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Messages 101 - 120 of total 234 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
hamie

Social climber
Thekoots
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:02am PT
There is now a link to the museum site, and a link to this SuperTopo forum thread on the website of the Anachronistic Club of Canada [ACC]. We have a spy in our midst........
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:07am PT
There is now a link to the museum site, and a link to this SuperTopo forum thread on the website of the Anachronistic Club of Canada [ACC].

I took a look at the Airborne Climbers of Canada site and didn't see any link. Can you give us a url?
Chief

climber
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:10am PT
Nice work Anders.
Jim and bm, I don't see a warrior or any class.
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:12am PT
Thanks Hamie !

Don't reveal your contact,unless it's Branson's naked friend.
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:17am PT
Chief sez:
Jim and bm, I don't see a warrior or any class

Touche !

We could grind this pyroclastic axe forever ....
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:11am PT
there are a lot of problems with "contemporary" history in Yosemite Valley... there has been no comprehensive guide book since 1994, probably 1000s of climbs are undocumented, little of this has reported in the climbing journals because most of this development doesn't reach the level of notoriety.

Who ever wants to write whatever history they think they can, should. The development of the 70s, now 40 years ago, will be lost as that generation of climbers comes to an end.

Canadian climbing has a long, proud history, and it should be told... there are wonderful stories held by just a relatively few climbers. I don't know how to implore you all enough.... but to say that the only stories that will survive are the ones you write down. Perhaps a few of the spoken stories will be recalled and written by those young ones who have heard them and piece them together, but once their attention turns to recording history, as ours did when we got old, they will wish they knew more.

It doesn't matter in the larger scheme of things, of course, but it is something we once did, it was the way we decided to spend a large part of our lives. It would be a wonderful legacy to pass those stories along.
Bruce Kay

Gym climber
BC
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:56am PT
and remember, as jim pointed out, the truth is for wankers
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:14am PT
You gotta love this Ed guy. Well said.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:43pm PT
I wonder who the ACC 'mole' is?
MH2

climber
Apr 14, 2010 - 12:50pm PT
No FA names? Damn! They often give more useful information about a route than the rest of it.
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:11pm PT
ANders look for someone with large claws on hands that have a lateral rotation and a weird star-type protuberance around their nose.
There's yer mole.

But to get this thread possibly back on track, I feel strongly that the history of climbing is the sum of the stories told by the people doing the climbing. Any historian worthwhile reading will do a lotta legwork in interviewing the various players and following their leads as to who did what, when , how and possibly even why.

Sorting the wheat from the chaff then becomes a game of listening to those stories and cross-referrencing notes from various sources. Players will emerge .... or not. Some stories will endure - like Daryl's Yosemite trip that ended at Stoney Creek, the legacy of Eric Weinstein, Perry's Cruel Shoes, or the first time Peter & Hamish did multiple laps on the Grand.

Other things, like the wake of pissed off people left behind by a certain guidebook writer, will also endure and a good historian will be able to figure that out too.



Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:18pm PT
Canadian climbing has a long, proud history, and it should be told...

Some of it has been told. I was lucky enough to be part of a project, dreamed up by Bruce Fairley, that eventually became "The Canadian Mountaineering Anthology". We picked stories that we hoped would tell the tale of 100 years of climbing and got them out in a book. The publication was financed by the ACC, and a quick look at Amazon confirms that it is still in print and available.

Needless to say, one book, even a relatively fat one like this, can't come anywhere close to telling all the stories that need to be told. But we did what we could, and maybe now it's time for someone to get the ball rolling for Volume II.

D

And, in case any of you are wondering, we didn't write the stories ourselves, but dug up stories previously published in various places, and used them as they were originally written. We tried to add some commentary, to give readers a bit of background, but the stories really do speak for themselves.
Tricouni

Mountain climber
Vancouver
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:21pm PT
Any comments on Chic Scott's book "Pushing the Limits: the Story of Canadaian Mountaineering"?
Tami

Social climber
Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 01:36pm PT
^^^ I have a story in that anthology. It is, of all things, a trip report & I blame David ( Ghost ) fer it being there. DUnno if Fairly Bruce had a hand in that or what.

It was funny that Dave asked that he put the story in & I said sure. The book took fekkin' years to publish :-D hahahah through which time I totally forgot both about the story and that I'd agreed to the thing being in there.

And then when it was ( finally ( snicker guffaw ) ) published and I got a FREE copy ( cos I was a contributer ) I was really surprised and , like, saying " how come I get a free copy ? " and Dave said ".........oh dear you are dumber then the food you eat" or something like that.

Ain't that rite Davey ?

Arright, Volume 2 would be a great idea. But who wants to read thru ALL THOSE JOURNALS to dig up the diamonds ? Not me, thatsfer sure ; I'm too lazy.

Edit for Glenn's post above - I greatly admire the amount of research Chic did for his book - he interviewed ( taped / video ) some 90 climbers coast to coast to coast. While I am sure there are some names and stories he missed out on, the compendium of information he gathered now sits in the Whyte Museum for anybody in the future who wants to listen to climbers babble on.

Any history should, at very least, start like this - by interviewing those responsible ( or to blame :0 )
bmacd

Trad climber
Beautiful, BC
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:12pm PT
Chic's interviews would do well to be on Youtube, more accessible than where they are now
Jim Brennan

Trad climber
Vancouver Canada
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:19pm PT
Any of the stories written by Hugh Burton in the Canadian Alpine Journal really take you there.
My favorite is Squamish Hardcore on McKinley, a good laugh.
klk

Trad climber
cali
Apr 14, 2010 - 02:19pm PT
Any historian worthwhile reading will do a lotta legwork in interviewing the various players and following their leads as to who did what, when , how and possibly even why.

Sorting the wheat from the chaff then becomes a game of listening to those stories and cross-referrencing notes from various sources.

It sound so easy.

I'm sure that reconciling Kevin's interview with Perry's interview will be a pleasant afternoon, with an outcome guaranteed to make everyone happy.

Gee Anders, what r ya waitin for?
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:15pm PT
I still don't understand how Chic Scott f*#ked up so badly as to totally miss, or dismiss, or not even really mention Hank Mather in his Pushing the Limits book
Oplopanax

Mountain climber
The Deep Woods
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:19pm PT
And Perry, I don't know about Loeks and Putnam but the FFA of the Left Side in the latest McLane guides goes to Nic Taylor and Paul Peart (visiting Australians) in '75. The same info is also given in the CAJ as I recall. Nic Taylor was an Australian hotshot i believe? (there's a couple period pics of him in Yosemite Climber I think too)
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C.
Apr 14, 2010 - 04:25pm PT
Yes, Kerwin - writing guidebooks and histories is a sure bet for making friends. :-)

The FFA of the left side of the Split Pillar was by visiting Australian Nic Taylor and Peter Peart, in 1975. Peter had emigrated from Australia to Canada in 1970 or so, and was quite active. I knew him through the BCMC, and also we had some classes together in 1975, and he mentioned his and Nic's adventure to me. (Really.) I have several times attempted to correct the "Paul" bit, without success. Peter still lives here, on Bowen Island - he's an engineer. Nic was here on a road trip - I believe the first Australian to pass this way on a visit may have been Chris Baxter, in 1972.

There was some skepticism about Nic and Peter's ascent, in that Peter was more into mountaineering, and Nic not well known. But Nic went on to do some impressive climbs in Australia and Yosemite, offering additional proof. I'm reasonably sure that Peter jumared the crux, or at least had a tight rope.

Peter patiently belayed me on the FA of A Question of Balance, in 1977. That is, while I tiptoed about, drilled bolts, and got scared.
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