A walk in the woods (TR)

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Messages 1 - 12 of total 12 in this topic
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Topic Author's Original Post - Feb 22, 2014 - 06:58pm PT
A few weeks ago it looked like this here:

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But not today. Winter was brief this year.

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A landowner can steer people where she wants people to walk, by building the ladders in certain spots. :-)

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eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Feb 22, 2014 - 07:03pm PT
The right to roam... landowners build these kind of small ladders to make it easier for people to pass fences.

Do you have a word for them?

We call them stiles.

TFPU!
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2014 - 07:05pm PT
Yes, it's a stätta.

:-)
eKat

Trad climber
Less than a second shy of 49 minutes
Feb 22, 2014 - 07:17pm PT
Thanks!

I wish I could hear you say it!

:-)
franky

Trad climber
Bishop, CA
Feb 22, 2014 - 07:21pm PT
In my geology days I never learned a one word name for that kind of outcrop. I'd call it something like "glacially eroded (or abraded) bedrock". A geologist would probably end up talking more about things like chatter marks or glacial striations.
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 22, 2014 - 08:11pm PT
I found one translation and it's "living granite". But I don't know what that really is.
Ward Trotter

Trad climber
Feb 23, 2014 - 12:16am PT
I'm not a geologist but several terms might apply here.

The nearest English term could be " Whaleback":

In England/Scotland
In England/Scotland
Credit: Ward Trotter


Other terms that might apply are:

---Roche Moutonnee (or moutonee)
---Rock Drumlins

In Sweden sometimes the larger glacial erosional landforms like these might be called
"Fryggbergs"
Lollie

Social climber
I'm Lolli.
Topic Author's Reply - Feb 23, 2014 - 07:29am PT
Whaleback! That's a good word. Descriptive. The picture is of hälleberg. As Wikipedia describes it in English: "ice-smoothed bedrock bumps which lack the steep, plucked lee side faces are referred to as whalebacks or rock drumlins."

Hälleberg is, by the Swedish definition, "a place where the outcrop is visible and not covered with earth, buildings nor growth." Such places are in Scandinavia usually polished and rounded, as a reminder of the Ice Age.

Flyggberg, is the not quite the same as hälleberg. They are two different phenomena, caused by the Ice Age. What they have in common is that the reciding glacier made them.
Hälleberg is always flat, while flyggberg has a precipice. The precipice is on the leeward side of the dominating direction of the icemovement.'




There's a mountain named Flyggberget. It's made out of diabas. (It's not the one in the image above, that's the Bergvattsberget.)

kaholatingtong

Trad climber
Nevada City
Feb 23, 2014 - 08:54am PT
TFPU
Marlow

Sport climber
OSLO
Feb 23, 2014 - 09:57am PT
Cool!
neebee

Social climber
calif/texas
Feb 23, 2014 - 10:20am PT
hey there say, lollie.... oh my this is a lovely share! my mom would love this, too...


makes me want winter to pass here and for us to see spring...

it is colder here, than the last few years... i am new to 'snow areas' too...


thanks again and happy good day!
pyro

Big Wall climber
Calabasas
Feb 23, 2014 - 11:36am PT
very kool!
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