Royal Robbins Falling while Soloing I-12 at Indian Rock

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Messages 141 - 160 of total 195 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
ArmandoWyo

climber
Wyoming
Sep 20, 2012 - 01:04pm PT
Before this gets too off-track, I'll add the original guide to Indian Rock. Dick Leonard did 2 of them, the first was November 13, 1939, and then a "reprint" in April 3, 1950. Both were mimeos on cheap stock colored paper. The 1939 is hard to see, so I will post both. The originals (if the term can be used of mimeos - ask someone over 60 what mimeo was) are at the guidebook collection I established at the AAC Library.
Armando
IndianRockGuide-Leonard-11-13-39
IndianRockGuide-Leonard-11-13-39
Credit: ArmandoWyo
IndianRockGuide-Leonard-4/3/1950
IndianRockGuide-Leonard-4/3/1950
Credit: ArmandoWyo
ArmandoWyo

climber
Wyoming
Sep 20, 2012 - 01:43pm PT
Comparing the 2 descriptions of I-12, the 1939 guide (and probably all done by Leonard), said that "It can be done, but one will have to be good." Maybe Dick should have added, And sober. The 1950 version of the Indian Rock Guide is obviously a re-type of the 1939 mimeo. The 1950 version added, "Ed. Has anyone been that good since 1939?" Although both are said to be "by Dick Leonard", I can't imagine Dick writing the Ed-note.
IndianRockGuide-Excerpt-april 3, 1950
IndianRockGuide-Excerpt-april 3, 1950
Credit: ArmandoWyo
JEleazarian

Trad climber
Fresno CA
Sep 20, 2012 - 02:08pm PT
Thank you Armando, for those excerpts. I didn't realize I-12 was done before WWII. Considering the likely footwear available, that's quite an achievement.

John
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Sep 21, 2012 - 02:29am PT
I bouldered with Galen, Steve, Tom, and Bruce. Bruce, amazing, at what 60 something or more, he would put a hand jam in between the 'fork' of two large branches of the tree down by the pit and do one-arm pull-ups, from a hand jam in a tree, AMAZING.

I have been there when Steck, Robbins, Chouinard and others were there but I can't say that I bouldered WITH them.
mouse from merced

Trad climber
The finger of fate, my friends, is fickle.
Sep 21, 2012 - 02:35am PT
In the early 70s I spent quite a bit of time at Indian Rock. My bouldering was spotty, if you will. I don't like crowds. Whenever I went there, I generally went across the street to the small park and went cruising back and forth over the traveses, high, low, in between, for hours. Much more relaxing and took me to the Dolomites in my head. For a time I could be Comici! Who needed Robbins?
Randy Hamm introduced me to the place. He liked it there as well.
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Sep 21, 2012 - 04:24am PT
Yeah, Mouse from Merced, I use to do those traverses across the street a lot as well. Fun and sure helped build the arms (and legs). If it was too crowded at Indian Rock, I'd go to Cragmont, which was even more crowded. Or Perhaps Mortar Rock or Remillard Park.

But some of the best views of the bay was sitting on top of Indian Rock, drinking a beer and smoking a doobie. That was classic too.

Good view from Grizzly Peak Rock also, if one could find one's way through all the broken beer bottle shards.

A good thing about Dalkey Quarry, it being so close to Dublin city centre (25 minutes by DART) and a 10-minute walk from the DART Station, one would think that in such a conurbation area, like Grizzy Peak, that there would be loads of broken bottles, trash etc. Not so, none. Okay, once I saw a television dumped at the bottom of one of the cliffs, but that is it.
Randisi

Social climber
Dalian, Liaoning
Topic Author's Reply - Sep 21, 2012 - 04:25am PT
Wow, the original Indian Rock guide.

Thanks for posting that!
Patrick Sawyer

climber
Originally California now Ireland
Sep 21, 2012 - 06:11am PT
ArmandoWyo

ask someone over 60 what mimeo was

I am under 60 (56) and of course it stands for mimeograph. I use to use them a lot at school on the school newspaper (cheapest way of publishing back then).
BBA

climber
OF
Sep 21, 2012 - 08:50am PT
Does the AAC have the entire collection of Yodelers? Maybe five or six years ago I was at the Sierra Club HQ in SF looking at documents and was given the "Yodeler" binders to peruse. They were an interesting history, and I was told they had not made it to the Bancroft. The paper was in trouble, starting to fall apart in a few places. It's a digitization project of worth because of the role the Bay Area had in early rock climbing.

I used the Yodeler as a reference for the first ascent of Kat Pinnacle on page 129, Volume 4, A Biography of William and Jeanne Kat (on the web). I was focussed only on William Kat, so I skipped a ton of interesting observations and climbing information by others about other climbs.
ArmandoWyo

climber
Wyoming
Sep 21, 2012 - 09:01am PT
Patrick, the old mimeos were cheap, but not too good for preservation. I had mimeos of first Valley guide (really a 2 page list, half of it, Climbs To Do), first Pinnacles National Monument (by Dave Brower), and Cragmont and Grizzly Rocks in Berkeley. All mimeos. These were Dick Leonard’s and the RCS’s records, so I don’t think the original mimeographs exist. Now the mimeos that Dick and others made are in the guidebook collection at the Library. Would folks like to see the scans I retained of these?
Armando
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Sep 21, 2012 - 09:03am PT
Armando, yes we would love to see your scans!
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
And every fool knows, a dog needs a home, and...
Sep 21, 2012 - 09:09am PT
But some of the best views of the bay was sitting on top of Indian Rock,

You know its pretty danged awesome, here in our Boomtown West, the land of the rapid rise and rapid fall, to have some continuity with generations past. Very cool that such a small rock can play such a big role in our collective mythologies and other assorted histories.

From mid-August of 2012:



DMT

ArmandoWyo

climber
Wyoming
Sep 21, 2012 - 09:23am PT
BBA,
I don’t think the AAC Library has Yodeler, but you should ask Beth Heller. Maybe in Nick’s collection, but not in mine.
The guides I have were pages of the Yodeler, but that is all I had - the selected pages, and not the complete issues. But I had a lot of them. These were part of the complete Cragmont Climbing Club/Rock Climbing Section records from 1932 on, everything from meeting notes to expense receipts of “expeditions” to the Valley in the 1930s to records of climbs done, books read, and RCS parties. These are now all part of AM Guidebook Collection at the AAC Library. I was the RCS chair in early 1970s, but didn’t inherit (or even see) this treasure trove then, but years later, when RCS had been shutdown by the Sierra Club and this big box of records had been badly damaged in a flooded basement. As I recall Willi Fuller, another ex-chair of the RCS, was heading to Alaska, and gave me the box. He didn’t know what to do with the box after the Sierra Club had abandoned the RCS and said I was the only “responsible” person he could think of, which I took to mean, I had lived in the same house near Indian Rock for a decade. Maybe I was on his way. Same way I “inherited” the remains of the Rotten Log from Royal Arches, which should be in my ex’s house in Berkeley - unless consumed by the termites.
Armando
Rich101

Mountain climber
Anatone , Washington
Sep 21, 2012 - 12:28pm PT
IS this the Erric Beck that started climbing in San Diego RCS ?

Richsrd Sheffield
The Real Mad Dog

Gym climber
Napa, CA
Sep 21, 2012 - 07:57pm PT
I do remember Peter Haan soloing it. Don't know anything about Robbins. However, when I started bouldering there back in 1963, there was a large tree, and it was possible to traverse from one wall to the opposite one. So, I speculate that back in those early days, if someone had attempted to solo I-12 (5.10B ???) and fell off, hitting a few branches could save one's life. Over time, branches and then the tree disappeared, as did the soil, so for the regular watercourse route you start a foot or so lower. The answer lies with Royal? Are you listening?

p.s. Not too long after our Rockzilla gym opened in Napa, I dropped by after a good meal and perhaps three glasses of wine, and in street shoes led a 10C (at about age 65). The next day, I really struggled to do it. So, should we climb drunk (I wasn't quite there; doubt if I've ever been drunk.)? Rhetorical question.
graniteclimber

Trad climber
The Illuminati -- S.P.E.C.T.R.E. Division
Sep 21, 2012 - 08:09pm PT
If Randisi suspected it was apocryphal, why did he post a thread with this title and repeat a slanderous story he thinks is FALSE?

Weak.
guido

Trad climber
Santa Cruz/New Zealand/South Pacific
Sep 21, 2012 - 08:19pm PT
Graniteclimber are you stoned?
ArmandoWyo

climber
Wyoming
Sep 23, 2012 - 09:25am PT
Armando, yes we would love to see your scans!

Peter,
I will start to review them and select the neat ones to post. Give me a moment. Still trying to milk the last of our Teton summer - before our looong winter.
Armando
Rick A

climber
Boulder, Colorado
Sep 23, 2012 - 01:04pm PT
Enjoying this thread.

It illustrates how even the tiniest crags can have a storied history and be significant to generations of climbers.

Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Sep 23, 2012 - 03:32pm PT
No kidding. If nothing else, Berkeley's Indian Rock is at least one of those static Byzantine Edging Temples we all know about scattered across the world, too close at hand to a town to be overlooked or only given the once-over and yet too tiny to make much difference other than social.
Messages 141 - 160 of total 195 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
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