notes on San Diego rock climbing

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Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Original Post - Nov 13, 2009 - 09:25am PT
bvb's Premium Miniature concept was ahead of its time.

True, you probably won't garner any "mass media sponsorship"
and the "conquistadors of the useless" probably won't be around,
since the stellar rock climbing recreation in this region is anything
but useless.

True, there are no "crevasse" to fall into, and you probably
won't need a "helo rescue" but the serious brush guarding
and hiding the excellent stone of San Diego county is one
of this regions finest attributes.

Why the obvious route finding challenges, and the inherent
skills demanded by this type of terrain have not been widely
accepted - I have no idea.

Route finding skills, and dealing with the environment on its
own terms (you will have no choice) are universally upheld
in our sport, and San Diego rock climbing falls right in line
with these interests.

So, if you think that the brush is just too "icky" for you,
or feel it is better to let others develop and maintain the
access paths, then please, go to Joshua Tree.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 09:31am PT
And if you climb here, and if you get lost in or mauled
by the landscape, you are far from alone.

How many times have I heard "real climbers" bitching
and whining about this really neat aspect of challenge
provided by the terrain? Because of a few scrapes?

More times than I can count.

"eww, its hard to find things at Woodson"

And the problem being?
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 09:36am PT
I had supposed than the new school had universally
come to terms with this key attribute, but I guess it is
still the Provence of those who accept climbing as a
means of connecting to the natural world, and not only
"accept" the terrain, but celebrate it as an integral
part of the experience.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 09:52am PT
Remember, these are tiny climbs, hardly routes at all,
so the challenges for today's super climbers appear to
be few.

Look again.

Has Laverne had an onsight lead?
Has Starving in Stereo? (believe it has been led)
(Good on ya if you have)

And there are countless others.

Aliens and offset nuts have given climbers the tools
they need to perhaps put a new face on the game,
if they choose, and the game is the onsight lead.

What's the matter? Afraid of hitting the deck? True,
the ground is only maybe 30 to 50 feet under you,
and therein lies the spice.

Remember, the runout lead high above pro is only
one means of adding "voltage" to free climbing.

And, you are advised to lace it up, since eating dinner
with a fork is its own reward, and getting hurt far from
the car, deep within the densely foliated terrain could
be a bad scene.
F10

Trad climber
e350
Nov 13, 2009 - 09:58am PT
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 10:05am PT
It's all about attitude, and how you view the outdoor
resources of this fine region; boasting near perfect
granite and near perfect winter weather too.
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Nov 13, 2009 - 10:10am PT
Oh come on Ray the weather is not that perfact, have you looked outside today? It's cloudy out, HAHA!

I see your back in the hood, hope your well.

T2
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 10:46am PT
In the 70's and 80's we "knew the game".

The psychological barriers of techncial difficulty.
The limitations of what now seems like the clunky
gear of the day. And just the sheer volume of thousands
of acres of rock climbing potential, waiting to be explored,
were some of the "walls" we ran into.

The top rope was often used because it suited the terrain, our
abilities at the time, and we adapted to it. There seemed little
point drilling bolts in some steep face on a 40' boulder, when
hundreds of huge boulders with (hopefully) cracks to climb
awaited discovery.

There was little peer motive, and it seemed like little peer
support or impetus to push beyond what was deemed the
unspoken "mode of operation".

And so we did our best, we had our "fun in the sun".

Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 11:15am PT
High Ball sessions at Mt. Woodson were without doubt
some of the most fun we had. The unspoked "prize" going
to the ones who could send the most, the hardest and
the highest. Or, to the one who could send what no one else
thought was sane, over and over again.

Tom Scott, bvb, Jeff and Adrian Almodovar, Greg Epperson,
Mike Paul, Behay, Rick Piggot and others locals providing the
"fuel" for days and days of "playoffs" - a rich game, motivating
each of us and inviting us all to taste a little "humbe pie". Yes,
it was competition, and yes, we competed like mad.
TKingsbury

Trad climber
MT
Nov 13, 2009 - 12:14pm PT
Thanks for posting Ray, interesting stuff for sure!

Cheers!
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 12:22pm PT
Mt. Woodson is the most well known and historic climbing
area in San Diego county. It has great access, sees lots of traffic
and enjoys the greatest concensus on difficulty.

In the 70's and into the 80's almost no one seemed to believe
we had anything harder than than 5.11. So many climbs at
Woodson remained undervalued for some time. But that began
to change and in my mind it changed fast when Jonny Woodward
came down and repeated one of the areas benchmark classics,
John Bachar's Driving South, giving it a grade of solid 5.12a.
Now, keep in mind, we had no internet, but word of the "new
grade" spread fast - it was news. Here was someone who knew
what they were talking about telling us that yeah, we had climbs
harder than 5.11!

That climb, as many of you know, was established as a ropeless
highball. Bachar's account of the "hideous bailouts" and "you
don't want to fall from up there" told to us right here on
Supertopo. So, yeah, its a good TR, lots of fun and maybe the
accomplishment of a personal goal - very cool. But, from one
standpoint, as a TR, you have not repeated it the way it done
on the FA. Maybe you get "points" for fewest TR rehearsals?
Mine was two, spread out over two years before a ropeless
send in 1984.

BTW, on a low hill west of Mother Grundy, I found another
even steeper and more buldging "Driving South". No highball
madness here, and since the jams are more positive, no harder
either, only .12a, plus the rock is a touch grainy, too. Just another
day out in the beautiful hills of my beloved San Diego backcounrty.
Kinda doubt its seen a second, but you never know. :-)
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Nov 13, 2009 - 12:46pm PT
Ray, are you trying to sell a new guidebook or something? Joking.


bvb sent me to Woodson with nothing but a handful of verbal descriptions and a crash pad. Lemon Chiffon blew my mind. Jaws kept me psyched for days, although it wasn't quite enough. I would love to go back with a spotter... I think I hear my train a comin!

This thread needs pics!
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 01:35pm PT
Beta for Laverne lead/on-sight lead:

Perhaps bring a pad for the start, there is a slab behind
forming a shallow cleft.

You pull out of there on a size transition from 1 1/4"
into a 1 1/8" section, pretty overhung. Its great!
The crux is up high, straight-in thumb up pinkies
up a smooth face.

Bring Aliens and know how to use.

In case, just in case, the crack (which was mud filled and
had to be cleaned) may have sprouted grass or shrubbies -
you may wanna look before you go.

In plain view for years with the word "Laverne" spray
painted on the side :-) Maybe 5 minutes above the road,
on "Woodson South".

Estimated grade as lead? Sure, I'll go out on a limb, maybe .12b
Total height: maybe 30+' tops. :-)
Spice-o-rama.

Betting it has never seen a real (non-TR) ascent.
And is, for sure by today's standard, very leadable.

ok - that's good for a while...
Have a swell day.
spRay

EDIT: in S.D. I see it like this:
if its low enough to highball, TR to rehearse if needed.
if its too high to highball, TR to rehearse lead, if needed,
and number your rehearsal up front.

Top Rope ascent is rehearsal/practice/ fun in the sun
"training" or bouldering...
Not valid FA in the big picture sense.
The rules don't change in San Diego.
(they just take a siesta)
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 13, 2009 - 03:18pm PT
There's a new world of climbing in San Diego.

Woodson will always have its history and unique place in west coast climbing, but some major climbing areas are only just recently becoming known to the public, after years of quiet and intense activity.

Mostly sport climbing, up to 6 pitches.

Some of it, to Quote Mr. Leavittation - "the best granite sportclimbing I've ever done".

"World class" gets heard even.

All requires a moderate effort to get to, with a sweet reward at the end of the trail. But you gotta know where to go... it ain't roadside.

I will post some photographic evidence should I break through the technological and mental barriers...stay tuned.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
sorry, just posting out loud.
Nov 13, 2009 - 03:33pm PT
dig it, can't send it, but I dig it.

Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 04:32pm PT
Establishing access paths (trail making) evolved a lot between 1975
and 1985/6.

We started as dumbass beach kids hacking away, but the nose for
establishing a singular line of access was born. For a couple good reasons.
Clearly it made sense for the terrain and, you want a logical route right
to the good places. Trail making became our art. The other reason was
obvious - only an idiot would "brute force" a bushwack line in these
hills - you'd get ripped up, stinging nettle raining down on your sweaty
back or, stopped cold by a wall of thick brush. No chainsaws allowed,
stealth mode, sensitive access.

The first tool was a machete, they worked "ok". The real deal though
is the three person team. Lead goes forward on pre-marked line
(you have to scout in advance) stomping brush down with boots
(long sleeves/jeans/hat/protective eye wear mandatory) The second
does the cutting, lopping shears preferred. The third clears the line,
tossing the brush off.

By making solo missions to scout a line, and working it in stages, major
trail sections were built up, accross, and over some pretty big hills.
Then we had cool places to go, bring our girlfriends, backpack in,
climb, camp and have a blast all by our selfish Sandi-Ego selves.

How many machetes got worn out?
How many lopping shears destroyed?
A few, for sure. :-)
Ghoulwe

Trad climber
Spokane, WA
Nov 13, 2009 - 05:01pm PT
Don't forget to mention that all of this trail building and exploration was taking place in rattlesnake territory. I had more than one heart-stopper while tromping through the scrub and surprising one of those little guys. Made the bouldering seem downright safe...

Eric
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 13, 2009 - 05:03pm PT
oh god. i remember some epic bushwhacks. but one stands out as THE most epic. the scumbags had spotted a new crag way out in the east county. we made plans to go back and look it over up close -- from the road the thing looked like arch rock: huge, perfect stone, stacked with laser-cut splitters.

long story short, the approach took us three hours. to go maybe 1/3 of a mile. we spent much of that time crawling on our hands and knees through a hellish tangle of coastal chapparal with full packs on. progress was made only through great effort of will, brute thrashing, and a total disregard for our bodies. this was maybe '77, and we hadn't yet discovered the joy of pruning shears.

we arrived at the crag spent, out of water, and looking like we'd all been under the lash. our cloths were torn to ribbons and we were covered with lacerations. i'm not making this up; we got totally fuking yodelled. we never even roped up -- we were too concerned about how much time it would take to reverse the approach. best part? as san diego crags can sometimes do, the cliff had shrunk from a 300' arch rock monolith to maybe 80 feet.

but the splitters were there, and they were perfect. we never went back.
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Nov 13, 2009 - 05:07pm PT
Ray, you need to upgrade you understanding of how to do "Battle of the Brush" in SD. When we were opening the T-domes and Rainbow back in 87, Warbler made it possible for us to do it by supplying the proper tools. We opened a few locales and made it seem civilized without the double overhead brush, though it required a team effort with a brush hook, loppers and the occasional chain saw. Rainbow was a great example of how to beat back the brush.

Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 05:27pm PT
re-read my post Pat.
no chainsaws allowed in SE county - stealth.
besides, the saw can't get the roots out.
our mode suited our money and how
it worked for us given the terrain.


please feel free to provide
your own methods in any
detail you like: T-domes
ain't the Mother Grundy.

edit: its YOUR thread too, eg:
"at suck and such place, we found napalm
worked like a charm".

also, bvb, that FA part is drivel too,
we all know how it works for various
areas - your views here very valid.
go for it, eg:
"what olson said is horseshit and we
all know it, etc. etc.

LOL :-)

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

plenty of room for input
and pics here, folks.

Ray

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 13, 2009 - 05:45pm PT
Yeah, at T domes we had the cover of ten lanes of freeway to dampen the two stroke. A light chainsaw rules for cutting trail, but you better be good with it or you'll throw the chain, or dull it in the dirt.

We used to run across that fwy to get up there.

We noticed that a storm drain left the brow ditch on the crag side of the fwy, and appeared to head under the fwy below. Another storm drain of the same size left the parking spot just north of the Migra chekpoint, in the basic direction of the other. Did they connect under the fwy, giving us a safe, albeit dark, method to cross?

Only one way to find out.

We had only gotten fifty yds or so, when we heard the booming voice of a Border Patrol agent ordering us out. We tried to explain what we were up to, but he didn't dig it. He's all irate - " What if you guys were in there and there was a flash flood?" This underneath a cloudless SD sky.

Good to know guys like him are looking out for us dumb climbers, huh?

Edit: Hey Pat, hows it going? If I had a scanner I'd post a really funny photo of you toproping Hatchett at T domes with one hand on the rope and the other clutching a beer which you appear to be pouring down your throat as fast as possible...
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 13, 2009 - 05:53pm PT
hey warbler are you gonna post pics or what. i'd love to see some of the new crags, especially the highly speculated upon but rarely seen granite sportcrag somewhere in the vicinity of rainbow/temecula/steve mcqueen/dark side of the moon...
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 13, 2009 - 05:54pm PT
thanks Kevin,
exactly, and if Woodson ain't the hub no more,
tell us what is - being dated is my bag now.

ok, I'm getting on a plane right now.
B great to hear/see some other SD
stuff...

B back tomorrow.

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 13, 2009 - 06:57pm PT
SD brethren,

I will post photos, but I'm a bit embarrassed to say I need assistance with the procedure.

There it is - I'm a digital noob, OK?

Be patient - I got some good ones.
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Nov 13, 2009 - 08:30pm PT
no one ever said there would be evidence.
rich sims

Trad climber
co
Nov 13, 2009 - 09:04pm PT
Ray
Red Book C&B of SDC page 92 I found a sneak 20 minute approach told to me by a guy who climbed EC Mt. in the 50s.
If this is the place I remember by, in, or through the reservation. It was 89-90 just before I moved to CO.
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Nov 13, 2009 - 09:36pm PT
Kevin check your email.
Tui

Boulder climber
SD
Nov 13, 2009 - 10:02pm PT
So I have this 5 page guide to woodson that has section 3 "the missing link, and other wonders" and "heart of the congo" written on it. The version I have is cut off on all sides of all 5 pages. Does anybody have the full version of this guide?

Also does anybody have any info/maps on all the stuff that is bolted between PhD and Vice Principals? There is a big wall with bolts up to for two lines. I also found one that looks like Driving South but has one big diamond shape pocket on it. Or does anybody have info/maps on the stuff that's below Fall Semester towards the Y Crack (I think that's what it's called). Any and all info and maps would be great. You can just email them if you don't want them posted online.

The Deerhorn Guide would be appreciated as well
Thanks.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 13, 2009 - 11:46pm PT
An SD area article from the May/June 1989 issue of Rock & Ice.









Eric Beck

Sport climber
Bishop, California
Nov 13, 2009 - 11:53pm PT
Hi Ray. Remember one we did where we poked our way out thru the brush to the east quite a ways. I thought it looked like a climb I had seem pictures of from Smith Rock, you picked right up on this and named it the "Grain Reaction".

Out this evening at the Happy Boulders with the neighbor's dogs, cool, good session.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 12:02am PT
Steve, you are the master archivist. Haven't seen that in years, and I bet those routes haven't been touched in years.

The rock up there, as is obvious in the photos, is excellent. Parking is a problem though. As I mentioned upthread, we used to run across Interstate 15 to get up there, but that has gotten sketchier as Temecula has metastasized into Temegalopolis. There is parking on the crag side of the fwy about 1/2 mile north of our old crossing point, closer to the Rock Candy Dome route shown in the second photo.

Good climbing, a little run out in keeping with the era.

Maybe a new crew will recut the trails and bring the domes back to life someday. We had many good days up there
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 14, 2009 - 12:04am PT
Another article on San Diego bouldering.



TripL7

Trad climber
'dago'
Nov 14, 2009 - 01:50am PT
Hello Ray!

Started climbing here in '71.
Was on many FFA's with Bill Breunner/at the Gorge BITD.
We climbed all over East County.
Was possible the first person to take the Santee Boulders seriously '71-88'.
Lived on El Nopal st. across from Magnolia Boulders 70-80's boldered alot.
I use to boulder on some of the cleanest free standing stones in El Cajon/Santee '71- but they were all blasted sooner or later to make room for industrial/residential dev.

I haven't read any posts hear just noticed title not sure what you are looking for.

Trip~
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 14, 2009 - 07:45am PT
notes on San Diego rock climbing
south east SD climbing access : mas importante

Private land - access sensitive!

Being lo-key is the sum of many things.

Goal is to: "not be there".

Climbing is within eye/ear shot of residents
dwellings, they can see and hear everything
that goes on, pretty much.

Furthermore - this stuff is near the US/mexico
border - and is today under a different level
of "scrutiny" than before. I'm sure you get my
drift.

This list'll make me look like an ass,
here goes:

* no dogs, ever
* drive slowly once off 94
* turn off the music
* avoid the "off belay" thing,
no need, you can see everything.
* be mellow, avoid loudness
* wear discrete colors, gear
* smile if U see residents
* park responsibly in good spots
* NO TRASH, this is SD, not LA
* procede into the brush, no hang out
* don't get killed, or have incidents
* if you are asked to leave, break out the Ak, and empty it :-)
* one more - no laughing or having a good time, dammit!

Trip - glad to hear you enjoyed SD rock climbing,
very happy you have joined us, any and all input/
stories or whatever welcome. Thank you.

Eric Beck - I was very lucky to share so many good
times climbing with you. It really meant a lot to me,
you need to know this. Can't thank you enough for all
your friendship and good natured support over the years.
My life, and my life as a climber would not have been the
same without it. Thanks again.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 14, 2009 - 08:01am PT
BITD, we climbed for ten plus years
on private property, and were only
thrown off once.

Access on private land - my magic wand

I'm gonna wave my magic wand here and
"create" the Deerhorn Valley rock climbing
area of the future.

* The place is set up: top/lower off anchors are in,
lead bolts in.
* Trails well defined.
* There are a couple small campgounds out there
run by residents, modest fee, quiet, no water, basic.
* Access to the rocks is chanelled thru "single points";
(always has been, its the brush).
* There is a moderate voluntary day use fee, sorrry, private
property - don't see any other way.

If you had private property with a really cool
recreation resourse on it, and you didn't know
anything about it, how could anything move
forward?

Is this a "vision", more like economic sense.

In other words, if you could generate revenue,
cash money, off some rocks and open area,
that resourse might start to look worthy of
being "negotiable" - I don't know.

In any event, the use would have to be lo-key.


Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 14, 2009 - 09:42am PT
Rock climbing in Deerhorn Valley began in 1975 by three
social D-listers from Mar Vista High. We had a new set of
stoppers, hexes, a rope, oval 'biners and, most importantly,
Basic and Advanced Rockcraft by Royal Robbins.

After a few of the initial clusterfukked forays, and the
inevitable meltdowns coping with our newfound need for
"accountability" - us beach kids began to move. None of us
even knew Mt. Woodson existed, that was "a long way away".

I now recognize how much I benefitted from my first two partners.
Owe 'em a lot. But, I mean, let's face it, we were basically retards,
spazmoden-incarnate, and if you'd seen the stupid sh*it we pulled
you would have said, "these idiots are gonna get killed, quick". But
we didn't. We dumped the 3/4" piece of surplus webbing we had for
rope, got rid of all the homemade chocks, pinched Basic and Advanced
Rockcraft off the Southwestern College bookstore, and became
rock climbers.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 14, 2009 - 10:23am PT
There was/is a need for a "summiteering" approach at Deerhorn.
We had to get on top of some huge boulders to set the top rope.
And to do that, we had to learn aid. Well, there is was, right in
Basic Rockcraft, "oh, its basic, its in the Basic book, must be easy"
and off we went.

Nailing up a nice solid Rurp seam in a 50' boulder is best done alone.
You have time to think, equalize placements, and move up safely. Two
Rurps equalized can be pretty good, little if any flex. Once, some guy
phoned me, upset about how he almost decked on the above seam,
giving me grief for the A1+ rating - guess he didn't equalize, ripped gear
and pulled his belayer off stance. Sorry, but - what can I say? The ground
is right there, and the 'plus' meant something on the rating. We didn't
know about the R and X thing back then.

Decent aid skills are a must for every rock climber, period. And the
greatest thing about Royal's books is - what's in them and, what is not
in them. The reason we had no incidents and were able to learn on
our own was because of those books. They do not lie. They do not
pretend to "show you everything". What you get is a simple utilitarian
concept, adaptable to each and every situation, inviting you toward
the things you must learn over time in the field. No substitute.

And more, there is a real spirit in Royal's books, and its the authentic
spirit of Yosemite trad climbing - you just get it, its right there. Also I
took Royal's idea of simple adaptable tools, and applied it to my life's
work. And guess what, that worked too. Positive ripple effects?

Top that.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<


EDIT: RE: RR's books, needless to say a wide and varied info-base
is always relevant but, the need for on-the-fly problem solving skills,
the skills that are essential in dealing with the seemingly infinite
number of variables in the field, is vital. Royal's books are about
"adaptability" - nuff said.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 14, 2009 - 11:42am PT
imho, the greater deerhorn valley area is almost -- almost -- as good as woodson. but it's remotely possible i'm biased on this point.

warbler -- when we gonna see some pikkys godammit??1?
Sewellymon

climber
.....in a single wide......
Nov 14, 2009 - 12:03pm PT
Ray, I always enjoy reading about the obscure San Diego rock and re-telling of my memories. My parents bought a place first on the Rainbow Heights, then later retired in Rainbow Valley. As I kid, I got to wander for miles up and around little nooks and crannies all along Rainbow Heights. I scrambled past what in later years proved to be good bouldering. During one visit w/ family to re-live old haunts, I was thrilled to see chalk marks. My childhood boulders were somebodyís circuit!

Iíve written B4 about the house built by a supposedly ex-CIA dood (around í74) atop the obvious 60í slab on the south end of the Heights. This crag was about ľ mile from our property, so Iíd been all around it as a kid. CIA dood built his back walls to incorporate a 15í high golden polished granite boulder. I always wanted to ask him if I could throw a TR off his deck onto the slab, but never did. House burned (mid Ď80ís), and as of 2 years ago not rebuilt, but new land-owners were talking about it. If the house has not been re-built yet, I hope to stealth back w/ rope and Soloist and finally do it up since itís such an icon from my childhood.

Also have fine memories of sitting on my folkís back porch w/ my kids and watching climbers top-roping on the south- facing Rainbow Boulders..
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 12:18pm PT
Eagle Peak from Boulder Creek
Eagle Peak from Boulder Creek
Credit: The Warbler
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 14, 2009 - 12:49pm PT
Aid climbing in San Diego

There are huge boulders with inviting features to aid on many of
the hills in southeast San Diego county. And because of our early
exposure to the right instructional resource, we took them on.
Basically, we climbed every thing we could, no question.

Solo on a route scouting mission up the south slope of Mother Grundy,
I came upon this spectacular very overhanging straight-in 60' Lost Arrow
crack inside a huge corridor formed by two leaning monster boulders.

At first I thought, OMG, I found the ultimate finger crack and its in the
shade! Nope, Arrows - mostly tied off - all the way. That summer I had
nothing to do, so packed my sh*t, hiked up and nailed the thing.

Remember, this is the type of stuff where you do not want to
rip gear. The good part is, no time constraints, no belayer needing to
piss or start whining. You can take your time, evaluate each placement in
detail, enjoy youself and learn something about the rock and about
how pitons (ping feedback) and aid systems work. Even if you have no
wall goals and you only want to free climb clean, sooner or later you
will come across fixed pins. And if you've spent some time using them
(in an even moderatly "critical" way) you will "know" something about
what you are looking at when you encounter one on a free climb.

Also, these aid climbs are a good way to find out if you like aid, if you
are into it enough to venture up onto walls; what is it like? How is it
managing the gear, how does self belay work? Am I dreaming, or is
this something I can really do? You can find out on your own and in
solitude if you like, no problem. But, don't expect a great deal of peer
support for this, ok? Its going to be you, the hills, and the task at hand.
And any satisfaction that comes from getting "up close and personal"
with the rock and having a fine day in the outdoors alone. Yes, alone,
thank you.

Many types of aid practice can be done in semi real-world conditions
out there. Lots of things about aiding on granite - with maybe the exception
of expando - can be set up, practiced, and understood to a certain level.
You will be in complete control of the situation, if a feature looks iffy,
you have the option to place a protection bolt, just like you would on
any other runout. Guarenteed, you will find out something about how
far you can push it.

I found out, of course, that I was not going to be a big wall climber; too
light (wall racks are too high a % of my weight) and am far too short
as well. :-) But, that didn't stop me from from going, learning what I could
and having a blast doing it. So expect no kudos from "the team". This
(solo aid in SD) is not about brownie points and, that's the best part.

:-)

swellymon, neat story, thanks.
you know, we once named a climb
"Obscurity Rules"....LOL
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 03:36pm PT
Eagle Peak Summit Wall
Eagle Peak Summit Wall
Credit: The Warbler
Most of the Eagle Peak escarpment
Most of the Eagle Peak escarpment
Credit: The Warbler
The wall in the bottom photo is about 500 ft high at its highest point, south facing like Corte Madera and El Cajon Mtn. The Summit wall is about 350 ft at its highest point, and has lots of good steep pitches, despite its fractured appearance. Elevation of Eagle Peak's summit is around 3,600 ft.

Routes up to 6 pitches, lots of 3and 4 pitch routes, some single sport pitches along the base.
about 120 pitches in this photo. 1/2 hr approach by mtn bike, USFS land.

I first saw this from a commercial flight into Lindberg Field, and didn't venture out there for a few years, as I was busy elsewhere. No bushwhacking involved for a change - even before the Cedar Fire which swept through in the first Fall season we were climbing there. The right side of the main wall has some 30 steep and overhanging pitches.
Eagle Peak Main Wall
Eagle Peak Main Wall
Credit: The Warbler
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 03:48pm PT
The Last Frontier, Corte Madera
The Last Frontier, Corte Madera
Credit: The Warbler
Corte madera
Corte madera
Credit: The Warbler
Corte Madera, one of Eagle Peak's two sister crags, about five hundred feet high, at an elevation of over 4,000 ft. Snow capped Mt Cuyamaca in the background. About fifty years of climbing history here, and lots of new sport routes on excellent rock.
Credit: The Warbler
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 03:55pm PT
ECM straight on
ECM straight on
Credit: The Warbler
El Cajon Mtn, the other big crag, scene of many new sport routes, and nationally known bolting controversy
ECM profile
ECM profile
Credit: The Warbler
mooser

Trad climber
seattle
Nov 14, 2009 - 04:31pm PT
Warbler, those are some really great pics. Makes me homesick for sun and dry rock.

On another San Diego note, I remember climbing the crack on the west side of what we called "Seal Rock," just north of Escondido on the west side of I-15. It's kind of a stand alone rock up at the top of the hill. There's a great hands-off hands curving, overhanging crack on the backside.

After my friend and I were on it--struggling mightily, I might add--I mentioned to Eeyonkee that we'd done it. He said something like, "Oh yeah, what is that, like 11c, or something? I remember that the top part took some bigger cams." I just kind of nodded. Inside, I was thinking, "Crap! You led that thing??"
TripL7

Trad climber
'dago'
Nov 14, 2009 - 04:38pm PT
Ray!

Thanks for the hospitality....no place like home!

I'll take sometime and do some catch-up, see where ya all been...looks like ya all been put-tin them dang rattlers on the skedaddle.

Speaking of rattlers, I recall a trip 4-5 of us made one Spring weekend @'73(Vawter may have been along) out to Corte Madera. Camped Friday night and after breakfast started the relatively short hike up to the face. We were planning on doing the 'Open Book'(Cameron/poway mt.boys FA 5.9?).

All were anticipating a fun weekend at our new haunts. As we finally made our way to the base of the 'dihedral', we had already encountered approx. 9-10 of those slithery beast. Generally right before we stepped on their tail. I am telling you, it was an infestation. If V is around, I am sure he could elaborate.

So, we get to the base of the climb and here we have 3-4 basking right on the belay rock/ledge. It was so rife with them I recall someone questioning whether or not 1-2 might fall out of the corner somewhere above. Even as we stood there I noticed everyone looking around and behind, expecting one to crawl up one of our legs any moment.

Really creepy kinda juju feeling going on. Not knowing what we would encounter on the circuitous journey back down we decided late Spring was mating season, or the were all just out of hibernation. We opted to bail, in light of the isolation/time required to get help.(This story makes us sound like a bunch of wussy's, but they didn't have any Helli's/cell phones etc. in '73)so everyone concurred.

On the way down, we took turns 'leading', not knowing if the next step down would land on one of them, our vision often being so occluded by brush etc.

Been to similar places and saw not a one.

Well, not really that much to gain from this story, just mentioned the rattlers above and this memory came to mind. I am going to read now and maybe have a little something else to add(I don't want to ask any redundant questions!)

Kevin-incredible shot up-thread...kind of our own little 'Nirvana'. Where is it? Is that you with the red ruck-sack?(do not answer if redundant).

Trip~

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 04:50pm PT
Sharma, Soy Chango P2, 11c, Eagle Peak Main Wall
Sharma, Soy Chango P2, 11c, Eagle Peak Main Wall
Credit: The Warbler
Pitch 2, Tail Tucker Arete 5.11 d, EP Main Wall
Pitch 2, Tail Tucker Arete 5.11 d, EP Main Wall
Credit: The Warbler
Bush Doctor &#40;the route, not the guy&#41;, 11d, on Tan Man Tower ab...
Bush Doctor (the route, not the guy), 11d, on Tan Man Tower above EP main wall
Credit: The Warbler
Pitch 2, Baby Face, 5.11c, EP Main Wall
Pitch 2, Baby Face, 5.11c, EP Main Wall
Credit: The Warbler
Trip-

That's Boulder Creek below Eagle Peak, last spring.

A bit of an effort to get there, but hey... as Ray pointed out earlier, se vale la pena!



TripL7

Trad climber
'dago'
Nov 14, 2009 - 04:54pm PT
Kevin!

Just now noticed the shots of Corte Madera above, awesome. Brings back some memories. We should start charging admission.

Super climbing shots.

Thanks!
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Nov 14, 2009 - 05:00pm PT
Great pictures Kevin. Now that your posting pics, I am sure you got all kinds of good ones to share.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 05:07pm PT
The steep and the deep.
Credit: The Warbler
GDavis

Social climber
SOL CAL
Nov 14, 2009 - 05:32pm PT
Make sure to look out for them ill eagles. They be out a-pillagin' yer jobs!
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Nov 14, 2009 - 05:35pm PT
Here's a San Diego rock climbing mystery photo. I'd conferred with BVB (the climber in the photo) as to where it was and we'd thought it was Corte Madera, either S Face or Spacious Enterprise, and I was all ready to post it as such to this thread, but closer inspection of the original large scan revealed the black dot above Bob to clearly be a drill and that he has a hammer on his hip, so I know our earlier conclusion is wrong since I don't think we ever drilled anything out there. It's San Diego for sure, circa 1977 or 78, but does anyone have an idea of where? Stonewall, maybe Babies On Fire?



That SD County chapparal bushwacking is burly for sure, I think I still have scars on my palms from blisters inflicted by military surplus machetes. Its right up there with the best brush I've found in the Northwest.
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Nov 14, 2009 - 05:41pm PT
damn, I know I have EP beta around here somewhere. Was planning on going in Dec. Now I can't find it. Feel free to email me all the beta you have!!!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 06:06pm PT
Weschrist,

There's a new guidebook with EP's routes available. Try REI. If you can't get it I can hook you up.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 14, 2009 - 06:22pm PT
right on Kevin,
look, when ya get the winch fixed on top,
I'll air-lift my dolt cart in, hop on and make
"an ascent".

great pics all.

B back tomorrow.
Ray
Port

Trad climber
San Diego
Nov 14, 2009 - 07:15pm PT
Eagle peak is the BEST sport crag is San Diego. In all honestly Im more than a little disappointed that a guide has been published. For the last year it has been a great pleasure to climb new routes as they appear on the wall with no idea of the rating. I wont be buying that guide. Its more fun to explore the crag. I hope this wont attract throngs of people to this gem. Thanks again Kevin for for efforts.

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 07:42pm PT
The Prime Rib, 5.12a, Eagle Peak Main Wall
The Prime Rib, 5.12a, Eagle Peak Main Wall
Credit: The Warbler
Homeboy, 5.10b, Tan Man Tower
Homeboy, 5.10b, Tan Man Tower
Credit: The Warbler
Port,

Your spirit of adventure is rare these days..

As you know, we kept the area secret for years, until the USFS tried to close it with an absurd raptor protection closure. A one mile by two mile seven month closure for one prairie falcon pair, from Dec 1st through June 30th. All cliffs were included, the 1000 ft slope below, 2 miles of Boulder Creek, and half way up the facing slope. For the entire climbing season.

A$$holes.

We were forced to go public to get the support necessary to protect the crag from closure. In their dishonest effort to keep climbers off public land, the Forest Service may well have inadvertantly laid the groundwork for Eagle Peak to become SD's most popular climbing area.

A$$holes.
TripL7

Trad climber
'dago'
Nov 14, 2009 - 08:16pm PT
Warbler!

That last shot^^ reminds me of Rebuffet/Alps.
Primo!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 08:22pm PT
I've been climbing at EP for about 6 years, and have only carried my camera 3 times, so my photos are a bit limited compared to the possibilities.
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Nov 14, 2009 - 08:26pm PT
Warbler,

That sucks about the FS. Here in Tahoe there was a buzz about closing one of the few popular sport walls in the area. Luckily the Wildlife Biologist up here is not on a power trip and fairly assessed the situation. The closure is limited to an obscure section of cliff that is rarely visited.

Great job fighting the incompetent power trippers!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 08:30pm PT
Wes,

I have also encountered the occasional sane and intelligent FS employee, but they're rare.

San Jacinto, Tahquitz and Suicide from SD
San Jacinto, Tahquitz and Suicide from SD
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 08:43pm PT
Phenomenal rock, lots of jugs, no climbers. Evah. Ahh, San Diego!
Phenomenal rock, lots of jugs, no climbers. Evah. Ahh, San Diego!
Credit: The Warbler
Nice rock, no climbers
Nice rock, no climbers
Credit: The Warbler
Nice rock, climber at the base
Nice rock, climber at the base
Credit: The Warbler
10a fun
10a fun
Credit: The Warbler
Port

Trad climber
San Diego
Nov 14, 2009 - 08:56pm PT
I dont know what climbs these are but just thought I'd add some photos.






The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 08:57pm PT
Credit: The Warbler
That's Baby Face, Port, another perspective.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 14, 2009 - 09:04pm PT
NICE looking stone and lots if it! Thanks for posting all those shots!

Rather frustrating that the climbing community through the Access Fund or some more effective mechanism hasn't been able to at least narrow the closure areas down to something realistic. Most of those species put up with people just fine and are more than willing to get in your face if they are not! They nest on buildings...
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 09:09pm PT
Credit: The Warbler
Steve,

The Access Fund has begun to contest raptor closures more aggessively when they are unwarranted. The situation here in SD, and at EP and Corte Madera in particular, has been pivotal in that change of stance, thanks to ACSD, the Allied Climbers of San Diego.

The routes here are probably not ballsy enough for your taste, but if your sack has shrunken like mine, come on down this winter, and I'll show you around.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 14, 2009 - 09:14pm PT
warbler, are those boouldering shots at the 'bow?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 09:21pm PT
bvb,

some moderates at Rainbow. I've got stacks o' slides, from the old days, but no scanner.
Port

Trad climber
San Diego
Nov 14, 2009 - 09:31pm PT
Wow...what a great photo. yea, thats the one. There are two lines there. The climbers left felt like 5.11 and the right felt 5.11+ or so, maybe harder if my memory serves me. Both were great leads.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 14, 2009 - 09:34pm PT
Port,

maybe 5.12!

If it was Bloodline. Awesome stone on that pitch, and just barely enough holds.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 15, 2009 - 12:34am PT
san diego ftw bump.
WBraun

climber
Nov 15, 2009 - 12:38am PT
Warbler has one of the best eyes in the business for spotting new lines ....
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 15, 2009 - 12:50am PT
It was a challenge trying to decide which line to do first here, Werner - we went with the two twin cracks just around the sunlit buttress in the shade, right up that light streak.

One is 140 ft, dead vertical or slightly overhung, straight up plumbline, 18 pieces of gear to protect it, 5.12. Its twin is a little shorter, but steeper and just as hard.


We preplaced the gear, as many of the placements are tricky, small wires in blind slots. But no bolts were placed.

No one else has been on 'em, and they are the best crack leads in San Diego County. Perfect rock.

An onsight ascent would be impressive.




Credit: The Warbler
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:15am PT
damn. i know where i'm going this easter.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:19am PT
I'm looking for some badass to send'm for photos, bvb.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 15, 2009 - 11:23am PT
Thanks for the positive email everyone.

T2, thanks for the warm thoughts - sorry for the slow reply -
wishing you and yours the best, you bet.

OffWhite: props for all your hard work in San Diego rock climbing.
You are a founding father. Wishing you and yours the very best
as well, always.

bvb - honestly, think Woodson stands on its own. Deerhorn is
different, they could be compared but have, and I hope will
continue to, serve different functions. Nothing could replace
"The Woodsonian Institute" in SD climbing history. Nothing.

Also need to mention, for the record, the exemplary contributions
of Greg Cameron and Rick Piggot - these guys kick A.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 15, 2009 - 12:39pm PT
Deerhorn Valley - a changing of the guard.

I left in the mid/late 80's, came back to socal in the late 90's
and hooked up with the late Rick Corbin, went out to Jtree for
some fun desert camping.

In the next site around a campfire stood a group of climbers.
Could hear there voices but paid no attention until the word
"Deerhorn" was heard. I walked up and said, "no one climbs
there anymore". Conversation stopped. Blank suprised looks,
one guy goes "we climb there, who are you"?

Turns out it was Bill Maki and crew who - using the old guide -
took over at my fave crags and did a flat out great job. It
seemed amazing to me. Bill and partners saw exactly what
I had. Way overhanging face climbs, deep diorite fins, stuff
I thought maybe some day some one would TR. Bill equipped
them and the other worthy lines (Inflateable Doll) then did the
lead proper. And of course, he led the "Fang arete" a "dream climb".

As well all know, drilling gear BITD sucked. Quartz content in
the rock compounded the problem making for cratered holes.
Ugly. Bill's accurate comment "there were some bad bolts" was
met with a nod. We were strapped for cash a long time, funky
home made hanger concoctions and a hand full of button heads
were all we had sometimes. Still, it opened the climb, left a "mark"
and some of the stuff got led; Primal Man ('77 - 10a) on Dinasaur
rock - straight up a steep pronounced swath of beautiful chicken
heads. Bill and crew replaced all the junk - done deal.

It was our intention from the start to do everything ground up.
The Bunker ('75 - 5.9) the first roped climb done in the area and
the Fang ('76 - 5.9) were done that way, onsight. Facelift ('77 - 10a)
marked a change. With a hook and a drill, I - the spastic noob - headed
up, set the hook and started to drill. "Hall of Fame" road rash from the
ground fall caused me to reconsider. I gazed at the landscape, acers
and acers of steep stone. Almost no one, except for we three dweebs
climbed out there. Mainly, we had the place to ourselves for years and
needed to build a lead circuit to get better; can't just top rope all the
time. A line was fixed, three bolts off jumars, and the flood gate was
open.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 15, 2009 - 12:55pm PT
Hey Ray -

You're obviously still psyched on Deerhorn, as is Bill - maybe you guys should make a combined effort to get legit access.

Bill's a founding member of ACSD, and the group has been pretty successful in the access dept. around here.

The Access Fund has also been actually buying properties with climbing on them, and sometimes reselling to a buyer who will allow access.

Hiding in the bushes kinda puts a damper on your climbing experience, eh? It's fun once in a while, but...


If you're living in SD, contact me
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:08pm PT




In that T-Dome article it list's Jim Campbell as the climber on High Voltage when in reality I believe it is Rick Lovelace.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:20pm PT
the 'bow -- some of the best of sandy eggo!

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:20pm PT
That's what I thought too, Tommy.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:24pm PT
more 'bow. stellar stone. the best.

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:27pm PT
Judging by the size of that tree trunk, that was not too long ago, eh, bvb?
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:28pm PT
coupla a years ago warbler. oh HELL YEAH!

jeff leads lookin' fully sw0le on the golden perfection:

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:41pm PT
I'll be there by 2:00, and the temps are purrrfect!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 15, 2009 - 01:43pm PT
Thanks for the invitation, Kevin.
I spend plenty of my climbing time clipping bolts these days but won't pass up a tasty thriller either.

The bumpersticker that I never quite got around to printing up, Sport Climbing- Alpinism's Answer to Menopause!!!
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 15, 2009 - 03:04pm PT
^^^
too funny

again, great pics all.

I just had the funnest dream,
really -

I was at the beach, here in IB,
and, everyone was there..
there was a party going on in
an apartment, I found it by
accident, even TM was there,
standing in the hall smiling.
everyone was inside an apt, busy
getting plastered...

I was like, I'm outta here, and
started up the beach - over a
sand dune comes a little suv buggy,
almost pitching on an endo as it
ripped off the dune, then -not kidding!
then I go - what the F? a full size bus
going full speed. - no way! - hauling A up the dune,
flys off, lands and almost breaks in half - everyone was
laughing their asses off! we were all there -
even Jaybro, and watched as these vehicles kept going
inland, crashing into someones pad. applause.
then some people started playing baseball
where I was standing, the batter hit me one ball,
I caught it, tossed it back, it skipped off the ground, so...
I kept going up the beach...where do I live and
why do I feel so great? I wondered...finally, after
looking all over the place I found
my place, made out of light blue fiberglass - like
a bungalow sized out house. I fiddled with the lock,
went in, opened the window, and stepped up on
the wrought iron railing, looking out over the pacific -
it was a splitter afternoon, I just held on, and
couldn't stop smiling :-)


cu guys later,
Ray


EDIT: in my dream, when I stood in the hall of the apartment
building, TM Herbert was there, as mentioned, he was tanned and
smiling a bit, no hat, looking straight at me, I turned left, looked
in the open door of the apartment, behind a person standing inside the
doorway, people were partying, The person, a man, turned to me and
smiled, a kind smile - it was Karl Baba. then I left,
on the beach were bunches of people, and I kept looking for Jaybro,
figuring for sure he was there, but never actually saw him. the ball
I threw didn't skip, actually it hit the ground and rolled, bad toss,
I tried to throw well, didn't - on the way home, I tried 3 or4 doors
on different apartments, going up and down stairs, none of them were
right. at one point, I crossed thru and inter section on a street and
walked right past Clark Jacobs, very clear, he was smiling, I
remember wondering why I never realized he was such a fine spirit
 that's it. It was a hyper vivid dream, rare for me)

Watusi

Social climber
Newport, OR
Nov 15, 2009 - 03:18pm PT
Cool thread for sure!! Makes me as well pine for the place...My little brother just opened his own tattoo parlor in SD and wants me to assist him......
can't say

Social climber
Pasadena CA
Nov 15, 2009 - 09:48pm PT
bump for the Warbler, Watsui, bvb and all the other SD folks
Josh Higgins

Trad climber
San Diego
Nov 15, 2009 - 10:46pm PT
Warbler: Next ACSD meeting I should ask you about Bloodline. I might be willing to give that a go onsight... I intend to get out to EP more this year!

Josh
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 16, 2009 - 11:43am PT
Deerhorn Valley - realm of the party gods.

How many times did we get sh#t faced drunk
and stoned out of our minds up there?

It went on for years. Before the climbs during the climbs after the climbs and
quite often too much beer camping out at night. I am sure the birds or the lizards
or whatever found my "burrito barf" in the bushes a rare treat. Holy sh*t.

If you took all the weed we burned up there from '75 to '85 you would probably
be looking at about three huge bails sitting in front of you.

This had an inverse effect that "stimulated" the climbing. When we
got too fukked up to climb, we grabbed our machetes, headed off into the
thicket, went exploring and found cool new places to do more bong loads
and cool new climbs, all over the place.

Once we were so trashed driving back to IB, I thought my truck was stalling out
for real - sh*t! Right in traffic about to hook a left up a freeway onramp. In a
panic I said aloud "there's something wrong". Dave glanced over, knowing smile,
message recieved, I pushed down on the gas pedal, the truck was fine.

True story.

Homegrown "grass", mexi, lumbo, thai stick, infinite variations of homegrown
green bud, anything we could get our hands on. And, the devastating uber-
lord of all, Humbolt; there was no fukking question about that. Dave had a
tree house and grew some green. He also had a pit in his backyard covered
with window panes for a hot house. Dave's weed was way better than mexi;
sometimes we'd break open an LB and find an old tennis shoe or other
"artifact" in it, not to mention all the stems.

We'd read how grit climbers often belayed at each available good spot, that
was good news, we could stop, hang out, and pull more tubes. The FA of the
Fang is a classic example. We needed to cut away some brush in order to have
a neat new spot to hang and rip some loads. Dave led the thing wearing a red
Wildy Klettersac (donini, now you know). Inside was his "unit", weed, and water
carried in a glass mason jar - how the hell did he do that? It never broke! At
the belay between the pinnacle and the main block, we consumed more
marijuana, prepping for the challenge of smooth white granite soaring above:
maybe 30' of actual climbing. :-)

Oh, we adapted to the "environment" alright. Strong steady onshores flowing
inland provided us with what can best be described as "god's own air
conditioning". Hard to light a match - Bics hadn't come on the scene yet.
So, having read Basic and Advanced Rockcraft by Royal Robbins, we used
our hard-wired "adapability" skills once again and developed our own
techniques to suit the specific demands of the situation. Magifying glasses
became a standard part of our kit and, the "Magnafry" was born - let the
wind blow, we lit our bongs with the Sun! Good god.

So, why all the "self medication"?

Mine would remain a deep dark buried secret and a burdon for years.
And I only learned about Dave a few months ago. I was told by a fellow
"I.B. youth" the truth. Dave's dad had been run over and killed by a car
just outside his house when he was a small boy. It was a terrible accident.
The person telling me looked me hard in the eye and said:
"they didn't even clean up the blood".

They put Dave on some kinda meds early, after that,
he was always considered a little "different".

So yes, rock climbing is good stuff, for all the reasons we know, "strong
medicine" as DR called it. Couldn't have said it better myself.

And Dave, I am so sorry that happened to you man. So sorry...

I will see you in the next life ol' friend, we'll get baked good - and climb
and climb till the sun don't shine.

Guaranteed.

Ray
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 16, 2009 - 12:12pm PT
keep puttin' it down ray, 'cause i'm picking it up.
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Nov 16, 2009 - 03:43pm PT
Rainbow is like a dream. A combination of so many of my favorite granite boulders.

Wasn't there during snaky-poo season....

Thanks for all this stuff guys.
Mighty Hiker

climber
Vancouver, B.C. Small wall climber.
Nov 16, 2009 - 04:54pm PT
Thanks Ray, Kevin et al - something good to read on a rainy November day.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 16, 2009 - 05:24pm PT
Well Riley,

The best has never been photoed... but things are changing down here.


Conditions yesterday were epic, like 20% humidity, mid to high 60s, and right before dark the rock got super tacky!

Every year after the first fall rains come and wash 6 or 7 rainless months worth of dust off the stone, the climbing is open season til July. Then you gotta milk the shade, the evenings, and the occasional low pressure system for a few months, but you can climb all summer here.


San Diego is a sleeping giant for sportclimbing and bouldering.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 16, 2009 - 05:53pm PT
in december, january, february, and march, winter storms will blow through san diego with lots of cool temps and rain, then the storm will clear out, the sun will be brilliant in a scrubbed sky, sometimes you get an offshore santa ana thrown in for good measure, and the grass and mustard just pops. it's gorgeous and the granite can feel like flypaper. when the conditions are just right in san diego, as they are so often during the winter, nothing else compares. it's simply the best.
Anxious Melancholy

Mountain climber
Back of beyond
Nov 16, 2009 - 06:56pm PT
Climbers with the itch have been exploring SD County for decades, and there's still more unclimbed rock to be developed. As so many have noted here, a bit of brush, heat, snakes, or other approach hindrances are typically encountered, but these and other difficulties are a part of climbing's tradition. Living my whole life here as a frustrated mountaineer, there wasn't much choice but to get on the rock, with the icy peaks being set so far from my home base. But early day trips in the 70's to Corte, Deerhorn, Lakeside, Los Coches, Woodson, Santee, Mission Gorge, People's Wall and the beach bouldering below, Cajon Mt, Dos Cabesas, and Stonewall, lead to more current climbing at McCain Valley, Poway Crag, Valley of the Moon, Descanso Crag, Descanso Falls, Long Valley Peak, and Eagle Peak just to name a few. And its not over yet! I just started work on a 350' tall crag that surely is going to give up some great stuff over the next few years.....Yeah, SD's gotten huge, and we're stuck in the corner of the nation so it sucks when trying to get outbound, but besides our local crags, it really isn't too bad with Tahquitz and Suicide, Yosemite and the great Sierra, NV's Red Rocks and Mexico's Canyon Tajo as major destinations less than a days drive away. And where else can you visit desert, mountains and beach all on the same day? Yeah, the SD vibe lives on........
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 16, 2009 - 10:22pm PT
good overview AM,

that's one of the things I was was fishing for here,
neat to hear about your crag - say, without giving
up too much, how 'bout posting a sneak peek pic
sometime?

be great to see...

thanks again for the post.

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 16, 2009 - 11:08pm PT
Credit: The Warbler
Some strong guy in San Diego on new rock
Credit: The Warbler
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 16, 2009 - 11:48pm PT
nice. soooo much rock in SD, it'll never run out.
BeeHay

Trad climber
San Diego CA
Nov 17, 2009 - 12:48am PT
Whoa Ray,

I honestly couldn't follow all the tokin' up stuff, but, is that Dave Hatchet you're talking to? Is he gone?!

Good thread though...

Brad
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 17, 2009 - 12:51am PT
DH is alive and well, living and climbing hard, North Shore, Tahoe.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2009 - 12:53am PT
Whoa Beehay, no it is no one you
ever heard of, why did you think Hatchett
would be down in IB?

never mind...

oh, and uh, glad you "couldn't get through it"

honsestly...

if there's anything constructive you'd
like to add about SD rock climbing,

love to read it.


Fogarty

climber
Back in time..
Nov 17, 2009 - 01:08am PT
Bump...

FROG

Great post long time Mike Fogarty
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Nov 17, 2009 - 01:26am PT
This is such a great thread. I really love living in the Northwest, never really looked back, but this heady mix of nostalgia and splendid new stuff is pretty intoxicating. Thanks a bunch ya'll, got me thinking about a trip back to the spawning grounds.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 17, 2009 - 01:37am PT
Credit: The Warbler
There have to be more than a billion boulders big enough to make moves on in San Diego County. Even if only 1 out of 1000 yields a good problem, that leaves over a million worth climbing on.

Sounds about right.

And 1 out of 100 of those million are really, really good, with multiple face routes, and/or splitters on perfect rock, with good landings. That's 10,000 epic boulders, more or less.

There are so many the untrained eye doesn't know how to pick a cluster that could be good, and so much brush that only the dedicated with a good eye can get the goods. Lots of private property too, but owners sometimes will allow climbing with a respectful request to climb, and a promise not to advertise it.


And then there's the crags - quite a few over four hundred feet, who knows how many slabs and walls 200 ft and under, the majority of them good rock.


It ain't called America's finest city for nothin'.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2009 - 02:54am PT
Kevin, I sent you an email,
but have no idea how I can help
access. My honest feeling is that
access issues are the business
of todays active climbers.

I opened an area, Bill took it
farther. I dealt with access in
my own lo-prfile way for over
10 years.

If the climbers in SD want to
climb there, they should go
for it.

If the area doesn't see activity
it's ok by me, because it isn't
a resourse I need.

Bringing it up here is a matter
of sharing opinion having climbed
in SD a while, and some tid bits of
obscure history.

That is all.

Thanks for all the
great posts, everyone.

Ray

weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:30am PT
I'm in SD 12/10-12/15. Surfing one of the days, just hangin out the others.

Eagle Peak is on the list, but I have to get the girly psyched.

Other must do/see things in SD?

Where do I pick up a good magnifying glass?
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2009 - 11:48am PT
thanks Wes,

if you wanna check out me old crags
take hiway 94 east,
left (only) on Honey Springs Road
drive up a ways, right by the road
on left is a L arching crack (LaBanda) graffiti on it

a bit east, is an abrupt right hook
onto the Mother Grundy Truck Trail

the Pinnacles face west
short approach, can't miss,
you will see em on Honey Springs
road.

notes applying to access in full

or

keep going out SE on the truck trail
till it levels in a semi wooded area
look right, along a low hill are
neat things to climb.

or, keep looking to the right,
the Truck trail branches - the right
branch goes out to Blackout past
a gate - climb over.

not a lot for the first time visitor
perhaps, the climbing can be diffuse.

the Mother Grundy truck trail is neat...

at any rate, have a swell time. :-)

Ray

edit: google earth helps
search Mother Grundy peak
or Mother Grundy Truck Trail.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 17, 2009 - 01:23pm PT
Wes,


What's "the girly" into?

Other than you, of course?

San Diego has a lot of things to see and do. It's famous for the SD Zoo, Wild Animal Park, and Sea World, but the desert is nice that time of year, and the local mtns for hiking. On the flip side, lots of Indian Casinos, and general entertainment, restaurants, plus you have TJ and Ensenada.

And if she's into shopping malls we got plenty.



bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 17, 2009 - 01:35pm PT
wes, your "girly" claims are so totally invalid without pics.

just sayin'.

p.s. i'll be in 'dago 12/24 - 28 so it looks like we'll just miss each other. so rest easy -- looks like you'll be spared the schooling you so richly deserve.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2009 - 01:46pm PT
Wes, watch out for "The Woodsonian Institute",
you may be sent to The Vice Principles Office"
if you don't already hold a "PHD"...

where many have received a well deserved "paddling"...

:-) just sayin'...
Sewellymon

climber
.....in a single wide......
Nov 17, 2009 - 02:09pm PT
a couple photos I snagged off the 'web of the terrain above Rainbow Valley




Pate

Trad climber
The Lost Highway
Nov 17, 2009 - 02:18pm PT
Warbler- you're an ace with the lens. Lots of time and energy obviously invested Thanks for all the pics.
Anxious Melancholy

Mountain climber
Between the Depths of Despair & Heights of Folly
Nov 17, 2009 - 05:02pm PT
Ray,

Here's a teaser, a view of the lower portion (100') of the rock taken from a friend's helicopter. Perhaps you'd like to go out there some time with me?

Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2009 - 07:03pm PT
amazing pic AM,
looks kinda like a euro crag - good find
and thanks for sharing.

there was a time I would have
loved to have had something
like that to develop etc.

have at it.

when I was openeing Deerhorn I'd
bring others out to send stuff I could
not so the pace could continue.

that stuff in the pic looks steeeeep

very cool.

I love going new places and exploring but
am fully beached these day, gotta pay back
to my body, and having neglected it, pretty
bad back thing, legs not doing well -
I may be on the couch for a year? tough
to say. I really appreciate the gesture -
what a thrill that would be!

thanks again for posting that pic
gotta say, overall, I'm blown away
by the SD offerings/potential - ha!

pretty funny...

have fun man
tear it up,
Ray
survivalmademedoit

Trad climber
Grantham, New Hampshire
Nov 17, 2009 - 08:43pm PT
I cut my teeth in San Diego--mission gorge, woodson, santee boulders, etc.

Great to see how many of those i climbed with (BVB, Mike Paul, Tom Scott, Dan Carrol, BEEHAY, Adrian and Jeff, FROG, Greg E, Paul D, Werner) are still in the game or at a minimum, their efforts to make SD such a great climbing area still live on.

Great memories!

Mark Vojtko
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 17, 2009 - 08:53pm PT
Vojtko! How's it hangin' dude?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 17, 2009 - 08:58pm PT
Anxious Melancholy:

That wall does have some potential when the waterfall's not running.
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Nov 17, 2009 - 09:46pm PT
AM... YES!

bvb, the girly on one of her FAs...



and some buttermilkin



See... I have one, I swear.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 17, 2009 - 09:49pm PT
what is she, 14 years old??1?
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Nov 17, 2009 - 09:50pm PT
She's mostly legal.

She cooks too.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 17, 2009 - 10:24pm PT
Credit: Adam Kimmerly
3rd pitch topout Crazy horse, EP
3rd pitch topout Crazy horse, EP
Credit: The Warbler
Corte
Corte
Credit: The Warbler
Happy cows and El Cajon Mtn
Happy cows and El Cajon Mtn
Credit: The Warbler
Eagle Peak Main Wall
Eagle Peak Main Wall
Credit: The Warbler
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2009 - 11:07pm PT
wes those are neat pics,
gee Kevin, I'm impressed.

might be kinda hard to imagine
one place having so much, and
so much room for exploring and
finding one's own till ya realize
San Diego county is bigger than
the state of Rhode Island.


ok
well, still got some odds and ends
stories coming, some slander and
full on sh*t talkin too...

wait, here's some sh*t talkin' now!

always kinda wondered why
Deerhorn was considered
"obscure" 'cause not only are both
sides of the place visible from
a paved road, the hike is only
minutes, plus, you can see the
crags from the orange ave overpass
on hiway 805 in chula vista, the 2nd
biggest city in SDC - you can even see
the Fang from there, no problem on
a clear day...

LOL

don't worry, its gonna get deep :-)

Ray

bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:17pm PT
geez ray, i never thought of deerhorn as obscure. most places in the u.s. it would be considered a destination area.
TripL7

Trad climber
'dago
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:22pm PT
Nice stuff here everyone!

Anyone check out the top of Mt. Lawson, east of El Cajon? Went bouldering/top roping there bitd.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:29pm PT
speaking of deerhorn, recognize this thing ray?

BeeHay

Trad climber
San Diego CA
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:34pm PT
VOJTKO!,

I was at the Santee Boulders 3hrs ago, had to finish with a headlamp. Anything's better than a f&*king climbing gym. I went once.

Brad
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:39pm PT
The Three Sisters Waterfalls side trip on EP approach
The Three Sisters Waterfalls side trip on EP approach
Credit: The Warbler
El Nino wall at Corte
El Nino wall at Corte
Credit: The Warbler
Corte profile
Corte profile
Credit: The Warbler
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 17, 2009 - 11:39pm PT
bvb, I think that's one of those ones I walked
by, took one look at, named it, rated it and never
climbed!!!

used to do that all the time,
check up thread on the bakeage
article - truth, stranger than fiction.

Deerhorn north - good send bvb!
Tired Trad Tales

Trad climber
southern cal
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:45pm PT
Lots of cool stuff on San Diego rock climbing. Here is some more info I found:

http://climbingtoposofsandiego.com/

I'll have to head down south some time instead of the usual JT action.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:46pm PT
nah, pretty sure that's deerhorn south ray. it was pretty much the first thing you got to after hiking into the easter island boulders, in a shady little corridor formed by two boulders.

that's beehay raptly worshiping the stone in the lower right of the photo!
BeeHay

Trad climber
San Diego CA
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:47pm PT
Hey,

What happened to Mark V.'s post? I went back to check his last name's spelling, gone...

Ray,

I was never deep like you guys, a simple minded construction guy, guess I saw Dave H on the T Domes, thought you were talking about Deerhorn. Like I said, don't have the attention span (or the chemical assistance!) to read it all.

Brad
survival

Big Wall climber
A Token of My Extreme
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:53pm PT
Vojtko is around.
He's here in NM at the moment.
I'll tell him to check back on this thread.
BeeHay

Trad climber
San Diego CA
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:54pm PT
Yeah Bob, I was waiting for you to quit d!ckin' around on that 5.6 crack so's I could crank the dimes on the face...

Let's talk some smack when you're here in December.

BH
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 17, 2009 - 11:58pm PT
A reliable source told me that black and white photo of bvb with the drill handle on the skyline is Lawson Peak wall.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 18, 2009 - 01:39am PT
Props the the Big Guns


Self esteem is interesting, isn't it?

In the 70's we were isolated down in south east San Diego county.
All we had were a couple instruction books and what was in the
public library. And in a couple weeks, we'd read all of 'em.

But it was still weird. Because there was, in our isolation this
undercurrent or unspoken notion that what we were doing
"didn't count".

Since all we had were these dinky climbs that clearly no one
cared about, being reinforced by the fact the place was basically
deserted.

This led to a bit of a complex. A state of casual disregard for any
value that may have really been there. In truth, we didn't know
what the hell we were doing and it showed.

Then one day my partner Rob dropped by and he was excited.
He handed me this book. I took one look and couldn't believe
it. The book was Pat Ament's Master of Rock.

It was like a bright light came on. Guess what, not only did
other people climb boulders, they wrote a book about it too!
Amazing. For us, and especially for me, San Diego rock climbing
was never the same.

Especially after getting a look at the pictures. And especially
that picture of John Gill sending The Thimble. Big impact.
It rearranged my brain cells and I started to study the rock
and the moves in a whole new way.

So, anyway, it's really special to be able to share this with
John Gill and Pat Ament right here on Supertopo. In fact,
it kinda blows my mind.

Pat, thanks so much for recognizing what you did, and for
writing that book when you did. Positive ripple effects all
over the place. And John Gill, thanks for being such an
important inspiration to so many climbers for many many
years. Talk about integrity.

We were just lost idiots in the socal burbs and for us,
a book like that was solid gold.

Now, I am pretty sure that book was stolen too, ok? But I
swear I did not steal it. The bookstore paid Pat's invoice, so
we just ripped off the bookstore, not Pat Ament. Just wanna
make that clear.

Fact is, we woulda pinched the stuffed moose head out of
Stanley Andrews if we thought we could. Hey, what do you
think those running shoes were for? Blue Nike waffle trainers
with the yellow swoosh, remember?

Thanks again guys, props big time.

Ray
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 18, 2009 - 03:38am PT
The Warbler


Imagine being a young social reject, an aspiring rock climber, totally
head over heels in love with the sport, sitting in his bedroom in his
parent's house reading Mountain magazine.

Reading about the exploits of the amazing new generation of Yosemite
climbers. It stimulated my mind, filled me with healthy ambition and a
drive to better myself. Very impressive stuff.

Now, imagine that same reject getting to meet one of those guys for
real. And remember, this is someone who is deeply involved in the
climbing action and culture of the Valley, a part of "what was
happening" in a very real way. Putting up not only cutting edge FA's
on rock, but on the dream-like frozen waterfalls as well. But more than
that - way more - Kevin was not only really cool to me, but genuinely
accepting as well.

It has taken me a lifetime to truely put a value on that kind of
acceptance from someone like him, and the value is priceless.

It told me something about Yosemite, the climbers and the culture,
and helped me begin the long climb out of my sorry little shell. And
what's more, he came from San Diego, meaning that hey, highly
skilled, famous and very cool climbers came from the same region
I did. Inspiring? You bet.

We shared some travel time, a few laughs and some nuances, including
seeing a snake that seemed to "glow" out in Joshua Tree. Good stuff, it
was all good, really was.

Over the years I'd heard about his ongoing development of San Diego
rock climbing, and his role in the all important access issues facing
climbers. What can I say?

My hat is off to The Warbler, a multi-skilled multi-talented man with
keen intuition and a heart of gold.

And, for me, still an inspiration after over 30 years.

Thanks Kevin, you rock.

Ray
Watusi

Social climber
Newport, OR
Nov 18, 2009 - 06:48am PT
Bump for the cool SD sh#t...Seeing as I was born in that place...
eeyonkee

Trad climber
Golden, CO
Nov 18, 2009 - 09:56am PT
Nice thread, Ray! Quite a body of great photographs, Kevin. I'm going to have to read this all of the way through when I get the time.
Redwreck

Social climber
Echo Parque, Los Angeles, CA
Nov 18, 2009 - 10:02am PT
Loving this thread. I just got a copy of the old Kennedy/Hubbard San Diego County Climbing Guide and am looking forward to exploring.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 18, 2009 - 10:27am PT
Ray wrote:

"Imagine being a young social reject, an aspiring rock climber, totally
head over heels in love with the sport, sitting in his bedroom in his
parent's house reading Mountain magazine."

Not hard to imagine, Ray, sounds just like me. Thanks for the kind words.

And I just flashed on that glowing serpent we marveled at long ago on a high powered adventure in Josh. Too funny!

I wish I had a slide scanner, because I could really clutter this thread up with some old stuff.

bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 18, 2009 - 10:41am PT
fer chrissakes warbler, we'll buy you a damn slide scanner! digitize that stuff before it becomes lost forever!

my hard drive is laden with classic pikkys i've pinched from the taco.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 18, 2009 - 10:48am PT
Kevin, I can download the current drivers for my
canon scanner - its full on with a tray for scanning
slides, I never use it, its in a bag in my closet.
great unit.

use it as long as you need, just fire me an email if you like.

I could drop it by a little later this week,
no problemo...


Ray
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 18, 2009 - 10:56am PT
Well Ray,

If you're serious, It'd be good to see you.

Money's been tight what with the mortgage, the kid, the two month reroofing job I just did on my house, and the climbing habit - a slide scanner just isn't in the budget. If I get ahead I'm going to Baja...

Speaking of which, I've got lots of photos of San Diego's down south outback.

survivalmademedoit

Trad climber
Grantham, New Hampshire
Nov 18, 2009 - 11:45am PT
Hey Guys,

BVB & BEEHAY--Hope you guys are well. Great catching up on the latest scoop about everyone. In all, things are hanging well (and when i'm out climbing, I still hang as much as I ever did).

In all, things are great. Living in New Hampshire now, but visiting Survival here in New Mexico. Had a 20 year layoff from climbing, but always fun to get on and touch the stone. Great to hear stuff about San Diego too! Much more fun grinding away skin cells on real stone vs. that plastic stuff anyday (plus, I don't have to get bitched at when I touch something with the wrong colored tape).

BEEHAY--heard you and Dan C. are hardcore mountain bikers these days? BTW: what's Tom Scott and Paul Dowdy up to? What's the best way to get in touch with them?

FROG- Great thread!

survivalmademedoit

Trad climber
Grantham, New Hampshire
Nov 18, 2009 - 12:57pm PT
Hey gang,
bvb,beehay...to see current pictures of Vojtko go here:

http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1014362/Chief_Cochiti_and_The_Old_Men

Edit: Oooops, this was actually posted by survival, not Mark.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 18, 2009 - 01:52pm PT
This is an early draft of the routes on EP for a guidebook that is now complete, and out on the market.

The guide is for Eagle Peak, Corte Madera and El Cajon Mtn, all of San Diego's publicly known major climbing areas.
Credit: The Warbler
dickcilley

Social climber
Wisteria Ln.
Nov 18, 2009 - 02:00pm PT
SD is the best climbing ever.But what do I know? I've never been anywhere or done anything.I want to spend the winter down there.If someone could just drop me off at one of those areas I've not seen.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 18, 2009 - 02:35pm PT
SD River, El Cajon Mtn, from EP, spring after Cedar Fire
SD River, El Cajon Mtn, from EP, spring after Cedar Fire
Credit: The Warbler
Third pitch, Tail Tucker Arete, 11d
Third pitch, Tail Tucker Arete, 11d
Credit: The Warbler
Hold detail, Bush Doctor, Tan Man Tower summit block
Hold detail, Bush Doctor, Tan Man Tower summit block
Credit: The Warbler
Climbers on pitch 3, The Shining Slab, 5.11b
Climbers on pitch 3, The Shining Slab, 5.11b
Credit: The Warbler
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Nov 18, 2009 - 05:37pm PT
Keep it comin' Boyz!

Eastern county has heaps eh?
Did a few routes on the Lowenbrau Pinnacle(is that right?).

KW- dude, Get. That. Scanner.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 18, 2009 - 06:00pm PT
lowenbrau pinnacle. my god, i haven't heard mention of that since the 70's.

Into the wayback machine, people! Time for a little stroll down memory lane...
Anxious Melancholy

Mountain climber
Between the Depths of Despair & Heights of Folly
Nov 18, 2009 - 06:01pm PT
Survival,

TS is here and doing well...still cranking. PD has been living above Colorado Springs in Woodland Park for many years. His back isn't doing so well so he don't rock climb no more, and his peak bagging days are slowing down, but he's still skiing. i hook up with him at least once a year for some powder runs or hill climbs.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 18, 2009 - 06:09pm PT
drljefe,

your best bet is to plot your gps grid,
and zip line in off a helo
full tactical, spectrashields up
the brush may fight back,
if your team gets hit, don't
fool around - fall back,
get on the sat phone,
and call for a helo evac
sick sh#t out there
so, don't rule out
a bag and tag sar ops

emphasis on the "bag"

good luck
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Nov 18, 2009 - 06:54pm PT
Ray-
ummm, didn't roger that!

papa's got a brand new bag.

WAAAAY east
like almost
or in
Imperial county
where there is
nothing
but
rock, no
brush
no
nada
not even a
pullout
off the 8
I gander
and wonder
if it's "hands"
or if at
75
it's Oh dub
or fingers
usually
at
sunrise.
sorry.
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Nov 18, 2009 - 07:55pm PT
Here's a couple of dusty old crappy pictures of Deerhorn for Raymond...

Credit: Off White

Brush Warrior with machete
Brush Warrior with machete
Credit: Off White

Slabbing on Dinosaur Rock
Slabbing on Dinosaur Rock
Credit: Off White
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 18, 2009 - 08:44pm PT
To anybody interested:

A few folks have asked me how to get the newly released ACSD (Allied Climbers of San Diego, http://www.alliedclimbers.org/access.php ) Guidebook to Corte Madera, El Cajon and Eagle Peak.

All 3 SD County REIs have them, but you have to go to the store to purchase it, according to ACSD's president. Vertical Hold climbing gym should have them soon, and they are available at ACSD monthly member meetings.


Both El Cajon and Eagle Peak are in Dave Kennedy and Chris Hubbard's most recent guide to San Diego climbing, published three years ago, but the only comprehensive guide to Eagle Peak is the new ACSD guide.


The ACSD guide was published with a grant to ACSD from REI, and includes a lot of information not needed by experienced climbers. The basic info for non climbers was included to satisfy REI's requirements for educating the average outdoor recreationist.

Cool black and whites of Deerhorn - I love B&W for climbing... Mountain Magazine style.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 18, 2009 - 09:02pm PT
Too cool Off White!
Much appreciated :-)

memories...

Kevin, bad news.
the slide/neg tray for the scanner
and the usb cable
are AWOL
repeat AWOL

looks like they defected...
dang it!

heavy straffing revealed no sign of life
mission aborted.

how bout we take up a small
donation, snail mail to you and
get this mission accomplished.

seems to me a small price considering
all the film you shot, not to mention
raw cost of all the routes, etc.

its your call :-)

Ray

EDIT: Off White - how come Dinasaur rock
looks so low angle now???

thanx again.

BeeHay

Trad climber
San Diego CA
Nov 19, 2009 - 12:23am PT
Doug,

I KNEW that was Galen in the middle of the 1st shot, 2nd shot confirmed, funny sh!t.

Mark,

Curly and I make many a twenty something cry for mommy when they try to ride with us. Mt Biking is a great compliment to climbing; technique, commitment, line selection, strength.
Climb with Tom S a few times a year, still going strong.
Haven't seen Paul D in decades.

Brad
drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Nov 20, 2009 - 01:45pm PT
More please.
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Nov 20, 2009 - 04:38pm PT
Lets move from the inland empire closer to the coast. This is Boomer Beach, a chossy beach bouldering area, but loaded with charm. I'm sure all these routes, shot in the late seventies, have eroded away.















Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 20, 2009 - 04:49pm PT
great shots Off White,
looks like a young Beehay
in one near the top.
Completely forgot about the beach.
Thanks for posting.

Also, Mike Fogarty!
so glad you could join us,
many years eh? pretty amazing.
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Nov 20, 2009 - 05:09pm PT
Killer photos, who the climbers? Looks like BVB in one of em.
Peace
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 20, 2009 - 06:37pm PT
Really cool black and whites Off White!

They bring back some great memories - I used to love to do that roof bvb's flying off of, never failed to get the attention of the sunbathers at Boomer. That roof dropped years ago, and many of those problems have changed, but when the south swells push the sand in, and the tide's low in the afternoon on a sunny day, Boomer still offers a good time and a pump.

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 20, 2009 - 06:41pm PT
Back to the inland empire...


San Diego River
San Diego River
Credit: The Warbler
Crazy Horse, pitch 1, 5.12b, EP
Crazy Horse, pitch 1, 5.12b, EP
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Early recon of Eagle Peak escarpment
Early recon of Eagle Peak escarpment
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
Off White

climber
Tenino, WA
Nov 20, 2009 - 07:15pm PT
Kevin, that new stuff looks dreamy. I'd love to see some of your old stuff scanned up. I usually squeak in a Boomer visit anytime I'm in SD, the ambiance is great.

Climbers in those shots are mostly Galen Kirkwood or Bob VanBelle, with one shot of Frank Noble, the curly dark hair on a roof.
Shano

Trad climber
921OB
Nov 20, 2009 - 07:52pm PT
working the moves on a new route. Gary Anderson topside - "Kona Kai" 1...
working the moves on a new route. Gary Anderson topside - "Kona Kai" 11b
Credit: CH
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 20, 2009 - 09:41pm PT
so i'm gonna be in san diego over thanksgiving and won't have a car. will be staying in clairemont. who wants to drive me bouldering??
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Nov 21, 2009 - 12:13am PT
Check your email bvb.

I went to a raptor monitoring meeting at the Cleveland National Forest office in Ramona, and I might have to take back some of the slander I dished out to the Forest Service earlier in this thread.

Not that they haven't earned it in the past, just because they might finally be looking at the issue of climbers coexisting with nesting raptors from a logical perspective. From the getgo in this dispute, San Diego climbers have offered to assist the Forest Service in monitoring at the crags, and have offered to manage necessary closures around active nests with signage and generally getting the word out.

Until last night, our offers have been ignored in favor of having people unfamiliar with the lay of the land fly around in helicopters on arbitrary dates, no doubt scaring the crap out of the "sensitive" birds, trying to figure out where they have decided to nest each year. Of course climbers already know pretty much exactly what's going on each year because they're at the crags all day long on a regular basis.

So hopefully some trust in climbers, and honest interaction on behalf of the FS will lead to a relationship based on mutual respect. This nesting season will be interesting.

Stay tuned...
BeeHay

Trad climber
San Diego CA
Nov 21, 2009 - 01:01pm PT
Ray, Bee Hay was never that young, nor that lean.

BVB, planning to leave town next WE, you'll have to get yer spankin' another time!
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 21, 2009 - 01:07pm PT
now THAT is the Beehay I know :-)

hope all is going good for you man,
thanks again for posting those old
pack pics a while back - it was/is
appreciated.

be careful in that holiday traffic Brad, ok?

Ray
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Nov 23, 2009 - 06:15pm PT
so i'm gonna be in san diego over thanksgiving and won't have a car. will be staying in clairemont. who wants to drive me bouldering??

still fishin' for a ride bump.
Ray Olson

Trad climber
Imperial Beach, California
Topic Author's Reply - Nov 23, 2009 - 06:43pm PT
bvb - you know I would, too injured,
gonna get my head stiched onto a new
body - they can do that now, I seen it in
the movies...
jeff leads

Sport climber
ca
Nov 23, 2009 - 06:55pm PT
Call me BVB....
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Nov 23, 2009 - 09:01pm PT
The Evil Upper Case Twin?!?
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 13, 2010 - 02:55am PT
Sorry for reviving the thread, but I'm planning on heading up to the northern T Domes next week (above the tractor one day, and probably the middle area the week after). Since I've lived here ('86) I've always stared up at those hills and since i started climbing a few years ago I've been wanting to hike up there. Since then I've made it up to the boulders above the weigh station quite a few times, and hiked 3/4 of the way up the steep side of the east (of the freeway) hill below the 3 giant eggs sitting on top. most of my friends are boulderers (as am i, but im an alpinist at heart) so the approach is a bit too extreme for their tastes and so finding people to team up with is hard.

Is anyone still going up there or would like to come up? I'd love to meet up with anyone willing to make the hike up there, and anyone whos familiar with the way would be even better.

Im also trying to set a day aside to getting up to the dome on the other side of the hill, overlooking the santa margarita river (temecula gorge). I've gotten most of the way hiking up the private road after old town and cutting west above the gorge rim, but i didnt have enough light to go further. Same thing with approaching from the weigh station (the long way) and cutting across along a trail to the top of the dome.

heres a link to a TR that some guys did to it. anyone know who bolted the stuff and what the real ratings are? http://poorboy44.smugmug.com/Climbing/2006/Temecula-Domes-Hell-Hike-Recon/2021552_pTDZw#103583186_r44X9

Back to the east hill again, has anyone done the approach from behind the conservation camp? I've heard from a friend that someone got up there with no problems, and other times ive heard that people were ran off the alarea. I really wanna get up to those eggs but there looks like some amazing spots along the backside as well.


The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 13, 2010 - 09:34am PT
Graham N,

The trail to the T domes above the dozer bucket is for sure gone, or at least the one the Hatchett bros and I cut, but the crag above is worth the effort. We called the big wide slab Rock Candy Dome because the rock's so sweet. There are a few bolted lines on it, one right up the center was attempted originally by myself, but left unclimbed for years due to fifty foot grounder potential from the crux. Now it's well bolted by myself and Mike Hatchett, and still an exciting lead on fine rock, Don't Look Back, 11c/d.

If you can get on Google Earth, you'll see that someone has cut a long trail along the ridge above the domes leading all the way to the summit of the mountain behind them. it appears to start at a residence above I 15 on the north end of the rocky ridge above the Santa Margarita River. It looks like there is maybe a link up trail that starts at the big dirt pullout about a half mile up the grade past the river crossing as you leave the Temecula Valley southbound. It winds through lots of those eggs you're interested in.
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 13, 2010 - 03:17pm PT
yeah i can imagine its been washed away, however the brush above there is no problem as it was burned out a year or so ago and still hasnt recovered. I've seen that trail coming from where the KRTM antenna is, and ive yet to go all the way up to the house to ask for permission as their property line (and front gate) is far from their house so id have to trespass to even get up there to ask. I guess i could leave a note? haha.

Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 13, 2010 - 05:04pm PT
hey warbler, in post #100 you put up some pics of a canyon with a guy standing and an overhung boulder stating it was new rock. where is that at?

oh also, how long ago has it been since you guys rebolted? Just want to know if i should be bringing any tools with me or not.
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Jan 13, 2010 - 06:19pm PT


Eagle Peak was nice too... but definitely a full day deal.
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Jan 13, 2010 - 08:29pm PT
Hey Warbler check these out. Kurt Smith on the what I believe is the first ascent of "The best of both worlds" 5.10c around 1986.

Check out the background of Temecula. Betcha it looks a lot different now.





T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Jan 13, 2010 - 08:39pm PT
"High Voltage"


Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 13, 2010 - 08:54pm PT
^^ Sh*t... thats when i moved to the area with my parents. i was 5. haha

really looking forward to getting up on those rocks.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 13, 2010 - 09:25pm PT
Hey Tommy,

I think I was there with you that day!

I've got a stack of crusty T Dome slides, but no scanner. Temecula sure has changed.

That's some good rock up there close to a lot of people that never touch it. Seems we did about 40 leads up there...
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Jan 13, 2010 - 09:59pm PT
I am sure you were there Kevin. Prolly Spike, Dave, you. That was back when we would park om the freeway and run across. Those were good times!
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 14, 2010 - 01:33am PT
i have a slide scanner id love to check out all the old pics.
gonamok

Trad climber
poway, ca
Jan 14, 2010 - 02:26am PT
Its hard to look for routes while carrying heavy equipment. Exploration is finding the routes, and suitable tools are light, compact and versatile.
One is hiking and fighting brush while you try to cover ground to your destination. The emphasis is on getting thru it quickly, not blazing a trail. The less you hack the faster you go. Why build a trail before you know if there are even routes there? Depending on the type of brush, ive carried modified machetes, a cleaver, a folding brush saw, a rebar rod, a long handled hatchet and some handmade tools like a solid copper bludgeon for dry shattery vegitation on rock ground. The copper blasts thru even thick crispies like manzanita and sumac, and it doesnt hurt to hit a rock on the downswing like steel does because the copper deforms and absorbs the shock. Brush saws can get you thru the deep canopy/tree type barriers found in the deep riparian low spots like the NE side of woodson, where you may have to cut a 4" or larger branch at times. Machetes arent good on the dry, lacking the heft to shatter, and are best suited to sumac and upper north slope type terrain. Tough rooted low plants like sage and scrub oak resist casual whacking, but if you need to cut through some, a hatchet with lengthened handle for striking at the low stalk and root area is effective. But none of that except maybe the brush saw are that good for development, which is heavier and more specific work involving minimal hiking.
I used to haul all kinds of shovels, rakes, car jacks, prybars, saws, you name it, to a new area and leave it all there for months while developing an area. Id bury it or cache it in cracks or thickets. Not having to lug any of it around means chainsaws etc may be viable, but construction type noise on or near private or public land will get you shut down, and while i have daydreamed of a gasoline brush saw, polesaw, brush shears etc instead of the hand tools I was laboring with, i never needed it and liked the wild eyed release of hacking and digging till i was exhausted and too pumped to open a beer. Those days usually ended with me covered with sweat mud in the dark, in the middle of nowhere, scraped up, pumped, exhausted and happy as a clam. I always had a spare set of clothes and socks, a towel, some water and beers and a carpet, and would have a beer and clean up a little in the dark, enjoying the sounds of the wildlife in the brush around me and feeling like one of them. I tried not to make noise or use my light because it froze all activity, creating a silence that lingered for 5 or 10 minutes, then stirrings quickly ramped back up into full activity around me. It was sometimes 9:00 or even later before i left because i found such solace way out in the brush, in the hush of night with my fellow brush denizens.

I guess i digressed into a rapture, but my point was that exploration is not development, and power tools are not some modern answer. Bushwhacking with your chain saw and extension loppers is about as smart as trying to fell a tree with a machete. apples and oranges.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 14, 2010 - 10:04am PT
Definitely in the exploration phase you need to slip through the brush like smoke.

But if your exploration yields something exceptional, a well surveyed and built trail makes the climbing that much better. I've spent hours crawling through brush to look at the ground underneath it before committing to a trail line. It's tempting to link up rocks to scramble over to minimize cutting brush, but if a trail is to be used for years by many climbers, it's best to have dirt under foot, at least on nearly level ground or traverses.

And don't make switchbacks too steep.

Just my $.02.

EDIT: Graham N - I'll try to dig up my T Dome slides and see if there are any decent ones.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 14, 2010 - 11:14am PT
Somebody get Kevin hooked up!

For the ST I use an HP Scanjet 5370C with the slide scanning gizmo. More than good enough for posting. If you are into higher resolution for archiving something like a Canon CanoScan 8800F would be better. I am no tech weenie and this stuff is fairly easy to deal with. Besides the clock is ticking on the image quality for those really old slides so git her done songbird! I bet you have some gems once the dust is removed with a slide duster/blower!
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 14, 2010 - 12:49pm PT
well let me clarify i dont have a dedicated slide scanner, i have a flatbed that has the capability of scanning slides. so it will definately work. Dunno the difference between the dedicated film/slide scanner results and what i use but ive been satisfied with the results.

So no one has any knowledge about the face on the other side of the hill overlooking the gorge? someones gotta know something. haha
weschrist

Gym climber
left sac
Jan 14, 2010 - 01:09pm PT
Haven't we been waiting for Kevin to get hooked up for a couple months now? Sheesh, you get a free printer/scanner with damn near every new computer purchase. Surely someone has one lying around. COME ON!
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 14, 2010 - 03:28pm PT
OK, OK.

So I'm a caveman with a climbing addiction which leaves me penniless and unable to update to new technology. ;-]

I'll try to get it together for everyone's entertainment.

Not tomorrow though - I'm off to Eagle Peak with a USFS biologist to show him falcon monitoring sites, and how to get to them without dying.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Jan 14, 2010 - 03:30pm PT
you're a good man kw.
InEpt

Boulder climber
SoulCal
Jan 14, 2010 - 09:29pm PT
Hey Graham the face overlooking the gorge has some potential for good lines on it and some phenomenal bouldering at the base. However the approach is to either solo up that 75ft wall of crumbling death above the water and army crawl on your stomach under manzanita for an hour or from the left use the trail we tried to make years ago only to be stopped 3/4 of the way by a gully of absolutely impenetrable poison oak. The routes on the dome weren't enticing enough to want to suffer more steroid injections for the poison oak but the rock was bullet and the bouldering was pretty stellar! There is a road that we stumbled on halfway up the mountain that was used for the transport of granite they used to quarry up there. But that too stops in the foreboding poison oak gully =(
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 14, 2010 - 11:28pm PT
^^ hmmm i wonder who bolted it then? A page or so back i posted a link to a trip report from some guys that went up to the base of it, said it took them hours to get there. The rock looks amazing, if a bit slick. Is the bouldering you are referring to the stuff to the left of the dome? That area has teased me for years. I think i know where you guys made the trail. I might just get my full suit up and hack through the poison oak to make the trail go through.

Side note again, I have access to the hill on the other side of the freeway, from a home off rainbow canyon road. They used to own the hillside all the way to the top where the 3 eggs are, and blasted and dozed an access road most of the way up back in the late 70's. It deteriorated about half way up but its completely doable, just needs some hacking. It goes up to the left of Vapor Lock. I'm looking for a couple motivated people whod like a shorter (if steeper) access to the top and backside of that hill without going around the conservation camp. Any takers?? haha

I'm also trying to plan a little expedition across the north side of the rocky hillside above tenaja (the national forest side, not the part with all the mcmansions). Theres SOOO much rock up there, for bouldering and for trad/sport

InEpt, you post on westcoastbouldering.com dont you? I need some motivated exploration partners. all my bouldering/climbing friends are too lazy for complicated approaches/trailbuilding
T2

climber
Cardiff by the sea
Jan 15, 2010 - 12:07am PT
Here is some fun stuff I found. I guess that is not the first ascent of Kurt on "Best of both worlds" Kevin, says here in the guide book you and spike put it up and I am sand bager by calling 10c. Guide book calls 11a

HeHe The players Kevin Worrall, Mike Hatchett, Kurt Smith, Tommy Thompson, Rick Lovelace












gonamok

Trad climber
poway, ca
Jan 15, 2010 - 05:00am PT
KW, you da man. My post was my 2 cents worth of spray only because the thread subject is dear to me, not because ive really accomplished anything. Im not only not in your league, im not on your planet. Hope i didnt come off uppity, i tend to babble.

peace, r
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 15, 2010 - 09:43am PT
Hey Ray---You coming to this Woodson shindig? You better say yes or expect to see the inside of a Grade VII haulbag on the way to the airport in a couple of months!!! LOL
medusa

Trad climber
culver city
Jan 15, 2010 - 10:11am PT
You must be very old Ray and washed up!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 15, 2010 - 10:18am PT
Far from it, dude! However, friends don't let friends allow their work ethic to eclipse the inner Funhog!!! And we is serious...
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 15, 2010 - 11:48am PT
I schwacked up to that north facing dome above the Santa Margarita River some time ago. We found the overgrown old roadcut which traverses the slope below it, and groveled up to the base. The rock looks good, and we saw a line of well spaced bolts with rusty Leeper hangers.

My evaluation of the crag was that it was not naturally set up well for lots of routes - the lower slab was a little too low angle, and the upper headwall too steep and featureless for many routes. Plus any north facing slope in SD has hellish brush and PO. Actually that crag's in Riverside County.

My guess is that there is a good, maybe extra good bouldering area up on the top of the hill above it. You just gotta get there and check it out. That end of the little mountain range, and the river bed is an Ecological Reserve, so go easy.
REIGN 1

Trad climber
Mt. Woodson, Ca
Jan 15, 2010 - 12:43pm PT
Warbler, Is this north facing rock the one you can see heading south on the 15 in Temecula just before heading up the hill where the border check is?
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 15, 2010 - 04:23pm PT
Yes, it's the crag you see in profile looking down the river canyon. You can see that crag from Tahquitz - in the afternoon it really shines and stands out on clear day from up there.

I didn't walk the whole base, particularly the west end of it, so there could be some worthy rock up there that I didn't see.

I know Randy Leavitt checked it out and didn't return either, but I think his reason was more the heinous PO rash he got for his efforts, than the lack of route potential.
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 15, 2010 - 10:26pm PT
Does anyone know if the tweaker homesteads on top of the hill are occupied? I walked near the one along the main road but wasnt sure if there were squatters or occupants and didnt feel like risking getting shot at. If no one lives there it is a fairly easy hike 80% of the way to the north slope, as well as the top of rock candy and the other t-domes.



these pics arent mine (credit to Scott Nelson), but heres a closer look at the north slope face.
Credit: Graham N
Credit: Graham N
Credit: Graham N
Credit: Graham N
Cannon

Trad climber
Wildomar, CA
Jan 16, 2010 - 02:46am PT
i had a question about access to the T-Domes. i exited rainbow valley and made a right. the road was gated with a rather ominous sign stating the road was used for various law enforcement agencies......and more or less i am not allowed on it. the question is, all the access directions i have found start with taking this road till it turns to dirt, what are the odds i am allowed to simply part at the weigh station and walk up the road....with out getting shot for it? and also what if i used the creek bed in temecula to gain access, what say you to that? i am willing to accept the fact that there will be some bush hacking.
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 16, 2010 - 04:29am PT
That gate's been up for a bit now. When the original guys wrote the directions there wasnt a gate at the bottom. I've parked at the end there by the weigh station and just hoofed it up the road, was gone for a few hours and had no problems, however my friend came back to his car and had a cop checking his sh#t out. Didnt get a ticket, but got a "talking to". My advice is to just leave a note on your car that says "went up the hill rock climbing". haha

Hiking from the creek is going to be WAAAAY too much work. If youre trying to reach the northern domes why not just have someone drop you off on the side of the freeway? We're heading up soon, you're welcome to come along.
REIGN 1

Trad climber
Mt. Woodson, Ca
Jan 16, 2010 - 04:52am PT
Me and some friends checked out that big face back in the 80's. We were dissapointed with the rock but put up a couple bolted routes since we hiked all that way. I remember the poison oak was alive and doing very well in that canyon. I never went back.
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 16, 2010 - 05:00am PT
yeah it looks so promising when you look at it from the other side of the canyon haha.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Jan 16, 2010 - 12:51pm PT
the chapparal guarding the base of this crag says it all. getting through that stuff can take 30 minutes per yard. you cannot conceive of how grim those thickets are until you've experienced one first-hand.

drljefe

climber
Old Pueblo, AZ
Jan 16, 2010 - 01:15pm PT
Then, if you go in spring, well, snakey.

I've sussed it from the road across the canyon.
Thanks for the pics.
gonamok

Trad climber
poway, ca
Jan 19, 2010 - 07:07pm PT
casual observation from the comfy environs of my car as i travelled to and from JT and Idylwild made me think that N. facing wall along margarita creek cyn might be the biggest hunk of rock in that entire amazing area. Its great to finally get a good look at it thanks to fellas who had the gumption to go have a gander. Impressive tho it is, the angles and features just dont create the kind of lines it seems to promise. Once again its proven biggest aint always best, and if ive thought about doing it, its prolly already been done. Hats off to those who explore the unknown for all our benefit! And thanks for sharing the pics.

ron
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 25, 2010 - 10:41pm PT
[photo[photo
Eagle Peak summit block
Eagle Peak summit block
Credit: The Warbler
id=142617]id=142616]

Yesterday at Eagle Peak. The route's called Nice Jugs, pitch 3, 12a.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 25, 2010 - 10:48pm PT
Credit: The Warbler

From the west a little earlier
gonamok

Trad climber
poway, ca
Jan 26, 2010 - 04:11am PT
that stuff is beautiful
Watusi

Social climber
Newport, OR
Jan 26, 2010 - 04:15am PT
Yep, pretty stuff indeed Kevin!!!
Porkchop_express

Trad climber
Currently in San Diego
Jan 26, 2010 - 05:06am PT
WOW this thread is AMAZING! I just moved out here, did a little exploring at woodson, santee and mission and finally bought the Hubbard guidebook.

This is really exciting because I figured there had to be more here than met the eye. Now if I could only climb half of this stuff...

Beautiful photos! I have a little idea of the work that goes into getting some of those shots and its greatly appreciated.

See you all at the shin-dig!

Steve
bajaandy

climber
Escondido, CA
Jan 26, 2010 - 10:12am PT
Impressive photos Warbler. Nice lighting, composition, framing. You've got the touch!
More San Diego little known gems...
http://supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1067033/This_aint_no_Mt_Woodson_thread
(In retrospect, I guess I should've just posted the pics from that thread here in this thread. Oh well...)
Graham N

Social climber
temecula
Jan 27, 2010 - 11:09pm PT
warbler, i sent you an email... =)



annnnnd..... BUMP!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Apr 18, 2010 - 12:41pm PT
Bumps all over San Diego County!
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Dec 31, 2010 - 12:33pm PT
Extending into Baja...Catavina, La Mysteriosa...

http://www.supertopo.com/climbing/thread.php?topic_id=1358530&msg=1361287#msg1361287
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 31, 2010 - 01:24pm PT
Climber's paradise:

Credit: The Warbler

Credit: The Warbler
dave

climber
Earth
Dec 31, 2010 - 01:43pm PT
Do tell! Stuff recently is piquing my interest again.

Just wondering about whats been happening at the Valley of the Moon, recently. I cleaned a line and attempted about 7 years ago just right of that nice .10 hand crack on the main formation when your walking in to the main area, did'nt send and never went back, had heard that J. Brown was interested but wonder if anyone ever did it and how hard they thought?
guyman

Trad climber
Moorpark, CA.
Dec 31, 2010 - 01:56pm PT
Kevin... the stuff in the top pic looks like marble? Any climbs?
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Dec 31, 2010 - 01:58pm PT
NO climbs there and it's a pile of rubble Guy! Wouldn't waste yer time on stuff like that. Besides I think Kevin is still recovering from the recon on that pile. Happy New Year!
Peace
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 31, 2010 - 02:03pm PT
Not marble, Guy, but granite, and the best, densest, most fine grained, iron hard granite I've ever climbed on. Covered with amazing holds.



There are 35 pitches in that photo, and many more longer ones not pictured around the corner.


Someday it might be open....
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 31, 2010 - 02:23pm PT
Pitches 2 and 3 of The Tail Tucker Arete, 11d Eagle Peak

Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
Dec 31, 2010 - 02:43pm PT
Well so much for that!
Peace
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Dec 31, 2010 - 02:48pm PT
I was just joking,

Ron's right - a hellish approach with a disintegrating choss pile at its end.


But some of us are into that kind of climbing experience....
Scole

Trad climber
San Diego
Jan 4, 2011 - 08:59pm PT
I gotta get up there now that I live in San Diego. That's some nice looking stone!
gonamok

climber
aging malcontent
Jan 6, 2011 - 01:51am PT
Word. Ray Olsen set the standard for climbing area development in san diego county. Ray didnt just find and climb tons of classic routes, he built trail networks, stabilized landings, installed belays and cleared rest areas. Ray carved a masterpiece out of some hard, steep, brushy terrain at deerhorn valley, linking dozens of high quality routes with sidewalk-like trails, complete with shady rest areas and vantage points. The routes featured picnic area landings, comfy belays and easy access to the top, and most could be climbed with only a handful of slings and crabs.

Ray. DUDE. Nobody did it better.
mooch

Trad climber
Old Climbers' Home (Adopted)
Jan 7, 2011 - 10:03am PT
Attention Allied Folks......clean up your drama at El Cajon Mtn!

The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 7, 2011 - 11:03am PT
I think the chopfest is over at ECM.

There is little to no info for the general climbing community about the extent of it over the years - route developers at ECM don't want to give the chopper any acknowledgment in the climbing media.

An all round twisted scenario.

Is that a genuine ECM artifact, mooch?

mooch

Trad climber
Old Climbers' Home (Adopted)
Jan 7, 2011 - 12:56pm PT
Not sound condescending but I did mention "clean up", meaning fix the aftermath. Yes it is. Of course, it charred from the fire this past summer. Found it laying at the base of the corner system on the far right side (close to 'Match Book' 5.9). You can see the bent bolt above (20'ish). Additionally, the .10a face route to the right of Match Book is chopped too. I can list a few others on the left side of ECM that were chopped. Yes, the chopping occured a few years back. But locals should demonstrate unity and fix these routes and prove to the choppper (Art....hmmm!) that he is outnumbered if he chooses to slither back to ECM. I believe a good chunk of these routes were Brian's. Not sure if Brian even cares about his chopped routes.

Allied? Really?

I'm not trying to uncover an old Taco thread on this (appears it was deleted), just saw the topic of San Diego climbing and it was still fresh in my mind after finding it a little over 3 weeks ago.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Jan 7, 2011 - 01:19pm PT
mooch,

I agree, allied would not describe the (true) San Diego climbing community.

There are too many areas to climb around here, and too many competing agendas.

I believe the strategy amongst those who developed routes at ECM is to wait for the dust to settle before cleaning up. But the key players have moved on it seems.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
May 7, 2011 - 12:13am PT
Sunny warm Bump!
frog-e

Trad climber
Imperial Beach California
May 7, 2011 - 12:39am PT
Recovering from neurosurgery, last june 3rd.

I have 2 trick-ass pieces of titanium in my lumbar spine.
They are the latest thing - called "pivots". My freaking
Lumbar is strong as hell - no kidding. Amazing.

No fusion, no disk removal;

And the unending nerve pain of of sciatica is gone. Welded leg muscles,
"Myofascial adhesions" in (primarily) the left leg persist, but it is getting
Slowly better. I am doing my best to heal my body, my mind and spirit.
My life has been (or was) an ordeal. Climbing was the best part of the
Whole thing.

If anyone has questions about degenerative lumbar arthrits; stenosis,
Blown disks, etc. And is looking for an opinion in socal, the guy to
See is Dr Ty at socal neurosciences in Orange. Bad ass surgeon.
I wrote the review (testimonial) on their web site. Saved my life;
Severe pain paitents don't last long. Severe pain beats up the brain
Pretty bad...memory, cognitive problems.


I am undergoing some kind of major spiritual or wholistic transformation.
Probably the result of many decades of over-taxed central nervous system.
Probably a little fried, but doing better.

And...I got a great tan. ;-)

Thanks Ron for the nice post. Good luck with your Woodson thing.

Have fun out there everyone!

-Ray


Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
May 7, 2011 - 04:18pm PT
Ray- Thanks for the report.

You have had much more than your share of ailments along the way.

Great to hear that you are on the mend!

Cheers- Steve
F10

Trad climber
e350 / Bishop
May 7, 2011 - 06:29pm PT
Good for you Ray, glad to hear you're on the mend and doing better !!

James
ron gomez

Trad climber
fallbrook,ca
May 7, 2011 - 08:15pm PT
Hope yo continue in your recovery Ray and glad you found some relief to your situation. I work in rehabilitation and want to check out your surgeon, alway good to hear of someone out there doing good procedures with good results! Keep up the hard work!
Peace
gonamok

climber
dont make me come over there
May 8, 2011 - 12:19am PT
Hey Ray, so glad to hear your surgery was a success and that youre on the upswing! You were a major force during the formative era of SD climbing, when there were still major areas to be found if you had the balls.

Good memories from BITD bro, remember Chuck and Judys party, how everybody was dancing like maniacs? Was that fun or what... If youre ever up for woodson or whatever, i still have the same number.
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
May 8, 2011 - 12:27am PT
Hey Ray,

Heal up quick bro! Sorry to hear you've been through all that, and hope it leads back to the rock for you...

Kevin
frog-e

Trad climber
Imperial Beach California
May 8, 2011 - 12:32am PT
Ron, that is very kind of you. I sincerly appreciate all your hospitality
and good will. We were (and are) all so fortunate to have those hills to run
around in, and the climbing is just so good. Hope to be around;
Getting to the point where I can maybe hike...or walk without limping.
Finally. All the work you are doing at woodson sounds awesome; used
to love to go out trail building - what a work out. Keeps one fit, eh?
I hope everything is going well for you. To quote our fine friend
Eppi:

"This is life, and we're living it..."

Take care Ron. It is my sincere hope we cross paths in the not so
distant future.

Sincerely,
Ray
Todd Gordon

Trad climber
Joshua Tree, Cal
May 8, 2011 - 12:42am PT
Great post, great pics from Kevin, great news from Ray (sounds like things are going well;......excellent, Ray...)........this is why supertopo rocks;...it's threads like this one....fantastic. San Diego has the awesome climbing opportunities...no doubt....truly inspirational....
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
May 8, 2011 - 12:43am PT
Some Swiss guy on vacation
Some Swiss guy on vacation
Credit: The Warbler
Eagle Peak Summit Area
Eagle Peak Summit Area
Credit: The Warbler
Soy Chango, EP
Soy Chango, EP
Credit: The Warbler
Bush Doctor start
Bush Doctor start
Credit: The Warbler
Bush Doctor, EP
Bush Doctor, EP
Credit: The Warbler
Bush Doctor headwall
Bush Doctor headwall
Credit: The Warbler
There's gold in them thar hills...
There's gold in them thar hills...
Credit: The Warbler
Credit: The Warbler
500 ft of good rock
500 ft of good rock
Credit: The Warbler
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Jul 1, 2011 - 01:07pm PT
I moved to Escondido back in November and my house is at the base of this mountain with what looks like about a 80 to 100 foot wall with some fun face climbing and some decent cracks as well. I've been exploring up there when I can and hope to check out the main wall for routes in the next couple months.
Does anyone out there know if this wall has been climbed before. Except for some hoodlum graffiti doesn't look like any one else has done much up there. There appears to be some fun climbs on the boulders and main wall. It's about 2 miles north-west of lake dixon. Here's some pics.

main wall, curves around to some more routes you can't see here.
main wall, curves around to some more routes you can't see here.
Credit: dirt claud
fun bouldering and shorter routes
fun bouldering and shorter routes
Credit: dirt claud
partial main wall side view
partial main wall side view
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud

apogee

climber
Jul 1, 2011 - 02:01pm PT
Todd G grew up in the No County/Fallbrook area- he might have beta on that crag. There's a ton of little crags like that in No County.
snake pliskin

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jul 1, 2011 - 10:49pm PT
I always want to check that face out every time I'm driving to meet my partner at the Park-and-Ride before trips to Idylwild or JTree.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Jul 2, 2011 - 01:51am PT
Hit me up if you ever want to check the place out snake p. (or anyone else that is interested).Pretty easy approach, sort of like mission gorge.
looks like some fun stuff up there.

thanks for the tip apogee
snake pliskin

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jul 2, 2011 - 02:53am PT
Do you approach from the, what is it, Southeast? Right side of the main wall photo. I'm driving to Joshua Tree tomorrow, so i'll take a gander as I drive by. I could very well be getting in touch in the fall when it starts to cool off.
Watusi

Social climber
Newport, OR
Jul 2, 2011 - 03:46am PT
Yeah, beauty stuff to be sure! Being born in SD we did a lot of exploring...SD holds an immense wealth of potential. I wasn't surprised to see what these intrepid explorers had unearthed...Especially with their Warbler at the helm...Great, inspiring, and appealing stuff...Very well presented of course. :)
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Jul 3, 2011 - 02:12pm PT
there is an approach that comes up just left of the wall. Easy trail, just gotta watch for them rattlers.
There sure is alot of cool little crags like that everywhere around here, as has been mentioned before, you just gotta be willing to bushwack and explore a bit.
Thanks to the past an present SD climbers who have exposed these gems too us.
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jan 21, 2012 - 02:00pm PT
Mid-winter bump...
gonamok

climber
dont make me come over there
Jan 23, 2012 - 12:14am PT
Ive been exploring the back country of san diego county off and on for over 30 years and I can tell you the amount of climbable rock is staggering. At present only a fraction of it has been developed (the most accessible, of course), and the rest is waiting for those intrepid enough to go out and get it.
bajaandy

climber
Escondido, CA
Feb 24, 2012 - 12:49pm PT
+ 1 to what Ron said. So much cragging in SD county that it boggles the mind. Access is usually the issue. Most everything climbable is on someone's private property. That crag above that claud posted out off the end of North Broadway is a prime example. Climbed there in the early 80's and got run off by a shotgun toting owner/manager. Maybe things have settled down a bit since then.
mooch

Trad climber
Old Climbers' Home (Adopted)
Feb 24, 2012 - 04:39pm PT
and the rest is waiting for those intrepid enough to go out and get it.

....the lot of it on private property or across the border.
Jonnnyyyzzz

Trad climber
San Diego,CA
Feb 24, 2012 - 06:36pm PT
Dirt clod I'm go out all the time up here around Escondido and the surounding areas checking out the crags and climbing what I can solo or rope solo. It's hard to find people to do the hard work to develop an area. I put in a lot of work last year at a nice crag out at Elven Forest with the blessing of the ranger at the park only to have his boss from somewhere show up one day and post no access signs at the trail head and chop all the anchor bolts above 12 of the climbs and all the bolts on the three sport routs. I was pissed but that's how it go's. I hope that place can be opened up someday its pretty sweet with easy access. I'm always up for checking new stuff out and doing some work if the climbing going to be worth it. I have two places I really want to go have a look at before it gets hot this summer. If anyone wants to join me or if you want someone check something out with you hit me up. I got a mecettie and a Hilti.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Feb 24, 2012 - 10:54pm PT
Sounds good Jonnyy, I'm down to do a little bush whacking, I'll get the machete ready. PM sent
The Warbler

climber
the edge of America
Feb 24, 2012 - 11:07pm PT
Let's see.... which line first?
Let's see.... which line first?
Credit: The Warbler

It's been pretty quiet out at the new crags....

1,500 ft side to side, 200 to 400 ft high, untouched 'til just lately.

Quite a few gear protected routes to do for a change.

Photos next year

Eagle Peak Summit area
Eagle Peak Summit area
Credit: The Warbler

Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Jul 7, 2012 - 01:15pm PT
Cat in the bag bump...
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Nov 19, 2012 - 11:11am PT
1st El Cajon Mt trip of the year, the season has begun!!

Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Eric Beck

Sport climber
Bishop, California
Nov 19, 2012 - 01:01pm PT
Hi Claud. This is a trip into my distant past. Your third pic, showing the trough up thru the red rock, I think is the start of an ancient route of mine, maybe mid 60s, that I did with Jerry Hooper.

Here's a tidbit from that climb. I had climbed up to the top of the trough, 5.8, and found a good stance, maybe 2 inches by 10 inches and was drilling. I almost had the hole completed when the good stance came off completely, leaving me hanging from the drill holder. Amazingly, the drill didn't break. I found some smaller holds and finished the bolt. I remember a 5.8 section immediately above and some more 5.8 with nested pins for protection. Four pitches altogether.

Back then we were able to drive up the road off to the east. It was a 20 minute brush free walk to the rock.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Nov 19, 2012 - 01:52pm PT
Man, It would be nice to have that type of access still. That hike is a bitch. Thanks for the background story. Didn't know people were climbing there back in the 60s. Lots of rock up here in SD that has not been touched since the 60s/70s it seams. Brian S. and Chris H. have done a lot of killer work in the ECM area and more routes have opened up on the rocks to the south of the main wall that is shown in the 2nd pic. That would be cool if there were any old ECM pics around.
mooser

Trad climber
seattle
Jan 16, 2013 - 10:14am PT
bvb wrote:

in december, january, february, and march, winter storms will blow through san diego with lots of cool temps and rain, then the storm will clear out, the sun will be brilliant in a scrubbed sky, sometimes you get an offshore santa ana thrown in for good measure, and the grass and mustard just pops. it's gorgeous and the granite can feel like flypaper. when the conditions are just right in san diego, as they are so often during the winter, nothing else compares. it's simply the best.

Yup. Well said.
bajaandy

climber
Escondido, CA
Jan 16, 2013 - 12:55pm PT
One of those cold, crisp, after-a-storm afternoons in San Diego of which you speak...
Credit: bajaandy
Credit: bajaandy
Tarbuster

climber
right here, right now
Jan 16, 2013 - 02:16pm PT
+1 on the BVB taste.
Quite a stash of really nice writing by Ray Olson in this thread: nostalgic and clear as a bell!
The Ron Amick passage is sweet too.
bvb

Social climber
flagstaff arizona
Jan 16, 2013 - 04:26pm PT
Today is one of those perfect days. Conditions do not ever get better than this. It's absoltely primo.
dirt claud

Social climber
san diego,ca
Feb 24, 2014 - 03:14pm PT
Great time at Corte Madera this weekend. Thanks to all who have made the spot such a great place to climb, great setting, clean routes and awesome rock!!

Sunset Streaks 5 pitch 10a
Sunset Streaks 5 pitch 10a
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Fun satelite rocks all around!!
Fun satelite rocks all around!!
Credit: dirt claud
Fun bouldering everywhere too!!
Fun bouldering everywhere too!!
Credit: dirt claud
Credit: dirt claud
Steve Grossman

Trad climber
Seattle, WA
Feb 25, 2014 - 04:29pm PT
Bump for the Sweetness...
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