horse pooh a week, to which I add chicken pooh, wood mulch, grass clippings, etc. I just turned the pile and man do I smell... of... freedom.

TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 22, 2013 - 03:39pm PT
Any grass buried deep enough will die,

Unless it's Bermuda Grass

Then get out the Roundup.

Repeatedly.

Check and see if your state has an agricultural extension program, or check with a local, small nursery / garden shop.

Soils and requirements can vary widely and if the area you want to plant is right up next to the house there's a good chance that construction leftovers have changed the soil composition radicaly from what's just a few weet away.

Just don't get suckered into buying sacks of "garden soil"
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 22, 2013 - 07:02pm PT
Then get out the Roundup.

Repeatedly.


Yup, because of course you want to be spraying poisons on ground where you grow food.


I'm by no means a grass expert but I believe most grasses of that type (called rhizomial ??) will not be able to survive buried at least 12". Don't quote me on that.

We have some perrenial grass here that is quite persistant, although I've not identified it exactly. If you leave a clump in the ground it will survive, but only if less than about 4-6". My strategy for those areas is to flip the sod with a bottom plow and let it dry, and/or remove the clumps. Where the roots are exposed it dies.

Thought I'd take a pic of the main pooh pile to make all you gardeners jealous. What's left in this batch is about 20 yards and it's got about another 2 weeks before it's ready. And yeah, the apple trees are blooming. The brown thing is a mobile chicken coop.

Credit: khanom
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Apr 22, 2013 - 07:11pm PT
Khanom knows his shit!

This is what I'm working off this year.



Mostly donkey manure, with whatever else I raked up off the yard layered together. I stir it up with the Mantis, and it makes for a real earthy mix.

I miss that donkey, and I'll miss her even more when my manure mulch piles run out.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Apr 22, 2013 - 07:59pm PT
Bermuda will survive even if a foot deep in well aerated soil.

(been there dun that)

Horse manure works great because it isn't as "hot" as steer manure and has a lot of incompletely digested fibrous material that really helps loosen up clay soil, and you can also usually get it for free or next to it.

Just make sure you compost it for a few months and don't put it on fresh or you will burn up your plants, mostly from the overabundance of the nitrogen in the urine. Also it gives time for any anti parasitic agents the horses had in their system time to break down. Horse wormer even in incredibly small concentrations will nuke all the earthworms.

Roundup on the other hand breaks down completely in about two weeks.







couchmaster

climber
pdx
Apr 22, 2013 - 08:01pm PT
Had the craziest strong Brandy wine Amish heirloom tomato last year. We have 6 strong starts off the biggest tomato warming up in the bullpen. Suppose to warm up soon and they'll be planted.
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Apr 23, 2013 - 07:54am PT
Well, I'll take your word for it TGT... I dunno. I've no real experience with Bermuda. But I've never seen grass survive when fully buried... now bindweed on the other hand...

If you wish to believe the Roundup is somehow safe, I guess I won't convince you otherwise. My thinking is that when you fúck with nature, she tends to fúck you back. Usually in unpleasant and frustrating ways.

More important companies like Monsanto are directly responsible for massive damage to agriculture and rural communities that may never fully heal. Thankfully the revolution in small-scale local farming is gaining speed. We're the people who will keep food costs down and be able to provide you with wholesome natural non-toxic food when all around you huge food monopolies are jacking up prices and forcing you to eat cheatoes.


We have a sweet deal with a local stable. They need to get rid of their crap, so we come about once a week with our dump bed truck and they load it for us. We don't pay for it but that doesn't mean it's free.

I find horse manure on it's own to be lacking. We also got a bunch of sheep manure -- the two together is fantastic. My philosophy with compost is the greater diversity the better.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 23, 2013 - 08:29am PT
Very envious of your spread there khanom. We have a tiny patch of city land here ... no room for a manure pile. We have two 50-gal drums of worm compost. They survive winters easily ( tho' we have a fairly mild winter ).

And agreed on grass. Around here the quackgrass ( rhizomal ) needs to be dug out , rhizomes and all and then ya gotta be vigilant for the little bits missed.

Don't use Roundup on food crops. Better to go an Organic route - yeah, I know - there's crap in the atmosphere but why put more in? Dig dig dig. We ridded our yard of convolvulus (sp?) that way. I still fight quack grass despite digging it out every spring.

There's no perfect garden. It's always work in keeping the weeds away.

Thanks for the note about horse-worm meds in horse manure. We don't have an easy source for horse manure but I do tend to jump on it if we get it. Don't wanna mess with our earthworm population !!!
Michelle

Social climber
1187 Hunterwasser
Apr 24, 2013 - 07:31pm PT
so back to this project. Round-up, no. unfortunately, I can't do a raised bed, so the next best thing would be to dig and haul. I can't get the depth being suggested but I suspect if I clear most of the "offending" soil, I can line it and replace. I have to be ghetto cheap about this, so I'm scavenging things. I'm also starting plants in toilet paper rolls! I the previous grass infested patch, I was thinking planting sunflowers, zuchinni and herbs in the ground. maybe corn. to disguise my mj plants in containers. tomatos and maybe peas. for sure cucumbers to pickle. then I started thinking I could do greens in the ground too. I need to do more research. your stuff all looks awesome folks! since I live on the SF peninsula, the weather is bomber and I get lots of summer sun. the Star Gazer Lily is in heaven and I also have orchids that are stoked to be outside in the shade.

I can't wait to buy land and grow more food and rustle chickens. maybe goats for cheese. plus guns to keep the zombies out of my food.

Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
May 17, 2013 - 01:21pm PT
Dug up in my vegetable patch:



Wine cork for scale:



I'm pretty sure it's an old-timey injectible vial. Medical waste.

Back almost a hunred years ago, the big place next door was a tuberculosis hospital - and it's built like one. My place - a hundred yards away - was the doctor/nurse quarters.

The real estate guy told me about potential medical waste when I got the place. "If you dig up any jars, DON'T open them".
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
May 17, 2013 - 01:51pm PT
Glyphosate (trade name RoundUp, etc), is the most widely applied agricultural chemical in the country. If you're fretting over if being applied near food crops...well, that ship sailed decades ago.

It's basically an enyzme synthesis inhibiter. It only works on actively growing plants, the uptake method is through the foliage (i.e. it won't work as a pre-emergent). And it does breakdown relatively quickly for an herbicide. EPA gives it one of the lower toxicity ratings.

Still, I wouldn't want it on my food.

Hey Chaz, you coughing yet?
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
May 18, 2013 - 07:51am PT
Elcap, you usually make sense. What happened?


If you're fretting over if being applied near food crops...well, that ship sailed decades ago.

And:
Still, I wouldn't want it on my food.

Farmers spray it ON food crops. You know that right? That's the whole point.


EPA gives it one of the lower toxicity ratings.

Given your apparent confidence in government work, which is possibly lower than my own, I'm not sure this means much.


The perpetual problem of humans monkeying with nature is that we are rarely able to know and understand the long-term implications of our actions. In the early part of this century almost no agricultural chemicals were thought to have negative effects, but naturally with use and time to see them we discovered that was very much not true.

Everything you do on a farm has consequences. Everything you put on or near the soil affects it. Sometimes it's perceivable, sometimes it's merely measurable, and sometimes you don't see the consequences for many years.

If you google glyphosate toxicity you can find studies that link the chemical to deliterious effects on living creatures (here's just one). But do you need a study to tell you that wiping out all plant life in a given area will not have some consequence? It matters to me that it is toxic to humans or toxic to mice, but far more important is that this practice ignores the delicate balance of systems farmers must work within to ensure long-term soil health and productivity.
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
May 18, 2013 - 08:04am PT
It is going to be awesome!
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
May 18, 2013 - 08:08am PT
Need a wider lens...
Need a wider lens...
Credit: khanom
Spinach!
Spinach!
Credit: khanom
Potatoes! &#40;And garlic to the left&#41;
Potatoes! (And garlic to the left)
Credit: khanom
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
May 18, 2013 - 08:36am PT
No garden this year.

I'm really bummed, as this has been a hobby of mine for a few years now.

The irony of poverty is not being able to afford to get my garden going this year. If I could fund the startup, I'd be paying less for the veggies I love to eat.

Being really poor sucks.

eKat

Mountain climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
May 18, 2013 - 08:45am PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#303567

She's ready to plant. . .
mechrist

Gym climber
South of Heaven
May 18, 2013 - 08:52am PT
How long does that plastic last? We were thinking about doing some of those, but it seems like 2-5 years max before the plastic would deteriorate up in Tahoe. Currently harvesting used windows in the tahoe area...
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
May 18, 2013 - 11:07am PT
Wes, if you are asking me, it's not plastic. Well, it's still a petroleum product. But it's a breathable lightweight row cover for keeping insects at bay and reducing heat. It comes in heavier weight versions that are excellent frost protection. It lasts long if you are careful -- it rips easily.

The brand we use is Agribon, available many places. We bought from Peaceful Valley Farm Supply in Grass Valley.

We do use greenhouse plastic on our cold frame, and it should last 3-4 seasons with care.
karodrinker

Trad climber
San Jose, CA
May 29, 2013 - 12:34pm PT
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:18pm PT
I'm real happy with what I've got going this year.





No problems. No setbacks.

This is when it's fun. Production matches exactly what I can cook and eat. Sometime in the next couple weeks the work will start and I'll be firing up the canner.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jun 10, 2013 - 09:27pm PT
She canned a case of Boysenberry jam weekend before last. Probably need to do at least two more batches and a batch or two of Raspberry

Thanks to climate cooling I'll have a bumper crop of tomatoes so the Salsa and sauce canning production will start in about two weeks.


The heat loving plants like the corn have been a dud this year. The Sweet potatoes are rather stunted, but the beans are finally starting to take off late from a state of arrested development.

I will have to transplant the Shallots this weekend.
when you grow them from seed you get clumps like Scallions and then you need to replant them and give e'm some room.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jun 14, 2013 - 01:40pm PT


If you can't quite reach something...



...you can always try to knock it over.



Happiness is a black wok.




( serving suggestion )

The Goat got hers, too. She gets rid of the ends, peels, seeds, etc. Unlike the Dogs, who know there's no future in begging, the Goat thinks she needs to be front-and-center for the whole process.
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jun 14, 2013 - 01:55pm PT
This is what I found lying on a pile of topsoil in the garden yesterday.

It was dead when I found it.
It was dead when I found it.
Credit: Ghost

No mark of violence. And I have no idea why it was on top of the dirt pile, unless a crow moved it there, but hadn't started tearing it up yet.

Ugly-looking creature.

Snowmassguy

Trad climber
Calirado
Jun 14, 2013 - 02:00pm PT
^^^^ I bet that thing could do quite a bit of garden damage !
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jun 14, 2013 - 02:58pm PT
Chaz, I like your setup. Nice big garden, avo trees, goats, what's not to like?

I'm a wee bit envious. Not too much, as I have my own sweet garden, but I like goats.

I wasn't going to plant this year, but crumpled at the last minute and got my babies in the ground. Good thing too, because we had snow over Memorial Day weekend. I put 'em in the ground the next weekend.

I'm growing my hot peppers in pots again this year, I had outstanding success last year. This year I've added habaneros into the mix. Pots are great for peppers, as you want a lot of sun to increase the capsaicin. Mobility is key if you live in an area with many trees and you can't find a site with all day sun.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jun 21, 2013 - 10:13pm PT
So far, so good!





Organic pesticide at work:



Got enough cucs today to can five pints of sweet pickle relish.



Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Jun 22, 2013 - 06:04am PT
Great looking garden Chaz, those avocado trees are amazing!
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Jun 25, 2013 - 07:26am PT
We got 1/2" of rain and it's still coming. This is the best thing evar!

Reminds me that I should be taking some photos.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jul 2, 2013 - 05:43pm PT
Rain? Hasn't rained here in months, and if it rains here before Thanksgiving, it'll be big news.

A few hours ago:









Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 2, 2013 - 05:45pm PT
I never thought I'd say this, but damn, I wish it would stop raining!

We've had over ten inches of rain in the last couple of weeks. My babies are well watered, but we need some sunshine!!!

Luckily, my peppers are in pots, so I've been controlling their watering very carefully.
rSin

Trad climber
calif
Jul 2, 2013 - 05:46pm PT
what kite are you flying for those shots chaz?
how many different ones do you got?
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jul 3, 2013 - 04:14pm PT
Brandon,
I've always grown my peppers in pots. Ever since I saw my neighbor do it. We were both living in apartments, and he had a dozen 5-gallon buckets planted with peppers lining the stairwell.

Rsin,
I have six KAP ( kite-aerial photography ) kites. I've used five of them to get pictures. ( The sixth - and as yet not utilized - one is a Kiwi Fishing Kite from New Zealand. I'm having a tough time tuning it so that it flies straight, and I don't feel like paying the $70 one-way postage back to New Zealand to get someone who knows what they're doing to look at it. ).

The one I used yesterday is the one I use about 75% of the time - it covers a wide range of wind speeds. It's a nine-foot delta ( ITW 9ft Levitation Light ). Besides flying in a wide wind range, it has less bad habits than my other kites, so it does OK in squirrelly, gusty winds ( like yesterday ).

And it flies at a very high angle, so it's the one to use if I'm close to trees or other obstacles.

Yesterday I got the kite hung up at the top of a 60' eucalyptus ( just to the left of my photos ). I had already taken the camera down because the wind was starting to get funky ( kite and camera were separated by about 150' ), and before I had the kite down it dove into that eucalyptus. No slack was enough to allow it to "fly itself out" of either the dive or the tree, but it was enough to allow it to eventually continue its power-dive into the ground, after being stuck up in the small eucalyptus branches for a few minutes. Good practice!
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Jul 9, 2013 - 09:16pm PT
Nice cukes! Just about to harvest my first pickling cucumbers.

Funny, these pics don't look like it... but this is 62lbs of garlic, between the two racks:
Garlic!
Garlic!
Credit: khanom

More garlic!
More garlic!
Credit: khanom
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jul 9, 2013 - 10:30pm PT
hey there all... say, i love this thread... thanks for sharing...

my garden is growing michigan wild-stuff really great, :)

and--a few other things, as well!

got green beans to eat from the plants now, :)
and some green tomatoes... :)


will take a picture and hope to share tomorrow night, :)

thanks for sharing... :)


*off and on-again, sun, all season now, :)
wow--brandon, i heard of that eastcoast rain, from a friend of mine, :O
crusher

climber
Santa Monica, CA
Jul 9, 2013 - 10:37pm PT
Chaz that goat is the cutest thing ever! Your garden's pretty rad too!
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Jul 10, 2013 - 11:23am PT
Had a chance to take some photos this morning.

Field from the east. Looks kinda small, don't it? It's about an acre.


We'll be up to our ears in corn


We're harvesting like 15-20 lbs of basil a week and it's just started


Second succession of scallions
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jul 10, 2013 - 05:19pm PT
Bumper crop of tomatoes due to the unseasonaly cool and stable spring.

Made 16 pints of salsa Sunday and am chopping up about 30 lb of Romas and canning them tonight.

We won't be buying store bought tomato products for a couple of years.
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Jul 10, 2013 - 06:59pm PT
Sweet! Nice one TGT.

Did you spray them with roundup for extra flavor?








Just kidding, eh!
BooDawg

Social climber
Butterfly Town
Jul 14, 2013 - 04:34pm PT
I posted the construction of my raised-bed garden on the "Show Me What You're Building thread.

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1197468&msg=2101200#msg2101200

Here are the results of the efforts. I'm basically harvesting about 5 lbs of tomatoes, peppers, basil, and other goodies each day. Zucchinis, squash, melons and more are coming on.

Lower left: Squash, zucchini, and cantaloupes growing in “Earth Boxes.”

Above: basil, peppers, and tomatoes growing in raised beds protected from turkey and deer with the wire cat cage. Protected from gophers below with galvanized hardware cloth.


Cat-cage / raised-bed garden.
Cat-cage / raised-bed garden.
Credit: BooDawg

Below & upper right: Harvest of peppers, tomatoes, and cherry tomatoes.

Upper left: home-made salsa using the peppers and tomatoes.

Harvest of tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, & peppers and the products turne...
Harvest of tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, & peppers and the products turned into salsa.
Credit: BooDawg

For more pictures and background on this garden, please go here:

http://www.yosemitecloseup.com/stories/sierra-sustainability/


TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jul 14, 2013 - 04:38pm PT
Have about 30 lb of tomatoes boiling down into sauce right now .

Should end up with 10-12 qts.

manzanita man

Social climber
somerset, ca.
Jul 14, 2013 - 04:46pm PT
zucchini
zucchini
Credit: manzanita man

tomatoes
tomatoes
Credit: manzanita man

cucs and lettuce
cucs and lettuce
Credit: manzanita man
treez

Trad climber
99827
Jul 14, 2013 - 06:57pm PT
Pretty well with all the sun this year.

My wife takes this very seriously.

Credit: treez
Credit: treez
Credit: treez
Credit: treez
Credit: treez
Credit: treez
Credit: treez
Credit: treez
Credit: treez

Now THAT is a zuc leaf.
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Jul 15, 2013 - 04:41pm PT
I just did the math and I sold 20 lbs of garlic between Thursday and Saturday. I'm seriously thinking of keeping the other 40 lbs for myself :)


treez, that is one fine looking garden!
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jul 25, 2013 - 09:21pm PT
We're a month or so behind you SoCal types up here, but...

First fruits in the PNW
First fruits in the PNW
Credit: Ghost
Reeotch

Trad climber
4 Corners Area
Jul 28, 2013 - 06:52am PT
After a couple of crop failures, I finally have some success! Things were just so hot and dry around here in June that hardly anything was able to get established. The humidity was running in the single digits and the temperatures were running in the triple digits.

All of the stuff below was planted between the solstice and the 4th of July. It was still slow going for some plants to get established. Sometimes I needed to water 3x a day.

Now that the monsoon has kicked in, the plants have gone crazy, especially the squash. When it rains the plants are visibly larger the next morning. So cool!

See the yellow zucchini? I collected the sandstone slabs myself to cre...
See the yellow zucchini? I collected the sandstone slabs myself to create my bed.
Credit: Reeotch

Things are getting a little crowded. The watermelon is making flowers!
Things are getting a little crowded. The watermelon is making flowers!
Credit: Reeotch

I planted sweet potatoes that had sprouted in the cupboard. The one by...
I planted sweet potatoes that had sprouted in the cupboard. The one by my foot came up different. Anybody know what it is?
Credit: Reeotch

Sweet potatoes, red potatoes, and "local" corn.
Sweet potatoes, red potatoes, and "local" corn.
Credit: Reeotch
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Jul 28, 2013 - 06:56am PT
NICE. . . I don't know what the mystery plant is. . . but it looks like it's about time to harvest that big white thing!

:-)

Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jul 28, 2013 - 09:09am PT
it looks like it's about time to harvest that big white thing!

It's a potaTOE
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Jul 29, 2013 - 10:22am PT
Great stuff put up here so far. I'm getting a ton of ideas for next year.

Like corn. I have to make room for a cornfield next year. Of all the things that taste better fresh, corn is definitely at the top of the list. Last time I grew corn, I'd get the water boiling, then go pick the corn. Stalk-to-stomach in minutes!


The goat knows where the action is. Like a dog hanging around the dinner table.



The cucs are slowing down - even though the plants are bigger than ever - but I'm still getting one of these every four or five days:



Which was turned into this:


( batch #11 and #12, dill relish and bread-and-butter slices )



Bird spooker:



When I started seeing ripe tomatoes, so did the birds. I put up bamboo posts with reflectorized streamers atop them. And that will spook most birds most of the time. But something was still getting my cherry tomatoes, about a day before they ripened. One by-product of the owl infestation here in the yard - one nest, three babies - is owl feathers. I attached a few of them to the tomato cages so they flapped in the wind, and I haven't had a problem since.



Yesterday:









I was hoping to get the goat in some of the aerial shots, but she's scared of kites, food or no food. And the dogs aren't stupid enough to stand outside in the heat.

I have to start winding things down. I'm headed to The PNW in a couple weeks, and I might not be back until the end of Sept. The peppers and tomatoes will stay, but the cucs and zucs are more of a job than I want to leave for the guy who watches my place while I'm gone.
Seamstress

Trad climber
Yacolt, WA
Jul 29, 2013 - 11:44am PT
Berriful
Berriful
Credit: Seamstress

It's time to load up on anti-oxidants
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Aug 11, 2013 - 07:51am PT
photo not found
Missing photo ID#315428

This morning's harvest. . . beet greens and two kinds of chard. . . and I only brought in ONE FRIKKEN WASP with them.

YIKES!

(that's a 15 quart bowl)
Dr. Christ

Mountain climber
State of Mine
Aug 11, 2013 - 08:20am PT
Not so well actually. Record heat was scorching the ground, nothing would come up. Had to put up shade cloth. Then it froze in early August, severely damaging the squish, cucs, and pot(atoes).

But we have nice kale, peas, lettuce, peppers, and onions.
Charlie D.

Trad climber
Western Slope, Tahoe Sierra
Aug 31, 2013 - 12:04pm PT
She's always late at 3,000 ft. but never fails to deliver:
Credit: Charlie D.
Chaz

Trad climber
greater Boss Angeles area
Aug 31, 2013 - 05:17pm PT
That's a fine looking batch of tomatoes!
khanom

Trad climber
Greeley Hill
Aug 31, 2013 - 07:27pm PT
Wes, what elevation are you at?
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Sep 6, 2013 - 07:58pm PT
It was a warm summer in Seattle, but it's drawing to a close, i.e it was a v. good year for: blueberries, always collards and ok for kale. We haven't had a good garlic crop in >3 years due to white rot (f*#king yuck!).

Here's the end of year harvest of ripe tomatoes before they burst from recent rain wetness(below):
Credit: Darwin

I love cucumbers, but I know all others don't (below):
Credit: Darwin

OK, my Dad's family had a Walnut/plum-prune ranch near Vacaville,CA. So when this ONE plum grew on our two year old tree, and I led a couple pitches at Index, I was STOKED!(below):
Credit: Darwin


And, finally
Credit: Darwin
Darwin

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Sep 6, 2013 - 10:28pm PT
OK not quite finally.

Some more growing ones:
Credit: Darwin

Black princes
Credit: Darwin
Messages 1 - 214 of total 214 in this topic
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews