Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
This thread has been locked
Messages 1 - 20 of total 236 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
John M

climber
Aug 3, 2018 - 09:53am PT
if you are bi polar, then likely neither pole is good for you. If you have a modest income then there are second world countries with decent health care programs and rural living that one can find. Panama is one example. Super powers, even ex super powers, seem to have lots of big problems. Though smaller countries can too.

Edit:

(I'm allergic to almost all chemicals)

have you tried acupuncture? Its not a magic pill, but if it reduces the reaction by 30, 40 or 50 percent, which I have seen it happen, then wouldn't that be great?
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:00am PT
Both Russia and the US are huge landmasses with very diverse experiences from region to region. To try and make generalizations is a popular sport but falls short of reality on the ground. You make many sweeping generalizations above based on limited regional experience.

Every empire is on a trajectory that ends in collapse, every one of them. The top .01% of sociopaths will attempt to milk or murder you where ever you go on the globe. The key is to not play and live as debt-free and under your means as possible.

So move where ever you like best and try it out. If you're not tied down to family/kids then you'd be foolish not to.

If you do move, report back from time to time.
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:07am PT
John M
if you are bi polar, then likely neither pole is good for you. If you have a modest income then there are second world countries with decent health care programs and rural living that one can find. Panama is one example. Super powers, even ex super powers, seem to have lots of big problems. Though smaller countries can too.

I considered alternative countries, such as Finland, for example, which has good universal healthcare, some affordably priced rural homes, perfect nature and climate, and may be, on a long term, this can become a possibility, as they do offer immigration path for self-employed freelancers and remote-workers. But I don't know their language. And at my age over 45 just don't see that I have any capacity to start from scratch again, like I did in the US, not knowing language, laws, customs and ways of life of yet a new country. I intimately know only 2: US and Russia.
(southern countries don't work for me because I can't tolerate heat: my idea of super-warm is 70F, and comfortable indoor temp is 52F...)
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:08am PT
Agree on regional choices within US. So many options.

I doubt one can say the US is gone bad beyond hope.

Grass is always greener. Vacationing is different than living day to day when assessing a choice about where to live.

If you want the cool climate and socialized medical. Why not move to Canada?
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:12am PT
fear

Both Russia and the US are huge landmasses with very diverse experiences from region to region. To try and make generalizations is a popular sport but falls short of reality on the ground. You make many sweeping generalizations above based on limited regional experience.

Every empire is on a trajectory that ends in collapse, every one of them. The top .01% of sociopaths will attempt to milk or murder you where ever you go on the globe. The key is to not play and live as debt-free and under your means as possible.

So move where ever you like best and try it out. If you're not tied down to family/kids then you'd be foolish not to.

If you do move, report back from time to time.

My regional experience is not limited! Not to even mention I lived nomadic lifestyle for years, having lived in all kinds of states and cities, and rural locations, getting on the ground experiences (which cut off 1/3 of the US from the list of placed I ever'd like to live in again).
I also know, I had spend years researching this: tax situation in every state, income taxss, property taxes, tax situation for telecommuters for out of state employers, building codes and other related regulations, property prices, climate, soils, natural hazards, local culture.

My conclusions are drown upon all the above, detailed research and on the ground experience. Should I add corporate culture experience, which I found to be intolerabe in the US>
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:12am PT
(southern countries don't work for me because I can't tolerate heat: my idea of super-warm is 70F, and comfortable indoor temp is 52F...)

I can relate to that! When renting, I used to leave my windows open in winter prior to having a family and find ice crystals in the sink in AM.

Try exploring Northern WY/Maine/MT... there are still 'wilder' regions with less local regulation out in the sticks.
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:15am PT
fear
I can relate to that! When renting, I used to leave my windows open in winter prior to having a family and find ice crystals in the sink in AM.

Try exploring Northern WY/Maine/MT... there are still 'wilder' regions with less local regulation out in the sticks.

You haven't read my next reply: I explored all aspects of life in these states, and these are not suitable for me and do not solve the issues that are making me leave to begin with. States are affected by global country-wide situation, and at the same time have their own unique aspects. My conclusion is nowhere in the US I can escape these issues. And right now I'm unable to and don't want to get back into corporate path for a required big paycheck to live normal life here, probably permanently.
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:18am PT
fear
Every empire is on a trajectory that ends in collapse, every one of them. The top .01% of sociopaths will attempt to milk or murder you where ever you go on the globe. The key is to not play and live as debt-free and under your means as possible.

So move where ever you like best and try it out. If you're not tied down to family/kids then you'd be foolish not to.

Yes, 0.01% of sociopaths will try to take all that is left, this is my strong feeling.
I'm debt free. I had seen total collapse during USSR crash, and the ones who lived simple life in villages still could make do back then, because their needs were extremely low and they could produce own food. All could surivive off the grid.
There were shared sandpoint wells to get water, though a kilometer away but people used sleds to carry water. Wood burning stoves for heat, etc.
thebravecowboy

climber
The Good Places
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:22am PT
You should let us vote where to send you.
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:23am PT
It sounds like you want to move back to a rural area in Russia then... Why not try it out?

Sometimes learning a completely new trade can offer some perspectives and opportunities too. I come from an IT background as well which can be soul-killing although profitable. In my own case learning new skills constantly keeps me sane.
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:25am PT
DMT
Life is an adventure. When deliberating choice A vs B?
Choose C!
Go somewhere new! Mexican Riviera! Costa Rica! Argentina? Chile!
The thing is that, not having a huge money buffer, I'm not in a position to just travel the world right now. Got to preserve my savings as mush as possible, as I'm not working and probably won't be able to for a while. (and as I mentioned I have trouble dealing with hot weather). So, I'd need to settle somewhere, at least for several years, start developing my little farm.
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:32am PT
fear
It sounds like you want to move back to a rural area in Russia then... Why not try it out?

Sometimes learning a completely new trade can offer some perspectives and opportunities too. I come from an IT background as well which can be soul-killing although profitable. In my own case learning new skills constantly keeps me sane.

I guess half of my heart wants to move to rural Russia...and half to stay in the US.
You're right: try it out.
I can buy a rural house with 2 acres of land for 10K USD in Russia, easliy.
Can try and see what happens. Not a big loss if I can't sell the house, I'd spend a lot more in the US on insurances, realtor fees, rents, taxes, etc.

May be US situation changes and healthcare becomes available for all, or cheap.
May be housing will be brought to more reasonable levels. (I'm seeing fixer shacks on 2,500 sq ft LOT (no joke) in town notorious for asbestos cancer epidemic, asbestos infestation everywehre sell for 100K now!)

And then I can decide.
May be I'll find it to be so horrible in Russia now, because of crime and rudeness of people, and lack of human rights, that I'll be forced to go to some plan C (Belarus!) or back to plan A return to the US and try to find some niche I can survive in, at least having a couple of goats and sheep without county red-tagging my dwelling.

Even from rural location, I expect to still work contracts in my field IT/programming, it's soul sucking, but no alternative to be starting at my age. Learning house building, repair and agricultural skills are priceless for long-term survival and saving money...
John M

climber
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:34am PT
I never thought that I would live in the desert, but I do. I also used to sleep with my windows open in the winter. I slept 10 months out of the year on my porch. But this was Yosemite where winters are not that harsh. Once I left Yosemite, my choices that I could afford in the US were places with 10 months of summer, with 4 months being pretty harsh, or 10 months of winter. I chose summer. I still love the United States, but there are days when I wish that I would afford to move to someplace like Panama.

Canada seems like a possibility for you, but I do understand that choosing a new country requires a certain level of energy. When ones health is difficult, that can make new choices tough. I also deal with health issues. America is not friendly towards people with health issues and insufficient funds.

I hope that things work out for you. Perhaps look for a Russian community within Canada.

Edit: Belarus sounds good too.

Did you see my above edit about acupuncture? just curious about your experience.
fear

Ice climber
hartford, ct
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:38am PT
When in doubt... keep moving.

Keep the tee-vee's turned off wherever you go. It's all Pravda.
Mungeclimber

Trad climber
Nothing creative to say
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:39am PT
My conclusion is nowhere in the US I can escape these issues.


Ok, I'm out of this thread. You've decided already, you just lack the commitment. Otherwise, you would have already put money down on property in Russia. I predict you'll use the cover of your rejection of corporate culture to override the practicalities of moving elsewhere, since you seem focused on that, and that will get you the commitment you need.

Best of luck,
M
Roots

Mountain climber
Redmond, Oregon
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:42am PT
Sounds like you need to go on a vacation to Russia and take a hard look before deciding...


John M

climber
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:42am PT
Damn dude you should limit it to just a few hours per night.

hahahaha.. that totally cracked me up. hahaha.. thanks for the laugh!
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:48am PT
John M

I never thought that I would live in the desert, but I do. I also used to sleep with my windows open in the winter. I slept 10 months out of the year on my porch. But this was Yosemite where winters are not that harsh. Once I left Yosemite, my choices that I could afford in the US were places with 10 months of summer, with 4 months being pretty harsh, or 10 months of winter. I chose summer. I still love the United States, but there are days when I wish that I would afford to move to someplace like Panama.

Canada seems like a possibility for you, but I do understand that choosing a new country requires a certain level of energy. When ones health is difficult, that can make new choices tough. I also deal with health issues. America is not friendly towards people with health issues and insufficient funds.

I hope that things work out for you. Perhaps look for a Russian community within Canada.

I had explored all possibilities of immigrating into Canada. First, immigrating there is A LOT harder now than it used to be. Especially at age over 45 -- severe loss of "points". Having a spouse (I do not) also helps. My profession is on-demand profession, but it does not matter, age alone cuts me off. One needs a job offer from Canadian employer who'll be a sponsor to get enough points. In 2015 Canada revamped point system and made it a lot harder to get in. There're thousands of young married professionals with advanced degrees, from India and China vying for Canada entry right now, with job offers on hand Need I say more...

Regarding summer vs. winter....say, one can make through 4 hot months using A/C, but these areas don't produce trees normally, or big conifer trees. Confier trees is something I like the most, want to be near them.
formerclimber

Boulder climber
CA
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:52am PT
John M
Did you see my above edit about acupuncture? just curious about your experience.

I tried it once, it was uncomfortable, I didn't feel good after and next day got the worst migraine I ever had.
It was kind of scary experience and I decided not to try anymore. I do use accupressure, though, on my own.

What really helps me is working outside, in the (organic) garden, working with animals, bringing waster from a well in a bucket or doing to the river to get water and bringing it from there, gathering firewood in nearby forest....rain or shine....this being my life not vacation.
Gunkie

Trad climber
Valles Marineris
Aug 3, 2018 - 10:52am PT
formerclimber has 8 posts in total, all today. TROLL
Messages 1 - 20 of total 236 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Recent Route Beta