New Mountain Bike required? (OT)

Search
Go

Discussion Topic

Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
Messages 1 - 20 of total 186 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Original Post - Jan 31, 2014 - 11:47am PT
What say you mountainbikers? I have a mid-to-early 2000s Trek (4300, I believe? Dunno, stripped the decals a ways back and forgot what model). I'd converted it to a "street bike" when I lived in S.F.. That meant locking skewers on the hubs, a seat with keeper cord, and smooth, higher PSI tires. Something that rolled okay and wasn't the easiest bike on the street to rip off (not that you can actually keep a bike on the street in that city).

So, now I'm here in Reno, eyeing all the prime MTB trails and wondering... Do I need a new MTB or should I just start rolling with what I have? The point is a bit moot as I won't invest in a new MTB at this level, but for somebody who is looking at getting a little technical but mostly just chasing an aerobic workout, is investing in the latest, shiniest bike really necessary or just gear fetish? Read: I am entirely uninterested in shock laden downhill behemoths.

What would be the best, cheapest way to upgrade the bike (or is it even worth it) beyond MTB tires and a new rear hub skewer (had to cut off the security skewer with a rotor saw because I lost the key, lol)?

Also, when I do retire the MTB, I want to make it a ghost bike to make pud piss his trousers in anger, lol!
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Jan 31, 2014 - 11:52am PT
Yer...






















Gonna....





















DMT
Footloose

Trad climber
Lake Tahoe
Jan 31, 2014 - 11:53am PT
Here you go...
Credit: Footloose

Walmart, $79.

Just a couple weeks ago, exploring the brand new Clear Creek Trail, all 13 miles of it. (Thanks Carson Valley Trail Assoc!)
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2014 - 11:53am PT
Get cornholed with motor oil as the lubricant?
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2014 - 11:54am PT
So, Footloose, are you saying I should upgrade to a worse bike, or that I should just shut up and f*#king ride already?
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Jan 31, 2014 - 11:54am PT
ParTAY time!!!!!111111

DMT
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2014 - 11:55am PT
That only happened ONCE, Dingus! I was in Wintermester at college and confused....
Dingus Milktoast

Gym climber
U.N. Ambassador, Crackistan
Jan 31, 2014 - 11:56am PT
Right on...

DMT
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Jan 31, 2014 - 11:59am PT
As long as the bike rolls ok, a few minor tweeks should permit you ride trails until you feel the need to upgrade.

A good tune up and tires should get you started. Until you are sure of the reliability of the wheel set, derailers, etc., don't plan on any solo epic rides.

Have fun.
StahlBro

Trad climber
San Diego, CA
Jan 31, 2014 - 12:00pm PT
Fat MTB tires, maybe wider bar and decent suspension fork if it doesn't have one. Good to go.
Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2014 - 12:03pm PT
Yes, the deraileurs I was particularly worried about. Wondering if it is worth upgrading.... I rode fairly hard on that bike, though, oddly enough, more as a road bike than on trails. I actually "got into" road biking on it! Man, nothing like hanging with road bikes when you're sporting front suspension! Trust me, they let you know about it in Marin on their 5k road bikes!

I'm thinking that doing the bare bones and seeing where it all goes is the first step. Of course, now it is raining/snowing and muddy as hell around here for the first time in months!
speelyei

Trad climber
Mohave County Arizona
Jan 31, 2014 - 12:05pm PT
I still had my Sherpa Pro from '92, and recently bought a 2013 hard tail 29er. Partially I wanted a new bike, and partially to support our local bike shop...
I've gotta say, 20 years advancement is noticeable.

Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2014 - 12:07pm PT
It's just funny on the gear thing for so many sports. For climbers, shiny new gear is the antithesis of cool. So, going to a sport like MTB or cycling, where guys are shucking and jiving for the newest stuff is such a culture shock.
weezy

climber
Jan 31, 2014 - 12:09pm PT
Trek yourself before you wreck yourself.

Just get new tires and go ride. Maybe take it to your LBS and have one of the mechanics look it over for frame cracks or any other stuff that will cause you pain and suffering. it probably just needs a tune up.

One of the best mtb riders I know kills it on a mid eighties Raleigh hard tail. It's the pilot, not the plane.
Elcapinyoazz

Social climber
Joshua Tree
Jan 31, 2014 - 12:21pm PT
My situation is almost the same (aside from the anti-theft measures). Took my old mid 90s Cannondale CAAD 2 hardtail that I rode as a XC/singletrack mtn rig for years, turned it into a commuter. Had it setup that way for 5-6 years.

Last week, I broke it down and rebuilt back to mtn bike. Took it out for a shakedown after disassembling and tweaking the old shimano XT 9 speed shifters (cam spring on the ratchet had lost some spring and wouldn't engage, wound it a little tighter, solved). Still rides sweet. Only thing that bothers me is the old v-brakes. Discs are so much nicer. Although I could solve that easily enough since the fork has a mount...just need to rebuilt the front wheel with a disc hub and buy a cheap mechanical disc brake. Still, I'm thinking if I find enough good trails around here and am riding enough to justify it, I'll go ahead and drop the cash for a full suspension rig next year.

I've got a total of about $1k in that bike. Rode it on singeltrack about 3/week for several years when living in the east and then living in UT. Used it for around town in PDX for a couple years, then let a housemate commute on it for a couple years. I feel like I've gotten my money out of it for sure.

Here's she is last week after all the parts swapping:
Credit: Elcapinyoazz

But for around town, and most of my weekday fitness rides, I'm on this thing mostly (Specialized Langster, a fixed gear track bike setup for the street, 25 front, 28 rear, bullhorns). It's perfect for that application and is getting way more time than my road bike:

Credit: Elcapinyoazz
kaholatingtong

Trad climber
Nevada City
Jan 31, 2014 - 12:22pm PT
I would just touch up the old bike with a few new little things that would do the job and get out and sweat and enjoy. I am currently re parting together a basically 20 year old mountain bike that that has parts from like 5+ different bikes, but for my purposes of just getting mileage on my bike outdoors, ( no more super crazy downhills for me these days either ) it works fine. So I guess I think what it comes down to is how you think you would really be using it, and what you would be happy with. Then again having a little cash to spend always changes perspectives on things. shrug.


John Duffield

Mountain climber
New York
Jan 31, 2014 - 12:28pm PT
I would either:

1. Lower the pressure on the tires to about 20# and roll it

or

2. Find a high end used bike on eBay cheap, which is the route I took.

I wouldn't throw more money into a beater bike.

I have to say, having a really good bike, makes me better than I really am.
looking sketchy there...

Social climber
Latitute 33
Jan 31, 2014 - 01:43pm PT
Having a really great bike only provides a small incremental increase in performance. A 2000 decade Trek is decent enough that only good tires, proper cockpit set-up, and tuning are necessary. The only other item may be maintenance on the suspension fork.

BTW, elcap... The only upgrade to that Cannondale you should really consider is a decent riser bar and lose the bar ends. It is a very good bike as is. Disc brakes are very nice, but that likely means a new wheel set and suspension fork, and at that point, it is probably better to start over.

Jebus H Bomz

climber
Peavine Basecamp
Topic Author's Reply - Jan 31, 2014 - 01:46pm PT
Having a really great bike only provides a small incremental increase in performance. A 2000 decade Trek is decent enough that only good tires, proper cockpit set-up, and tuning are necessary. The only other item may be maintenance on the suspension fork.

Thanks for the feedback, Randy. I appreciate the fun over performance note you strike, as that is really what I seek.
this just in

climber
north fork
Jan 31, 2014 - 01:56pm PT
I heard ghost bikes are in these days.
Messages 1 - 20 of total 186 in this topic << First  |  < Previous  |  Show All  |  Next >  |  Last >>
Return to Forum List
Post a Reply
 
Our Guidebooks
Check 'em out!
SuperTopo Guidebooks


Try a free sample topo!

 
SuperTopo on the Web

Review Categories
Recent Route Beta
Recent Gear Reviews