Time for the FIRE FALL!

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Messages 21 - 40 of total 59 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
aguacaliente

climber
Feb 17, 2010 - 03:44pm PT
A Nikon 300/2.8 uses a 122mm filter in front or a 39mm filter in rear, not that I have ever had one. Simple aperture math (300/2.8 = 107mm entrance aperture) tells you the filter has to be enormous. There was also a 300/4.5 lens that was more portable. Although the chrome era placed value on the image as made in camera, a photo reproduced for a print or a book could easily be color tweaked a little - achieving precise color balance for reproduction is not simple.

Anyway, these photos are really cool and I like how they emphasize the virtue of being in the right place at the right time, beyond any reproduction enhancements.
Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 17, 2010 - 04:05pm PT
The front element is VERY large, but the filter size on the modern lens is 52mm (per Nikon). I assumed larger on an older lens because everything seems larger on the older lenses. Of course, they probably didn't have the slip in filter then and you would attach to the rear element.

You are right about the color balance on a reproduction. That's why I made clear my source. Even the color of the room (or ligthsource) you are in will change it.
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 04:51pm PT
Great shots Walter!

Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 17, 2010 - 04:58pm PT
Yeah Walleye - I especially like the tight crop of the middle shot. Almost like lava. Keep em comin'!
Captain...or Skully

Social climber
walkin' the road to nowhere
Feb 17, 2010 - 04:58pm PT
WALLEYE!!!!

WooHoo!!!! Nice.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 09:58pm PT
wonderful shots Walleye
Timid TopRope

Social climber
Paradise, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 10:53pm PT
As I'm going down the thread, I'm thinking, Where's Walleye when you need him and right at the bottom, Wham!. Great shots everyone and thanks for the details Jerry D.
Roxy

Trad climber
CA Central Coast
Feb 17, 2010 - 11:00pm PT
Awesome thread!
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Feb 17, 2010 - 11:04pm PT
Back to the actual, historical, Fire Falls---- it was actually cool visually and romantic too. I saw them many times. But the biggest problem I always supposed was what happened when the falls were concluded. All at once, all over the upper end of the Valley, thousands of cars started up and tried to head back to the campsites where they belonged. The traffic jam was stupendous and would last for well more than an hour and a half-- all these vehicles idling and nudging forwards. You could even hear the noise as they all began their trek in unison.
Melissa

Gym climber
berkeley, ca
Feb 18, 2010 - 12:32am PT
I waited for about 45 minutes on Monday at dusk but didn't even get a twinge of orange.

It was like the Facelift for photogs. There must have been a hundred of them in the Manure Pile area.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 18, 2010 - 02:47am PT
The fantastic image that Galen Rowell made of the light on Horse Tail Falls occurs in February. The reason is because the Sun sets on the western horizon which is visible from the top of Horse Tail Fall at a bearing from 248.17º to 256.05º. The horizon is roughly 90 miles away. (A side note: the distance to the horizon in miles is the square root of the altitude in feet, the proof is left as an exercise for the reader).

So one calculates the days that the sun sets in between those two headings, and at a time when there is water in the falls, which is winter time... this year the first sunset would have been on 2/1/10 at 1717 PST, and the last sunset will be 2/19/10 at 1737 PST, which is Friday.

Ideal conditions would be a clear sky all the way to the coast which gives a maximum red sunset. That was not quite the case when I took my image on 2/14/10, I marked the position of the sunset that day also.

After Friday, the Nose will obscure the Sun from Horse Tail Falls and we'll have to wait until next year...



Today would have been a good day to shoot the falls, though it was hazy around sunset. Tomorrow night will be partly cloudy, and Friday some chance of snow...

neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Feb 18, 2010 - 06:02am PT
hey there say, dmt, ed, and every single other photographer, of you all....

i just love how light plays and moves in photos... i was never able to pursue, as a kid... (got married, etc, no funds, etc, just kids) :)

BUT----every time i SEE this stuff, i just "fall in love again" with what the good lord can do in our world, with light, color, rocks, and darkness, and every single thing...

thank you all for helping to explain all this stuff, as to lens, photo-shooting and all...

i hope someday that i can make up for lost time just a tad--and get some wonderful shots, too, in some ways...

ed, and all:
thanks for trying to explain this as to detail...i will never really understand, unless i have an "on hand nearby coach"---but i still just love to hear it all...


thanks for all the great shares, here... sure do LOVE that waterfall, too... even the name! ...
god bless...

you all made my night very happy today (or better said-early morning, as it is now)...
:)
Walleye

climber
The Hot Kiss on the end of a Wet Fist
Feb 18, 2010 - 11:00am PT
Jerry wrote

"John Shaw makes an interesting point that The Chrome Era was interesting and unique in the history of photography in that it was the only time that the image made in camera was so highly regarded. Unlike a film negative or raw digital file which must be developed, it was viewed as the authentic and infallible finished image."

This is a very good, and interesting point, and I tend to agree with it in a kind of non rigid way. My final prints for exhibition always must match the original transparency as closely as possible, and that would be MY interpretation. I have to cringe sometimes when photographers say that they interpreted the image to how they felt at the time they made the photograph. Is it the same thing? I'm not really sure, but it always brings up heated discussions in photo circles.

Thanks all for the feedback on my images. I was out with a client on Monday the 15th and I thought it was going to really light up, but it didn't do much at all. This year really has the potential though because of all the warm temps we've had. The water volume is very good right now.
CF

climber
Feb 18, 2010 - 11:28am PT
having photographed this for almost 20 years i can say that it does get that red, looks like molten metal being poured.

i used to be the only photog at the turnout before sentinel but now it is so crowded you can not find a place to park

Horsetail Falls, El Capitan, Yosemite 3/5/08 5:24 pm
Credit: CF
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Feb 18, 2010 - 11:57am PT
hey there walleye, say, i am just now getting offline, but i HAD to come to see all this...

i will forever be in awe of how photos can be taken...

very nice, you all.. very very nice...

well, god bless... all for now, today...
:)
Srbphoto

Trad climber
Kennewick wa
Feb 18, 2010 - 12:12pm PT
My final prints for exhibition always must match the original transparency as closely as possible, and that would be MY interpretation. I have to cringe sometimes when photographers say that they interpreted the image to how they felt at the time they made the photograph

That's an advantage of transparencies (for some). You have a positive image for reference. With color negatives you are working more from memory. With black and white you are further removed from "reality".

With the very little color printing I have done, I always liked printing from transparencies because I liked that reference point. One of my friends (who only shoots color) never refers back to the chromes. He wants the print to be the interpretation at that moment.

We should have a Supertopo exhibition. Anyone got any gallery space? :)
CF

climber
Feb 18, 2010 - 12:45pm PT
what year was galen's photo taken?

i have noticed that it is very hard to get photos of the firefall being as red as it used to be due to the build up of smog in the central valley.

the sun now has to set through this and it seems to get very muted and cut off and not get a chance to be brilliant red.

the only time you might be able to get it really crisp red is after a storm.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Feb 18, 2010 - 12:59pm PT
CF,

or during or after a forest fire, me thinks, given some red sky views I've seen post fire.
Ed Hartouni

Trad climber
Livermore, CA
Feb 18, 2010 - 01:10pm PT
fires happens during the summer,
water happens during the winter...


the best red sunsets will be on those very clear days from Yosemite all the way out into the Pacific ocean...
Jerry Dodrill

climber
Sebastopol, CA
Feb 18, 2010 - 01:12pm PT
Ya munge, but you don't get many fires in february. CF- Galen's shot was in '73, six months before I was born. haha.
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