Did you have an "OUTDOOR UPBRINGING" ?

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drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Topic Author's Original Post - Jan 22, 2010 - 01:14pm PT
I'm in the process of going through my late father's endless archive of slides to be sent off and scanned.
After viewing tray after tray there is no question why I am why I am today.
From the deepest wilds of desolate Baja to every nook and cranny of the southwest, my parents took me there, often pulling me out of gradeschool for extended trips.
I developed a love for the desert, ocean, ancient cultures, and the rock.
My folks weren't hippies, climbers, or surfers, they just loved solitude and camping, and they sure exposed me to some bitchin places.

It was only natural that I would revisit many of these places and feel right at home in the outdoors.

Thank goodness video games hadn't been invented yet.

(not a scan) Bahia Concepcion '70
(not a scan) Bahia Concepcion '70
Credit: drljefe

HOW 'BOUT YOU?
Reilly

Mountain climber
Monrovia, CA
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:19pm PT
Yessum, 'cept when I had to come into town...

Credit: Reilly
franky

climber
Davis, CA
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:21pm PT
Nope, my dad used to hunt and fish a lot, but stopped by the time I was old enough to go with. My mom claimed to like the outdoors, but never took us.

Got into it myself during at the university. Kind of a bummer, but maybe if I had started young I would have stopped loving the outdoors in some kind of teen angst rebellion. Who knows.
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 22, 2010 - 01:22pm PT
Credit: drljefe
Listen pardner, I did some city slickin too.
Tradmedic

Ice climber
Thunder Bay, Ontario
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:23pm PT
Hells yes. I still blame my parents for turning me into a semi-exiled outdoor nut. Low-impact/Leave no Trace camping was the norm, along with the occaisional cross-country road trip with stops at seemingly all the parks. Extended trips (canoeing especially) by the time I was 3. And on, and on. Now, my mom is retired and is still one of my best paddling partners, my brother is my best whitewater paddling partner (though he is pretty mean on a mountian bike too, and is willing to second me up damn near anything). Skiing, and winter camping to deal with the cold of Northern Ontario. My parents did what they could to support my climbing, but there wasn't much of a scene or community in my hometown so it was slow at first. They definitely aren't worriers, in fact my mom came out to try ice climbing when I was first getting into it. And barely shake there heads anymore when I spout off about different possible trip plans leading up to some adventure.

I am unbelievably thankful for the 'outdoor education' I received at the hands of my parents, and am constantly blown away by the patience they had to be doing all of this with two young boys!
Rokjox

Trad climber
Boys I'dunno
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:25pm PT
Most of the time until I got to high school, I was pretty urban, other than a stint in a flat bottom boat in Louisiana. But once I was given a rifle in Wyoming, I blossomed pretty fast. Learning to ride horses and ski helped too.
Cosmiccragsman

Trad climber
Apple Valley, California
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:29pm PT
IZZAT you Drl?

I thought it wuz Tarbuster. ;)

My Dad was in the Marine Corps for 33 years and He taught me a lot.
Hunting, map reading, climbing, and lots more. When he wasn't in Nam,
He would spend all his spare time with us kids in the outdoors.
Jeremy

Social climber
Albuquerque, NM
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:30pm PT
Yep...on a golf course...
treeman

climber
mule city
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:32pm PT
Thanks for sharing that with the campfire jefe. My parents weren't real outdoor types, but we camped plenty and did the hunting and fishing thing as kids. But more importantly they instilled in me the freedom to explore things and let me be me. Signed me up for a climbing program in high school, sent me a NOLS semester course long time back, hell even paid for a couple years at Prescott College (Granite Mtn. University)! I'm making sure my own kids are on the right outdoor path. My daughter (3) loves camping and skiing, and our son (10) regularly ditches school to go snowboarding ( got it worked out with the principal that this counts towards his PE).
bluering

Trad climber
Santa Clara, Ca.
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:34pm PT
My folks weren't hippies, climbers, or surfers, they just loved solitude and camping, and they sure exposed me to some bitchin places.

Same here.

I'm trying to do the same with my son. He ain't 2 yet but he's camped at Tahoe, Tuolumne, Yosemite, and Jtree. He digs it too!
matty

Trad climber
los arbor
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:35pm PT
yep, skis as soon as I could stand on them, same with the bike. Winter camping in ice caves, canoeing, sailing, backcountry skiing. No climbing though. It was my pleasure to introduce that outdoor activity to my Dad, who after getting a late start at 56 has climbed 15 pitch free routes, waterfall ice, aid climbed, big mountains in peru and even some valley 5.9! Good job Dad, I'm proud of you. Thanks for raising me to appreciated the outdoors.

Matt
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 22, 2010 - 01:37pm PT
Treeman- I was thinking of you and how your kids are being raised- Y'all don't have to make an effort to get them out there, it's just how you roll.
happiegrrrl

Trad climber
New York, NY
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:38pm PT
hahah - those cowboy duds are so cute.

My family was a bit outdoorsy, but more in a leisure way than a recreational way. That may account for why I consider the camp time/camaraderie aspect as important as the actual climbing....

Sundays in decent weather would be a "load everyone into the car, along with a picnic" day. In winter it would be - go to church and then lunch at a town restaurant. But in the summer season it was the picnic and communing with nature.

Usually we'd drive in the country and find a farmer field with a big shade tree and that was where we'd stop. Sometimes it was a county park on the way to Silver Lake for swimming.

And the big 2-week summer vacation trip was made in some sort of camper rig, staying at campgrounds along the way.

The day trips were more often excursions to historic places(Fort Ticonderogo, House on the Rock) and the "Roadside America" attractions along the way. I still adore those kitschy stops.

They might stop somewhere and let us kids run around in a big park or something, but we never did hikes or anything. If we found our way to the top of a high point, it was because the station wagon took us there.

But, we did live out in the country, and had a woods out back after heading through 2 farmer hay fields. I always enjoyed wandering that woods.
Batrock

Trad climber
Burbank
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:39pm PT
As much as you can living in Burbank. My dad was a fireman and had lots of time off during the week. I remember spur of the moment trips where he would come home from work and tell us that we would be missing the next few days of school and we would load up the jeep and head for the Mojave or the Sierras. That was reason enough for me to follow in his footsteps to become a fireman.

This picture was taken by my brother of me, in the foreground and my dad in the background bouldering around at the base of Williamson Rock. Exact location is near the Leaning Pillar for you Williamson folks. Picture was taken in 1978.
Williamson Rock 1978
Williamson Rock 1978
Credit: Batrock
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:43pm PT
Oh yes, most definitely.

Bush Alaska in the 60's.
Bush planes
Snowmachines
River boats
Dog sleds

Then down south, long cross country road trips, lots of time with the cousins out in the "back 40".

I was very lucky that way, and have tried to ram it down the throa.........er......I mean share it with my kids too!
hossjulia

Social climber
Eastside
Jan 22, 2010 - 01:48pm PT
Sorta, by economic default.
Meaning camping was all my parents could afford. Found out later they both hated it. Which is a great credit to them that they took us camping and taught us some things about the outdoors anyway. My Dad was big on survival skills. My Mom says I seemed to just know things about the wild and that I taught them a lot.
I remember one year they had to cancel a trip, might have been 69 when it was a wet summer in Cali. Anyway, I went ballistic and was a complete bitchy 10 year old brat for months afterward, earned me less presents for Christmas that year. I remember screaming at them about ruining my life and that I just wanted to live in a tent and camp out for the rest of my life! (and I meant it. Those of you who know me, you know how that turned out! LOL.)
We did do the desert racing thing when I was younger too, which included some great trips to Baja to pre-run and scout the Baja races. Probably responsible for my love of the desert. (and chorizo)
Numerous trips up 395 from San Diego to Carson City to visit grand parents made me fall in love with the Sierra and particularly Mono Lake. Now, some 30 years later, I live right next to it. But I gotta tell ya, it smells kinda bad and the pogonip fog in winter is brutal!

My Mom and Dad both say I was born wild. I call myself feral these days.
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 22, 2010 - 01:55pm PT
Credit: drljefe
Thanks Mom!
When I came of age, she was fully supportive of me living out of my bus in some rainshadowed pinyon juniper playground.

I can thank my dad for the inherited wanderlust.
Hopefully I can use it a bit more responsibly than he.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Jan 22, 2010 - 02:11pm PT
I can thank my dad for the inherited wanderlust.
Hopefully I can use it a bit more responsibly than he.


Dude....never leave me hanging like that.
C'mon, spill it.


Don't make me send the Toaster down on yer azz!


At least enough to quench my curiosity.
I won't send the Toaster to squeeze any deep family secrets outta ya...
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 22, 2010 - 02:32pm PT
Bruce-
Dad bailed. Prototype deadbeat Dad. Evaded responsibility (and authorities) by sailing the entire west coast of North America until his death in 2000.
I definitely have the "bail" gene, but would prefer balance.
There.
(just didn't want the BLT to choke me out!)

NEXT!
Buggs

Trad climber
Corrales, New Mexico
Jan 22, 2010 - 02:48pm PT
Yes my parents helped alot with my outdoor enthusiasm. Father career Air Force fighter pilot. We moved alot.

Colorado Springs, Upstate New York, Northeastern Pennsylenvy, Nevada, California, Nebraska, Wyoming. Cheyenne was my first real recognition of the outdoors. Favorite trips were to Veedavou and our cabin in Red Feather Lakes outside of Ft Collins CO. I think that's where my fondness for moving over stone began. Unroped of course.

Air Force picked me up and the adventure continued. Survival instructor for ten years. Formal climbing and all the outdoor skills I would ever need. Took me to Washington State. Then to Alaska.

Great thread Jefe. I'll post some scans of me as a young'un when I can sort through my boxes in Bruce's hay barn.

drlBuggman
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Jan 22, 2010 - 02:55pm PT
Countless days hiking miles of rivers while fly fishing with my old man. I guess that is why I'm not too upset when my field work/climbing adventures end with me stumbling to my car hours after dark, wet, cold, hungry, and with no headlamp. That's just how we roll.

Kinda sucks I was allergic to fish though...
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Jan 22, 2010 - 03:09pm PT
Jefe,
I'm sorry to hear that man. But he gave you good genes and started you down the path you're on. And thanks to your mom and probably partly him too, you've turned out to be a great human.

You know the Toaster would only ignore me if I sent him after somebody anyway.......

Now if someone did wrong to his GodDaughter, my Amber, there might be some serious chokin' goin' on!
Batrock

Trad climber
Burbank
Jan 22, 2010 - 03:10pm PT
Weschrist,

Thats the only way to roll in my opinion. Otherwise it's just another day.
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Jan 24, 2010 - 12:29pm PT
Jefe Bump!

Here's to an outdoor upbringing!

Blinky

Trad climber
North Carolina
Jan 24, 2010 - 12:57pm PT
I kinda do and kinda don't.

My Mother wasn't into outdoor anything, wouldn't have dreamed of going camping or anything. My Dad was an outdoorsman but except for a few hunting trips he was pretty much absent when I was little.

But... I grew up less than a mile from Shades Crest, a long 80' to 120' sandstone escarpment that stretches for several miles. I scrambled and explored there by myself for years until I met some guys who were learning to climb. I joined them and we climbed together all over the Southeast until I was 23 when I got into whitewater paddling.

So I'm a outdoors type for sure... but not really because of my upbringing... more like location and a love for wild places.
Peter Haan

Trad climber
San Francisco, CA
Jan 24, 2010 - 01:15pm PT
Jefe, retouched as best as I can with the tiny web files; your slides scanned in hires
TIFFs will produce much better fixes.

Credit: Peter Haan
Credit: Peter Haan
reddirt

climber
Jan 24, 2010 - 02:59pm PT
I had zero outdoorsiness contribution any sort of parenetal units...

I did spend a chunk of my childhood in Westchester County NY. I think one of the most influential & formative events was reading Jean George's My Side of the Mountain in elementary school & going over to her house every now & then to visit her & her meagierie. The most appealing thing about Sam (the main character) to me, back when I was a kid as well as now, was his self sufficiency.

Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Jan 24, 2010 - 03:14pm PT
Is there a better way?


The first deer I saw was through the scope of my dad's rifle resting on the living room window sill.
I grew up in the forest of New England, and was accustomed to listening to the birds before rising.

We wandered through the woods, and in the winter skated on a nearby pond.

How shallow must life be if not exposed to the beauty of nature while young?
MisterE

Social climber
Across Town From Easy Street
Jan 24, 2010 - 03:28pm PT
Yes indeed! Hippy parents, lived pretty much off the grid from ages 2-5, 7-12...

1965:



1966:



1973 (with my woodpile):



1974:



photo not found
Missing photo ID#142492
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 24, 2010 - 03:37pm PT
Pappy took us into the snowy woods when I was five and showed us how to find dry wood and build a fire. The best part was peeing on it to put it out. Now I'm a pyro with a pee fetish.
Doug Robinson

Trad climber
Santa Cruz
Jan 24, 2010 - 04:49pm PT
OK, BASE 104, you win.

You guys SO narrowly escaped another one of my family-camping-on-the-shore-of-Tenaya-Lake stories.

But hey, who needs tales of pup-tents-to-the-wild-Tuolumne, when we can be livin' large in legend? I'm here to tell ya, I taught that BASE dude everything he knows 'bout rasslin' wolverines. Don't see those suckers around anymore, now do ya?

Trouble with your other idea, though, 104, is that the ashes of your sac alone would fill that cave...

Besides, in another century the place'll be overrun by nano-tube-gecko-boot weenies just down from soloing the headwall. They ain't worthy to piss on your ashes.
LEB

climber
PA
Jan 24, 2010 - 05:00pm PT
My family was not at all outdoors-oriented but when I grew up, I became extremely so. If anything, they actually actively discouraged it but for me there was simply no discouraging. If it is in your blood, then it is in your blood.

One of the biggest bones of contention between my first husband and I was that I wanted to do more and more outdoors stuff and he was totally not interested. It became more and more of an issue as time went on. I could not deny that part of myself.

I think parents can certainly point you in one or another direction but if it is not what you want, you won't follow that path. Similarly, if you are called in that direction, it does not matter how much someone tries to discourage you. The outdoors will call you increasingly louder until you finally answer.

Climbing is a subset of outdoors activities and it is rooted in the same common ground. I have seen many here post that family, wives, etc. were totally opposed to their pursuit of said activity and it became a major bone of contention for them. While I never wanted to climb, I can certainly understand this bone of contention thing. It was a major source of rift in my first marriage. Luckily, this second husband is even more outdoors-oriented than I am so there is no longer any problem on that count.
Toker Villain

Big Wall climber
Toquerville, Utah
Jan 24, 2010 - 06:56pm PT
We need a link to that story about the germans camping in the meadows.

;)
Ricky D

Trad climber
Sierra Westside
Jan 24, 2010 - 10:59pm PT
I was raised by wolves.


Does that count?
Scared Silly

Trad climber
UT
Jan 24, 2010 - 11:34pm PT
I think my outdoor upbringing started off with something with the following:

"Get out of the house and don't come back until dinner"

Actually I made my first trip to the valley when I was 2 ... been sleeping in the dirt for over 40 years now.
TGT

Social climber
So Cal
Jan 24, 2010 - 11:41pm PT
My dad was foreman at the Seven Oaks NFS station in the San Bernardinos.
The house was a log cabin.

Almost had a pet rattlesnake at two years old, but Grandma cut his head off with a shovel.

I've been told my first word was Star.

That was my dad's favorite pack mule.
Spider Savage

Mountain climber
SoCal
Jan 24, 2010 - 11:43pm PT
Hell yes. In North Idaho there's nothing happening indoors. I had good outdoor parents. Hiking and camping was what you did for leisure.

Now I live in Los Angeles. In addition to making sure my kids and all their friends had plenty of outdoor experience I volunteer frequently as a Boy Scout leader taking kids out all the time. Sad thing is that more and more, kids are more interested in computer generated adventure.

Dr.Sprock

Boulder climber
Sprocketville
Jan 24, 2010 - 11:50pm PT
my dad used to get drunk and take me out behind the woodshed and give me an awful whoopin, bum phillips style,

"discipline, for disciplin's sake, boy,"

now if that ain't country, i don't know what is,



hey, thats jus a funin,

don't want dad givin me the stank eye when i get to hell,
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 24, 2010 - 11:51pm PT
hey there drljefe... say, what a neat topic here... neat pics, too, everyone...

say, our mom was able to grow up on ohio property, her home, built on and with the woods... they had a neat pond... put in, i think, by her dad... yep---outdoors, she was... taught to her by her dad...

her sis, too, the aunt that died falling through the ice, just recently:
she got her place in the woods, too.. and the same dad, when he was still alive, helped her did THAT pond, too...

the woods are since gone from the growing-up-home that they all have, but the pond is left...

the woods of that land taught them all well....

next:
she moved to san jose, when we were 4-5? (chappy and me) (and the others were babies, and some, yet to be born)...

well, our dad was not that big a fan of the greatoutdoors, but he did hike with friends that loved to do it.. and did take us camping on occasions:
thus, we never forgot it, and took-off for the great outdoors, as our mom had even had a heart for....

sure was in us, for whatever mixture of reasons... even the few that have to live in the city, have found a way to have a place in the greatoutdoors... right now, i am a mite stuck, but i did have a bit of it in texas, for a little while---an old run down place, just out of town:

raised our kids there, before they were full grown,and the place fell apart and we rescued by having to move into town (though still near the openness of texas, being it was a small town)...

and yep:
now our kids love the greatoutdoors...

and here in michigan, the grandkids are starring right up, with camping trips and outdoor sports...

:) and i am SO VERY glad for it....

thanks mom... :)
and thanks to dad, who did take us, even when he was not too keen on it...
we will NEVER forget.. and are even now passing this love for critters, trees, mountains, streams, and all the etc.... (yep, rocks, too)...
on down the line...
:)

if i can find some pics... will post some tomoorrow...
:)


*edit:
say, i just now remembered jody and how he shared about his dad, and the ranger? days... great outdoors stuff...
Ricky D

Trad climber
Sierra Westside
Jan 24, 2010 - 11:51pm PT
"Sad thing is that more and more, kids are more interested in computer generated adventure."

Do what I do when I take youngun's into the wilderness...

I tell them that Cheetos grow wild for the picking on some special trees.

But we will have to walk a while to get to them.

It's an adventure coming and going.






Did I mention that kids now hate me?
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Jan 24, 2010 - 11:55pm PT
hey there ricky d... say, as to this quote..
Do what I do when I take youngun's into the wilderness...

I tell them that Cheetos grow wild for the picking on some special trees.

But we will have to walk a while to get to them.

It's an adventure coming and going.

sounds like the tactics one of my sons used recently, in another field...
*think their kids DO like the greatoutdoors... it is supper that is sometimes that hard adventure... :)
Ghost

climber
A long way from where I started
Jan 25, 2010 - 12:07am PT
It's odd, really, that my father put so much effort into introducing me to the wilderness when he wasn't really all that "outdoorsy" himself. Or at least not in the yuppie way we use the term now. He grew up dirt poor on a farm in northern Canada and came of age just in time for the great depression. But by the time War II was over and he'd settled down and started a family he was doing okay. My mother was a city girl, and really wasn't interested in what the dirt had to offer, but my dad really did make it a priority to give me as much of the outdoors I could handle.

Dunno if it backfired, or what. But by the time I was fifteen I was a paddling bum. Which changed to mountain bum once I discovered the mountains. But I am forever thankful for what he gave me.
Fishing at age 11 or so
Fishing at age 11 or so
Credit: Ghost
Taking mom, dad, and sis on a wilderness trip
Taking mom, dad, and sis on a wilderness trip
Credit: Ghost

Banquo

Trad climber
Morgan Hill, CA
Jan 25, 2010 - 10:42am PT
We were always outdoors.

Dad was a field topographer for the USGS in the western states. We typically moved twice a year to tiny towns in the middle of nowhere. I attended something like 26 different schools. Places like Island Park Idaho, Rosette Utah, Gila Bend Arizona, and John Day Oregon.

When out of school I spent time with dad driving 4WD into the boonies, lugging theodolites to the tops of peaks and hiking out trails while marking them on aerial photos with pinholes.

Dad grew up in Fernwood Idaho and joined the Air Corps late in WW2. He served in Egypt and India. After college he worked on the Alaskan Highway before joining USGS.

He did a stint in Antarctica as navigator (by sun and stars) on a surface expedition. He has a mountain range named after him down there.
Dad, Ellsworth Land, Antarctica, 1962
Dad, Ellsworth Land, Antarctica, 1962
Credit: Banquo
Evel

Trad climber
Slartibartfasts Newest Fjiord
Jan 25, 2010 - 02:11pm PT
Dad was absolutely the best when it came to being in the woods. I had my first trap line when I was 8. Sold the pelts for gas to put into my dirt bike. Dad wanted to settle in CO after the Marines but mom said no deal. Compromise was a month every summer to climb and fish. Mom was no slouch either. Taught me how to shoot well enough to go on to USMC Scout/Sniper. Also a semi-pro water skier way back in the day. All said my folks were the best. Miss 'em both every day.
Alan Rubin

climber
Amherst,MA.
Jan 25, 2010 - 02:44pm PT
My family wasn't the least bit outdoorsy, liked to travel but picnics with friends were the closest we ever got to outdoor activities. But maybe that was enough, since as far back as I can remember I was attracted by the outdoors despite an urban/suburban upbringing. I remember as a very young child driving through northern Westchester, NY past reservoirs(Croton, for those from the area) surrounded by low, forested hills, thinking that it was just incredibly wild and wanting to get out there and wander. No one in the family could figure out where in the "genes" this came from. Probably Moses and that Mt. Sinai thing...!!!!
seth kovar

climber
Bay Area
Jan 25, 2010 - 05:02pm PT
Credit: seth kovar

Me and my Great Uncle, Dave Craft, in the Badlands in '78 or '79...

At this part of the trip I took on the role of Lawman (much to the dismay of Dave, I'm sure), and searched the campground for the notorious and elusive Black Bart...

My memories of the trip are vague, but the awe of it all still lingers.

Much thanks to Dave for opening my eyes and heart to the beauty of this country and instilling in me a love and respect for nature...

note: survival, thanks for the redirection
Anastasia

Mountain climber
hanging from a crimp and crying for my mama.
Jan 25, 2010 - 06:42pm PT
To the horror of my parents, I was a six year old with a knack for wandering into the Sespe Wilderness. That tracked enough dirt into my life to keep it permanent.

14re3

Boulder climber
Twin Peaks ,CA
Jan 26, 2010 - 12:12am PT
Brutus of Wyde brother here.
Army brats raised in alaska. OUR mother was the inspiration. Moose creek camping with mom & her friend (also female) while the army officer husbands worked. Mom also worked at the alaska native hospital as an RN. Winter survival camp for us while in alsska.
She had me & my next younger brother in a scout troop that hiked 50miles of John Muir trail ea summer. Mt whitney, Mt san gregonio (greyback) Slushy medows. joshua tree/ zion / She became a desert lover in her last years!
The user formerly known as stzzo

climber
Sneaking up behind you
Jan 26, 2010 - 02:08am PT
Somewhat. Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts at first, then summer camp. Climbed a lot of trees. Learned to rappel at 14. Now I smile about it. At the time, the objective was simply to rappel - no climbing or caving involved. I suppose it had something to do with the camp being owned by a former SEAL ;-). I suppose it's also why I just kinda dig rapping instead of walking off :D
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Jan 26, 2010 - 03:24am PT
11ish, I got the intro to Josh rock toproping. not sure if we had backpacked san gorgonio by then or not with the scouts, but regular outdoor trips with the scouts was definitely part of my upbringing...

backpack san gorgonio

canoe Colorado flat water sections

road bike to oceanside

backpack to New Army Pass

car camping to Oneill regional park with capture the flag night sessions

but all that was couched in what I thot was a suburban hell and disneylandification of every day living, so not so off the grid. as a teenager, I would exploit this urban environment by bouldering on the traverses on underpasses of freeways.


Allen Hill

Social climber
CO.
Jan 26, 2010 - 04:51am PT
Summit of Ypsilon, RMNP, age thirteen. My fifth ascent of it. Lucky ki...
Summit of Ypsilon, RMNP, age thirteen. My fifth ascent of it. Lucky kid. What a fun thread idea.
Credit: Allen Hill
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Mar 4, 2010 - 02:50pm PT
Started apline skiing between my dads legs when I was 3. I did a fair bit of tree climbing in my folks yard up pine trees. My folks had a condo in Squaw Valley in the 80's and it seemed we'd be up there a couple weekends a month year round, and for most of Christmas break. I got in alot of downhill skiing in my adolescent and teen years. In the spring and summer I'd hike up to the various peaks. The granite cliffs below the first tram tower always captivated me.

My dad was pretty active in outdoor activities after he got out of the Navy post WW II and before settling down with family, he climbed, hiked, skied and scuba dove.

When I was interested in climbing, my folks took me to Tuolumne to take some Yosemite Mountaineering classes, I learned the basics of ropecraft, belaying, self arrest and moving over stone.

Then they got a cabin by Royal Gorge (sick of the drive from the bay area to squaw) and I got into x-c skiing in my college years, so I'd ski the trails in the winter, and mountain bike them in the summer.

I guess that qualifies as an outdoor upbringing.
Pate

Trad climber
Mar 4, 2010 - 03:04pm PT
I don't remember not being able to ski. It was just part of life. And I thought naively that all people had a ski background like I did, not only were we rope tow/kicker groms but we were a kick-and-glide-pine tar wax family too. Silent New England woods.

My grandfather put a fly rod in my hand and took away the spinner and KastMaster when I was 8, a heavy bamboo rod that wore me out within an hour, but I'd still swing it all day. Sunnies and bass in Ohio on his pond led to bonefish, tarpon and permit with him stalking the flats at his place in the keys. You could see tailing fish from the porch, put down your iced tea and sneak out and have a go. He'd glass them with his old WW2 navy binocs and say "Why don't you go out and show those fish who's boss."

Summer camp was all hiking and white water for a month every July. Frame packs and steep White Mountain trails. Saco and Androscoggin floats.

I'm not sure if they knew what they were doing to me as a child, but somehow they peeled me away from pop-culture and instilled a sense of wonder in me from day 1. And it led me to peaks, waves, reefs, powder, cliffs, rivers, deserts views and memories and a collection of rugged, wonderful friends, and a headful of realized dreams that make up my life.

I recently took my daughter down to Florida, to the same flats I walked with my grandfather 30 years ago, and I felt a profound sense of attachment and connectivity while standing out in that impossibly turquoise water. One of those rare moments when all that has been and all that will be are perfectly displayed, with me right there where I was supposed to be. A moment of clarity.

Looking down I hoped that I was doing the same for her.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Mar 4, 2010 - 03:39pm PT
nice Pate

totally understand, as I suspect most here feel that ring of truth in it.
tolman_paul

Trad climber
Anchorage, AK
Mar 4, 2010 - 04:46pm PT
Pate,

It's a amazing what kids pick up, and how much experiences mean to them.

For his 4th birthday I took my oldest boy, now 13, on a "hunting" trip. It was a 3 day canoe/camping trip. We paddled out two the second of a long string of lakes, set up camp, and spent the time portaging and exploring the other lakes in the system. We did some fishing for rainbow trout, I don't recall if we caught any, and enjoyed warming our fingers in the frozen morning by the campfire.

Literally for the next 6 months that trip was the only thing he'd talk about.

drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Dec 17, 2010 - 10:38am PT
Credit: drljefe

All the old slides have been scanned.
A treasure trove of images I've never seen, but remember.
Experiences like this helped shape the man I would become.
Leggs

Sport climber
California originally, Old Pueblo presently..
Dec 17, 2010 - 11:03am PT
I like the man you've become...
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
CALIENTE!
Dec 17, 2010 - 11:04am PT


Yes I was blessed to be the 2nd son of an engineer and outdoorsman who grew up during the depression. Like many of his generation my pop loved doing things with his hands and being self-sufficient.

He taught me to hunt, fish, use a chain saw, split wood, build fences, build spring houses, build houses, travel, camp, take care of equipment (a man takes care of the tools that take care of him, son).

He was also an engineer and metallurgist; an acknowledged pioneer of robotic welding techniques and in his later years in custom 'micro-welding' for medical equipment and other specialized tasks where tiny welds and exotic materials were involved (like welding aluminum to graphite....).

A man with one foot in the last century and one in the next.

He was of the kind, well, an old Aerosmith song may describe it best:

We all live on the edge of town
Where we all live ain't a soul around
People start a coming all we do is just grin
and say we gotta move out cause city's moving in
I say we gotta move out before city moves in.

He took us from rural New Jersey to even more rural Tennessee in 1973. The remainder of my childhood was spent on 30 acres of woods fields and hills, with a limestone cliff just down the bluff at Turnbull Creek. A thousand acre homestead ranch belonging to the Spicer clan backed my pop's land and I had the run of that place.

Had my own horse, chickens, cows, and learned how to take care of all of those critters too.

Now I am not my Pop. I roll a bit differently then he did. But I carry him and the skills he taught me in my heart, everywhere, all the time.

Cheers
DMT
Leggs

Sport climber
California originally, Old Pueblo presently..
Dec 18, 2010 - 10:16pm PT
I grew up with parents who loved the outdoors. I can't recall even one family vacation that involved a hotel/motel room. We spent all vacations traveling up and down my home state of California, into the Pacific Northwest and Canada, camping and hiking all along the way...
When mom passed at the age of 35, her ashes were scattered over Lake Tahoe from a small plane, as she'd requested... beautiful.

I started teaching my own son how to climb when he was three, and have followed in my parents footsteps as I expose him to the beauty and power of being outdoors and enjoying all it has to offer...

I should take advise posted earlier about scanning slides, as all my childhood photos are still in that format... my father took some amazing photos...

Here is a photo or two of my son...
photo not found
Missing photo ID#182699
photo not found
Missing photo ID#182700
photo not found
Missing photo ID#182702



drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Jul 17, 2011 - 05:22pm PT
Sea of Cortez
Sea of Cortez
Credit: drljefe

Backroads wrenchin'
Backroads wrenchin'
Credit: drljefe

Credit: drljefe

Take your kids when you go.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jul 17, 2011 - 05:36pm PT
I did.

This is my Grandpa, he was the co-founder of Sugarbush. It's a ski area in Vermont. He did this after his time in the Tenth Mountain Division in WWII.


This is me at 12. My Grandpa took me to France every summer to train for ski racing. It worked, and I did well at ski racing.
http://s260.photobucket.com/albums/ii22/btmayo79/?action=view¤t=LaGrave.jpg


This is my Dad. In this picture we were backpacking, 15 years ago.


Another picture I took of the old man.


And a final one. On Mt Jefferson in NH, BITD.

sbailey2

climber
Jan 31, 2013 - 04:45pm PT
Brandon,
Who is your Grandpa? My Grandfather was also in the Tenth, and from Vermont.
10b4me

Boulder climber
Somewhere on 395
Jan 31, 2013 - 07:25pm PT
the family used to take road trips to visit relatives in Missouri, and Colorado, but didn't really take up the outdoor lifestyle until a senior in high school.
donini

Trad climber
Ouray, Colorado
Jan 31, 2013 - 07:33pm PT
Always played outdoors....team sports etc, also Huck Finned it building tree houses and fishing for crappies and bass. Went to boy scout camp in the Poconos, but no National Park visits or backpack trips in the wilderness.
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Jan 31, 2013 - 08:29pm PT
I have spent my entire life outside, except lately, when I am more and more attached to my computer.

That's OK. I just bought a sailboat, and NOBODY is invited. Except people who can teach me.

I just like being alone these days.
Brandon-

climber
The Granite State.
Jan 31, 2013 - 08:45pm PT
Sbailey2, my grandpa was Edgerton (Tony) Hyde. He was in Italy in the Tenth during the war. Purple Heart and all that. Sadly, he passed away almost a year ago. He is missed.

This is his medal for being inducted into the VT skiing hall of fame,



Like Pate wrote upthread, I can't remember not skiing. My Dad and Grandpa strapped plastic skis on me when I was eighteen months old. It was all downhill from there. HA!

Climbing came along when I was about twelve and as a skinny little ski racer, it was only natural that I climb. My dad was my constant belay slave for years, even though he didn't want to climb.
moosedrool

Trad climber
lost, far away from Poland
Jan 31, 2013 - 08:51pm PT
After I turned seven I spent every summer in camps for children and then for teenagers. The camps were located in forests, often by a lake, or by the sea. A couple of times we went to the mountains. I loved it! If I didn't have a family I would be most likely a dirtbag.

drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2013 - 09:53pm PT
So I started this thread a couple of years ago when I was going through my Dad's old slides.
Well they were sent off to Mumbai, or somewhere, and for Christmas my brother burned discs of all the scans.

What a treasure of memories and once again I'm reminded of why I grew up to love the desert, the ocean, Mexico, rock, the Southwest, camping, getting dirty, ancient cultures, and...especially my Mom.

Here's just some of the thousand or more images I've been drifting through.



































Take your kids when you go. Instill in them a love and respect for the natural world. Let them get dirty, scared, scraped up, and happy.



LilaBiene

Trad climber
Jan 31, 2013 - 09:56pm PT
Yep!!! I was one lucky kid.

Growing up, my brother and I spent every summer with my mom on the ocean in Maine while my dad worked and came up on weekends when he could. We used to have contests to see who could actually make it the whole summer without ever putting shoes on. There was no TV, and we had to learn to entertain ourselves when the fog would roll in for a week or more at a time. Seaweed and jellyfish fights! By the end of the summer we could run over the barnacle-covered rocks without drawing so much as a drop of blood. The rocks and tidal pools provided endless possibilities for exploration -- something new every turn of the tide. Fishing, swimming, lobster hauling (replenishing bait...bah!), caulking skiffs in the spring, reading buoys, weather, shoreline, tidal pull...

My parents put me on skis when I was four. I used to say that I'd rather ski than breathe. My favorite days on the mountain were the cold, windy ones because it meant no lines, more runs and lots of ice. On those days you could hear your own edges and just fly. I actually can't ski in powder. Sad, I know. Is it me, or are skis embarrassingly short these days?

My dad taught me how to sail and windsurf in those same Maine waters. We went backpacking in Baxter State Park when I was about 11 and climbed Mt. Katahdin -- my dad and uncle dragged me across Knife's Edge howling. (Before crossing my uncle told us about a Boy Scout that had fallen off the year before and had never been seen again...)

My grandpa taught me about respecting the ocean and always keeping your wits about you once you pushed off from the docks. We fished with block wood scraps and hand-tied lines and hooks. I can still clean a mean fish and make his famous fish chowder. He took us blueberry, raspberry and blackberry picking, showed us the Indian trails around town and told us endless stories. He took us to climb the best trees. He taught us how to use a jackknife, splice a rope and tie endless knots. Most importantly, he led by example. He never lost his temper, saw the best in everyone and always made sure we knew how to get ourselves out of trouble by always having a back-up plan in mind.

Lucky, lucky kid.

Edit:

There's a point to this, right?
There's a point to this, right?
Credit: LilaBiene
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2013 - 10:11pm PT














The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 31, 2013 - 10:29pm PT
Awesome pics, jefe...

I grew up on the edge of what was wilderness, now urban sprawl, and learned a lot about nature and climbing by exploring every nook and cranny of every canyon and mesa I could walk to from my house.

About as soon as I could drive, I was doing the same thing in Yosemite
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2013 - 10:39pm PT
Thanks Kevin.
What's cool is that when I look at my dad's photography I see a lot of my own "eye", my sense of composition, etc.
Even though he split when I was young, there's a lot of him in me.
And I have to thank him. Every weekend was a camping trip. My parents would pick me up from school on Friday with the rig packed and we'd be on the road.
They'd also pull me out of school for extended Mexico trips.
Todd Eastman

climber
Bellingham, WA
Jan 31, 2013 - 11:06pm PT
... come home for dinner!
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2013 - 11:21pm PT
Love your Mother











ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Feb 1, 2013 - 12:07am PT
My Mom tells me, she had me in her stomach when she and my Daddyo camped on the Merced in Yosemite, 1958! That started it all for me there. I'm sure little did she know what they were starting!
Peace
east side underground

climber
Hilton crk,ca
Feb 1, 2013 - 12:14am PT
Credit: east side underground
Credit: east side underground
Credit: east side underground
Credit: east side underground
Credit: east side underground
Credit: east side underground
Credit: east side underground


jefe " love your mother" f*#k ya.....mines been gone almost 30 yrs now
Anastasia

climber
InLOVEwithAris.
Feb 1, 2013 - 12:18am PT
Yes and No... My parents would gather wild plants for food. Mom taught me how to pee outside when I was four during one of those wild plant escapades. I would work the soil since I could stand, we planted, learned what was poisonous and what was not. Watched my Dad tend the bee hives. He could do it without a suit. Bees didn't bother him while I sadly have always been allergic. I remember finding a snake in our backyard and my mother killing it with a hoe in one whack. Plus my brother and I played at the local creek pretending we were explorers/frontiersman. When we visited my grandmother in Greece, I would chase the goats, route find through the mountains, stay away from my uncle's mule, to watch out for his back legs since they could kill etc.

It wasn't camping, and yet it was wilder than what most folks grew up with.
Donald Thompson

Trad climber
Los Angeles,CA
Feb 1, 2013 - 04:40am PT
Not in the sense of living in the city and being taken camping per se.
My earliest experiences in the outdoors were , thankfully, of a varied nature, in many wonderful locales.
My dad was a career man in the Army. For 3 years we lived near Hanau, Germany. Nearby we're mysterious forests with flowing rivers where the mist would hang on the trees for days.
We hiked for hours in the forest, exploring, even though it was off-limits, but we found our hole in the fence.
Where the forest gave way to train tracks there sat a tiny little German village. We fantasized that Hansel and Gretel lived nearby. Magic.

In Kansas there was a large ,rarely used Army training area behind our house. Blizzards would rage for days to reveal a world of snow and ice when the sky would clear. We would hike in the snow and discover iced over streams where we could sled down their winding courses. In the spring tornados would move through, churning up the soil and uncovering a million ring-neck snakes. And then the fireflies...

In Monterey Bay we used to take our bikes and race down huge sand dunes around Sand City. We'd go out on boats and fish, or fish off the city pier all day. We also ventured into the hills behind Seaside, looking for the illusive junk bike dealer.
Wayno

Big Wall climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 1, 2013 - 04:54am PT
Yeah, a crow shat on a log and sun hatched me. Is that outdoor enough for you?

%^)
Norwegian

Trad climber
Pollock Pines, California
Feb 1, 2013 - 08:56am PT
im hookin up my ladies
the best i can,
i take it so far as to eliminate
that threshold that distinguishes
outside and inside,

Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
Credit: Norwegian
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Feb 1, 2013 - 09:24am PT
Credit: StahlBro

Credit: StahlBro

Credit: StahlBro

Credit: StahlBro
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 1, 2013 - 10:04am PT
Nice one stahlbro. Looks like Havasupai.





















Remember when you "played", you played with dirt? Or at least played outside instead of in front of a computer screen?


Even if you weren't camping out all the time, chances are you were still outside a lot more than kids today. F*#kin A, I just caught myself sounding really old.
matty

Trad climber
under the sea
Feb 1, 2013 - 10:05am PT
In short...YES!!!


Father-son trip report here
justthemaid

climber
Jim Henson's Basement
Feb 1, 2013 - 10:52am PT
Nice pics everyone. This thread is fun. Jefe- your shots on the beach in Baja mirror some of mine. We've got some parallels. I'll raise you a cute polka-dot bathing suit as soon as Dad gets some scans to me. All my little kid photos seem to be in his possession.

My family was pretty outdoorsey. They were both LA Unified teachers so we had summers off. Skiing, hiking, swimming, Baja trips and we owned horses so I was outdoors all the time.


PS: @ Weege... Guess we won't be parking Arnie at your cabin any time soon ;)

PPS: @ Jefe.. Yup.. Kids these days...
BASE104

Social climber
An Oil Field
Feb 1, 2013 - 11:10am PT
Jefe,

Those are some great pics. I MUST go scan the ones of my son when we were hanging out. He dug it.

One of the funniest moments was teaching him how to pee outside without upsetting the ladies. Priceless.

Now he is off in college.
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Feb 1, 2013 - 12:04pm PT
Jefe,

Yep, Havasupai in the early 70's. What an incredible place.

Rob

Edit - Are those Chaco Cyn shots? maybe de Chelly? Chaco rules....
Karen

Trad climber
So Cal urban sprawl Hell
Feb 1, 2013 - 12:20pm PT
Credit: Karen

Every summer my family camped in the Sierra, namely Twin Lakes outside of Bridgeport. My Grandparents loved to fish, while they fished I would go explore. My Grandparents also camped along the coast at a place called, Faria-think that is how it's spelled-again it was all about the fishing.

My parents always were camping and exploring all over, from the Salton Sea, Joshua Tree, Dana Point (keeping in mind none of these areas were developed yet.

One summer (it was the year for me between 4th and 5th grade) we drove all the way up to Alaska, north of Fairbanks as far as we could drive the camper. We literally went everywhere you could drive up there. We ended up driving onto and taking the ferry back to St. George. That was cool, we slept in the camper then spent the days looking at the amazing scenery.

There is so much more but I will spare you. It is no wonder I totally love camping and exploring and have one a ton of it on my own, independent, never needed a partner, just would set out on my own. There's a world of beauty out there and I've never understood people who just laze around and don't get out there!!!
drljefe

climber
El Presidio San Augustin del Tucson
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 1, 2013 - 08:12pm PT
stahlbro, yes, Canyon de Chelly, Monument Valley, Chaco Canyon, Bandolier, Sedona.
There's even one posted on a previous page of the hike into Havasupai.

Cool stories and pictures, folks!

My parents loved the Pueblos too.
Acoma, maybe?
Credit: drljefe

Once my dad bailed my mom and I continued exploring together.
Lago Chapala or Patzcuaro, can't remember, road tripping deep in Mexico.
Credit: drljefe

Credit: drljefe

Credit: drljefe

And I guess it all led up to this sorta thing
Credit: drljefe
my favorite ground up FA from last summer, High Pro Glow

and one of my favorite boulder problems, with my buddy giving his kids an outdoor upbringing
Credit: drljefe







limpingcrab

Trad climber
the middle of CA
Feb 1, 2013 - 08:20pm PT
I love seeing pictures of people outside with their little kids. Cool thread, getting me excited for my first, due in May!

And yes I did, very much. No pics on my phone though.

throwpie

Trad climber
Berkeley
Feb 1, 2013 - 08:27pm PT
Me and Mom. Yosemite Valley circa 1954. We would stay for weeks and months at a time...me, mom, Grandma Turner and my sister...along with assorted aunts, uncles and friends. My dad ran the Sherwin Williams paint store in Merced so he would come up on the weekends. We had the run of the place...just had to show up for dinner and the firefalls.
Credit: throwpie
hooblie

climber
from out where the anecdotes roam
Feb 1, 2013 - 08:40pm PT
out - where all the stuff that always was, pretty much still is

door - implies sanctuary, launching pad, base station, shelter place

up - harding was being cynical, up is where we drag our selves

bring - ok, folks made it possible technically

ing - and it goes on ... thankfully!


my folks, ya i owe 'em bigtime
michaeld

Sport climber
Sacramento
Feb 1, 2013 - 08:55pm PT
Hiking, Camping, soccer, baseball, track and field.

Then I turned 12, was the boss of me. Skateboard, biked, weed and alcohol.

Then I turned 16 and started playing video games 20 hours a day for 5 years until I found rock climbing.

I was outdoors for 95% of the time in those video games if that counts.
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 2, 2013 - 07:40pm PT
Great thread idea!

Here's my favorite images so far:

El Jefe, this one belongs blown up and framed in your home!
Pretty much says it all.




East Side Underground:




Norwegian:

Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Feb 2, 2013 - 09:50pm PT
Outdoor upbringing?
No, not in the conventional sense.

My old man toted a B.A.R. and a heavy pack up and down snow-covered hills during the Korean War. He swore he would never hike again. Claims he's a sociopath, says he was never happier than when he was killing gooks! What a bunch of BS! I kind of get what he means tho …

I do have one very crisp memory outdoor with pops: I was four years old and he took me on a short day hike in the brush at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains above Arcadia California … Showed me how to kick the sides of my feet into the off-camber dirt trail where it sloped down and away into the ravine. Slow and deliberate movement, self-reliance, route finding, balance, technique: it's all in there in that one experience!

He took me to the sports car races a lot and left me to my own devices: so I was outside at Riverside Internationa l Raceway, pedaling around on my Schwinn stingray out in the dirt under the hot sun, watching big bore sports cars battle it out … and not very far from Mt. Rubidoux in fact. That was kind of an outdoor experience on steroids.

But as kids we were outside all the time, what with it being a 60s and all. My boyhood pal and I grew up more or less as brothers at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains. At 9 years of age we were doing long day hikes without supervision. By 13 we were teaching ourselves how to rock climb.

Hard to say if it's in our family blood to be ... outside.
If there's any link, it'd be traceable only as epigenetic.

Yosemite Valley, 1931, taken by my father's adoptive parents:

TMJesse

Mountain climber
Olympia, WA
Feb 2, 2013 - 10:40pm PT
I was truly blessed with the most perfect start to the outdoors - Tuolumne Meadows was our family vacation spot, as it is today. Looking over these antique pictures is a bit startling!

1962
1962
Credit: TMJesse

1962
1962
Credit: TMJesse

Lake Tenaya
Lake Tenaya
Credit: TMJesse

Headed back to camp from the store.  Could be 2012, but was 50 years p...
Headed back to camp from the store. Could be 2012, but was 50 years previous.
Credit: TMJesse

Just the start of a long family tradition
Just the start of a long family tradition
Credit: TMJesse

to see today's updates, see:

http://www.supertopo.com/tr/August-2010-Tuolumne-Family-Basecamp/t10746n.html
http://www.supertopo.com/tr/Annual-Tuolumne-Family-Basecamp/t11153n.html
http://www.supertopo.com/tr/Food-for-Dreams-Annual-Tuolumne-Family-Campout/t11656n.html
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